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The Witches: The Graphic Novel

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Roald Dahl's darkly funny masterpiece, The Witches, now available as a graphic novel from Eisner Award-winning artist Pénélope Bagieu! Witches are real, and they are very, very dangerous. They wear ordinary clothes and have ordinary jobs, living in ordinary towns all across the world -- and there's nothing they despise more than children. When an eight-year-old boy and his Roald Dahl's darkly funny masterpiece, The Witches, now available as a graphic novel from Eisner Award-winning artist Pénélope Bagieu! Witches are real, and they are very, very dangerous. They wear ordinary clothes and have ordinary jobs, living in ordinary towns all across the world -- and there's nothing they despise more than children. When an eight-year-old boy and his grandmother come face-to-face with the Grand High Witch herself, they may be the only ones who can stop the witches' latest plot to stamp out every last child in the country! This full-color graphic novel edition of Roald Dahl's The Witches, adapted and illustrated by Eisner Award winner Pénélope Bagieu, is the first-ever Dahl story to appear in this format. Graphic novel readers and Roald Dahl fans alike will relish this dynamic new take on a uniquely funny tale.


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Roald Dahl's darkly funny masterpiece, The Witches, now available as a graphic novel from Eisner Award-winning artist Pénélope Bagieu! Witches are real, and they are very, very dangerous. They wear ordinary clothes and have ordinary jobs, living in ordinary towns all across the world -- and there's nothing they despise more than children. When an eight-year-old boy and his Roald Dahl's darkly funny masterpiece, The Witches, now available as a graphic novel from Eisner Award-winning artist Pénélope Bagieu! Witches are real, and they are very, very dangerous. They wear ordinary clothes and have ordinary jobs, living in ordinary towns all across the world -- and there's nothing they despise more than children. When an eight-year-old boy and his grandmother come face-to-face with the Grand High Witch herself, they may be the only ones who can stop the witches' latest plot to stamp out every last child in the country! This full-color graphic novel edition of Roald Dahl's The Witches, adapted and illustrated by Eisner Award winner Pénélope Bagieu, is the first-ever Dahl story to appear in this format. Graphic novel readers and Roald Dahl fans alike will relish this dynamic new take on a uniquely funny tale.

30 review for The Witches: The Graphic Novel

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mehsi

    The Witches are back, this time in a gorgeous and dark Graphic Novel! I loved it! I LOVE LOVE The Witches by Roald Dahl. Not just the original novel but also the old movie. Both scared me to bits when I was little. Witches that looked like normal ladies that wanted to exterminate all the kids in the world. I was eager to get started on this one. The cover promised that it would have wonderful art. It has been many many years since I last saw the movie or read the book so I cannot say if the The Witches are back, this time in a gorgeous and dark Graphic Novel! I loved it! I LOVE LOVE The Witches by Roald Dahl. Not just the original novel but also the old movie. Both scared me to bits when I was little. Witches that looked like normal ladies… that wanted to exterminate all the kids in the world. I was eager to get started on this one. The cover promised that it would have wonderful art. It has been many many years since I last saw the movie or read the book so I cannot say if the graphic novel follows everything or if there are additions or reductions. I do remember some parts here and there, some things were definitely familiar to me. Plus, now I definitely want to try out the normal novel again. Not any time soon though as I am not visiting a library any time soon (just my hubby who is getting my reservations that suddenly went on transit/transport when I visited last week and so I couldn’t cancel them). But I hope this year at least. In this book we follow a small boy and his grandma as they mourn the loss of the parents. Grandma was just the best character, next to the boy, in the book. I instantly took a liking to her. She never forced the boy anything, just gave him his space, plenty of love and hugs, and told him stories that people probably wouldn’t tell the average 8-year olds. But it has definitely saved him, and later on is the one thing that keeps him safe. Grandma is old but kick-ass. She is not afraid to tell people her opinion (I had such a laugh at the doctor scene), and she believes her boy and helps him out later. I love it! I had a big laugh at how she scoffs at all the old people and their bingo and such. I believe I may end up like this boy’s grandma. Though I do hope that I don’t encounter witches. shivers The witches were a terrifying bunch. They seem normal (though for me a bit too normal) but wait until they remove things. Then you won’t be happy. Then you want to run. The Grand Witch is as frightening as she was in the book and the movie. She is not one you want to pass in an ally. She is even mean towards her underlings, with just a snap she will BBQ you into ashes. I loved how brave our MC was when he turned into a mouse, and the plans he made. Of course he had help from his new friend and his grandma, but a lot things he had to do require a big dose of bravery. There were lots of exciting and OMG parts. I loved it! I just love how the parents of the girl reacted. Shocked yes, but I was half expecting them to run away. Instead they loved their daughter even if she was now a mouse. They were so eager to help her out. It was perfection and it made me smile so so much. The ending? Mm, again it has been a while since I last read the novel, but the ending felt as if there could have been more. I would have loved an epilogue. I would love to know how things went on. The illustrations were perfection. Pénélope Bagieu has an amazing art style! All in all, I would highly recommend this one to everyone. Review first posted at https://twirlingbookprincess.com/

