Hot Best Seller

Carioca Fletch

Availability: Ready to download

Carioca Fletch Fletch’s trip to Brazil wasn’t exactly planned. But it’s Carnival time in Rio and he has plenty of money, thanks to a little arrangement made stateside. And it took him no time to hook up with the luscious Laura Soares. Fletch is beginning to relax, just a little. Carioca Fletch But between the American widow who seems to be following Fletch and the Brazilian w Carioca Fletch Fletch’s trip to Brazil wasn’t exactly planned. But it’s Carnival time in Rio and he has plenty of money, thanks to a little arrangement made stateside. And it took him no time to hook up with the luscious Laura Soares. Fletch is beginning to relax, just a little. Carioca Fletch But between the American widow who seems to be following Fletch and the Brazilian widow who’s fingered Fletch as her long-dead husband, he suddenly doesn’t have much time to enjoy the present or even get a wink of sleep. Carioca Fletch A thirty-year-old unsolved murder, a more recent suicide, an inconvenient heart attack–somehow Fletch is connected to all of them and one of those connections might just shorten his own life. From Rio to Bahia and back again, at the height of Carnival, Fletch has to keep moving or get stopped cold.


Compare

Carioca Fletch Fletch’s trip to Brazil wasn’t exactly planned. But it’s Carnival time in Rio and he has plenty of money, thanks to a little arrangement made stateside. And it took him no time to hook up with the luscious Laura Soares. Fletch is beginning to relax, just a little. Carioca Fletch But between the American widow who seems to be following Fletch and the Brazilian w Carioca Fletch Fletch’s trip to Brazil wasn’t exactly planned. But it’s Carnival time in Rio and he has plenty of money, thanks to a little arrangement made stateside. And it took him no time to hook up with the luscious Laura Soares. Fletch is beginning to relax, just a little. Carioca Fletch But between the American widow who seems to be following Fletch and the Brazilian widow who’s fingered Fletch as her long-dead husband, he suddenly doesn’t have much time to enjoy the present or even get a wink of sleep. Carioca Fletch A thirty-year-old unsolved murder, a more recent suicide, an inconvenient heart attack–somehow Fletch is connected to all of them and one of those connections might just shorten his own life. From Rio to Bahia and back again, at the height of Carnival, Fletch has to keep moving or get stopped cold.

30 review for Carioca Fletch

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jack Heath

    3 Stars. More of a "Fletch Does Rio" vacation adventure than a murder mystery. In many ways a travelogue with comedic overtones! It would have been enjoyable to see Chevy Chase turn this into a movie! That sometime journalist Irwin Fletcher has fled to Brazil and met the beautiful concert pianist Laura. As they sit at a patio across the road from Copacabana Beach, an old woman screams that Fletch is her husband - even though, as we learn, her Janio was murdered more than 40 years ago! She thinks 3 Stars. More of a "Fletch Does Rio" vacation adventure than a murder mystery. In many ways a travelogue with comedic overtones! It would have been enjoyable to see Chevy Chase turn this into a movie! That sometime journalist Irwin Fletcher has fled to Brazil and met the beautiful concert pianist Laura. As they sit at a patio across the road from Copacabana Beach, an old woman screams that Fletch is her husband - even though, as we learn, her Janio was murdered more than 40 years ago! She thinks Fletch can identify who killed her beloved. Through the booze, the parties and the folklore, Fletch can't get any straight answers. Or any sleep. This isn't the only riddle he sets out to solve. He meets the Tap Dancers who are part of the enigma that is Brazil. It's all here, the music, the frustrations, and the rich and the poor. One can't help asking whether being in one's twenties at Carnival time in Rio is as carefree now as it was in the 1980s? It does hold the reader; but I wanted more mystery than this. (December 2017)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Hobart

