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Heidi's Children

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Illustrated by Pelagie Doane. Author listed on cover as "Johanna Spyri's Translator"


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Illustrated by Pelagie Doane. Author listed on cover as "Johanna Spyri's Translator"

30 review for Heidi's Children

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chantal

    Cute little sequel of the story of Heidi. Glad I have read them all by now. It is an easy read and also more for children, then for grownups. I did enjoy it to read what happened to Heidi. Even though it was written by another author the writing style is really close to the original author. It gets 3 points.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kali

    When I was seven or eight, there was a block of flats near my home which were condemned. My sister, her friend and I spent several afternoons exploring the old flats. In one of them, I found abandoned copies of Heidi Grows Up and Heidi's Song. I read them, loved them, and lost them. In need of comfort recently, I reread Heidi and then bought the sequels from Amazon. They're just as simple and satisfying as I remember. I love the way we discover more of the Grandfather's past - including his name! When I was seven or eight, there was a block of flats near my home which were condemned. My sister, her friend and I spent several afternoons exploring the old flats. In one of them, I found abandoned copies of Heidi Grows Up and Heidi's Song. I read them, loved them, and lost them. In need of comfort recently, I reread Heidi and then bought the sequels from Amazon. They're just as simple and satisfying as I remember. I love the way we discover more of the Grandfather's past - including his name! - and how it all ties together. I kind of want to put 'Adelheid Halm' (Heidi's maiden name) on a bookmark now.

  3. 5 out of 5

    KyneWynn

    I love this book, because it finishes telling about what happened to Heidi --it is a sequel written by a different author who also wrote Heidi Grows Up. Tritten deftly weaves pieces of the original book into this charming sequel,(which includes a bit of a mystery), and stays true to the characterization of the original. My original copy fell apart from being read so many times, luckily I was able to find a replacement of the same edition.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth S

    Contented sigh. I very much enjoy the grown-up Heidi that Tritten gives us. His first sequel (Heidi Grows Up) was good but not great. Plot was a little meandering. This second sequel has a better plot and some of the same wisdom and faith found in the original Heidi.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    A gift from my Grandmother Cassidy the year she died.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mimi

    Growing up, my grandmother had all three of the Heidi novels, so I didn't realize that the two sequels were spurious until adulthood. I found this one, the third, at a FOL sale and picked it up immediately. I loved the re-read and found that I only remembered whispers of the story. What really struck me was the picture of folklore, cultural traditions, and history that Heidi and her family live. I want to find the middle one now.