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    One of those books with a tortured origin: here's the translated edition of a French adaptation of an English novel. Maybe the French influence explains why Grandmamma's smoking was not quietly dropped out of book even as so much else was changed to make the 37-year-old story more palatable for a modern audience. The basic plot remains the same, with a young orphan boy being told about witches by his grandmother and then stumbling across a meeting of witches plotting to destroy all the children One of those books with a tortured origin: here's the translated edition of a French adaptation of an English novel. Maybe the French influence explains why Grandmamma's smoking was not quietly dropped out of book even as so much else was changed to make the 37-year-old story more palatable for a modern audience. The basic plot remains the same, with a young orphan boy being told about witches by his grandmother and then stumbling across a meeting of witches plotting to destroy all the children of England, but Bagieu fiddles with the details a lot in her adaptation. For increased diversity, the unnamed protagonist and his grandmother, who came from Norway in the novel, are depicted as brown-skinned people, and another character has been gender-swapped to provide the protagonist with a more dynamic and appealing sidekick. I read the novel just before beginning this adaptation and I much prefer Bagieu's spin on the tale. It's funnier and less cold-blooded. Now maybe I'll try the new movie.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Schizanthus Nerd

    Roald Dahl was my favourite author when I was a kid. Ive read four of his books so many times over the years Ive lost count: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Matilda, The BFG and The Witches. I could also pretty much ruin each of the movies (the originals, if theyve been remade) for you by telling you every line before they happen. I loved searching for witches when I was a kid. Sure, I knew that this story was fiction but it was fun to play what if and check to see if women walking past me Roald Dahl was my favourite author when I was a kid. I’ve read four of his books so many times over the years I’ve lost count: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Matilda, The BFG and The Witches. I could also pretty much ruin each of the movies (the originals, if they‘ve been remade) for you by telling you every line before they happen. I loved searching for witches when I was a kid. Sure, I knew that this story was fiction but it was fun to play ‘what if’ and check to see if women walking past me were wearing gloves or scratching their head, or if their teeth had a slight bluish tinge. [image error] Although I was really interested in reading this graphic novel adaptation, I was nervous about it too. I’m a bit of a purist where childhood favourites are concerned; while I’m mostly okay with minor changes, I don’t want you to mess with my cherished childhood memories. I’m happy to report that the story I know and love remains intact here. Sure, there are some changes but none that make me want to point at a specific page number in the original book and demand that it be changed back because it ruined the story. [image error] I’m sure I’ve missed some because it’s been a few years since I last read The Witches but the changes I noticed straight away were: * The story takes place in England, not Norway * Grandmamma and her grandson aren’t white (loving this!) * Bruno Jenkins is a girl, whose name I still don’t know. Her surname is Jenkins and she has much better lines than Bruno did * The Grand High Witch now says “remove” rather than “rrree-moof” and “wigs” instead of “vigs” * Formula 86 is hidden in a different location in the Grand High Witch’s room * There’s gambling at the hotel (whose name has changed) and mention of yoga and organic food * Grandmamma’s conversation with the Jenkins’ has a different outcome and happens at a different time in the story * Grandmamma ends up going into the kitchen to find her grandson rather than him meeting her back in the dining room * The Jenkins family now stays in touch with Grandmamma and her grandson. There were only a couple of things from the novel that I missed in the graphic novel. While the story of the girl in the painting is explained well in the graphic novel, the other early witch stories are only mentioned briefly. Also missing was Grandmamma telling her grandson how many beats per minute a mouse’s heart beats (500!). Neither impacts the story at all. They were simply a couple of my favourite bits as a kid. [image error] As a decades long Roald Dahl fan, I wholeheartedly approve of this adaptation. Besides the story remaining true to form, I also loved the illustrations. The Grand High Witch looked different unmasked than she does in my memory of the book and original movie but she was fantastic nonetheless. I definitely need more Roald Dahl graphic novel adaptations. Blog - https://schizanthusnerd.com

