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The Whole Picture: The colonial story of the art in our museums... and why we need to talk about it

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If you think art history has to be pale, male and stale - think again. Should museums be made to give back their marbles? Is it even possible to 'decolonise' our galleries? Must Rhodes fall? From the stolen Wakandan art in Black Panther, to Emmanuel Macron's recent commitment to art restitution, and Beyoncé and Jay Z's provocative music video filmed in the Louvre, the questi If you think art history has to be pale, male and stale - think again. Should museums be made to give back their marbles? Is it even possible to 'decolonise' our galleries? Must Rhodes fall? From the stolen Wakandan art in Black Panther, to Emmanuel Macron's recent commitment to art restitution, and Beyoncé and Jay Z's provocative music video filmed in the Louvre, the question of decolonising our relationship with the art around us is quickly gaining traction. People are waking up to the seedy history of the world's art collections, and are starting to ask difficult questions about what the future of museums should look like. In The Whole Picture , art historian and Uncomfortable Art Tour guide Alice Procter provides a manual for deconstructing everything you thought you knew about art, and fills in the blanks with the stories that have been left out of the art history canon for centuries. The book is divided into four chronological sections, named after four different kinds of art space: The Palace The Classroom The Memorial The Playground Each section tackles the fascinating and often shocking stories of five different art pieces, including the propaganda painting that the East India Company used to justify its control in India; the Maori mokomokai skulls that were traded and collected by Europeans as 'art objects'; and Kara Walker's controversial contemporary sculpture A Subtlety, which raised questions about 'appropriate' interactions with art. Through these stories, Alice brings out the underlying colonial narrative lurking beneath the art industry today, and suggests different ways of seeing and thinking about art in the modern world. The Whole Picture is a much-needed provocation to look more critically at the accepted narratives about art, and rethink and disrupt the way we interact with the museums and galleries that display it.


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If you think art history has to be pale, male and stale - think again. Should museums be made to give back their marbles? Is it even possible to 'decolonise' our galleries? Must Rhodes fall? From the stolen Wakandan art in Black Panther, to Emmanuel Macron's recent commitment to art restitution, and Beyoncé and Jay Z's provocative music video filmed in the Louvre, the questi If you think art history has to be pale, male and stale - think again. Should museums be made to give back their marbles? Is it even possible to 'decolonise' our galleries? Must Rhodes fall? From the stolen Wakandan art in Black Panther, to Emmanuel Macron's recent commitment to art restitution, and Beyoncé and Jay Z's provocative music video filmed in the Louvre, the question of decolonising our relationship with the art around us is quickly gaining traction. People are waking up to the seedy history of the world's art collections, and are starting to ask difficult questions about what the future of museums should look like. In The Whole Picture , art historian and Uncomfortable Art Tour guide Alice Procter provides a manual for deconstructing everything you thought you knew about art, and fills in the blanks with the stories that have been left out of the art history canon for centuries. The book is divided into four chronological sections, named after four different kinds of art space: The Palace The Classroom The Memorial The Playground Each section tackles the fascinating and often shocking stories of five different art pieces, including the propaganda painting that the East India Company used to justify its control in India; the Maori mokomokai skulls that were traded and collected by Europeans as 'art objects'; and Kara Walker's controversial contemporary sculpture A Subtlety, which raised questions about 'appropriate' interactions with art. Through these stories, Alice brings out the underlying colonial narrative lurking beneath the art industry today, and suggests different ways of seeing and thinking about art in the modern world. The Whole Picture is a much-needed provocation to look more critically at the accepted narratives about art, and rethink and disrupt the way we interact with the museums and galleries that display it.