  7. 4 out of 5

    BookSweetie

    If you read and loved Johanna Spyri's classic HEIDI (written first in 1870 though not published for another ten years or so), perhaps you were lucky enough to discover HEIDI GROWS UP (HEIDI #2) and HEIDI's CHILDREN (HEIDI #3) written by Spyri's translator Charles Tritten. Tritten explains in a forward that there were so many adoring fans around the globe writing with questions about what happened next to Heidi and Peter and Grandfather that Tritten was inspired to carry the characters forward If you read and loved Johanna Spyri's classic HEIDI (written first in 1870 though not published for another ten years or so), perhaps you were lucky enough to discover HEIDI GROWS UP (HEIDI #2) and HEIDI's CHILDREN (HEIDI #3) written by Spyri's translator Charles Tritten. Tritten explains in a forward that there were so many adoring fans around the globe writing with questions about what happened next to Heidi and Peter and Grandfather that Tritten was inspired to carry the characters forward in time while keeping to the spirit of Spyri's original story. In this third and rather satisfying book, we very quickly are reminded that Heidi "to be sure... was no longer the little girl of yesterday, but she had kept her gaiety, her passion for nature, her childlike excitement for the changing seasons." In other words, Heidi may be grown up, but she is true to the nature of the girl whom readers first met. In this book, she is married, living in Dorfli with Peter, Peter's mother Brigitta, Grandfather (Alm Uncle), and Jamy, the boarding schoolteacher -- all in the manor house Heidi inherited from the good doctor. Heidi, although expecting her own child some months hence, actually slips deftly into the idealized mother figure role very quickly in this book when Jamy's 9 year old sister Marta is welcomed to Heidi's household. Marta is the child at the center of this book now that Heidi is adult. Marta had written a letter from Paris that showed how desperate was her need for love, understanding and nurturing since her grandmother had died. Heidi:"I've always wanted a little girl to mother..." Jamy: " If you can give Marta part of your faith in these mountains and the Lord that made them, that will help." Marta develops a key relationship with Alm Uncle (Grandfather) that leads to illuminating his painful emotional past he has kept secret all these years ---and binds all the characters together in a satisfying way. This book does have a moral and religious flavor that some modern readers might find unrealistic or too overt, but as an older adult who has memories of my own grandparents and others born in the 19th century, religion and character-building intertwined more easily (especially in stories) and was a more accepted/expected aspect of daily life. The lessons from Marta's grandmother and the Grandfather's lives are spelled out by Heidi for Marta (and young readers): Heve courage to do what you know is right (unlike the too fearful grandmother) and be more ready to forgive (unlike the late-to-forgive Grandfather). Marta is also encouraged to sing the hymn/ say the prayer taught to her first by her grandmother... she needs repetition and time to understand and absorb its messages of asking the Dear Spirit for a kinder heart, stronger will, broader mind, and purer life. And, yes, if readers wonder: Heidi and Peter have twins whose names are suggested by grandfather (and accepted by Heidi and Peter):Tobias and Marta. The significance of this naming is not fully clear until Grandfather's secret is better understood -- late in the book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Teressa Morris

    One of my favorite books when I was a little girl was Heidi. I even enjoyed the Shirley Temple movie version of the story, even though it was not that close to the original. For my tenth birthday, I received Heidi Grows Up. It was so much fun to read Tritten's continuation of the beloved story. I had no idea that there was a second sequel until about four months ago when I read Barbara Fisher's March House blog, highlighting her latest find, Heidi's Children. While I couldn't afford to send to One of my favorite books when I was a little girl was Heidi. I even enjoyed the Shirley Temple movie version of the story, even though it was not that close to the original. For my tenth birthday, I received Heidi Grows Up. It was so much fun to read Tritten's continuation of the beloved story. I had no idea that there was a second sequel until about four months ago when I read Barbara Fisher's March House blog, highlighting her latest find, Heidi's Children. While I couldn't afford to send to England for Ms. Fisher's pristine copy, I did find an old,beat-up library copy in readable condition, for dirt cheap on Amazon. This book is just as sweet and wholesome as its predecessors. There is a strong Christian theme running throughout which I found comforting rather than preachy. Marta, Jamy's sister, is an anxious child, prone to bouts of hysteria. She is unsure of herself and her place in the world since the grandmother who raised her has died and her parents are wealthy party people. Heidi and her grandfather try to teach Marta the power of prayer as well as two phrases which really rang home with me, "Have courage" and "Be ready to forgive!" If you have been following this blog for awhile, you may remember that I have struggled with both of these issues (The Year of No Fear, My One Word for 2013: Courage). It was nice to see a fresh reminder from so many years ago!! I think this book (in fact, all 3 of them) would be a fine addition to any pre-teen's library. The beautiful descriptions of the Swiss countryside, combined with the look inside Heidi's family, make for a charming piece of historical children's literature. I give Heidi's Children four milk cans!!!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lynn Smith

    Bought for me by my aunt for xmas it was a lovely read and you finally had a full history of the grandfather. I still have the trilogy to this day and have read it as an adult some years ago now. I keep it for the memories it envokes of a treasure bought by my aunt.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Zink

    The plot was compelling. The dialog was unrealistic. It was a good story about Heidi's life with Peter and the demise of the Alm Uncle.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Pickstone

