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Unoffendable: The Art of Thriving in a World Full of Jerks

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‘Being offended’ has become a common occurrence in a world of increasing censorship, inclusive language-guides and safe-spaces. It’s a good thing to strive for more kindness and compassion. But wishing that humanity becomes entirely inoffensive is pointless because there’s always something that offends someone. Fortunately, there’s another path... The ancient Stoics obser ‘Being offended’ has become a common occurrence in a world of increasing censorship, inclusive language-guides and safe-spaces. It’s a good thing to strive for more kindness and compassion. But wishing that humanity becomes entirely inoffensive is pointless because there’s always something that offends someone. Fortunately, there’s another path... The ancient Stoics observed that some things are in our control and others are not. We cannot control the foul language of people, opinions that oppose our own, and that there will always be a bunch of trolls that intend to trigger us for fun. What happens in our environment isn’t up to us. But what is up to us, is the way we handle it. Many choose to spend heaps of time and energy on the mere words of others, which withholds them to pursue meaningful goals and to be at peace in an unruly universe. What a waste! Unoffendable explores philosophical ideas backed by personal anecdotes to figure out how we can thrive in a world full of jerks, bullies, and people we simply don’t agree with.


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‘Being offended’ has become a common occurrence in a world of increasing censorship, inclusive language-guides and safe-spaces. It’s a good thing to strive for more kindness and compassion. But wishing that humanity becomes entirely inoffensive is pointless because there’s always something that offends someone. Fortunately, there’s another path... The ancient Stoics obser ‘Being offended’ has become a common occurrence in a world of increasing censorship, inclusive language-guides and safe-spaces. It’s a good thing to strive for more kindness and compassion. But wishing that humanity becomes entirely inoffensive is pointless because there’s always something that offends someone. Fortunately, there’s another path... The ancient Stoics observed that some things are in our control and others are not. We cannot control the foul language of people, opinions that oppose our own, and that there will always be a bunch of trolls that intend to trigger us for fun. What happens in our environment isn’t up to us. But what is up to us, is the way we handle it. Many choose to spend heaps of time and energy on the mere words of others, which withholds them to pursue meaningful goals and to be at peace in an unruly universe. What a waste! Unoffendable explores philosophical ideas backed by personal anecdotes to figure out how we can thrive in a world full of jerks, bullies, and people we simply don’t agree with.

30 review for Unoffendable: The Art of Thriving in a World Full of Jerks

  1. 4 out of 5

    Arunkrishnan

    If an Insult has truth in it, there is something to learn. If not, it is just nonsense. In either case, getting offended makes no sense. So chill like a stoic and have more fun.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Simona Paunova

    I was familiar with most of the topics and Stoic principles covered in the book, but unlike most of the similar books and articles, the author shares his story, highs and lows, and that’s something I really appreciate.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rashid Malik