    This originally appeared at The Irresponsible Reader. --- Just in case people were thinking I'd drunk too heavily in the Fletch/Gregory Mcdonald Kool-Aid bowl, this should alleviate any concern. I just don't like this book. Following the events of Fletch, our now-jobless journalist is enjoying life in Brazil, he's got a girlfriend, is making some investments and friends and is about to enjoy Carnaval. Quite by accident, he runs into the newly-widowed Joan Allen Stanwyk, and things get a little awk This originally appeared at The Irresponsible Reader. --- Just in case people were thinking I'd drunk too heavily in the Fletch/Gregory Mcdonald Kool-Aid bowl, this should alleviate any concern. I just don't like this book. Following the events of Fletch, our now-jobless journalist is enjoying life in Brazil, he's got a girlfriend, is making some investments and friends and is about to enjoy Carnaval. Quite by accident, he runs into the newly-widowed Joan Allen Stanwyk, and things get a little awkward for a bit. But before he can follow up with her, an elderly Brazilian woman claims that he's the reincarnation of her murdered husband, come back to identify his murderer. This distracts Fletch greatly and between that, and a new group of acquaintances who seem to be rich young men who devote all their time to wine and women, Fletch can't deal with Joan. He first has to spend some time trying to deal with the problems of their debauchery, this supernatural claim and learning about the Brazilian culture in general. This might, might, be an okay book if it was about any other American hiding in Brazil, learning about the culture and people. But it's not a Fletch book. He doesn't solve the mystery by being clever or interviewing anyone. It's not a particularly funny book, either. It's mostly Fletch bouncing from situation to situation with little control or agency for a couple of hundred pages, and then solving a decades-old mystery by a cheap stunt. What redeems this book is the Joan Allen Stanwyk material that bookends it. Those are the only chapters that really feel like Fletch (and, they're grounded in the rest of the series). Also, Fletch's background in, interest in, and history of investing in art is shown here in embryo—as well as the other things he does to pay for his villa, GCN stock, racehorses, and so on. So that's good, but we didn't need to see it, the character was good enough without that. Naturally, Dan John Miller had nothing to do with any of my problems, he does a great job as usual. This was just a misfire for Mcdonald (not the only one in the series), and is easily forgotten—and should be.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Hans

    This novel is a bit of an enigma. It's clearly a Fletch novel because Fletch is the main character and because it covers an important event in his character's history--what happens weeks after the closing events in the first Fletch novel (Fletch). This also isn't a Fletch novel. Fletch novels feature Fletch playing the role of an investigative journalist in some form. This is Fletch in the liminal state. He still is Fletch, but he's running from being Fletch…and he clearly isn't working. (He doe This novel is a bit of an enigma. It's clearly a Fletch novel because Fletch is the main character and because it covers an important event in his character's history--what happens weeks after the closing events in the first Fletch novel (Fletch). This also isn't a Fletch novel. Fletch novels feature Fletch playing the role of an investigative journalist in some form. This is Fletch in the liminal state. He still is Fletch, but he's running from being Fletch…and he clearly isn't working. (He does reluctantly deal with a mystery, but only because he is the mystery.) The events in Brazil will end up making him even more Fletchy--he has a trial by Carnival before he can get there. This is really a story about Brazil. It's a story of Rio and Carnival that Fletch just happens to fall into, like James Bond falls into the woman's story in The Spy Who Loved Me (which is totally different than the movie--no metal-mouthed baddie in that book). Though Fletch comes out a lot more transformed from this book than James Bond did in that story. I read that McDonald waited to tell this story until he could actually spend time in Brazil to capture it correctly. Brazil is here all the way through. Fletch is in Brazil long enough to start to understand it, but just long enough to illuminate a few of its mysterious ways. I feel like I could rank my favorites of the 7 Fletch books that I read so far, but I would keep Carioca Fletch in it's own ranked column. It is and isn't a Fletch novel. And it is an important chapter.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ian

    In theory 'Carioca Fletch' is the seventh published book in the Fletch series, although it follows almost directly on from the first, 'Fletch'. I say 'in theory' because whilst I'm not entirely sure what this is, it sure as heck isn't a Fletch book! Best guess I can make is a free-form, drug fuelled travelogue of Rio and surroundings during carnival, featuring some bloke who goes by the name of IM Fletcher. Gone is the clever writing and electric dialogue, and in its place resides something some In theory 'Carioca Fletch' is the seventh published book in the Fletch series, although it follows almost directly on from the first, 'Fletch'. I say 'in theory' because whilst I'm not entirely sure what this is, it sure as heck isn't a Fletch book! Best guess I can make is a free-form, drug fuelled travelogue of Rio and surroundings during carnival, featuring some bloke who goes by the name of IM Fletcher. Gone is the clever writing and electric dialogue, and in its place resides something someone perhaps thought was art. The lack of pretty much everything I have enjoyed about McDonalds work means this is a painful experience. I suspect if this had some out as the second book it would have killed the series stone dead. At least I got through it relatively quickly, but not because it was a page turner! Very disappointing.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    Carioca Fletch takes Fletch and deposits him in Rio in the middle of Carnival week. Part travelogue, part mystery, part comedy, the story has Fletch accused of murder and followed halfway around the world by a bereaved widow, sealed in a coffin, possessed by the spirit of a man who died forty years ago, burying bodies at sea, beaten to an inch of his life, confused, dismayed, a stranger in a strange land. This isn't a plot-driven story as much as it's a series of glimpses of a few days in Rio an Carioca Fletch takes Fletch and deposits him in Rio in the middle of Carnival week. Part travelogue, part mystery, part comedy, the story has Fletch accused of murder and followed halfway around the world by a bereaved widow, sealed in a coffin, possessed by the spirit of a man who died forty years ago, burying bodies at sea, beaten to an inch of his life, confused, dismayed, a stranger in a strange land. This isn't a plot-driven story as much as it's a series of glimpses of a few days in Rio and various odd events. It doesn't have the format or structure of a traditional novel. Don't read this expecting a story that slowly builds to a climax. It's more like watching an ever-changing parade.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jon

