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The Crown: The Official Companion, Volume 2: Political Scandal, Personal Struggle, and the Years That Defined Elizabeth II (1956-1977)

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The official companion to the second and third seasons of the Emmy-winning Netflix drama about the reign of Queen Elizabeth II, featuring additional historical background, expert commentary, and beautifully reproduced images Starring Claire Foy and Olivia Colman as Queen Elizabeth II, seasons 2 and 3 of The Crown present the next chapters in Peter Morgan's intimate portrait The official companion to the second and third seasons of the Emmy-winning Netflix drama about the reign of Queen Elizabeth II, featuring additional historical background, expert commentary, and beautifully reproduced images Starring Claire Foy and Olivia Colman as Queen Elizabeth II, seasons 2 and 3 of The Crown present the next chapters in Peter Morgan's intimate portrait of Britain's longest-reigning monarch. In this official companion--again written by biographer and historical consultant, Robert Lacey, and covering both seasons--readers will go beyond the palace gates and follow the Queen as she draws on every ounce of strength to maintain the legitimacy of the monarchy in an era of scandal and political change. Featuring "Truth vs. Invention" sections that explain which details of the show are true and which are dramatic devices, and exploring rumored infidelity, royal babies, political maneuvering, and more, this informative and entertaining book--for fans of the show and royal obsessives alike--offers an unforgettable look at the Windsor family.


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The official companion to the second and third seasons of the Emmy-winning Netflix drama about the reign of Queen Elizabeth II, featuring additional historical background, expert commentary, and beautifully reproduced images Starring Claire Foy and Olivia Colman as Queen Elizabeth II, seasons 2 and 3 of The Crown present the next chapters in Peter Morgan's intimate portrait The official companion to the second and third seasons of the Emmy-winning Netflix drama about the reign of Queen Elizabeth II, featuring additional historical background, expert commentary, and beautifully reproduced images Starring Claire Foy and Olivia Colman as Queen Elizabeth II, seasons 2 and 3 of The Crown present the next chapters in Peter Morgan's intimate portrait of Britain's longest-reigning monarch. In this official companion--again written by biographer and historical consultant, Robert Lacey, and covering both seasons--readers will go beyond the palace gates and follow the Queen as she draws on every ounce of strength to maintain the legitimacy of the monarchy in an era of scandal and political change. Featuring "Truth vs. Invention" sections that explain which details of the show are true and which are dramatic devices, and exploring rumored infidelity, royal babies, political maneuvering, and more, this informative and entertaining book--for fans of the show and royal obsessives alike--offers an unforgettable look at the Windsor family.

30 review for The Crown: The Official Companion, Volume 2: Political Scandal, Personal Struggle, and the Years That Defined Elizabeth II (1956-1977)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Zosi

    3.5 stars. As interesting as book 1, but this volume felt a bit rushed. It’s shorter than the first volume even though this one covers twice as many episodes, and it shows. The first volume was constructed with lots of pictures, notes on characters, and stills from the show-but this one doesn’t have any apart from a couple pictures and the photo stills in the middle. Also a couple of copy errors-it makes the book feel rushed, and most of the most important parts of the episodes are either not me 3.5 stars. As interesting as book 1, but this volume felt a bit rushed. It’s shorter than the first volume even though this one covers twice as many episodes, and it shows. The first volume was constructed with lots of pictures, notes on characters, and stills from the show-but this one doesn’t have any apart from a couple pictures and the photo stills in the middle. Also a couple of copy errors-it makes the book feel rushed, and most of the most important parts of the episodes are either not mentioned or glossed over. I would have liked to see a little more effort put into it, as was evident with its predecessor.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Roos

    2.5 star. This was disappointing. You could have gotten so much more from this

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sage

    I still enjoyed this book, but I wish they hadn’t jammed in 2 seasons to one book - I feel like there’s so much more I wanted to know, and there wasn’t time to get to it all. And I would have loved more behind the scenes photos and info as well, to mix with the (somewhat dry) history. I’m a huge history nerd, and *I* was bored at certain points. I feel like I did learn a lot though — who knew that Buzz Aldrin took communion on the moon?! That was super cool! Solid 3 stars, perhaps 3.5 if I’m fee I still enjoyed this book, but I wish they hadn’t jammed in 2 seasons to one book - I feel like there’s so much more I wanted to know, and there wasn’t time to get to it all. And I would have loved more behind the scenes photos and info as well, to mix with the (somewhat dry) history. I’m a huge history nerd, and *I* was bored at certain points. I feel like I did learn a lot though — who knew that Buzz Aldrin took communion on the moon?! That was super cool! Solid 3 stars, perhaps 3.5 if I’m feeling generous!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn Harris

