Hot Best Seller

Futureproof: 9 Rules for Humans in the Age of Automation

Availability: Ready to download

"While we need to rewrite the rules of the twenty-first-century economy, Kevin's book is a great look at how people can do this on a personal level to always put humanity first."--Andrew Yang "A clear, compelling strategy for surviving the next wave of technology with our jobs--and souls--intact."--Charles Duhigg, author of The Power of Habit The machines are here. After de "While we need to rewrite the rules of the twenty-first-century economy, Kevin's book is a great look at how people can do this on a personal level to always put humanity first."--Andrew Yang "A clear, compelling strategy for surviving the next wave of technology with our jobs--and souls--intact."--Charles Duhigg, author of The Power of Habit The machines are here. After decades of sci-fi fantasies and hype, artificial intelligence has leapt out of research labs and Silicon Valley engineering departments and into the center of our lives. Algorithms shape everything around us, from the news we see to the products we buy and the relationships we form. And while the debate over whether or not automation will destroy jobs rages on, a much more important question is being ignored: What does it mean to be a human in a world that is increasingly built by and for machines? In Futureproof: 9 Rules for Humans in the Age of Automation, New York Times technology columnist Kevin Roose lays out a hopeful, pragmatic vision of how people can succeed in the machine age by making themselves irreplaceably human. He shares the secrets of people and organizations that have survived technological change, and explains how we can protect our own futures, with lessons like - Do work that is surprising, social, and scarce (the types of work machines can't do). - Demote your phone. - Work near other people. - Treat A.I. like an army of chimpanzees. - Add more friction to your life. Roose rejects the conventional wisdom that in order to compete with machines, we have to become more like them--hyper-efficient, data-driven, code-writing workhorses. Instead, he says, we should let machines be machines, and focus on doing the kinds of creative, inspiring, and meaningful things only humans can do.


Compare

"While we need to rewrite the rules of the twenty-first-century economy, Kevin's book is a great look at how people can do this on a personal level to always put humanity first."--Andrew Yang "A clear, compelling strategy for surviving the next wave of technology with our jobs--and souls--intact."--Charles Duhigg, author of The Power of Habit The machines are here. After de "While we need to rewrite the rules of the twenty-first-century economy, Kevin's book is a great look at how people can do this on a personal level to always put humanity first."--Andrew Yang "A clear, compelling strategy for surviving the next wave of technology with our jobs--and souls--intact."--Charles Duhigg, author of The Power of Habit The machines are here. After decades of sci-fi fantasies and hype, artificial intelligence has leapt out of research labs and Silicon Valley engineering departments and into the center of our lives. Algorithms shape everything around us, from the news we see to the products we buy and the relationships we form. And while the debate over whether or not automation will destroy jobs rages on, a much more important question is being ignored: What does it mean to be a human in a world that is increasingly built by and for machines? In Futureproof: 9 Rules for Humans in the Age of Automation, New York Times technology columnist Kevin Roose lays out a hopeful, pragmatic vision of how people can succeed in the machine age by making themselves irreplaceably human. He shares the secrets of people and organizations that have survived technological change, and explains how we can protect our own futures, with lessons like - Do work that is surprising, social, and scarce (the types of work machines can't do). - Demote your phone. - Work near other people. - Treat A.I. like an army of chimpanzees. - Add more friction to your life. Roose rejects the conventional wisdom that in order to compete with machines, we have to become more like them--hyper-efficient, data-driven, code-writing workhorses. Instead, he says, we should let machines be machines, and focus on doing the kinds of creative, inspiring, and meaningful things only humans can do.

45 review for Futureproof: 9 Rules for Humans in the Age of Automation

  1. 4 out of 5

    TEELOCK Mithilesh

    A.I. and automation have certainly garnered a lot of attention and headlines in the tech press over the past decade, especially as the technology has improved exponentially in recent years. But with the current economic crisis unfolding, business leaders across all industries are going to be rethinking which jobs can be automated. In Futureproof (Random House)—originally scheduled to be released in 2020 but one of the many books pushed to 2021—New York Times technology columnist Kevin Roose sugg A.I. and automation have certainly garnered a lot of attention and headlines in the tech press over the past decade, especially as the technology has improved exponentially in recent years. But with the current economic crisis unfolding, business leaders across all industries are going to be rethinking which jobs can be automated. In Futureproof (Random House)—originally scheduled to be released in 2020 but one of the many books pushed to 2021—New York Times technology columnist Kevin Roose suggests these machines aren’t actually threatening jobs, and with the right planning and organization, “futureproofing” your company for technological change could set up better protections for jobs down the road.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Toby LeBlanc