    As a fan of the wisecracking journalist, Irwin Fletcher, portrayed by Chevy Chase in two films from the 1980s, I really went into this book expecting a goofy story. What I found was a much more serious, yet entertaining, mystery novel. Set in Rio during Carnival, the story follows Fletch as he is unwittingly enmeshed in a forty-seven year old (as in, it happened that long ago) murder mystery. Taking him from the wealthy hotels of the elite to the slums of Rio, Fletch's adventure is highly entert As a fan of the wisecracking journalist, Irwin Fletcher, portrayed by Chevy Chase in two films from the 1980s, I really went into this book expecting a goofy story. What I found was a much more serious, yet entertaining, mystery novel. Set in Rio during Carnival, the story follows Fletch as he is unwittingly enmeshed in a forty-seven year old (as in, it happened that long ago) murder mystery. Taking him from the wealthy hotels of the elite to the slums of Rio, Fletch's adventure is highly entertaining and worth the read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Chris Aldrich

    Following a few months after the original book Fletch, Carioca Fletch begins with a jolt of plot as an old woman from one of the favelas of Rio de Janeiro identifies Fletch as the reincarnation of her long dead husband and wants to know who murdered him 47 years ago. Everyone apparently believes her wholeheartedly and there's nothing Fletch can do but go along with what might be an elaborate joke. Nearly simultaneously Fletch runs across a widow who he says will think he killed her husband! And Following a few months after the original book Fletch, Carioca Fletch begins with a jolt of plot as an old woman from one of the favelas of Rio de Janeiro identifies Fletch as the reincarnation of her long dead husband and wants to know who murdered him 47 years ago. Everyone apparently believes her wholeheartedly and there's nothing Fletch can do but go along with what might be an elaborate joke. Nearly simultaneously Fletch runs across a widow who he says will think he killed her husband! And so the mystery begins??? Mcdonald does an excellent job of introducing the reader to a particular flavor of Brazilian culture which presages the pace of the plot. As a reader I felt nearly as frustrated with the pace of life and the style of culture (which heavily parallels the plot) as Fletch must have in his own evolving situation. This treatment makes me identify with I.M. much more closely than I might have otherwise, so kudos to Mcdonald for that. As it turns out the woman Fletch initially dodges because he says she'll think he killed her husband is Joan Stanwyk. She's had him tracked down so that she can confront him about her husband's death as well as a large amount of money that has gone missing. Seemingly only minutes later, Joan disappears just before Carnival and there isn't much Fletch can do to find her. I had hoped for more mystery on this front, but the solution is wrapped up in a few scant pages right at the end. Travelogue There's some great description and depiction of the Brazilian culture and the piece feels like a reasonable travelogue in some sense. Sadly it means it's a bit thin on plot. Things start off with a nice bang, but then plod along for most of the book before things begin to pick up again in the last quarter of the book. There was so much more that Mcdonald could have done with the plot. Joan Stanwyk tracking down Fletch for a confrontation, Fletch and the Tap Dancers disposing of a friend's body in a scene that presaged the entire plot of the film Weekend at Bernie's (1989), the detective portion relating to who killed Junio all those years ago... Instead Mcdonald seemingly lets all the plot points work themselves out without any real work from our protagonist who just floats along through the culture. However, I will give him huge points from an artistic standpoint as he's done a great job instilling a particular pace and cultural way of life into the text in such a manner that it really seems natural and satisfying that things work out the way they do. Wrap up Yet, in the end ultimately I'm conflicted as I'd have preferred more Fletchness, but I find it to have been enjoyable--at