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chessa

    I love The Witches - the original book, the movie from the 90s - and now this graphic novel adaptation! The art was really fun and fresh - kind of a child-like, quirky quality that I think will appeal to kids especially (particularly love how Grandmama is drawn!). The author did a great job of incorporating minor updates that helps the material feel more contemporary. Recommended for long-time Dahl fans, but a fun way to introduce a whole new audience to his work! I love The Witches - the original book, the movie from the 90’s - and now this graphic novel adaptation! The art was really fun and fresh - kind of a child-like, quirky quality that I think will appeal to kids especially (particularly love how Grandmama is drawn!). The author did a great job of incorporating minor updates that helps the material feel more contemporary. Recommended for long-time Dahl fans, but a fun way to introduce a whole new audience to his work!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ricki

    This brings back so many memories! It's very well done.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mayar El Mahdy

    I'm lowkey in love with Penelope Bagieu. This is such an adorable story, the artwork is beautiful and enjoyed it immensely. I don't know how the actual book ends but I feel there is more to the story.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    A very entertaining, and sometimes heartwrenching, adaptation of my favorite Roald Dahl book. Absolutely love the art style and character designs!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus I am not a fan of Dahl, which is odd considering that he started writing when I was a child. His work is odd, and not in a pleasant way. He may be the reason that so many British writers portray adults as inherently evil and cruel to children. Not only that, but Dahl was, by all accounts, not very nice (https://www.bbc.com/culture/article/2...). My library has a few books that were purchased before I got here; I haven't added any others, and had never read The E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus I am not a fan of Dahl, which is odd considering that he started writing when I was a child. His work is odd, and not in a pleasant way. He may be the reason that so many British writers portray adults as inherently evil and cruel to children. Not only that, but Dahl was, by all accounts, not very nice (https://www.bbc.com/culture/article/2...). My library has a few books that were purchased before I got here; I haven't added any others, and had never read The Witches (1983). Still not a huge fan, but I might get the graphic novel for my bloodthirsty readers who all want to snuggle up with a good murder. **Spoilers** A young boy goes to live with his eccentric, chain smoking grandmother after the death of his parents. He's used to being told bedtime stories, and so grandmother tells him one about the witches of the world who all hate children. They are bald, have weird fingers and toes, and odd eyes. When the grandmother becomes ill, the doctor visits and recommends a trip to the seaside for the cool air. Once there, the boy gets a present of two mice, but the hotel wants them to be kept in a cage. Since this interferes with training them to do circus tricks, the boy hunts around the hotel for a vacant space and finds an empty conference room. Soon, however, it is filled with women.. all wearing wigs and looking suspiciously like his grandmother's tales of witches. Sure enough, the Grand High Witch herself is there, and unveils her plan to turn all of the children in the world into mice while they are at school so that the teachers kill them. She has the serum developed, and needs to witches to set up candy shops to distribute the potion. She turns a girl into a mouse before their eyes, and turns the boy as well. The two children manage to get back to the grandmother, and they plan to snatch a bottle of potion, does the witches, and avert disaster by having them turn into mice. It's a plan fraught with peril, but they are successful. Returning home, the boy decides to stay a mouse, since his grandmother is 83 to his 8, and he will live about as long as she does if he remains in mouse form. Strengths: The drawings are excellently creepy, even though they don't bear any resemblance to Quentin Blake's illustrations at all. The grandmother is very supportive of her grandson, and clearly loves him. She is quite the character. The story moves quickly, and the adaptation manages to describe things in enough detail that it's all easy to understand. Weaknesses: This has some fairly gross and disturbing moments, with the boy in mouse form getting his tail hacked off in the kitchen, the witches turning into mice, and the head witch revealing her true form. What I really think: So disturbing, and not in any sort of instructive way. There's no allegorical, moral lesson, and the fact that the boy wanted to stay a mouse so he would die when his grandmother did... just not my idea of a pleasant read. Others will enjoy this foray into Dahl's dark world, but I think I developed a new frown line or two reading this.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Krysta