30 review for The Whole Picture: The colonial story of the art in our museums... and why we need to talk about it

  1. 4 out of 5

    Adnaan Jiwa

    A fantastically penetrating book that dissects the behaviour of the British empire through colonial art and how it shapes the idea of ‘good taste’ today. Procter exposes the disturbing history of art displayed in British museums and galleries and how, by not properly acknowledging this, galleries are perpetuating racist ideals. This book also explores constructive ways of dealing with statues of dubious historical figures that are currently vaunted across the western world. In addition, Procter A fantastically penetrating book that dissects the behaviour of the British empire through colonial art and how it shapes the idea of ‘good taste’ today. Procter exposes the disturbing history of art displayed in British museums and galleries and how, by not properly acknowledging this, galleries are perpetuating racist ideals. This book also explores constructive ways of dealing with statues of dubious historical figures that are currently vaunted across the western world. In addition, Procter examines how particular artists today are creating discussions about colonial history and current racial inequalities in insightful ways, like Kara Walker’s ‘Sugar Baby’. I’m surprised that this book isn’t more popular!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cecile

    This is brilliant. I loved it so much. This book has genuinely changed the way I think about museums, both as spaces of oppression but also sites of change. Procter does an incredible job of exposing the brutal, pervasive legacies of imperialism in art museums. But she also gives just as much time and attention to the resilience of historically ignored communities who continue to resist imperial histories, and to share and make visible the other side(s) of these stories. Procter also gives us the This is brilliant. I loved it so much. This book has genuinely changed the way I think about museums, both as spaces of oppression but also sites of change. Procter does an incredible job of exposing the brutal, pervasive legacies of imperialism in art museums. But she also gives just as much time and attention to the resilience of historically ignored communities who continue to resist imperial histories, and to share and make visible the other side(s) of these stories. Procter also gives us the tools to reconsider museums. To look at them in a new light, to challenge them: “You are a visitor - you have powers - and you can make trouble if you want to”. Also, Procter is such a good writer. The structure of this book is so good and she proves that intelligent, meaningful scholarship can and should be both accessible and entertaining. Anyway, couldn’t recommend enough. Plz read so I can talk about this with people. I’ll talk about it anyway so you might as well x

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bree Pollard

    essential reading !!!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Roisin Maeve

    Glad I finished it the later parts were v thought provoking

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lucy Vari

    Procter skilfully uncovers the colonial histories of various artworks with significant depth of analysis, while also offering ways of rethinking how we actively engage with museums. There are so many great insights in this book, but I particularly loved how Procter refutes the criticism that reframing historical narratives is a deceptive act of 'imposing modern moral judgments onto the past', and acknowledges that there have always been people who resisted colonialism and racism, but have had th Procter skilfully uncovers the colonial histories of various artworks with significant depth of analysis, while also offering ways of rethinking how we actively engage with museums. There are so many great insights in this book, but I particularly loved how Procter refutes the criticism that reframing historical narratives is a deceptive act of 'imposing modern moral judgments onto the past', and acknowledges that there have always been people who resisted colonialism and racism, but have had their contributions hidden or erased.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Amelie

    I liked some stories more than others but all were equally important.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    4/5 stars Insightful, informative, very well done. Could have been more academic but then it would have been a different book; and actually I think Procter's approach (a wide-ranging series of case studies, basically) works very effectively to both be accessible and provide depth. Kind of wishing I'd read a physical copy so I could have annotated it, although given how this reading year has gone I don't think I'd have actually managed to finished it if I'd done so. Would highly recommend. 4/5 stars Insightful, informative, very well done. Could have been more academic but then it would have been a different book; and actually I think Procter's approach (a wide-ranging series of case studies, basically) works very effectively to both be accessible and provide depth. Kind of wishing I'd read a physical copy so I could have annotated it, although given how this reading year has gone I don't think I'd have actually managed to finished it if I'd done so. Would highly recommend.

  8. 4 out of 5

    angelinakahlo

    As an arthistory student (living in Europe and learning mostly about European art) this was an important read which SHOULD be on our curriculum! Not only does Procter include examples of artworks which have to be analyzed from a postcolonial pov, she also does a great job explaining her reasoning behind it. Would highly recommend this to anybody who is interested in learning about how institutions (museums, galeries, etc.) shape our way of percieving art!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    "The Whole Picture" is a critical look at art in western museums and how these places manage to hide their colonial past. Well worth reading. "The Whole Picture" is a critical look at art in western museums and how these places manage to hide their colonial past. Well worth reading.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    So, not being any kind of student of art this book showed me my complete ignorance, and I loved it! Powerful stuff leaving me with so much to think about.