    The Crown: The Official Companion Volume 2 provides some useful background information for Seasons 2 and 3 of The Crown series on Netflix but it is far less detailed than Volume 1, which is about the first season of the same series. Lacey quickly summarizes historical events such as the Suez crisis or the process of decolonization in the Commonwealth which deserve a more in depth treatment. Individual historical figures, such as Prince Philip, are discussed in more detail. There is a defensive to The Crown: The Official Companion Volume 2 provides some useful background information for Seasons 2 and 3 of The Crown series on Netflix but it is far less detailed than Volume 1, which is about the first season of the same series. Lacey quickly summarizes historical events such as the Suez crisis or the process of decolonization in the Commonwealth which deserve a more in depth treatment. Individual historical figures, such as Prince Philip, are discussed in more detail. There is a defensive tone to the preface, describing how novelists and screenwriters are "deploying their imaginations to recreate a drama that is both fictitious & true." The goals of historical fiction are very different from the goals of non-fiction history writing and these differences, such as how fiction writers emphasize particular themes for artistic or dramatic effect, should be acknowledged rather than obscured as "true." There are a few inaccuracies in the historical context. For example, Antony Armstrong-Jones was not the first commoner to marry a senior member of the royal family since Henry VIII married Anne Boleyn, as stated in the book. There were other more recent examples of untitled commoners marrying into the royal family such as the future James II and Anne Hyde in 1660. The extent of the dramatic license taken by the screenwriters is sometimes minimized or obscured in favour of emphasizing those parts of the series that are closer to the historical record. The audiobook is very well read by Alex Jennings, who plays Edward VIII in The Crown on Netflix. He does a broad range of voices from Prince Charles (whom he portayed in the film The Queen) to the Texan accent of President Lyndon Johnson to the Welsh accents of Prince Charles's tutors at the University of Aberystwyth.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    This was wonderful, as was the first volume! It is a solid background to each episode in seasons 2 and 3- obviously it won't give you the entire story behind a particular historical figure or event, but enough to help grasp the basics. I listened to the audiobook, and as I suspected, Alex Jennings was fantastic for round 2. Certainly worth a listen/read if you enjoy the Crown! This was wonderful, as was the first volume! It is a solid background to each episode in seasons 2 and 3- obviously it won't give you the entire story behind a particular historical figure or event, but enough to help grasp the basics. I listened to the audiobook, and as I suspected, Alex Jennings was fantastic for round 2. Certainly worth a listen/read if you enjoy the Crown!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Anita Boeira

    The first volume was excellent. The second volume seemed to have been written by a completely different person. I also really enjoyed all the photography in the first volume, but on the second volume the glossy photo pages where stills from the show. I am much more curious about the real imagines that inspired the tv show. I’ve already watched the tv show!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Alison

    While I was watching seasons 2&3 of The Crown there was several points where I wondered where the truth started and stopped...which bits had been massaged for dramatic effect, and which bits are supported by historically accurate evidence? This volume provides exactly what I was looking for - background information about the events portrayed, referenced back to historical sources. It is written by Robert Lacey who is the show’s historical consultant.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    The history comparison (to the tv series) is still fascinating, but the substantial format differences (fewer, smaller pictures, less detail overall) between this book and the first one took some time to get over.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    Not as good as the first book. The writing was rambling instead of well encapsulated fleshed out stories, and there weren't nearly as many photos. Skip this one. Too bad since the first one was so enjoyable! Not as good as the first book. The writing was rambling instead of well encapsulated fleshed out stories, and there weren't nearly as many photos. Skip this one. Too bad since the first one was so enjoyable!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lacey

    I preferred the format of the first volume in this series much better. This book felt like it was written by a completely different author, and it was very dry. I wish he had introduced the Season 3 cast in photos the same way he introduced the cast in the first volume.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Caroline Bews