    One very strong impression that surfaces, while reading the book, is that the author is someone like a privileged, easily offendable, princess, not a spartan, who after having fought a long war with life, tired, finally sat down to commit to pages his life experiences. The author's views though valid (because he stands on the shoulders of the philosopher giants) are coming out of a tender and inexperienced person. What the author sites as examples of his being offended by the world are not even One very strong impression that surfaces, while reading the book, is that the author is someone like a privileged, easily offendable, princess, not a spartan, who after having fought a long war with life, tired, finally sat down to commit to pages his life experiences. The author's views though valid (because he stands on the shoulders of the philosopher giants) are coming out of a tender and inexperienced person. What the author sites as examples of his being offended by the world are not even somethings that one should even consider as problems worth noting in a book that is supposed to help people cope with life. I mean, consider the problems that people in some of the areas of Africa, or Afghanistan, or Syria or Iraq are facing, life-threatening problems. The guy never faced any life-threatening situation let alone a physically threatening one and he has complaints about life treating him not well and then he comes up advice for the rest of us. The advice is well-meant, only the examples from his personal life water them down. I wouldn't think anyone would find those examples so oppressing that one would sit down to write a book about them. He is not someone who is suffering from a crippling condition, not even colored (looks like belonging to an ethnic group does not qualify as belonging to a downtrodden class), living in a developed part of the world; its nothing like being born in a slum of India, belonging to the untouchable cast, so what are all those complaints about that he moans about in his book. According to author "I’d say that judging is just another form of repression"; now consider a person who has no penny on his person, a homeless guy, a person who hasn't had a thing to eat for three days, a guy who has been thrown out of his home, someone who has been diagnosed by cancer; and our author finds others "judging" something to be concerned about while your life and livelihood is not even threatened and you are thriving otherwise. What problems is he even talking about? The author hates his own father and brags about it throughout the book. When his father encourages him to become a man, he finds him controlling and manipulative. Thankfully he finds lots of other men to write good words about throughout the book. A man needs advise from other men to find his path through life. Just look at the people he looks up to; "This may sound weird, but I kind of look up to the outcasts of society, even though I donʼt agree with them or support their actions. For example, Dutch politician Geert Wilders from the Dutch Freedom Party (PVV) is one of the most criticized and ridiculed people in the Netherlands. Not only because of his anti-Islam agenda and controversial statements but also because of his dyed blonde hair. Despite insults, death threats, and the need for 24/7 security, he keeps on doing his thing. Even the ‘life coach’ I told you about gains at least a modicum of my respect because, despite all the dislikes below his videos as well as trolls, parodies, satire, and downright hateful comments, he just keeps putting himself out there." A few pages back youtube life-coach was an example of wrong behavior and few pages later, what you read in the quote up there. This guy is confused; should have taken his time before writing a book. This is a messy book to look into for advice. "After we received our grades, I asked the arrogant young lady about her grade: “A seven,” she said irritated. I laughed and went straight to the pub with my awesome group members to celebrate our victory. This was really one of the best payback moments I’d ever experienced in my life." A horrible example of a book that claims to teach stoic virtues. Revenge seeking is vice. What is this guy teaching in this book? Contradiction after contradiction.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Salma

    The main idea, and a brilliant one, is the quote from Seneca: “If deservedly, it is not an insult, but a judicial sentence; if undeservedly, then he who does injustice ought to blush, not I. And what is this which is called an insult? Someone has made a joke about the baldness of my head, the weakness of my eyes, the thinness of my legs, the shortness of my stature; what insult is there in telling me that which everyone sees?” ~ Lucius Annaeus Seneca, On The Firmness of the Wise Man, XVI (transla The main idea, and a brilliant one, is the quote from Seneca: “If deservedly, it is not an insult, but a judicial sentence; if undeservedly, then he who does injustice ought to blush, not I. And what is this which is called an insult? Someone has made a joke about the baldness of my head, the weakness of my eyes, the thinness of my legs, the shortness of my stature; what insult is there in telling me that which everyone sees?” ~ Lucius Annaeus Seneca, On The Firmness of the Wise Man, XVI (translated by Aubrey Stewart, 1900)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Graham Woodley

    I got this book after seeing some of Einzelganger's YouTube videos. It complements them nicely, giving something of an insight into Stoic philosophy. The book is quite autobiographical, which is fine. Whilst reading I could relate to some of my own personal issues and also to the suggesting methods of addressing them. My interest is kindled (pun) in Stoic philosophy from reading this and I will do further research into it. All in all quite a good read, not too long, so it stays 'on-topic' and is good I got this book after seeing some of Einzelganger's YouTube videos. It complements them nicely, giving something of an insight into Stoic philosophy. The book is quite autobiographical, which is fine. Whilst reading I could relate to some of my own personal issues and also to the suggesting methods of addressing them. My interest is kindled (pun) in Stoic philosophy from reading this and I will do further research into it. All in all quite a good read, not too long, so it stays 'on-topic' and is good to put some detail and further understanding to the YT channel.

  6. 5 out of 5

    John Floro

    Well Done A personal story with lessons shared. Great perspective on taking and not taking offense from people and situations surrounding our lives.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Les

    Just as Great as his YouTube! Honest. Relatable. Smart. Genuine. Vulnerable. All great things! The book flowed really well & thus, I read it in one sitting.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Itch Iseatingnandos

    Enjoyable pop take on Stoicism- something that we desperately need right now.