  11. 4 out of 5

    aqilahreads

    reading this really makes me realize how important it is to look beyond on what was being showcased in the museum. that its important to think about what kind of stories museums tell, how they serve us, and how they represent. that its also important to understand its histories & origin, the hows and whys museum objects are being displayed to a certain extent and why it shouldnt. alice procter started doing undercover tours in museums where she speaks about the hidden and dubious origin stories o reading this really makes me realize how important it is to look beyond on what was being showcased in the museum. that its important to think about what kind of stories museums tell, how they serve us, and how they represent. that its also important to understand its histories & origin, the hows and whys museum objects are being displayed to a certain extent and why it shouldnt. alice procter started doing undercover tours in museums where she speaks about the hidden and dubious origin stories of both the institutions and the objects within them, highlighting histories of imperialism, nationalism and racism. she was able to do this for almost a year because the museum staff even thought that she was an official guide 🤣 i cant help but to really admire alice procter's intention and how passionate she is as an art historian and museum enthusiast. as an art lover myself, this was quite an eye-opening read. honestly i have never thought that theres so much more layers of stories within an object and thats captivating. but not too sure why i felt that theres still something missing in the writing & i couldnt quite follow on some of the art history. still one of those reads where art/museum lovers shall not miss.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Laura-Diana

    Read this.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Zulekha Saqib

    'I do not believe guilt is inherited, but responsibility is, and there is nobody alive today whose existence has not been shaped by colonialist, racist forces. That is a legacy we all live with, and we should all deal with the consequences. If you have benefitted, then soaking yourself in remorse and guilt does not help anyone. What you can do, though, is ask constantly how you have felt those benefits. At whose expense were they gained?' 'I do not believe guilt is inherited, but responsibility is, and there is nobody alive today whose existence has not been shaped by colonialist, racist forces. That is a legacy we all live with, and we should all deal with the consequences. If you have benefitted, then soaking yourself in remorse and guilt does not help anyone. What you can do, though, is ask constantly how you have felt those benefits. At whose expense were they gained?'

  14. 5 out of 5

    Will Bowers

    Having been on some of Proctor's tours myself, I can see that her deep knowledge, personality, and wit shine through in her writing. The way the book is written evokes meandering through a fascinating exhibit, every new piece of information pushing you forward to the next one. It's very easy to pick up this book and not notice time passing. Anyone working in museums must read this to consider the roles they play in perpetuating white-supremecist colonialism throughout their exhibits. For the rest Having been on some of Proctor's tours myself, I can see that her deep knowledge, personality, and wit shine through in her writing. The way the book is written evokes meandering through a fascinating exhibit, every new piece of information pushing you forward to the next one. It's very easy to pick up this book and not notice time passing. Anyone working in museums must read this to consider the roles they play in perpetuating white-supremecist colonialism throughout their exhibits. For the rest of us, it provides the brutal truths of decisions made behind the scenes, and suggests ways we can demand better as museum attendees. I would simply recommend this book for everyone, white gallery- and museum-goers especially.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Liz ♡

    “I do not believe guilt is inherited, but responsibility is, and there is nobody alive today whose existence has not been shaped by colonialist, racist forces. That is a legacy we all live with, and we should all deal with the consequences. If you have benefitted, then soaking yourself in remorse and guilt does not help anyone. What you can do, though, is ask constantly how you have felt those benefits. At whose expense were they gained?”

  16. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    this could have been hundreds of pages longer, that's my only criticism. this could have been hundreds of pages longer, that's my only criticism.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jake Sheridan

    Holy shit this book was GOOD y’all!!!! This is like S-tier historicity stuff right here. If you are at all interested in museums, and the power they hold or could hold, you simply must read this. It’s also an incredibly rich book for reading into the history and interpretation of race, colonialism and Britain. Basically it interprets and complicates a set of individual pieces in musuem a throughout the world. It meanwhile provides a theory on museum types (as media of sorts) and their implicatio Holy shit this book was GOOD y’all!!!! This is like S-tier historicity stuff right here. If you are at all interested in museums, and the power they hold or could hold, you simply must read this. It’s also an incredibly rich book for reading into the history and interpretation of race, colonialism and Britain. Basically it interprets and complicates a set of individual pieces in musuem a throughout the world. It meanwhile provides a theory on museum types (as media of sorts) and their implications for interpretation. It uses the pieces to connect and build upon certain broad histories. Amazing, really. Easy to read in chunks. Often hard to read, often gripping, fully thought provoking.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Liberty Petersen

    Very interesting!! Loved the ideas and arguments Procter presented. I did feel sometimes that she inserted personal opinions and used overly evocative, subjective descriptions to sway the reader, and felt that it would have been stronger if she had kept it more strictly facts - her argument would have been strong enough on its own.