    Source: ARC from Edelweiss The Witches: The Graphic Novel is a compelling adaptation of Roald Dahls classic novel. It embraces the slightly scary, but also funny, tone of the original, delivering a book that is sure to enthrall readers with its brave heroes and their quirky adventures. Readers who may not have picked up a Roald Dahl work on their own may be inspired to see what else he has written after being introduced to his imagination with this beautifully-illustrated adaptation. One of the Source: ARC from Edelweiss The Witches: The Graphic Novel is a compelling adaptation of Roald Dahl’s classic novel. It embraces the slightly scary, but also funny, tone of the original, delivering a book that is sure to enthrall readers with its brave heroes and their quirky adventures. Readers who may not have picked up a Roald Dahl work on their own may be inspired to see what else he has written after being introduced to his imagination with this beautifully-illustrated adaptation. One of the aspects of The Witches I have always loved is the relationship between the boy and his grandmother. Many children’s books, of course, simply dispose of the parents altogether, so that the kid protagonists can experience danger and excitement unimpeded. Even the stories with adult authority figures, however, may not focus on grandparents. That Dahl chooses to feature a grandmother is therefore very special–and what a grandmother she is! She clearly loves her grandson dearly, but she does not coddle him, instead warning him of the perils of witches (and thereby possibly scarring him for life), and then allowing him to fight the witches because he believes it is right. She deftly balances her desire to care for him with her knowledge that she has to allow him room to grow. The grandmother, however, is not merely wise and lovable–she is also hilarious! The Witches is actually rather a creepy book–the titular characters really will do anything to rid the world of children and Dahl does not let his characters get away easily. So it is important that the story adds a bit of levity through the grandmother. She keeps the book from becoming too overwhelming for readers, allowing them to see that, even though there are scary things out in the world, there is also love, and laughter, and fun. She really is the heart of the story. Pénélope Bagieu’s illustrations are a good fit for Dahl’s story. The color palette is eye-catching and the art style is one that will likely appeal to children, while also maintaining a bit of that quirky edge readers may associate with Dahl. The panels expertly and smoothly guide readers through the story; this is no clunky adaptation, but a work that feels like it could have been written as a graphic novel from the start. Even readers who are not usually attracted to graphic novel adaptations of classic novels may inadvertently be lured in by this one. The Witches: The Graphic Novel expertly captures the spirit of Dahl’s story and transforms it into a new medium sure to attract a new contemporary audience. Fans of Dahl’s work will want to check this one out, but it stands on its own and will likely find its own readership, as well.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Books.and.brews_

    It's been a long time since I read the original book so reading this graphic novel adaptation was a bit of a nostalgic experience.  A boy's Grandmother teaches him how to identify witches, a skill he thinks he'll never need... until he does. Overhearing the Grand High Witches plot to rid the country of children he must find a way to stop them! The artwork is fantastic and is easy to follow while maintaining the great qualities of the original book. I recommend this one for any Roald Dahl fans and It's been a long time since I read the original book so reading this graphic novel adaptation was a bit of a nostalgic experience.  A boy's Grandmother teaches him how to identify witches, a skill he thinks he'll never need... until he does. Overhearing the Grand High Witches plot to rid the country of children he must find a way to stop them! The artwork is fantastic and is easy to follow while maintaining the great qualities of the original book. I recommend this one for any Roald Dahl fans and could be a great introduction for a new generation of Dahl readers! Thank you so much Scholastic for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mrs. Mazzola