  9. 5 out of 5

    GK

    Written by an youtuber with a Good message: Be resilient enough not to get offended. If you haven’t read anything spiritual in your life this book might have some value for you. Otherwise the book might appear very shallow with good borrowed up quotes which are often misused. Personal examples could have been better. The nature of examples takes away all the weightage.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jacquline Ard

    I prefer this form of writing where personal examples are used to explain concepts and ideas. It gives it more life than just listing facts or statistics. I am the poster child for taking offense. My emotions kind of resemble a riptide. They don't necessarily show most of the time - until they do. What I found most helpful was the idea that other people's feelings and opinions are none of my business. Sure, it should be obvious, but I am prone to projecting. I imagine I can't be alone in projectin I prefer this form of writing where personal examples are used to explain concepts and ideas. It gives it more life than just listing facts or statistics. I am the poster child for taking offense. My emotions kind of resemble a riptide. They don't necessarily show most of the time - until they do. What I found most helpful was the idea that other people's feelings and opinions are none of my business. Sure, it should be obvious, but I am prone to projecting. I imagine I can't be alone in projecting judgments and ideals onto others. I doubt most humans even think of me at all. Maybe the point is that I should feel better about that; therefore, focusing on what I want and need vs. what others want and need. Even if I was right, and my projections are true (not actually projections, then), I probably don't need to please most others - or hate them. Though, any attempts at being liked inauthentically tend to result in self-sabotage since I must know deep inside that it's all a lie. I am trying to accept the impermanence of life (especially my feelings) and the mindfulness I continue to avoid, but I guess I have a long journey ahead of me in the search for inner peace. I haven't exactly dealt with the various parts of my shadow. I'm currently looking into energy healing and possibly metaphysics, soon enough. I think I've done so much that is un-Stoic, non-Buddhist, and so not in accordance with Taoism. More than anything, I don't think I am "alive." My core issue is fear with overthinking which leads to a lack of action which results in regret and spiritual death. Perhaps that sounds like a bit much, but it's something I know so well. I've watched many of the YouTube videos, yet I've mainly targetted shadow work (no, I refuse to take cold showers). That's been interesting... Everyone has their own method. I found one that suits me. I have many triggers connected to emotions, lifelong memories, childhood trauma, and projections. I have an ugly history of feeling insulted by true and false insults. But I get it: "The world isn't responsible for how I feel: I am. Embracing this is crucial to becoming unoffendable." I don't want to be a slave to others (and yet I do). I'm not sure about ever actually approaching the philosophies that are mentioned in the book since I have my own random combination based on Christianity and various strains of "paganism." I could certainly modify some pieces. I will find a way to throw in more of that healthy detachment, but that will definitely be a process. I actually read this book in one evening, but I am slow to update. As I already stated, I'm a sucker for personal stories (especially if they involve details of pain and sorrow). I was engrossed. Interestingly enough, I felt like I was reading my own life's story with some differences here and there, of course. I wonder if I've been a doomer, myself, though I'm not sure if that's valid for women. Regardless, I found the presented information to be very useful for the fallen souls similar to me. Whether I entirely implement it is another story.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kosta Bakas

    4.5 stars

  12. 5 out of 5

    David Sjolander

    Excellent read. Very helpful!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rishabh Mishra

    Author has explained some very fundamental ideas about True wisdom and True Happiness. Most of us are in pursuit of superficial happiness and look for sensual gratification and often end up being unhappy and unsatisfied. The author very well explains the source of true happiness. A must read.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Bruh

    As if I saw a reflection of myself I have read your book and I found it inspiring. That transformation from being triggered by a simple word to becoming almost immune and managing to make progress in life as well as yourself. You came in terms with yourself and said "Screw this. This is my life and I decide how things work around me" therefore ignoring nonsense that used to drive you out of control. When I was reading this book I didn't see a coach or a celebrity giving quotes. I saw a reflection As if I saw a reflection of myself I have read your book and I found it inspiring. That transformation from being triggered by a simple word to becoming almost immune and managing to make progress in life as well as yourself. You came in terms with yourself and said "Screw this. This is my life and I decide how things work around me" therefore ignoring nonsense that used to drive you out of control. When I was reading this book I didn't see a coach or a celebrity giving quotes. I saw a reflection of myself. A Middle Eastern who has moved to a Northern country. Facing racism, anger, fear and shame. The realization of how careless I was to assume that the world should act the way I wanted it to be. I have been observing your YouTube Channel and I have learned quite a few things and have read this book to find that you haven't always been like this gives me hope that anybody can crawl out of their hole and become who they always wanted to be. I, Therefore thank you for this experience. Totally worth checking this book out. It's a 5 star from me. Keep doing what you love. ✌