least it was better than Fletch, Too which still sits poorly with me. I am left a bit adrift at the end with respect to the Tap Dancers who were so pivotal to most of the plot. What happened to the promised trip back to the brothel? Somehow they just seem to drift out of the plot. Why wasn't there better development of a romantic interest? I don't recall if this or something else set things in motion from a cultural standpoint, but as I recall the mid-80s, this would have ridden at the forefront of the zeitgeist of Brazillian culture in North America with several other books, television shows, and even movies which featured Brazil and even capoeira at the time. Highlights, Quotes, & Marginalia "You have not heard of queima de arquivo?" ... "It means 'burn the record'" Marilia said. "It means 'cover up,'" Laura said. "It is the Brazilian way of life. That is why we are so free." —Loc 65 & 68: One of the motivating concepts within the book and an interesting life philosophy. There are dozens of appearances of the word burn throughout the book. "Half your diet should be carbohydrates." "You're reading about diets?" —Loc 266: I find it interesting that this discussion predates some serious anti-carb literature that appears in the culture about a decade or more hence. "Anyone can make up a story and say it is the past." —Loc 234 "Have you ever been paralysed?" Toninho's big brow eyes swelled. "I have the wisdom to know that one day I will be." —Loc 462: An interesting life philosophy "É preciso terno?" Such was a tourist joke. In Brazil a suit was never necessary. —Loc 808 Fletch gathered in the stern line. "Not in the S.S. Coitus Interruptus." —Loc 1300 Colombo, a sparkling clean tearoom noted for its great pastry —Loc 1958: Who can resist a pastry reference? The sound is overpowering. It is perhaps the maximum sound the earth and sky can accept without cracking, without breaking into fragments to move with it before dissipating into dust. —Loc 2287: Mcdonald does a really good job describing the music of Brazil throughout. I particularly liked this passage. ...cheering on the biggest and most amazing human spectacle in the world except war. —Loc 2426: a nice description of Carnival; apparently one so apt that he uses it multiple times. Then he remembered his other ear had slipped into the personality of a tomato. —Loc 2560: great description of an ear after a brutal fight "Fletch, you always seem to be someplace you're not supposed to be, doing something you're not supposed to be doing." "Got any other news for me?" —Loc 2684: Quintessential Fletch description and rejoinder Fletch had come back to life. He was in a closed coffin. —Loc 2939: A great pair of sentences just by themselves, but they also have a nice parallelism to where Fletch is within relation to the plot at the time. (a waitress to Fletch) "Have an accident?" "No, thanks. Just had one." —Loc 2979: Witty dialogue "I was worried about you. I've been stood up for dinner before, often, but seldom for breakfast." "Not very nice of me." "It's okay. I had breakfast anyway." —Loc 2986: Witty dialogue "I mean, everyone needs a vacation from life. Don't you agree?" "A vacation from reality." —Loc 3068 "She fell out of her cradle. She's enjoying a few moments crawling around the floor." —Loc 3097: great description of a grown woman "I learned some things." "I'd love to know what." "Oh, that the past asserts itself. That the dead can walk." Fletch thought of the small carved stone frog that had been under his bed. "That the absence of symbols can mean as much as their presence." —Loc 3100 Edgar Arthur Tharp, Junior —Loc 3106: Fletch indicates that this artist will be part of his future purpose; The name reappears in Confess, Fletch as a tangential part of the plot.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    This Fletch book wasn't as funny, amusing, or as witty as I've come to expect. It felt like it was ghostwritten. They can't all be home runs. Still worth reading/listening to. This Fletch book wasn't as funny, amusing, or as witty as I've come to expect. It felt like it was ghostwritten. They can't all be home runs. Still worth reading/listening to.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Larry Peninger