  19. 5 out of 5

    joanna ☀️

    Not sure how I feel about this one to be completely honest. The information is fantastic, but I did struggle with the writing style and some of the formatting. I also found it to be kind of repetitive at points as well. I’d definitely recommend it either way, and I’m excited to discuss this in class.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Meg Briers

    Museums are places of remembering, and misremembering Revealing and enlightening text on the danger of representations of history. Inspired by Jack Edward's tbr list and well worth the read, for anyone. Museums are places of remembering, and misremembering Revealing and enlightening text on the danger of representations of history. Inspired by Jack Edward's tbr list and well worth the read, for anyone.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jojosbookshelf

    "You are a visitor - you have powers - and you can make trouble if you want to." "You are a visitor - you have powers - and you can make trouble if you want to."

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jas

    In reading this, more so than anything else, I’m reminded of one thing - everything in art is deliberate. Everything you see, feel, experience is as a result of a conscientious choice somebody made way before you ever laid eyes on it. This is something that with words we’re somewhat quicker to accept & understand, but the coded and occasionally cryptic nature of art sometimes obscures this. Prior to the publication of this book, Alice Procter has been known for her excellent uncomfortable art to In reading this, more so than anything else, I’m reminded of one thing - everything in art is deliberate. Everything you see, feel, experience is as a result of a conscientious choice somebody made way before you ever laid eyes on it. This is something that with words we’re somewhat quicker to accept & understand, but the coded and occasionally cryptic nature of art sometimes obscures this. Prior to the publication of this book, Alice Procter has been known for her excellent uncomfortable art tours, and that’s what I thought this would be. A series of essays, shredding the owners & institutions that propagate the problematic environments that exist within galleries and museums. But in actuality, the work done here does achieves more than that which could be done by a series of rants. Here, the deliberateness extends beyond the metaphors dropped into portraits and historical sculptures, and includes/implicates the very act of museum curation - this raising an important question “what is the story being told here, by who, and for whom?”. Interesting things happen when we consider the display of objects stolen from other lands, whereby this divorce from an object’s origin allows only for a singular and one sided story telling - that of the thief. One may question the role that an understanding of the impact of colonial/racist art has for society. This is a sensible thing to ponder, art isn’t setting out any policies, nor is art vocally baying for migrant blood. However, the very nature of art allows for the honing of an essential tool in the fight against prejudice. As Procter points out, art is static. It is fixed, and consequently a work’s meaning is set in stone (or oil..). This provides a platform whereby a viewer or participant can decipher the mechanisms of power at play, without the chaos and noise that would be present when trying to do the same with a section of society. And, if one can become perceptive in this regard then they can map these systems onto their own experiences and interactions. Reading this also allowed for a degree of personal reflection. As someone who frequents the kind of galleries that typically feature the types of problematic work dissected here, I’ve come to question why exactly that is. Clearly museums are not suited to the kind of deep learning and nuanced education that comes from multifaceted conversations, and so academic interest can’t be the whole reason. I think the real reason may lie in something a lot more subtle. Procter notes early on in this book that there are a few different types of museum, but traditionally they have taken the form of “the palace”. These are the collections of the rich and powerful (read: white European & male), that ultimately were not for the eyes of this brown man. And so, perhaps my mere presence in these spaces is indicative of a hopeful progress, though the infrequency with which I note other people of colour is further proof of the work still to be done.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Floortje

    i really took my time reading this one and i'm so glad i did, this is such an essential read that keeps you thinking. really going to museums with a different point of view from now on i really took my time reading this one and i'm so glad i did, this is such an essential read that keeps you thinking. really going to museums with a different point of view from now on