    Love Alex Jennings as a narrator so enjoyed listening to this.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lexie

    3/5. I didn't enjoy this as much as Volume 1. I thought it was a bit rushed and it didn't go into a lot of the history like the previous novel. 3/5. I didn't enjoy this as much as Volume 1. I thought it was a bit rushed and it didn't go into a lot of the history like the previous novel.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Messenger

    Enjoyed but not as good as volume 1

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lulu

    Accessible, engaging history of Queen Elizabeth II's reign in the1950s-70s. Accessible, engaging history of Queen Elizabeth II's reign in the1950s-70s.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Saturday's Child

    A quick, easy but still interesting read over the Queen's Birthday long weekend. A quick, easy but still interesting read over the Queen's Birthday long weekend.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    This is only interesting if you read or listen to it as you watch the show or soon after. I haven't seen season 2 in awhile and the beginning of the book was quite boring. By the middle of season two, though, I liked the dive into backstory I'd forgotten. As for the rest...it was interesting to walk around listening to it, but I'd already extensively googled and most of the articles I found breaking down real vs dramatized events from the show were more engaging. Part of the pitch of the book is This is only interesting if you read or listen to it as you watch the show or soon after. I haven't seen season 2 in awhile and the beginning of the book was quite boring. By the middle of season two, though, I liked the dive into backstory I'd forgotten. As for the rest...it was interesting to walk around listening to it, but I'd already extensively googled and most of the articles I found breaking down real vs dramatized events from the show were more engaging. Part of the pitch of the book is 'you can't believe everything you see on screen - or even reliably fact-check it on the internet!' OK. I'm familiar with how the internet works. The author really is a well-qualified British historian with more standing to know this stuff than others, but there are a great many reputable news sites interested in The Crown as well and producing the same information in this book. It was perfectly fine - just maybe not worth a whole credit on Audible.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Desi

    Enjoyable read for fans of The Crown. Only 3 stars because there are a few small mistakes and cramming two seasons into one book meant there weren’t as many details or photographs as volume 1. Still....looking forward to volume 3 and future seasons of The Crown!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lyn Ryan

    Interesting companion to the Netflix series, that fills in the political landscape and clarifies the rumours from the facts. Much of the series is imagined, but based on detailed research. Some events are totally fictious, but, according to the authors, designed to reveal deeper truths. I am very interested in the series. It is a remarkable achievement, beautifully acted and edited. I am interested in this idea that the monarch supposedly floats above politics like some guardian angel. This seri Interesting companion to the Netflix series, that fills in the political landscape and clarifies the rumours from the facts. Much of the series is imagined, but based on detailed research. Some events are totally fictious, but, according to the authors, designed to reveal deeper truths. I am very interested in the series. It is a remarkable achievement, beautifully acted and edited. I am interested in this idea that the monarch supposedly floats above politics like some guardian angel. This series shows the monarch to be very much involved in discretely pulling on the levers of power, and acting in accordance with political wishes. I am also somewhat uncomfortable with the idea that I am presented with 'history', even though it is clearly a dramatised narrative. The screenwriters and authors freely admit that some events are fictious, and most canny viewers would understand intuitively that the private conversations depicted in The Crown could only the work of imagination. Clearly a large amount of research has gone into this series, but it still a subjective view appearing with a kind of gloss of being more fact than fiction. How many viewers rely on this version of history as being fact, or 'the truth'? How many viewers do not understand the complex interplay between the need to tell a narrative and the need to remain faithful to events and political realities? I find this trend of blending historical fact into a narrative both interesting and a little disturbing, with the popularity of authors like Hiliary Mantell and Philippa Gregory. Both are excellent authors and I have enjoyed books by both, but I still have a somewhat niggling doubt about how lesser research teams and less professional authors can massage the truth into something else for their own narrative, or even political, purposes.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Gabriella Rusk