    An interesting and revamped version of the classic Dahl story. I like that the story feels updated in the details and art, but still retains the same creepy, scary, horrifyingly funny quality of the original. Graphic novel adaptations do not circulate well in my library, so I will only purchase if excess funds are available. E ARC provided by Edelweiss+ and the publisher. All opinions are my own.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ellon

    The Witches is one of the Dahl novels I actually havent read yet (but now I want to read it so I can compare). The story is a bit dark (as most Dahl books are) but it was exciting. I wasnt a huge fan of the illustration style but it fit the story well and reminded me of illustrations of other Dahl stories. I dont think I will purchase for my elementary library though. A bit too much adult things like the couple making out on the bench, the mouse in the cooks pants, and the blood. The Witches is one of the Dahl novels I actually haven’t read yet (but now I want to read it so I can compare). The story is a bit dark (as most Dahl books are) but it was exciting. I wasn’t a huge fan of the illustration style but it fit the story well and reminded me of illustrations of other Dahl stories. I don’t think I will purchase for my elementary library though. A bit too much “adult” things like the couple making out on the bench, the mouse in the cook’s pants, and the blood.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    This graphic novel is so fun & funny! A wonderful 2020 adaptation of my favorite Roald Dahl story, originally written in 1983. There are so many expressive jokes woven into the art panels! (The Witches give the Grand High Witch's theatrics a lot of side-eye.) Minus one star because the Grand High Witch has lost her memorable accent. I still wanted a "Vitches of Inkland!" moment.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sherry Guice

    The the story and it was so enhanced by the graphics!!! I hope this draws children to Roald Dahl's work! I believe it is timeless.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jazmyn Dolbin

    Super fun way to read one of my.childhood faves.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tracy

    I'll be honest, I never read the original, but I did watch the movie when I was younger and man this was pretty well done..and spooky!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Mathey

    Gorgeous!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Pam

    Graphic Novel I received an electronic ARC from Scholastic, Inc. through NetGalley. Bagieu captures the spirit, eeriness, love and humor of Dahl's novel in this retelling. Readers are drawn in by the text and the highly detailed drawings. They'll cheer for a young boy coming out of grief for his parents and still outwitting an entire country's witches. The graphics bring out the characters' emotions and move the story forward. A delight to introduce readers to Dahl's work in this style.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Larakaa

    I read the German version. Very sweet!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey Canino

    A fantastic graphic novel adaptation of Dahl's 1983 book about all of them witches and the chaos that unfolds when a boy (later, a mouse) attempts to thwart their plans for worldwide child rodent-ification. Bagieu's script makes subtle updates to the characters and dialogue of the original text in order to bring them into the 21st century, all while leaving intact Dahl's signature grim English charm. More importantly, her art fully renders the narrative her own. While Quentin Blake's original A fantastic graphic novel adaptation of Dahl's 1983 book about all of them witches and the chaos that unfolds when a boy (later, a mouse) attempts to thwart their plans for worldwide child rodent-ification. Bagieu's script makes subtle updates to the characters and dialogue of the original text in order to bring them into the 21st century, all while leaving intact Dahl's signature grim English charm. More importantly, her art fully renders the narrative her own. While Quentin Blake's original illustrations seem some distant inspiration, Bagieu's loose, clear linework makes far more frightening and, just as often, amusing visual moments out of the story. Alternately endearing and grotesque character designs (her Grandmamma is a delightful stump of a human being, and her Grand High Witch is a snarling, angular beast) leave an enduring impression through their exaggeration, one that I do not envy the 2021 film adaptation for needing to top. In all, an enchanting flight of whimsy that argues there's no grandiose, genocidal evil that can't be foiled with the love and assistance of one's family and friends. Would that it were so simple. Out now from Scholastic!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alissa

