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Black Panther, Vol. 9: The Intergalactic Empire of Wakanda, Part Four

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The dramatic conclusion of the spacefaring saga, "The Intergalactic Empire of Wakanda," is here at last! It's the groundbreaking story of a king who became a slave - and a slave who became a legend! But how did T'Challa go from Wakandan monarch to the unwilling servant of an alien empire? Finally, witness the Black Panther's fall from grace - and the rise of an enemy now p The dramatic conclusion of the spacefaring saga, "The Intergalactic Empire of Wakanda," is here at last! It's the groundbreaking story of a king who became a slave - and a slave who became a legend! But how did T'Challa go from Wakandan monarch to the unwilling servant of an alien empire? Finally, witness the Black Panther's fall from grace - and the rise of an enemy now poised to exert his ruthless grip on Earth! To protect our planet from N'Jadaka's violent invasion, the nation of Wakanda must go to war against its own future...and its fi rst, best and only hope lies in its mighty king, the Black Panther! COLLECTING: BLACK PANTHER (2018) 19-25


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The dramatic conclusion of the spacefaring saga, "The Intergalactic Empire of Wakanda," is here at last! It's the groundbreaking story of a king who became a slave - and a slave who became a legend! But how did T'Challa go from Wakandan monarch to the unwilling servant of an alien empire? Finally, witness the Black Panther's fall from grace - and the rise of an enemy now p The dramatic conclusion of the spacefaring saga, "The Intergalactic Empire of Wakanda," is here at last! It's the groundbreaking story of a king who became a slave - and a slave who became a legend! But how did T'Challa go from Wakandan monarch to the unwilling servant of an alien empire? Finally, witness the Black Panther's fall from grace - and the rise of an enemy now poised to exert his ruthless grip on Earth! To protect our planet from N'Jadaka's violent invasion, the nation of Wakanda must go to war against its own future...and its fi rst, best and only hope lies in its mighty king, the Black Panther! COLLECTING: BLACK PANTHER (2018) 19-25

30 review for Black Panther, Vol. 9: The Intergalactic Empire of Wakanda, Part Four

  1. 4 out of 5

    Paul E. Morph

    Ta-Nehisi Coates’ epic, five year run on Black Panther comes to an end with this volume. Coates has improved as a comicbook writer a great deal over that time, although it’s his stint on Captain America that’s benefitted the most from that. This book remained a bit of a mess plot wise right up to the end, unfortunately. Don’t get me wrong (cue Pretenders song) there are some really nice moments in here, amidst the muddle. I found T’Challa’s final communion with the spirits of his ancestors partic Ta-Nehisi Coates’ epic, five year run on Black Panther comes to an end with this volume. Coates has improved as a comicbook writer a great deal over that time, although it’s his stint on Captain America that’s benefitted the most from that. This book remained a bit of a mess plot wise right up to the end, unfortunately. Don’t get me wrong (cue Pretenders song) there are some really nice moments in here, amidst the muddle. I found T’Challa’s final communion with the spirits of his ancestors particularly moving. The artwork was generally of a high standard, particularly Daniel Acuña’s work. Unfortunately, the constant switching back and forth between different artists made the overall visual experience jarring. Marvel doesn’t seem to be able to get one artist to complete even a single issue these days. The thing that I find most upsetting, though, is Marvel’s message of isolationism being a good thing. What with Krakoa and Wakanda both embracing self-segregation it feels like the old Marvel message that we all need to work together and embrace one another’s differences seems to have died a death. From other readers’ positive reactions to these story elements, it is clear to me I’m behind the times but it upsets me. Not to mention that it makes absolutely no sense for T’Challa not to call in his Avengers team to help when Wakanda is facing its greatest threat ever. He called in virtually every black superhero in the world to help, even some he’s never had any contact with prior to this story and who have no connection to Wakanda whatsoever, but not the team of Avengers he is currently the leader of. Tactically it makes no sense. Character relationships-wise it makes no sense. The only way it makes any kind of sense is to stick two fingers up in a ‘we don’t need whitey’s help’ message… which makes me sad. Sorry if my sadness isn’t currently very on trend. Don’t misunderstand me; I’d be as horrified as anyone else if the Avengers came swooping in and ‘white saviour-ed’ the day, but for them not even to be allowed a relatively minor supporting role, just fighting in the background like a lot of the other characters did to show their long-established relationship with T’Challa, seems wrong-headed to me. Sorry. Anyway, I’m looking forward to seeing what the next creative team do with the book off the back of Coates’ status quo changes. My next book: Mr. Quiet