    This was the first Fletch book I've read. It reads just like watching one of the fletch movies. Probably one of the greatest openings in a book. Fletch finds himself in Rio at the start of Carnival. His meeting with the beautiful Laura Soures and plenty of cash. When a woman comes up Fletch tells his guest that she is probably there to accuse him of her husband death. All this in the first chapter. A Brazilian widow accuses Fletch of being her long dead husband who had been murdered. She says he This was the first Fletch book I've read. It reads just like watching one of the fletch movies. Probably one of the greatest openings in a book. Fletch finds himself in Rio at the start of Carnival. His meeting with the beautiful Laura Soures and plenty of cash. When a woman comes up Fletch tells his guest that she is probably there to accuse him of her husband death. All this in the first chapter. A Brazilian widow accuses Fletch of being her long dead husband who had been murdered. She says he came back as Fletch to name his killer. How does this even happen. It happens the I.M. Fletcher that's for sure. Also one of his local compatriots dies while in the company of hooker. To solve this a plan is suggested that he drowned while on a boating trip. This was one of the funniest scenes of the book. Totally reccomend reading the fletch series

  10. 5 out of 5

    Helen

    After watching the Rio Olympics, I thought I'd give this a try even though it's about 30 years old in its picture of Rio. I didn't realize until I got into it that the plot takes place immediately after the Alan Stanwyck affair. That's kind of the periphery, though. The main plot is a bizarre and often confusing romp through Carnival with Fletch and a group of wild and wealthy young men as they (sort of) help him solve a murder from the past that supposedly happened to a Brazilian inhabiting his After watching the Rio Olympics, I thought I'd give this a try even though it's about 30 years old in its picture of Rio. I didn't realize until I got into it that the plot takes place immediately after the Alan Stanwyck affair. That's kind of the periphery, though. The main plot is a bizarre and often confusing romp through Carnival with Fletch and a group of wild and wealthy young men as they (sort of) help him solve a murder from the past that supposedly happened to a Brazilian inhabiting his body in a sort of reincarnation. I would've put it down several times out of sheer confusion, but I was in need of something to read while waiting for the book I really wanted to read. Anyway, the end does deliver a good payoff, but it's a long time coming.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Lock

    I like the Fletch series; very diverting and good plotting. The female characters are frequently sexual foils for the main character, which can get old, but in general I like the books quite a bit. What is special about the Fletch books is the plotting, which frequently involves at least two mysteries, if not more. In this case, there was the mystery of the missing North American woman in Brazil during carnival, the mystery of Fletch's doppleganger, who was murdered 45 years prior to the time of I like the Fletch series; very diverting and good plotting. The female characters are frequently sexual foils for the main character, which can get old, but in general I like the books quite a bit. What is special about the Fletch books is the plotting, which frequently involves at least two mysteries, if not more. In this case, there was the mystery of the missing North American woman in Brazil during carnival, the mystery of Fletch's doppleganger, who was murdered 45 years prior to the time of the novel, and the mystery of how to understand Brazil. McDonald used culturally transmitted information such as Brazilian superstitions and fairy tales to inform how characters behave, and which turned out to be crucial to solving the mysteries. This was quite a deft touch.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Harry Collier IV

    This was decent book but it was not a good book. Sequels rarely live up to the original and Carioca Fletch did not disappoint in that regard. Again. it wasn't a bad book and I enjoyed seeing Fletch in Brazil living it up. It had multiple mysteries happening at the same time and yet I never became confused or forgot what was happening. My problems come towards the end of the book where we are given two chapters of pure exposition on Carnivale with little to no actions. McDonald rewards us for our p This was decent book but it was not a good book. Sequels rarely live up to the original and Carioca Fletch did not disappoint in that regard. Again. it wasn't a bad book and I enjoyed seeing Fletch in Brazil living it up. It had multiple mysteries happening at the same time and yet I never became confused or forgot what was happening. My problems come towards the end of the book where we are given two chapters of pure exposition on Carnivale with little to no actions. McDonald rewards us for our patience with a very nice very graphic scene after but why did we need to sit through all the parade description? All-in-all, if you liked the first Chevy Chase film and wonder what happened next this is it (the second film is a disgrace and was never actual part of the Fletch Canon).

