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Evening

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Two sisters, lost youth, and youthful obsessions; organized by day as the family sits shiva, Evening unfolds the paradoxes of love, ambition, siblings, and the way the past continues to inflect the present, sometimes against our will. In her thirties, Eve is summoned home by her distraught family to mourn the premature death of her sister, Tam, a return that becomes an unex Two sisters, lost youth, and youthful obsessions; organized by day as the family sits shiva, Evening unfolds the paradoxes of love, ambition, siblings, and the way the past continues to inflect the present, sometimes against our will. In her thirties, Eve is summoned home by her distraught family to mourn the premature death of her sister, Tam, a return that becomes an unexpected encounter with the past. Eve bears the burden of a secret: Two weeks before Tam died, Eve and Tam argued so vehemently that they did not speak again. Her sister was famous, acclaimed for her career as a TV journalist and her devoted marriage. But Tam, too, had a secret, revealed the day after the funeral, one that inverts the story Eve has told herself since their childhood. In the aftermath, Eve is forced to revise her version of her fractured family, her sister’s accomplishments and vaunted marriage, and her own impeded ambition in work and love. Day by day as the family sits shiva, the stories unfold, illuminating the past​ to shape the present. Evening explores the dissonant love between sisters, the body in longing, the pride we take in sustaining our illusions, and the redemption that is possible only when they are dispelled.


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Two sisters, lost youth, and youthful obsessions; organized by day as the family sits shiva, Evening unfolds the paradoxes of love, ambition, siblings, and the way the past continues to inflect the present, sometimes against our will. In her thirties, Eve is summoned home by her distraught family to mourn the premature death of her sister, Tam, a return that becomes an unex Two sisters, lost youth, and youthful obsessions; organized by day as the family sits shiva, Evening unfolds the paradoxes of love, ambition, siblings, and the way the past continues to inflect the present, sometimes against our will. In her thirties, Eve is summoned home by her distraught family to mourn the premature death of her sister, Tam, a return that becomes an unexpected encounter with the past. Eve bears the burden of a secret: Two weeks before Tam died, Eve and Tam argued so vehemently that they did not speak again. Her sister was famous, acclaimed for her career as a TV journalist and her devoted marriage. But Tam, too, had a secret, revealed the day after the funeral, one that inverts the story Eve has told herself since their childhood. In the aftermath, Eve is forced to revise her version of her fractured family, her sister’s accomplishments and vaunted marriage, and her own impeded ambition in work and love. Day by day as the family sits shiva, the stories unfold, illuminating the past​ to shape the present. Evening explores the dissonant love between sisters, the body in longing, the pride we take in sustaining our illusions, and the redemption that is possible only when they are dispelled.

30 review for Evening

  1. 5 out of 5

    Elyse Walters

    Audiobook, read by Erin Moon Eve and her older sister Tam grew up in a Jewish family in Toronto Canada. Tam stayed in Toronto and lived near her family. She was married - two children and was a well-known successful TV anchor woman in Canada. Eve, took a different path in life. Considered a semi rebel - with a bohemian side.... she moved to New York for college - and stayed. At age 35, she was working on a dissertation about British women during the interwar, and teaching adult education classes. Audiobook, read by Erin Moon Eve and her older sister Tam grew up in a Jewish family in Toronto Canada. Tam stayed in Toronto and lived near her family. She was married - two children and was a well-known successful TV anchor woman in Canada. Eve, took a different path in life. Considered a semi rebel - with a bohemian side.... she moved to New York for college - and stayed. At age 35, she was working on a dissertation about British women during the interwar, and teaching adult education classes. Not married. No children. A ‘sorta’ boyfriend. Eve loved them all - parents, Nana, and most: her sister. But.... during Eve’s last visit With Tam, they had a terrible fight from Tam’s hospital bed. Tam was dying of cancer. The fight resolved around a secret. Then.... Tam died....before the sisters had a resolution-conversation. Eve returns home for the funeral with her family - and sits shiva with them for 7 days. Another secret was discovered, the day after the funeral. Tam left Eve a card asking for forgiveness. Plus a video. Revealing Conversations - stories - and memories-(summers on Lake Ontario) - unfold with family members and childhood friends. Love- interests too. With much reflection, we are are privy to Eve’s most inner thoughts and feelings, around guilt, loss, grief, competitiveness, forgiveness, understandings, sisterly bonds, and love. I liked this book— its crafting—it’s storytelling— the dialogue was fresh, endearing, with a wonderful supportive cast. Shiva, means 7. Nessa took us through each of the seven days. One of the purposes of Shiva in the Jewish faith is to demystify the impact on death and morning.... and help the grieving immediate family members cope with loss. A lovely slim book — pulled on my heartstrings without being overly sad - with a satisfying ending.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nenia ✨️ Socially Awkward Trash Panda ✨️ Campbell

    FUCKED UP FAMILY SECRETS YAS

  3. 5 out of 5

    Counterpoint Press

    Evening brilliantly unfolds the paradoxes of love, ambition, and siblings. Its lyrical prose and exploration of family illuminates the way the past continues to inflect the present, sometimes against our will.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Erika Dreifus

    I read my friend Nessa's book in a day/evening—although I'm likely to go back to linger over some of the many simply gorgeous sentences.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