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bogi Takács

    I didn't realize before picking up the book that this was the end of Coates' run, I only thought it was the end of this particular story arc :((( It goes out with big space opera battles and as usual, interesting takes on in-universe politics (a bit more of the former, but the latter is definitely still present). I am sad that this series is over for now. Not sure who will be writing Black Panther next? I really really hope Marvel isn't going to just cancel it for now. I thought the finale was co I didn't realize before picking up the book that this was the end of Coates' run, I only thought it was the end of this particular story arc :((( It goes out with big space opera battles and as usual, interesting takes on in-universe politics (a bit more of the former, but the latter is definitely still present). I am sad that this series is over for now. Not sure who will be writing Black Panther next? I really really hope Marvel isn't going to just cancel it for now. I thought the finale was cool and cinematic. It also left some fault lines open wrt Wakanda and imperialism that I can already see becoming further plotlines, while at the same time also giving resolution to individual characters - I thought that was great. But I also had some frustrations. (I feel my writeup of my frustrations is relatively long, but there aren't that many of them, so please weight them accordingly.) * I really appreciated that the comic discussed and engaged with how the original inhabitants of the land weren't just bloodthirsty monsters, and relating this to concepts of Indigeneity. But I thought that the resolution of this plotline in this volume undercut the attempt somewhat. (view spoiler)[I felt it was instrumentalizing that they were let out of their prison only because the good-guys needed some additional help, and the mentions of honor etc. didn't do much to mitigate that. I also wasn't clear on what happened with them at the end, one panel showed them settling on a different planet, but in another panel they seemed to live in Wakanda on Earth? (hide spoiler)] I feel like I missed something?? * Plurality/multiplicity presented as a weakness and something bad will never not aggravate me. It wasn't a big part of the storyline, at least, but sigh. (If Marvel is going to go with a high-profile writer from outside comics next time around as well, could I recommend Akwaeke Emezi?) ____ Source of the book: Lawrence Public Library

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    The rating might be a little high for this volume alone, but I do believe that for his overall work on the character through this and the preceding series that Coates evolved as a writer. And, in reality I never thought he would be able to sell me on doing a Wakanda/Black Panther space opera story. I just didn't think it was in his range. I'm wrong. Look, Coates comes from a different style of writing, and different subject matter. Transitioning from one medium to another (books, essays to comics The rating might be a little high for this volume alone, but I do believe that for his overall work on the character through this and the preceding series that Coates evolved as a writer. And, in reality I never thought he would be able to sell me on doing a Wakanda/Black Panther space opera story. I just didn't think it was in his range. I'm wrong. Look, Coates comes from a different style of writing, and different subject matter. Transitioning from one medium to another (books, essays to comics) is not easy and not everyone can do it. The same would apply to a novelist transitioning to movies-the mediums each have different requirements. Coates, learned and improved in both this and his Captain America series (which in some ways plays more to his writer strengths). He also avoids getting too bogged down in the company mandated event crossover. This volume is The Panther's concluding fight against the tyrannical Wakanda Empire (not something I can explain in few sentences-best short version I can manage is an interstellar exploration experiment by T'Challa goes awry and over the course of time Wakanda grew an empire that was more feared than Marvel's Shi'ar empire in a distant galaxy). Part of the story, over the 25 singles issues is a hero's journey as T'Challa has to re-discover himself (part of the experiment's back firing was his amnesia). Coates ties in some plot lines from the previous series as characters and being from the revolution against T'Challa's rule re-appear (as does Bast and the Orisha). there are nice character moments to go with big action scenes. (Full disclosure read as digital floppies).

  4. 4 out of 5

    Armando Wyoming

    Black Panther, the royal screwup of Wakanda finally has to come to terms with his ancestors in a particularly shameful series of flashbacks. What a family reunion! Meanwhile, his living relatives must prepare for N’djaka’s (Apologies if that’s misspelled.) invasion on Earth. A pretty good end to Coates’ run. This also had great art!

