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Radiant Lyre: Essays on Lyric Poetry

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An essential collection of essays by important contemporary poets about the forms and rhetorical strategies of lyric poetry We are delighted when we recognize patterns and continuities, as we are delighted by a new poem's radical adjustment of, critique of, rejection of, or simple application of those patterns and modes. A poem means something because of previous poems. —f An essential collection of essays by important contemporary poets about the forms and rhetorical strategies of lyric poetry We are delighted when we recognize patterns and continuities, as we are delighted by a new poem's radical adjustment of, critique of, rejection of, or simple application of those patterns and modes. A poem means something because of previous poems. —from the Introduction Radiant Lyre: Essays on Lyric Poetry is a significant new book on poetry from its earliest, traditional roots to its most recent and fractured forms. The essays gathered here, by an array of brilliant contemporary poets, explore the history of the lyric poem, its rhetorical modes and strategies. How does the lyric operate in an elegy, a love poem, or an ode? How is meaning conveyed by a pastoral poem, the sublime, the narrative? How does the lyric investigate nature, beauty, and time? How are these lyric forms and strategies received? Radiant Lyre gives the contemporary reader a sense of the origin, evolution, and present status of the modes and means of lyric poetry. David Baker and Ann Townsend have assembled an important anthology, vital to any serious reader of poetry. Contributors include Linda Gregerson, Richard Jackson, Eric Pankey, Carl Phillips, and Stanley Plumly.


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An essential collection of essays by important contemporary poets about the forms and rhetorical strategies of lyric poetry We are delighted when we recognize patterns and continuities, as we are delighted by a new poem's radical adjustment of, critique of, rejection of, or simple application of those patterns and modes. A poem means something because of previous poems. —f An essential collection of essays by important contemporary poets about the forms and rhetorical strategies of lyric poetry We are delighted when we recognize patterns and continuities, as we are delighted by a new poem's radical adjustment of, critique of, rejection of, or simple application of those patterns and modes. A poem means something because of previous poems. —from the Introduction Radiant Lyre: Essays on Lyric Poetry is a significant new book on poetry from its earliest, traditional roots to its most recent and fractured forms. The essays gathered here, by an array of brilliant contemporary poets, explore the history of the lyric poem, its rhetorical modes and strategies. How does the lyric operate in an elegy, a love poem, or an ode? How is meaning conveyed by a pastoral poem, the sublime, the narrative? How does the lyric investigate nature, beauty, and time? How are these lyric forms and strategies received? Radiant Lyre gives the contemporary reader a sense of the origin, evolution, and present status of the modes and means of lyric poetry. David Baker and Ann Townsend have assembled an important anthology, vital to any serious reader of poetry. Contributors include Linda Gregerson, Richard Jackson, Eric Pankey, Carl Phillips, and Stanley Plumly.

30 review for Radiant Lyre: Essays on Lyric Poetry

  1. 4 out of 5

    Keith Taylor

    In addition to Baker and Townsend, there are essays by Linda Gregerson, Stanley Plumly, Eric Pankey, Carl Phillips, Richard JAckson, all poets who are now either in late middle age, old, or even dead. The book was published in 2007, and is often a brilliant summary about what the lyric poem was for a couple of generations of academic poets. In that case it is very useful. The method of each essay is recognizable. These very smart, very well educated writers establish a base line for understandin In addition to Baker and Townsend, there are essays by Linda Gregerson, Stanley Plumly, Eric Pankey, Carl Phillips, Richard JAckson, all poets who are now either in late middle age, old, or even dead. The book was published in 2007, and is often a brilliant summary about what the lyric poem was for a couple of generations of academic poets. In that case it is very useful. The method of each essay is recognizable. These very smart, very well educated writers establish a base line for understanding (eg: elegy, love poem, ode) in the classical tradition, in the renaissance, or in the 19th century, talk a lot about that and then find correlations in the modern, even, very occasionally, the contemporary. It certainly works as a good refresher or even as an introductory text with nuance and complications. it is a summary of what we (or some of us, anyway) understood to be poetry (and the criticism of poetry) for a few decades. But what struck me as odd is how dated this book felt. It was published in 2007, yet if feels very old. There is nothing of the questions of identity, engagement, vulnerability or urgency that seem to be motivating the conversation now. There is nothing about learning from the rhythms of popular music, the patterns that have become forms for a new generation of poets. Now, I am one of the old ones, and I am not at all sure that the ways we're talking about poetry now are not simply superficial fashions that might disappear in a couple of years. But I've got to think there will be lingering forms and attitudes that will enrich the discussion of poetry, more so than continued discussion of received forms and enriched syntax.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Connor

    Good but inconsistent.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

    This would be a great book to teach from / with or read for a class, if you don't know much about lyric poetry. Unfortunately, I was more disappointed than not. I came to this book looking for new readings/interpretations/"definitions" of lyric poetry, but this recycled a lot of common knowledge about lyric poetry in general, including the "typical" lyric poets (Keats, Sappho, Whitman, Dickinson). I was looking for a bit more contemporary attention, or at least new ideas about the "old" poets, eve This would be a great book to teach from / with or read for a class, if you don't know much about lyric poetry. Unfortunately, I was more disappointed than not. I came to this book looking for new readings/interpretations/"definitions" of lyric poetry, but this recycled a lot of common knowledge about lyric poetry in general, including the "typical" lyric poets (Keats, Sappho, Whitman, Dickinson). I was looking for a bit more contemporary attention, or at least new ideas about the "old" poets, even if they are "crazy" ideas that I disagree with. What I got was a book of essays separated into what could have been interesting sections: "erotics," "pastorals," "people," and "time" in lyric poetry, to name a few; all contained close readings of the aforementioned poets, with a few interesting "new" ideas sprinkled in (those sprinkles were the high points for me). And in each section the same people wrote an essay: David Baker, Ann Townsend, Linda Gregerson, Stanly Plumly, etc. These essays seem to have been engineered to overlap in order for the book to become a complete whole, but that was annoying for me: different people often spent a good page or two in different essays repeating the same histories or ideas, as opposed to using the other essays as springboards or reference points.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alessandra Simmons

    Fabulous collection of essays on lyric. If you've been wondering the history, the modes, or means, or just what lyric poetry is, this book is a must read. David Baker and Ann Townsend as well as the other poet-essayists in this collection do a great job to show varying perspectives on ode, elegy, the erotic, pastoral as well as discuss lyric time, sublime, and other lyric modes. Wonderful informative essays! Fabulous collection of essays on lyric. If you've been wondering the history, the modes, or means, or just what lyric poetry is, this book is a must read. David Baker and Ann Townsend as well as the other poet-essayists in this collection do a great job to show varying perspectives on ode, elegy, the erotic, pastoral as well as discuss lyric time, sublime, and other lyric modes. Wonderful informative essays!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  6. 4 out of 5

    Abby

  7. 4 out of 5

    Brian Williams

  8. 4 out of 5

    Robert

  9. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Cleary

  10. 5 out of 5

    Micah

  11. 5 out of 5

    Clint

  12. 5 out of 5

    Maggie Glover

  13. 4 out of 5

    Cassie

  14. 4 out of 5

    Noel Mariano

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Streeby

  16. 5 out of 5

    Zach Linge

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Altice

  18. 4 out of 5

    Karissa Morton

  19. 4 out of 5

    Gregory

  20. 5 out of 5

    Claudia

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dona Omaits

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rosalynde

  23. 4 out of 5

    Thom

  24. 5 out of 5

    Susan Wood

  25. 4 out of 5

    X.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ariel

  29. 4 out of 5

    L. A.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Shanley Jacobs

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