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jenna Baumgartnersanguis

    Awesome Inspirational, motivational, personable. When he said bibliography I thought oh god here we go, but it’s incredibly relatable to society in general of what we go through. Thank you to the author for putting yourself out there!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Yamil Díaz Aguirre

    The author explains how to apply the Marcus Aurelius philosophy in daily life by improving our perspective of everything. If you are searching for a book that helps to improve your life and also you're interested in the Stoic philosophy, this is your book. The author explains how to apply the Marcus Aurelius philosophy in daily life by improving our perspective of everything. If you are searching for a book that helps to improve your life and also you're interested in the Stoic philosophy, this is your book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jane Reddish

    I like how the author also included his flaws and insecurities while writing this book. It's very easy to read for non-native English speakers like me. Great read as introduction to stoicism, I guess. I like how the author also included his flaws and insecurities while writing this book. It's very easy to read for non-native English speakers like me. Great read as introduction to stoicism, I guess.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Merel Tettero-Leevendig

    Interesting book. Lots to think about! I liked it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Gareth Otton

    I like the idea of this book and there are some great quotes in this book, but it felt less like a book teaching you to be ‘Unoffendable’ and more like the author listing all of the problems he has faced in his life, and in many cases not even handled all that well. A good example is a chapter that I think is supposed to be about not reading too much into other people’s actions because what you see as offensive they mean to be friendly. He describes a co-worker who gives him a horrible nickname I like the idea of this book and there are some great quotes in this book, but it felt less like a book teaching you to be ‘Unoffendable’ and more like the author listing all of the problems he has faced in his life, and in many cases not even handled all that well. A good example is a chapter that I think is supposed to be about not reading too much into other people’s actions because what you see as offensive they mean to be friendly. He describes a co-worker who gives him a horrible nickname and by calling him this makes him think that she hates him and it makes his life harder. Upon leaving another job though, she exclaims how much she enjoyed working with him and how she will miss their laughter, showing that she never meant any offence in what she was doing and she thought that she was being friendly. It was a good anecdote of how poor communication and prejudging caused this man to hate an aspect of his life when he could have either cleared the air and not let it bother him and he would have been much happier. He even comes to a similar conclusion in the book, making you think that he has learnt his lesson. Then he says this: ”Ill-willed or not, I can’t deny that I found her manner of socializing repulsive and her demeanor arrogant. I suspect she isn’t a happy person and I’m glad she isn’t my girlfriend.” These are hardly the words of someone who had learned he was wrong about a person and had looked on a situation in a new light. Instead it is a petty and insulting point of view of a woman and situation that he seemed to have got wrong by over thinking things and getting offended over something that was not her intent. This is obviously just one point in the book, but I felt similar issues with other chapters. The lessons were small, the examples were long, and it seemed to dwell more on the injustices of his own life than the lessons that helped turn him into a better person, as I am not sure that actually happened in the 50% of the book I read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Shashwat Rohilla

    I like the content on his youtube channel. So, I wanted to give a try out this book. In short, it lacks depth. I like that the author put down his insecurities and thought on them using philosophical principles. It's a matter of perspective but throughout the book, I didn't find any actual "problem". It looks like a teenager, who was bullied in school, read stoicism and wrote the book. The whole book is about maintaining composure in the face of people's negativity. Similar stuff with different I like the content on his youtube channel. So, I wanted to give a try out this book. In short, it lacks depth. I like that the author put down his insecurities and thought on them using philosophical principles. It's a matter of perspective but throughout the book, I didn't find any actual "problem". It looks like a teenager, who was bullied in school, read stoicism and wrote the book. The whole book is about maintaining composure in the face of people's negativity. Similar stuff with different titles and examples. But if he is really ignoring all of these things and studying those ancient philosophers, I think he won't have elaborated some things in that detail esp. the type of insults where he explains the meaning of different phrases. Moreover, I only saw problems. I am not sure if I found any example of tough struggle, somewhere he showed resilience, discipline or control. I think the author is still struggling with the issues he wrote about. Trying to heal his wounds. May you heal faster! The book shares a content that other people facing the same issues can connect with. It's helpful, I get that; but that's it.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mark Prohaska