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A book about how to maintain humanity amidst algorithms speaks to one of the many anxieties we have to consider in this globalizing, climate changing, pandemicking world. Thankfully, it was not all doom and gloom. Similar to the The Uninhabitable Earth by David Wallace-Wells, Roose lays out what's at stake with a sense of hope. He is quick to point out how we can avoid Skynet with interesting exceptions in form of people who dodge the automation bullet. And, of course, his nine rules are highly A book about how to maintain humanity amidst algorithms speaks to one of the many anxieties we have to consider in this globalizing, climate changing, pandemicking world. Thankfully, it was not all doom and gloom. Similar to the The Uninhabitable Earth by David Wallace-Wells, Roose lays out what's at stake with a sense of hope. He is quick to point out how we can avoid Skynet with interesting exceptions in form of people who dodge the automation bullet. And, of course, his nine rules are highly digestible and easy to understand, making staving off the Terminators seem easy. Roose successfully argues that human's uniqueness (some would say messiness) is what is most valuable in the age of automation. The more we hand over the process of creativity and insight to the machines, the more they control us. The most enlightening concept Roose gave me was the machines will not take our humanity, we will just outsource our humanity to the machines. They, in turn, will just replicate themselves in us, making us as predictable and number driven as they are. The linchpin in our automation is the current societal problems we already experience: sexism, racism... all the isms. Someone is creating the technology, programming the algorithms, and are subject to the same biases we all experience. Roose did a good job of naming his privilege. He gave examples of how automation has hurt oppressed communities (i.e. benefit applications denied on the basis of race by AI), but spent just a few paragraphs here and there exploring how unchecked AI and automation marginalize communities further, widening the ism gaps. He left his observations on this topic broad, encouraging other authors and innovators to continue the work (people who explore "consequences," as he calls them) instead of using his research to pinpoint specific places where our humanity is already at risk. I would have enjoyed an entire chapter devoted to how we currently automate our ability to oppress. Roose missed a chance to give us enough information to start the revolution to take our humanity back, helping us to be proactive instead of cleaning up the consequences. Where Roose leaves us is to let us stew on the way we think about ourselves. The more we deliberate on how to include (or exclude) machines from our lives, the more they remain the helpers they are supposed to be. Roose includes an appendix of shortcuts to accomplish this. One place he makes sure to highlight is increasing our Media Literacy. This could be a whole other book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alexander