    This is a repeat of my review for Heidi Grows Up I had completely forgotten that the sequelae to Heidi were written by someone other than Johanna Spyri. I approached a re-read with caution and rediscovered that Charles Tritten was Spyri's translator and a personal friend and that alone made it more of a sequel and less of a cashing in on a famous book kind of thing. It reads pretty faithfully to the original - though Peter seems to have grown a few brain cells in the interval - and I take it This is a repeat of my review for Heidi Grows Up I had completely forgotten that the sequelae to Heidi were written by someone other than Johanna Spyri. I approached a re-read with caution and rediscovered that Charles Tritten was Spyri's translator and a personal friend and that alone made it more of a sequel and less of a cashing in on a famous book kind of thing. It reads pretty faithfully to the original - though Peter seems to have grown a few brain cells in the interval - and I take it kindly that Tritten says he wrote to two books because children were asking for the story and Spyri herself would never have refused any child's request, especially after her only son died. The simple morality that flows through Heidi survives and into the next one too.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Vera City

    This books have something that always make me feel at home! Easy to read and full of beautiful moments when we can see how much Heidi has grown up, it is surely a great continuation for everyone who want to know what happened with that amazing girl and all her companions!! It is also full of new dicovers about her beloved grandpa! So, if you love Heidi and want to know more about her, 'Heidi and Peter' and this book would be perfect for you!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tena

    I remember reading this waaay back in elementary school and absolutely loving it. But somehow HEIDI'S CHILDREN didn't hold up through adulthood. This book focuses more on Marta than on the characters we come to love in HEIDI, and while 10-year-old-me liked her well enough to check this book out of the school library again and again, 25-year-old-me mainly just thought she was annoying. A bit disappointing, but not enough to completely ruin my enjoyment.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    I picked this baby at my local libaries book sale last year. Perhaps not a work of deep and astounding fiction, it was still a fun read, and enjoyable to return to a character from my childhood and find her grown up, but unchanged in character.

  15. 4 out of 5

    rivka

    I thought I had read this years ago, but if I did, I had not remembered what an incredible retcon it is! Fun read, but not nearly as good as the original.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    I hope this book will make me happy!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Zeta T.

    More about Jamy's sister from the previous sequel. I guess another kid to get to know the grown-up Heidi, Peter and now frail Grandfather to get the story moving.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Penelope Polins

    The last of the two "Heidi" sequels written by Frau Spyri's English translator. It's worth seeking out as unfortunately It is currently out of print.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Christina Baehr

    I think I could read my daughters anything if I just put the word "Heidi" in every now and then and they'd love it, so strong is her appeal. But really, this wasn't great.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lorraine Lopez

    Lovely continuation of the Heidi story. All characters are very likable,and the story is very sweet without being too cutesy.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sharyn

    I love the Heidi series - the first novels I ever read. The copies I have were my Mother's from her childhood, so old and very treasured.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    It wasn't a bad read, but I think because the writing is obviously different, it just doesn't have the sweetness and star quality that Heidi had.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Arunima

    really good and of course exciting!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Carol (Kimiko)

    i love reading too my son. and he can read it today his kids. easy read.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Phillips