    As we approach October, I once again amp-up my Witchy Reads. Witches was the Coraline of my childhood: A totally creepy kid's book that was actually waaaaay too creepy to be a kid's book. I freaking LOVED it!! And then there was the movie adaption... which watered things down significantly, but still managed to be exceptionally creepy (I re-watched it as an adult recently and was surprised at the creep factor). So I was excited to find this graphic novel adaption. Not as good as the original print As we approach October, I once again amp-up my Witchy Reads. Witches was the Coraline of my childhood: A totally creepy kid's book that was actually waaaaay too creepy to be a kid's book. I freaking LOVED it!! And then there was the movie adaption... which watered things down significantly, but still managed to be exceptionally creepy (I re-watched it as an adult recently and was surprised at the creep factor). So I was excited to find this graphic novel adaption. Not as good as the original print book. The illustrations were too bright and colorful and cute for the dark atmosphere of the story, but then it's marketed toward 2020's kids, not 1980s kids. Not implying that 2020 kids are soft, sensitive marshmallows who lead sheltered lives. I'm just saying back in the mid-80s, my friends and I were riding bike (sans helmet) at breakneck sped up and down the road and engaging in shenanigans that would make parents of today cringe. So three stars. It was a fun read. But the actual original book was better.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jordana

    I read the original story in grade 5 and wanted to read this version because it is quick and so I could get a refresher before the movie comes out. I vividly remember this story in grade 5 giving me a phobia of mice/rats (my teacher did not help the matter when she read it to us). Reading it now, 7 years later, a lot of my opinions / views have changed. I find this story super original, Roald Dahl is not afraid to bring in weird and wacky concepts to make his books entertaining. I loved the I read the original story in grade 5 and wanted to read this version because it is quick and so I could get a refresher before the movie comes out. I vividly remember this story in grade 5 giving me a phobia of mice/rats (my teacher did not help the matter when she read it to us). Reading it now, 7 years later, a lot of my opinions / views have changed. I find this story super original, Roald Dahl is not afraid to bring in weird and wacky concepts to make his books entertaining. I loved the depth and past of the main character and even the ending (*I had completely forgot about the main characters backstory and how the book ended*). The art style in this was nice and fit the theme perfectly, however it was not my favourite. By the looks of it, the movie should be a very close representation of the source material. I highly recommend that you give this quirky middle grade a read either as the graphic novel or the novel itself.

  23. 5 out of 5

    David

    The artist Pénélope Bagieu turns out to be a great choice for this adaptation of Roald Dahls 1983 story. Some changes have been made with the addition of a new character, but it still sticks to the original structure of the story. Bagieu suits Dahls love of fantasy and the grotesque, but she also is able to translate the text into a different medium. We get glimpses of the fantasies of the lead character. Begieu uses the form to build suspense and takes advantage of the changes of perspective The artist Pénélope Bagieu turns out to be a great choice for this adaptation of Roald Dahl’s 1983 story. Some changes have been made with the addition of a new character, but it still sticks to the original structure of the story. Bagieu suits Dahl’s love of fantasy and the grotesque, but she also is able to translate the text into a different medium. We get glimpses of the fantasies of the lead character. Begieu uses the form to build suspense and takes advantage of the changes of perspective for the characters viewpoint. She also brings in the body language of the characters to comic or sinister effect. But she also is capable of handling the moments of tragedy and sadness within the story. Altogether this is an entertaining version of Dahl’s story for a whole new generation to delight in.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    I knew nothing about The Witches before reading this graphic novel. I have never read the book or seen the movie so I can't say how similar or different this version is from those. All I know is that the witches are creepy and ugly in the movie and they are also ugly and gross looking in the graphic novel. The story is really interesting and I got so hooked! I would have read it in one sitting, but I ran out of time and had to continue another day. The ending left me wanting more, but it was a I knew nothing about The Witches before reading this graphic novel. I have never read the book or seen the movie so I can't say how similar or different this version is from those. All I know is that the witches are creepy and ugly in the movie and they are also ugly and gross looking in the graphic novel. The story is really interesting and I got so hooked! I would have read it in one sitting, but I ran out of time and had to continue another day. The ending left me wanting more, but it was a good ending. SPOILERS AHEAD: I'm so glad their soup plan worked and then I was so happy when the two mice friends reunited in the end! That was so sweet and I love their new mission. I also really liked the detail of the female mouse's mom hugging the grandma when they came to visit the grandson mouse. That was really sweet and heartwarming.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kim Tyo-Dickerson