  24. 5 out of 5

    Aparna Ram

    I really like the way this book is structured. In each chapter, Procter takes one artefact/art/memorial and uncovers the colonial or otherwise painful histories behind them, providing us both with significant analysis and offering us ways of rethinking how we interact with these objects and the museums that hold them. "what is the story told here, for who, and by whom?" You come away thinking not only do you have an individual responsibility to question what you are seeing, but museums have a re I really like the way this book is structured. In each chapter, Procter takes one artefact/art/memorial and uncovers the colonial or otherwise painful histories behind them, providing us both with significant analysis and offering us ways of rethinking how we interact with these objects and the museums that hold them. "what is the story told here, for who, and by whom?" You come away thinking not only do you have an individual responsibility to question what you are seeing, but museums have a responsibility to provide a wider context to its collections, and give voice to those people that history has rejected and/or forgotten. And if you are thinking "yes but can't reframe historical narratives by imposing moral modern moral judgements to the past", then you'll find an interesting refute in the book as Procter lays evidence that there have always been people who resisted colonialism and racism, it's just that their contributions have been overshadowed and forgotten. Overall, I'd say this is essential reading for any student of history, or even anyone who has stepped foot inside a museum. p.s. Do yourself a favour and google images of objects that Procter tackles in each chapter. It really adds to the reading experience

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mae

    I love museums, and I love art. As a child, these institutions fueled my curiosity and opened my mind to the various ways in which life can be lived to the fullest. But perhaps after pursuing art in uni, a museum reads very differently to me now. There are times when encountering an artwork is magic; but at other times, hesitation and apprehension bubble up to the surface. This book is illuminating, sensitive, and well-researched- encouraging a critical eye in viewing the problematic aspects of o I love museums, and I love art. As a child, these institutions fueled my curiosity and opened my mind to the various ways in which life can be lived to the fullest. But perhaps after pursuing art in uni, a museum reads very differently to me now. There are times when encountering an artwork is magic; but at other times, hesitation and apprehension bubble up to the surface. This book is illuminating, sensitive, and well-researched- encouraging a critical eye in viewing the problematic aspects of our museums and the art housed within them, while also championing a better way forward. I thoroughly enjoyed the precision and specificity in the way Proctor writes; this firmly grounded the breadth of works, people, places, and instances mentioned in the book, truly making it an ambitious success. It's 2020, and I think every person who has ever stepped into a museum before needs to read this!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Becca Housden

    The subject of this book is a strikingly important one, and the discourse around it has been growing in recent years. This book’s contribution is well written and wide ranging, from more historic artworks through to contemporary performance art, all looked at through the eyes of colonial and racist attitudes. The inclusion of context surrounding the pierces of art discussed, and the people surrounding it where informative and aided the more theoretical discussions surrounding display and interpr The subject of this book is a strikingly important one, and the discourse around it has been growing in recent years. This book’s contribution is well written and wide ranging, from more historic artworks through to contemporary performance art, all looked at through the eyes of colonial and racist attitudes. The inclusion of context surrounding the pierces of art discussed, and the people surrounding it where informative and aided the more theoretical discussions surrounding display and interpretation that followed. There were a couple of instances where I would have appreciated a slightly more wider discussion about a museum or gallery as a whole, rather than the spaces being viewed through the prism of one object, but the structure and concept does work well and aid the texts readability.

  27. 5 out of 5

    E L K Y

    Trust but verify is something I think everyone learns or should learn early on. And it can be easily applicable to the art we see in our galleries, museums - particularly in the western countries that have history of thinking regions outside their own belong to them, that they somehow bring peace and higher quality of life through forced regimes and idealism, then abandon the places not leaving the cultural heritage and valuables behind. Forgotten stories are still held behind shining glass in g Trust but verify is something I think everyone learns or should learn early on. And it can be easily applicable to the art we see in our galleries, museums - particularly in the western countries that have history of thinking regions outside their own belong to them, that they somehow bring peace and higher quality of life through forced regimes and idealism, then abandon the places not leaving the cultural heritage and valuables behind. Forgotten stories are still held behind shining glass in galleries and museums all over the planet without adding the stories to the whole picture. Alice Procter book explains is beautifully, particularly from the point of view of British museums and I would highly recommend this book, whether you study art or not, it's important to learn. History is of course often unpleasant, but that won't make it disappear. And I think it's important when we learn about history of art, to not forget the chapters that defined it, often hundreds of years ago before the art that is exclusively part of education, courses, shows etc could develop and shine on it's own. Asian, African, Oceania, Latin American art are important heritage, it's crucial to art theory, history and inspiration and it's corners in galleries was in most cases result of colonialism, whether you want to admit it to yourself, or not. So, trust what the little card tells you about the art you are viewing but verify how it came to be, where it comes from, why it's there and who paid the biggest price. Not something we can easily do and that's why the way we are first learning about art and it's long history should and needs to change.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Inge