    This is an excellent book and I heartily recommend it to all thinking people. It is well written and is written in a simple and direct fashion. It combines commentary on principles laid down by Stoicism, Buddhism, and Taoism with real life examples. The Greeks had a principle they called Phronesis, meaning practical wisdom. And this book is full of practical wisdom. The book could have used some more editing. On p. 19 he refers to a flow chart which was missing on my Kindle version of the book. A This is an excellent book and I heartily recommend it to all thinking people. It is well written and is written in a simple and direct fashion. It combines commentary on principles laid down by Stoicism, Buddhism, and Taoism with real life examples. The Greeks had a principle they called Phronesis, meaning practical wisdom. And this book is full of practical wisdom. The book could have used some more editing. On p. 19 he refers to a flow chart which was missing on my Kindle version of the book. Also, there are misspellings and grammar errors. Still, the book is so interesting and entertaining that these flaws are hardly noticeable. Also, if you haven't seen seen Einzelganger's You Tube page you should definitely see it--you are in for a treat!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Faizanul Islam

    True advice I found this book very helpful and to the point. The non sense is set to minimum. I used to get offended with ease, even when offender did it accidentally. Now I know that its just my perception of the things and nothing else. I practice negative visualization daily and I find myself at peace in crowd, in traffic and places of public interest. I visualize that we are like an atom in universe and if we keep getting offended on petty stuff nobody would give us a damp. I am at peace and h True advice I found this book very helpful and to the point. The non sense is set to minimum. I used to get offended with ease, even when offender did it accidentally. Now I know that its just my perception of the things and nothing else. I practice negative visualization daily and I find myself at peace in crowd, in traffic and places of public interest. I visualize that we are like an atom in universe and if we keep getting offended on petty stuff nobody would give us a damp. I am at peace and happier.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra

    The 3 stars for being a story about overcoming obstacles, and showing yourself stronger than them. Any story of this kind, with struggles that turn out to empower the people involved, deserves some appreciation. Minus 2 because I haven't felt like I got any practical, direct advice about how to be myself less offendable. Inspiring, though not very pragmatic. The 3 stars for being a story about overcoming obstacles, and showing yourself stronger than them. Any story of this kind, with struggles that turn out to empower the people involved, deserves some appreciation. Minus 2 because I haven't felt like I got any practical, direct advice about how to be myself less offendable. Inspiring, though not very pragmatic.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mantesh Gouda

    Nice book. Completed it in just 3 days. Author wrote in such a manner that we can concentrate on book for so long I recommend this book to all those who want to improve themselves internally. When author said he took 6 years to complete degree which is of just 4 years, I totally relate to it because even I am taking 6 years to complete my engineering which is of 4 year degree

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Gustavo

    Deceptively deep, this book explores how to focus your time on important prospects, while spending less energy worrying about societal interactions. A transformative reading experience to those who are motivated to follow through with Einzelganger's wisdom. Deceptively deep, this book explores how to focus your time on important prospects, while spending less energy worrying about societal interactions. A transformative reading experience to those who are motivated to follow through with Einzelganger's wisdom.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dorothy: ebookofashes Boyd

    Good way to life This book and many story that help you understand that you and people act. It have a great time reading. I will re-read this book. The book it good if you want to change to be better you.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tricia Tort

    I chose this book because I found the title amusing and the description relevant to our current culture. And while it had some good perspectives and reminders, I was disappointed in the overall book and author’s writing style.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Frederick Josey

    Much needed This has been a really inspiring book to read. It has opened my eyes to a lot of hardships I have been dealing with and thought it was just me going through them. Eyes wide open!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    Enjoyable A Good book, well worth the read in a world where a lot of social graces and manners seem to be disappearing. Becoming unoffendable in this current world seems like solid advice. A well written guide for the budding Stoic.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Pablo Jaramillo

    Honest & Sincere Great way to put the Stoics teachings into practice. Go with the flow, be mindful of your time the clock it’s ticking.

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