    Loved reading this new Scholastic Graphix title via Edelweiss+ digital reading copy, pages flying, on Roald Dahl Day, 13 September 2020 no less! My son raced through it this morning and we can't wait to get our hands on a hard copy! Utterly delightful interpretation of the Roald Dahl classic with vibrant, hilarious characterization in line, form, color - Bagieu has a marvelous comics style that is unique yet has echoes of Seuss and the original Quentin Blake drawings - and some new twists on the Loved reading this new Scholastic Graphix title via Edelweiss+ digital reading copy, pages flying, on Roald Dahl Day, 13 September 2020 no less! My son raced through it this morning and we can't wait to get our hands on a hard copy! Utterly delightful interpretation of the Roald Dahl classic with vibrant, hilarious characterization in line, form, color - Bagieu has a marvelous comics style that is unique yet has echoes of Seuss and the original Quentin Blake drawings - and some new twists on the beloved story that has enthralled and horrified children for so many years. Every school librarian should order multiple copies, G3 and up. My teens are going to love it as well.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Misa

    I love Roald Dahl's books and to find a graphic novel based on his book "The Witches", which is my favorite after "Matilda", I was super excited to read it in this spooky season. I really loved this book and as usual it freaked me out. The effect was the same as when I've seen the movie for the first time and when I've read the book also for the fist time. The artist made it so much fun to read. I loved the granmother in this book better than any version. She is crazy funny and amazing with her I love Roald Dahl's books and to find a graphic novel based on his book "The Witches", which is my favorite after "Matilda", I was super excited to read it in this spooky season. I really loved this book and as usual it freaked me out. The effect was the same as when I've seen the movie for the first time and when I've read the book also for the fist time. The artist made it so much fun to read. I loved the granmother in this book better than any version. She is crazy funny and amazing with her grandson. The ending was better.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Disclaimer - I never read the original book. But this adaptation is funny and the artwork is so on point! You'll fall in love with the grandmother immediately. Any deficiencies that come into this work (background information, feelings, things of the like) come from the challenges of a graphic novel format. But this is clear to understand and leaves the reader the ability to fill in gaps. It makes me want a second one! And also, I love how this one goes back to the old notion that witches are Disclaimer - I never read the original book. But this adaptation is funny and the artwork is so on point! You'll fall in love with the grandmother immediately. Any deficiencies that come into this work (background information, feelings, things of the like) come from the challenges of a graphic novel format. But this is clear to understand and leaves the reader the ability to fill in gaps. It makes me want a second one! And also, I love how this one goes back to the old notion that witches are ugly, mean people out to get you. Such a fun read for the month of Halloween.

  28. 5 out of 5

    M (aka DarkBeauty73)

    I have wanted to read the book for awhile. So when I found it was being turned into a graphic novel I jumped at the chance and bought it. Honestly I was a bit disappointed. Not sure if it is because I am not the intended audience. Or that it lost something in turning it into a graphic novel. It was a cute story. That no matter your size you can do anything you put your mind to and unconditional love and exceptience.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alana

    This is a fun update on Dahl's novel, with some significant changes that make it more of a harmony to the original melody than a direct adaptation, but these changes are well-suited to keeping the story relevant to young people right now. The original book, while still entertaining, DOES read as dated in 2020 (although my 12yo still loved it when we read it together this summer). Penelope Bagieu's art continues to be absolutely delightful.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Emily Dietz

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I do not remember all the focus on grandma smoking cigars lol. And for a young adult graphic novel, I feel like the gore (moyse tail, killing of mice witches at end) in the story was very heavily depicted. Beside those couple things, very entertaining and much as I remember the actual story. Would love to see other Roald Dahl as this type of graphic novel, such as Matilda or Charlie and the chocolate factory.

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