    3.75 stars. I didn’t love this as much as I thought because I wasn’t informed well and went in with very high expectations. I thought it would center the debate about colonial history in museums - after all, the blurb said it’s a ‘valuable contribution to the urgent ongoing conversation (…)’. The last chapters did deliver on that front, but I wish these discussions themselves would’ve featured more prominently. Only in the final chapter was it mentioned that museums who do want to change often s 3.75 stars. I didn’t love this as much as I thought because I wasn’t informed well and went in with very high expectations. I thought it would center the debate about colonial history in museums - after all, the blurb said it’s a ‘valuable contribution to the urgent ongoing conversation (…)’. The last chapters did deliver on that front, but I wish these discussions themselves would’ve featured more prominently. Only in the final chapter was it mentioned that museums who do want to change often struggle to because they’re put under pressure from the institutions keeping them alive, for instance. I would’ve loved to read more about this, but it only came up in the last few pages. I’m also unsure if the distinctions worked for me. I felt they overlapped too much to work as separate forms, especially as their functions could change from ‘palace’ to ‘classroom’, for instance. It gave the impression the author wanted a chronological point of view, but because this doesn’t work for every institution she settled on these terms. I’m just not sure if this helped me understand her argument better: ‘Playgrounds’ are really synonymous for creative modern art spaces for example, so I was confused as to why this wasn’t used instead. I think I wasn’t as amazed by this because (and I hate to be that person) most of the facts portrayed as shocking revelations I already knew from uni courses. I would’ve liked a deeper delve into the arguments used and seeing examples come up that way. This is still a very accessible, well-written read about colonialism in museums, and it’d be a great guide for anyone who’s looking to read more about this. I can definitely see myself recommending this.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    "You are a visitor - you have powers - and you can make trouble if you want to." Alice Procter exceptionally deconstructs the innate colonialism that is engrained within most museums around the world, using real-life exhibitions and examples to demonstrate the ways in which institutions subtly (or not so-subtly) manipulate audiences to believe certain viewpoints (or even affirm their pre-existing ideas). This is an important aspect in understanding museums because most visitors don't actually rea "You are a visitor - you have powers - and you can make trouble if you want to." Alice Procter exceptionally deconstructs the innate colonialism that is engrained within most museums around the world, using real-life exhibitions and examples to demonstrate the ways in which institutions subtly (or not so-subtly) manipulate audiences to believe certain viewpoints (or even affirm their pre-existing ideas). This is an important aspect in understanding museums because most visitors don't actually realise they are being influenced at all - especially not when museums are supposed to be the beacons of intellectualism and enlightenment. Procter deftly toes the line between academic analysis and straightforward narratives with her categorising of four types of museum (the Palace, Classroom, Memorial & Playground). These categories really emphasise how all institutions have a role to play in recontextualising the very concept of a museum - whether they are art galleries or science museums or even external spaces. I feel that a lot of people would push back a lot on the ideas presented in this book, it pushes you to recognise your own biases and asks you to consider why you may have those preconceived ideas. For me, as a museum lover (and employee!) this book is a must-read for the modern museum goer looking to understand the institutional histories a little more.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rosie Kirk

    A really interesting read! I love a museum but this book did a great job at capturing the unease I’ve felt in a lot of museums (especially the Pitt Rivers and the British Museum) and where that comes from, and also made me think a lot more about the fact that all museums have been curated in a very certain way to make us feel or think certain things, which now seems very obvious but has made me reevaluate many a museum trip.

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