    I enjoyed this book very much. Heidi and Peter have gotten married and are expecting a baby. Heidi's friend Jamy from boarding school comes to live with them and teach at the small school in the village that Heidi had to stop teaching in because of her pregnancy. Later Jamy's sister, Marta, who has a nervous problem and has occasional crying fits comes to live with them too. Heidi and the grandfather work wonders on this little one with their caring, love, patience and no nonsense approach. The I enjoyed this book very much. Heidi and Peter have gotten married and are expecting a baby. Heidi's friend Jamy from boarding school comes to live with them and teach at the small school in the village that Heidi had to stop teaching in because of her pregnancy. Later Jamy's sister, Marta, who has a nervous problem and has occasional crying fits comes to live with them too. Heidi and the grandfather work wonders on this little one with their caring, love, patience and no nonsense approach. The baby is born but it turns out, delightedly to be twins! A lovely story of growing up and learning to control oneself surrounded by the beautiful mountains of Switzerland! This series would make a wonderful family read aloud. I can't wait to buy the last book in the series, Heidi Grand'mère, and read that one too... it is on my Amazon wish list. "Quite often, on rainy days, Marta would be seen at the Alm-Uncle's side with her slate, pencils and school books. she was afraid not to come when he called her. But gradually, her fear of him changed into admiration and respect. If anything troubled her he saw to it that everything was set right and if her lessons puzzled her, his explanations made it all clear. Often when there were errands to be run, he would send for her. It tired him to climb the stairs and he no longer attempted it. "'The child can get it,' he would say and, as time passed, she ran his errands more and more willingly. Heidi, too, sometimes sent her to the store and Brigitte let her pat out the little cakes she baked in the kitchen. At school she was allowed to wash blackboards, clean erasers and put away the chalk. Thus, for the first time in her life, she began to feel that she was of some use and was no longer a burden. 'You bring back my strength,' the Alm-Uncle said to her one day when she ran to him with her lessons. 'Sometimes I think the dear Lord lets us stay on earth as long as we are needed. He sees that you and I are helping each other.' 'Does He?' asked Marta, looking up into the old man's face. 'Indeed He does,' he replied, nodding wisely. 'Sometimes again I think He sent you to me. He has a marvelous way of working out everything for the good of His children here on earth.' 'Tell me more,' pleaded Marta. 'How do you know about Him when He is so far away?' 'He is near, if we have Him in our hearts, child.'" (pg 55-56) Ultimate Popsugar Reading Challenge prompt(s) – #34 A book you meant to read in 2019

  26. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Pieck

    This last book rounds out an unlikely trilogy, and brings to a close the story of Heidi. In it, we see Heidi helping another girl who begins the book as lost and bewildered as Heidi was at the beginning of the original book, coming to a home where she doesn't expect to be loved. The goats are still here, although now Peter has expanded his farming to include crops, a horse, and a precious cow. The book is pleasant, with lovely descriptions of the mountains, flowers, etc. It isn't as strong as the This last book rounds out an unlikely trilogy, and brings to a close the story of Heidi. In it, we see Heidi helping another girl who begins the book as lost and bewildered as Heidi was at the beginning of the original book, coming to a home where she doesn't expect to be loved. The goats are still here, although now Peter has expanded his farming to include crops, a horse, and a precious cow. The book is pleasant, with lovely descriptions of the mountains, flowers, etc. It isn't as strong as the first two books, but it is still worth the read. Now that I've gotten most of the goats out of my system, my next reading adventure will be to revisit the Little House books, which my grandmother read aloud to me when I was eight or nine. She would have been 110 this year, and would have been amazed that I could carry all nine books (plus many more by other authors) in Braille versions in a machine that weighs less than some hardcover novels!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie

    Birthday Book #63 from my friend Mary. A nice conclusion to the Heidi trilogy. I thought all three books felt like they could've been written by Johanna Spyri, as Tritten's two were very true to the original characters and the spirit of the book and the setting. I didn't particularly care for Marta, or her selfish parents, and I wish we would've had more of Jamy and Max's relationship instead, but I still loved the setting, Heidi and Peter and their little ones, and the sense of family in the Birthday Book #63 from my friend Mary. A nice conclusion to the Heidi trilogy. I thought all three books felt like they could've been written by Johanna Spyri, as Tritten's two were very true to the original characters and the spirit of the book and the setting. I didn't particularly care for Marta, or her selfish parents, and I wish we would've had more of Jamy and Max's relationship instead, but I still loved the setting, Heidi and Peter and their little ones, and the sense of family in the community.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sabine

    I first read this book in kindergarten, and I loved it. It was my first time ever reading a novel and I was completely enchanted. Now that I'm older I must admit, this book is very pastoral and wishy washy. There's never any real stakes, and everything is even and slow paced. If you're not a fan of fluffy novels this is not the book for you. That being said, it is a pretty good book for a weekend feel good read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Naomi

    Soothing to read work-as-a-story, like Boxcar children. Pretty heavy on the religious moralistic stuff, but it was written in the 30s so maybe that was a thing? I really want to visit Switzerland. There has been a copy of this book on my shelf for 30+ years, I thought I should read it again. Nice illustrations.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Paul

    Was nice to read but not my cup of tea. Maybe and hopefully with the sequel...

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