    This book is for super fans of Netflix’s hit series, The Crown which recently released its third season. It delves into each episode and breaks down the historical elements, sorting out fact from fiction. I’ve loved watching this television show and have always wanted to learn more about the actual history of it all. Robert Lacey explains where the writers may have drawn inspiration for some of the dramatic elements in the series. Heavily researched and intensely detailed, Lacey also points out w This book is for super fans of Netflix’s hit series, The Crown which recently released its third season. It delves into each episode and breaks down the historical elements, sorting out fact from fiction. I’ve loved watching this television show and have always wanted to learn more about the actual history of it all. Robert Lacey explains where the writers may have drawn inspiration for some of the dramatic elements in the series. Heavily researched and intensely detailed, Lacey also points out where show runner Peter Morgan completely made something up. Some episodes blend together timelines or events and Lacey explains the decision to create more fictional dialogue or scenes not entirely based on fact. At the same time, Lacey also provides background for many of the historical events I wanted to learn even more about. For example, I had never heard of the coal mining tragedy at Aberfan and was completely enraptured by the episode and learning more about this terrible event. I was also very interested in learning more about Prince Charles and his time in Wales. However, I was disappointed there wasn’t very much about Margaret, despite the focus of her in the final episode. Because the second season had come out quite some time ago, I skimmed the first half of this book. I was having trouble recalling many of the details from those earlier episodes and the second season was not my favorite in terms of story lines. However, skipping ahead to the third season section of this book was worth it because the episodes were fresh in my mind and it was wildly fascinating to learn more about many of the big historical events. If you’re a big fan of the show, I highly recommend reading this and if you haven’t watched it yet, head over to Netflix! Can’t wait for Season 4. (GR)

  20. 4 out of 5

    Shreedevi Gurumurty

    The fascinating royal and social history that inspired Seasons 2 and 3 of The Crown, written by the show's historical consultant. In this incredible companion to the second and third seasons of Netflix's acclaimed series The Crown, renowned biographer and the show's historical consultant Robert Lacey takes us through the real history that inspired the drama. Covering two tumultuous decades in the reign of Elizabeth II, Lacey looks at the key social, political and personal moments and the effect t The fascinating royal and social history that inspired Seasons 2 and 3 of The Crown, written by the show's historical consultant. In this incredible companion to the second and third seasons of Netflix's acclaimed series The Crown, renowned biographer and the show's historical consultant Robert Lacey takes us through the real history that inspired the drama. Covering two tumultuous decades in the reign of Elizabeth II, Lacey looks at the key social, political and personal moments and the effect they had not only on the royal family, but also on the world around them. From the Suez Canal Crisis and the US/Russia space race to the Duke of Windsor's collaboration with Hitler and the rumoured issues with the royal marriage, the book will provide a fascinating insight into the two decades that the show covers, revealing the truth behind the fiction on-screen.Extensively researched and complete with beautifully reproduced photographs, this is a unique look behind the history that inspired the show and the years that would prove to be the making of The Queen.There's a lot of sociopolitical intrigue to unpack here as we reach Queen Elizabeth II's reign in the latter years of the 20th century. The Crown 👑 is a package deal. It has mystery, drama, glamour, and romance to keep fans like me hooked.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Leslie Goddard

    I love the idea of a companion book to the popular series, and this book will undoubtedly thrill historians who want to delve deeper into the issues surrounding the monarchy in the years covered by the show. There is a good amount of political background, as well as broader historical context (e.g. the moon landing and Phillip’s fascination with it). As a fan of the show, however, I found it curious that they did not devote any time here to going behind the scenes. You get no insight into casting I love the idea of a companion book to the popular series, and this book will undoubtedly thrill historians who want to delve deeper into the issues surrounding the monarchy in the years covered by the show. There is a good amount of political background, as well as broader historical context (e.g. the moon landing and Phillip’s fascination with it). As a fan of the show, however, I found it curious that they did not devote any time here to going behind the scenes. You get no insight into casting decisions, how the sets were designed, how closely the costumes followed history, or anything else related to the “making-of.” I wasn’t expecting the entire book to cover that but I was expecting a little bit of it. An entire book with that approach might have been a more exciting read than this, which slants heavily toward the historical/political/academic. That said, I do love how the book takes you through how closely the script of each episode conforms to historical fact in both its details (not very much) and its broader scope (quite a lot). The idea that the show is mostly fictionalized but is accurate in the big picture it presents of these years is fascinating and the best part of this book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Karen Adams