    Futureproof packs in a ton of insight into a small package. I often complain that nonfiction (especially of a political nature) books should have been magazine articles instead, but this tightly constructed book is one of my rare-ish exceptions. It's a brief tour through trends in AI and automation, their social implications, and opportunities for us to thrive in a changing world. In the first half, Roose quickly lays out characteristics of automation and broader trends, making a case for and aga Futureproof packs in a ton of insight into a small package. I often complain that nonfiction (especially of a political nature) books should have been magazine articles instead, but this tightly constructed book is one of my rare-ish exceptions. It's a brief tour through trends in AI and automation, their social implications, and opportunities for us to thrive in a changing world. In the first half, Roose quickly lays out characteristics of automation and broader trends, making a case for and against being concerned. The threat these days, he argues, is more from simple process automation and inept bureaucratic algorithms than it is from giant industrial robots. The second half lays out a series of ideas for thriving in a more automation-heavy future. They're all focused on places and skills in which humans had advantages, which he cleverly terms as "surprising, social, and scarce." No one insight or recommendation is too earth-shattering on its own; instead, what Roose has done here is built a simple, but useful framework for thinking about these issues and where they're headed. I also appreciated that this book is personal and conversational, relentlessly focused on people rather than just the technology. As Roose said, what so much of this comes down to is: "It's just people, deciding how to treat other people." It's a story of technology, but one of how it affects our lives and what we should do about it. Look, as some of my praise above might indicate, this is neither the definitive nor final word on these topics. It doesn't pretend to be, and it's wise not to have tried. I have my complaints, including a tendency to resort to proof by assertion in some spaces, especially on how concerned should we be about the disruptive power of automation. It's also a little unsure how much it wants to be about automation in specific (vs. technological change more broadly), not to mention some of the tendencies common to pop politics, psychology, and sociology (like naming toplines from a bunch of fairly narrow studies). But Futureproof engages with complexity, admits uncertainties, and ties together many disparate issues brilliantly and with clear focus. What more can you ask for? Thanks to NetGalley for an ARC!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    Thanks to Random House and NetGalley for an ARC of this title. I really enjoy Kevin Roose's writing on technology for the New York Times, and his podcast for them last year, Rabbit Hole. This book is a little more business-y than I expected, but I thought its points for the risks automation brings to our lives were well-defined, and the advice for using humanity to our advantage to be well thought out. Roose does a good job of taking some ideas from the last few years (digital "detoxing", adding Thanks to Random House and NetGalley for an ARC of this title. I really enjoy Kevin Roose's writing on technology for the New York Times, and his podcast for them last year, Rabbit Hole. This book is a little more business-y than I expected, but I thought its points for the risks automation brings to our lives were well-defined, and the advice for using humanity to our advantage to be well thought out. Roose does a good job of taking some ideas from the last few years (digital "detoxing", adding "friction" to one's life) and synthesizes them together in a way that's easy to bring them into your own life. Some of the solutions are very broadly defined, but Roose calls this out in the book's Appendix, with further thoughts on how to make them more personal. The book is clearly trying to appeal to a broad audience (everything about the title and design of the cover screams HELLO BUSINESSPERSON PICK ME UP IN THE AIRPORT TO READ ON YOUR NEXT FLIGHT), but that little touch at the end kept me from thinking this was a little too glib.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Pilz

    I just reviewed Futureproof by @KevinRoose. #Futureproof #NetGalley I rarely enjoy books about the consequences of AI and automation of humanity, which stay so clearly on the surface of the topic. Kevin Roose though runs through the challenge of employability of us humans in a Malcom Gladwell style. Kevin starts his book with some observations, learnings that he encountered while researching the topic, which appear to be the things that hurt our society. From there, he distills 9 different medicin I just reviewed Futureproof by @KevinRoose. #Futureproof #NetGalley I rarely enjoy books about the consequences of AI and automation of humanity, which stay so clearly on the surface of the topic. Kevin Roose though runs through the challenge of employability of us humans in a Malcom Gladwell style. Kevin starts his book with some observations, learnings that he encountered while researching the topic, which appear to be the things that hurt our society. From there, he distills 9 different medicines, he calls Rules, which are habits we all may want to employ to become and stay more employable. Some of his prescriptions seem to be a little nostalgic, forgiveness granted, he has studied humanities. Still, even someone working in the filed of AI, Machine Learning, Automation and Computer Science may want to swallow one or the other Kevin Roose pill.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Steven Ridgely

    Good information.

  7. 4 out of 5

    jennet wheatstonelllsl

  8. 4 out of 5

    Alex Hunt

  9. 5 out of 5

    Shay

  10. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Cheresnick

  11. 4 out of 5

    Amber

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

  13. 5 out of 5

    Gary Windlass

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lynette Murphy

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dave

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jedediah Baker

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lily

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lara

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ian

  20. 5 out of 5

    Paul Vittay

  21. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  22. 4 out of 5

    Random House Book Club

  23. 4 out of 5

    Zac Cohen

  24. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  25. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sam

  27. 5 out of 5

    Albert Gubler

  28. 4 out of 5

    Elaina Richards

  29. 4 out of 5

    Levi Fowler

  30. 4 out of 5

    Dav

  31. 4 out of 5

    Maximilian

  32. 5 out of 5

    Gaurav Kumar

  33. 4 out of 5

    Drew

  34. 4 out of 5

    Mitch

  35. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  36. 5 out of 5

    Thijs Niks

  37. 4 out of 5

    Nahom Workie

  38. 5 out of 5

    Renzze

  39. 4 out of 5

    Christian Buckler

  40. 4 out of 5

    Myles

  41. 4 out of 5

    Saam Aghevli

  42. 4 out of 5

    Chris Stanford

  43. 5 out of 5

    Nikki Putnam

  44. 5 out of 5

    Tito

  45. 4 out of 5

    Chris

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.