    Lyrical story of a family told from the viewpoint of the surviving sister, as the family sits shiva for the golden one who was lost to cancer.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Rochford

    A story as beautiful as its cover. The subject matter is my real-life worst case scenario, but the novel is brimming with humor and sex appeal (don't get me wrong, I also cried a lot). As soon as I finished reading, I turned back to the first page to start again. It might land on my favorites list, TBD! Read this book, it is wonderful. :)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sjfstudio

    What an enjoyable and thought provoking book. I was immediately drawn into Eve's world of family, childhood memories, and loss. Over the period of sitting shiva the story and the family secrets unfold in a lyrical and arresting way and I stayed up reading late into the night until I'd reached the end. The writing is exceptional. Nessa Rapoport is an author who knows the value of words and uses them lovingly and intelligently. I recommend this book highly, you won't be disappointed.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Just did not enjoy this book as I expected to. Unfortunately the story felt bogged down by verbiage, figurative modifiers and phrases that are piled on but add nothing to the understanding of characters or plot. I found myself rereading passages to glean their significance, only to find they added none. Chapter 10 has one exceptional example of this, with a sentence of 115 word - “Then, for a brief wonder, we raise our heads, skulls lolling on our backs as if pleading for mercy, permitted to see Just did not enjoy this book as I expected to. Unfortunately the story felt bogged down by verbiage, figurative modifiers and phrases that are piled on but add nothing to the understanding of characters or plot. I found myself rereading passages to glean their significance, only to find they added none. Chapter 10 has one exceptional example of this, with a sentence of 115 word - “Then, for a brief wonder, we raise our heads, skulls lolling on our backs as if pleading for mercy, permitted to see the tips of firs and cedars and, over them, a sky so passionately blue we are convinced: we can again survive this underworld so that for scant moments every year, we can emerge into magnificent summer light, a light that transforms the towns and villages far from Toronto, grants them a condensed eternity as we make our way here, she’d our winter skins to return to the children we were, the air whose purity revives our shrunken lungs-all the way back until death is merely the season’s turning, inevitable, innocuous, almost affirming.” Whew. Unfortunately, the prose writing here weighs the characterizations and the story down, making them secondary to the presentation.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Rapport is a lovely writer - what I mean is that her prose is both delightful and fresh. What I also mean it is compelling and deep especially when she is writing about family and relationships. We see a complicated family, Jewish and grieving, portrayed as they sit shiva for Tam, a young and accomplished woman who died too soon and her sister, Eva, our protagonist whose guilt is palatable. I could not help but enter in. The story was constructed around unmasking secrets. That was intriguing, bu Rapport is a lovely writer - what I mean is that her prose is both delightful and fresh. What I also mean it is compelling and deep especially when she is writing about family and relationships. We see a complicated family, Jewish and grieving, portrayed as they sit shiva for Tam, a young and accomplished woman who died too soon and her sister, Eva, our protagonist whose guilt is palatable. I could not help but enter in. The story was constructed around unmasking secrets. That was intriguing, but Rapport’s depiction of relationships and inner dialogue was the spark that kept me reading.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Helena

    Boring. I had to force myself to finish but luckily it was short. I seem to be in the minority but I didn’t care and didn’t particularly like the main character Eve. In the midst of a horrible family tragedy, she is utterly self absorbed, ruminating endlessly about her relationship with her dead sister, her divorced parents, her ex boyfriend and current boyfriend, even her aunt and uncle. I certainly didn’t care about the dead writer who was the subject of her long unfinished dissertation. I did Boring. I had to force myself to finish but luckily it was short. I seem to be in the minority but I didn’t care and didn’t particularly like the main character Eve. In the midst of a horrible family tragedy, she is utterly self absorbed, ruminating endlessly about her relationship with her dead sister, her divorced parents, her ex boyfriend and current boyfriend, even her aunt and uncle. I certainly didn’t care about the dead writer who was the subject of her long unfinished dissertation. I did of course feel sympathy for the dead sister and her motherless small children but the big reveal about the sister was no big deal. A disappointment.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Poetic I had to look up approximately 3 words in the first few pages. There's a poetic element to this book which I enjoyed and makes me feel like I probably missed things and could reread it.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Bluminberg

    A family sits shiva after the death of a sister, beautiful, successful, married. The other sister, a more carefree, bohemian type is caught up in the fog of grief, family secrets and feelings of personal failure. Beautifully written, but was slow and plodding in a couple of places.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Hallie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I really wanted to love this book, but it was just way too predictable. If it hadn't been structured so much around the mystery of Tam's secret, it wouldn't have felt like as much of a let down when the secret turned out to be exactly what I'd anticipated.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mel Raschke

    Captivating

  15. 5 out of 5

    Julie

  16. 4 out of 5

    Judy Feld

  17. 5 out of 5

    sandra margolis

  18. 4 out of 5

    Galya P

  19. 5 out of 5

    Estee

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tw

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ruth Rothseid

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sari

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lira

  24. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

  25. 4 out of 5

    Donna

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dominika

  27. 4 out of 5

    Julie

  28. 5 out of 5

    Zainab

  29. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Pearson

  30. 5 out of 5

    Beth Gross

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