    I found these two volumes while trying to learn more about 20th century British history. I compare my addiction to "The Crown" to 2020: like something I never would have expected to happen and didn't see coming. I have never been interested in the Royal Family, although I always liked and felt for Diana. But the show turned me into a huge fan of The Queen. She has seen and been through so much, and most importantly, she has evolved. After season 2, I was in awe of her strength, wisdom, and power I found these two volumes while trying to learn more about 20th century British history. I compare my addiction to "The Crown" to 2020: like something I never would have expected to happen and didn't see coming. I have never been interested in the Royal Family, although I always liked and felt for Diana. But the show turned me into a huge fan of The Queen. She has seen and been through so much, and most importantly, she has evolved. After season 2, I was in awe of her strength, wisdom, and power. One thing I didn't like was how ignorant I was/still am of British history. The episodes were good even if you didn't know the history, but I kept asking Gale to stop the program so I could ask her questions, since she lived in England for 3 or 4 years. She didn't always know the answers, so I started looking for books to fill in my many blanks. Each episode is summarized in a chapter, and each episode chapter has corresponding chapter that describes what happened in real life. The show follows history generally, but sometimes things are changed for story-telling purposes. The books include photos of the historical figures as well as of the actors.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Matt Conger

    A disappointment compared to The Crown: The Official Companion, Volume 1: Elizabeth II, Winston Churchill, and the Making of a Young Queen. This book has (roughly) the same number of pages as that one, but covers twice as many episodes and has a font size that is ~30% larger. It also dropped the actor/character explanations as well as the longer, thematic essays that aren't episode-specific. Even the number and variety of photographs in this volume are far less than what had been shown in the pr A disappointment compared to The Crown: The Official Companion, Volume 1: Elizabeth II, Winston Churchill, and the Making of a Young Queen. This book has (roughly) the same number of pages as that one, but covers twice as many episodes and has a font size that is ~30% larger. It also dropped the actor/character explanations as well as the longer, thematic essays that aren't episode-specific. Even the number and variety of photographs in this volume are far less than what had been shown in the prior one. The core content is mostly similar. It still contains 10-20 page explanations behind the events of each episode as well as frank commentary on what was real and what was invented. I just wish they hadn't set a modestly high standard with Volume 1!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    Season 2 and 3 Combined Not as good as the first book because was more political detailed and less interesting. Also this book felt rushed particularly at the end to get the book published as quick as possible for the release of season 3. Recent events mentioned like the 2019 birth of Megan and Harry's baby Archie as a comparison event. Season 2 portion of book was definitely not a companion book for series when it was originally released because this was released after Season 3 came out. Not a g Season 2 and 3 Combined Not as good as the first book because was more political detailed and less interesting. Also this book felt rushed particularly at the end to get the book published as quick as possible for the release of season 3. Recent events mentioned like the 2019 birth of Megan and Harry's baby Archie as a comparison event. Season 2 portion of book was definitely not a companion book for series when it was originally released because this was released after Season 3 came out. Not a good time to combine seasons since a totally different cast played the characters except for John Lithrow as Winston Churchill. Overall seemed like some episodes were not talked about but the political backstory instead. Seemed more like a modern history book and not about The Crown itself of both the show nor Royalty. Skimmed a lot at the end because it was boring and again rushed to get book off to the publisher.