  5. 5 out of 5

    John Ward

    Quality last trade edition for Coates. I also enjoy the captain America series.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    Ta-Nehisi Coates' Black Panther run wraps up, and he's certainly come on in leaps and bounds as a comics writer over the duration. The early issues had that slightly stilted quality which often attends a prose writer's first comics forays, but where some of them never lose that, here Coates keeps all his plates spinning with the aplomb of a veteran, Wakanda fighting an invasion born of its own corrupted scions on three fronts: on the ground, in space, and in the mystic realm where the ancestral Ta-Nehisi Coates' Black Panther run wraps up, and he's certainly come on in leaps and bounds as a comics writer over the duration. The early issues had that slightly stilted quality which often attends a prose writer's first comics forays, but where some of them never lose that, here Coates keeps all his plates spinning with the aplomb of a veteran, Wakanda fighting an invasion born of its own corrupted scions on three fronts: on the ground, in space, and in the mystic realm where the ancestral Panthers reside. Sure, there were moments where one could think, hang on, why is Monica Rambeau looking moody in that cool line-up panel when surely she has the power to take down the armada pretty much single-handed...but these are the built-in flaws of the superteam idea, rather than something anyone's first comic can be expected to solve. I do still wonder whether the Intergalactic Empire storyline needed to run quite as long as it did – as when the X-Men head off into space, it didn't feel like it was altogether playing to the strengths of the character/s. But it certainly fed into one of the book's bolder themes where, contrary to some of the more dippily partisan readings of the Black Panther film, Coates was determined to show that like any powerful nation, Wakanda too had its flaws in the present, atrocities in its past, and the potential for worse to come if it didn't keep a constant eye on itself. One area where the run has aligned more closely with the film, and left me at a slight distance from both, was in showing a more reactive T'challa than we saw in the Priest run, still and always my favourite take on the character. But that preparedness has gradually crept back in (as, who knows, it might have done in the films too, had the general shittiness of our own world not intervened). Leading here to a wonderful scene with his father's spirit, against a wonderful Daniel Acuña backdrop of the realm and the lineage, at once numinous and welcoming: "T'challa is never surprised. T'challa always has a plan. T'challa is always in control." "Is that not what I was taught?" "Yes. But if there had been time... I would have taught you so much more." Obviously that's given more impact by what happened to Chadwick Boseman. But then that the first issue which came out after the terrible news, the one with a memorial border, should see T'challa inciting his forces with talk of grieving fallen fighters and using that as fuel... Oof. A late adjustment, or synchronicity at work? I'd almost rather not know.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Westen

    I think it's cool how in this volume, T'challa has to reckon with his duties as king and his responsibilities as an Avenger, and how he needs to decide to put one or the other first. And I totally agree with Ororo on this, yes T'challa didn't want to be an emperor, which is why he'd make a good one. Always suspect someone who wants or welcomes becoming an authority figure, at least in fiction anyway. I think it's cool how in this volume, T'challa has to reckon with his duties as king and his responsibilities as an Avenger, and how he needs to decide to put one or the other first. And I totally agree with Ororo on this, yes T'challa didn't want to be an emperor, which is why he'd make a good one. Always suspect someone who wants or welcomes becoming an authority figure, at least in fiction anyway.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Adrienna

    I am reading #4. issue #176 single issue not the entire book 9.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Juan Pina

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mack

  11. 4 out of 5

    TheMightyBlerd

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jay Hancock

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tjavierb

  14. 5 out of 5

    Neil Golemo

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lee

  16. 4 out of 5

    Micah

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Chase

  18. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Milligan

  19. 5 out of 5

    Craig

  20. 4 out of 5

    Richard Harrison

  21. 4 out of 5

    Edward

  22. 4 out of 5

    Anthony Small

  23. 5 out of 5

    Cookie

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bruce

  25. 5 out of 5

    Brian

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ian Hague

  27. 5 out of 5

    Angela

  28. 5 out of 5

    Osisubis

  29. 4 out of 5

    Chris Craven

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sam

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