  25. 5 out of 5

    hpboy13

    As The Crown becomes more episodic after its stellar first season, so too does this book. There isn’t much sense of a throughline here, so I think it holds up less well as an independent read. However, it proves to be a terrific companion when watching the show – I read it concurrently with watching Season 3 of the show, and found it very enjoyable, and preferable to the usual googling I did whenever the credits rolled. On some topics, this book is a gem, fleshing things out and providing welcome As The Crown becomes more episodic after its stellar first season, so too does this book. There isn’t much sense of a throughline here, so I think it holds up less well as an independent read. However, it proves to be a terrific companion when watching the show – I read it concurrently with watching Season 3 of the show, and found it very enjoyable, and preferable to the usual googling I did whenever the credits rolled. On some topics, this book is a gem, fleshing things out and providing welcome context – in particular, the chapter on spies in 3x01, the Prime Ministers, Tony Armstrong-Jones. On others, it oddly glosses over them – I don’t quite understand why neither this book nor the show seem even slightly interested in exploring Princess Anne. Fans of The Crown will enjoy this book, and it can help tide us over until Season 4!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    I was disappointed by the decision to downgrade the design from Volume 1 (which was a meticulously-rendered, gorgeous thing) into, for lack of a term, a "regular" book. The first one felt like an art book; this one felt quite plain in comparison. The content itself was quite good, though at some points I had to wonder why Lacey spent his time focusing on the things that he did; in the chapter for "Dear Mrs. Kennedy", he spends remarkably little time discussing the titular Kennedy (and never clari I was disappointed by the decision to downgrade the design from Volume 1 (which was a meticulously-rendered, gorgeous thing) into, for lack of a term, a "regular" book. The first one felt like an art book; this one felt quite plain in comparison. The content itself was quite good, though at some points I had to wonder why Lacey spent his time focusing on the things that he did; in the chapter for "Dear Mrs. Kennedy", he spends remarkably little time discussing the titular Kennedy (and never clarifies what sort of interactions did or didn't or were suspected to have occurred between her and Elizabeth II) which is on its face a weird choice. There were a few instances like this - though some of Lacey's apparent tangents were actually quite interesting.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    I've enjoyed many of Robert Lacey's books, particularly his well-regarded biography of the Queen. I expected this to be mostly recycled material, but was pleased to find much that is new. For those who love the Netflix series "The Crown" as well as British history, this companion book is very good. Lacey adds many insights into the events depicted in the first season of "The Crown" and provides helpful context and analysis. The first volume is more comprehensive. This second volume feels more ru I've enjoyed many of Robert Lacey's books, particularly his well-regarded biography of the Queen. I expected this to be mostly recycled material, but was pleased to find much that is new. For those who love the Netflix series "The Crown" as well as British history, this companion book is very good. Lacey adds many insights into the events depicted in the first season of "The Crown" and provides helpful context and analysis. The first volume is more comprehensive. This second volume feels more rushed and could have benefited from some additional material.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

    It somehow took me almost a year to finally finish this book!! I wanted to finish before the next season was released and it was a great recap of the previous two seasons. I enjoyed the chapters about Prince Charles and Princess Margaret - the more scandal, the better! I'm really excited for next season/the next book because Princess Diana will be introduced. The chapters about the Prime Ministers were extremely boring and dry to me. Churchill was awesome, but I didn't care for Eden, Wilson and Ma It somehow took me almost a year to finally finish this book!! I wanted to finish before the next season was released and it was a great recap of the previous two seasons. I enjoyed the chapters about Prince Charles and Princess Margaret - the more scandal, the better! I'm really excited for next season/the next book because Princess Diana will be introduced. The chapters about the Prime Ministers were extremely boring and dry to me. Churchill was awesome, but I didn't care for Eden, Wilson and Macmillan.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Helen Baker

    My daughter brought me this for Christmas as she knows how much I have loved the Netflix series. I have to say I wasn’t sure if I would enjoy the book but it was very thoughtful of her. Anyway I loved it, it is really interesting and filled me in so much on the history and political background of our country. I was born in 1968 and this book covers 1956-1977 ending with the Queens Silver Jubilee that I do remember being 9 at the time. I mainly read fiction so a factual book is quite a departure f My daughter brought me this for Christmas as she knows how much I have loved the Netflix series. I have to say I wasn’t sure if I would enjoy the book but it was very thoughtful of her. Anyway I loved it, it is really interesting and filled me in so much on the history and political background of our country. I was born in 1968 and this book covers 1956-1977 ending with the Queens Silver Jubilee that I do remember being 9 at the time. I mainly read fiction so a factual book is quite a departure for me but it was an informative and enjoyable one.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tam

    I read the companion book for series one of The Crown and having finished this one, I can say they add hugely to my enjoyment of the show. I love history and it is important to me to know what information I see on the show is fact and what are the wonderful screenplays of Peter Morgan. Care is taken to dig into the historical events that character stories are woven around. It's just getting additional information about something that I already love. Great book! I read the companion book for series one of The Crown and having finished this one, I can say they add hugely to my enjoyment of the show. I love history and it is important to me to know what information I see on the show is fact and what are the wonderful screenplays of Peter Morgan. Care is taken to dig into the historical events that character stories are woven around. It's just getting additional information about something that I already love. Great book!

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