  13. 5 out of 5

    Brenna Sydel

    Am I crazy because I just read this to complete the series? Is it nuts that I just wanted to finish the damn thing and therefore sort of 'hate' read it? It was tolerable, although again this felt like a hurried and rushed ending. None of the characters were all that compelling and I just found myself reading for the sake of finishing it. I kept waiting for something to grab me but, alas, this did not occur. Is it god awful and horrid? Nah, not really. Will it stick with you forever and ever? Not a Am I crazy because I just read this to complete the series? Is it nuts that I just wanted to finish the damn thing and therefore sort of 'hate' read it? It was tolerable, although again this felt like a hurried and rushed ending. None of the characters were all that compelling and I just found myself reading for the sake of finishing it. I kept waiting for something to grab me but, alas, this did not occur. Is it god awful and horrid? Nah, not really. Will it stick with you forever and ever? Not a chance. Is it worth reading? I mean.... I guess? Sure. It's harmless. It's a quick read. It probably would be good for a beach or pool read. Just something simple and kind of fun.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Alex Teixeira

    I was still in high school when I read the first Fletch book. It was 1982. The first Fletch novel was released in 1974. I used to read a lot of mysteries back then and one day stumbled upon Fletch, I was hooked, that's all the mystery I wanted to read during that time (peppered in with some fantasy, science fiction and literary books, too). I read all the Fletch books up to the last one, "Fletch Too", in 1986. This one was particularly fun for me, because I was born in Rio and have been back man I was still in high school when I read the first Fletch book. It was 1982. The first Fletch novel was released in 1974. I used to read a lot of mysteries back then and one day stumbled upon Fletch, I was hooked, that's all the mystery I wanted to read during that time (peppered in with some fantasy, science fiction and literary books, too). I read all the Fletch books up to the last one, "Fletch Too", in 1986. This one was particularly fun for me, because I was born in Rio and have been back many times since on vacation. I have fond memories of reading these mysteries, I thought the books were funny and fun. Worth checking out if you like light mysteries, humor, and fun.

  15. 5 out of 5

    JDK1962

    An extremely long short book. I had always been curious about what happened to Fletch after he arrived in Rio. Especially since I first read Fletch when I was a teenager growing up in Sao Paulo (yeah, I'm a paulista, not a carioca). Now I'm no longer curious, and this was a letdown. It reads like something a famous novelist would write after visiting Rio at Carnival. Some of the small details ring true, but my god, does this man over-romanticize Rio and Brazilians. Ultimately, the mysteries and ch An extremely long short book. I had always been curious about what happened to Fletch after he arrived in Rio. Especially since I first read Fletch when I was a teenager growing up in Sao Paulo (yeah, I'm a paulista, not a carioca). Now I'm no longer curious, and this was a letdown. It reads like something a famous novelist would write after visiting Rio at Carnival. Some of the small details ring true, but my god, does this man over-romanticize Rio and Brazilians. Ultimately, the mysteries and characters are weak and seem more like an excuse to write swooningly about Brazil.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Niki

    This was not my favorite Fletch book but I still enjoyed it. I recently returned from Brazil where I attended the 2016 Summer Olympic games so I especially liked reading about a place I just visited. Slight spoiler coming................................................................I didn't particularly care for the supernatural aspect of this book. The storyline with Janio Barreto was a bit far fetched for my taste. But as usual, the author does a very good job of writing the story and joinin This was not my favorite Fletch book but I still enjoyed it. I recently returned from Brazil where I attended the 2016 Summer Olympic games so I especially liked reading about a place I just visited. Slight spoiler coming................................................................I didn't particularly care for the supernatural aspect of this book. The storyline with Janio Barreto was a bit far fetched for my taste. But as usual, the author does a very good job of writing the story and joining the different storylines.

  17. 4 out of 5

    J

    This read less like a mystery than like a love letter to Brazil. What it sounds like is that McDonald took a trip to Brazil, fell in love, wanted to tell everyone how much he loved Brazil, so he wrote a mystery and decided to set it in Brazil so he could do just that. Long passages about culture and dancing aren't terribly interesting if you're not fascinated by Brazil and its music and culture and don't do much to advance the plot. The biggest problem ultimately is that the book wants to do two This read less like a mystery than like a love letter to Brazil. What it sounds like is that McDonald took a trip to Brazil, fell in love, wanted to tell everyone how much he loved Brazil, so he wrote a mystery and decided to set it in Brazil so he could do just that. Long passages about culture and dancing aren't terribly interesting if you're not fascinated by Brazil and its music and culture and don't do much to advance the plot. The biggest problem ultimately is that the book wants to do two different things and each get in the way of the other. By far the weakest book of the series.

  18. 5 out of 5

    f

    This is a very atmospheric and unusual entry to the Fletch novels, and takes place a few months after the exploits of the original novel; Fletch has moved down to Brazil and is embroiled in mystery after an old woman claims him to the doppelganger of her husband, murdered 47 years previously. Taking place during the hyperreal Carnivale, Carioca Fletch enters surreal territory, dragging its reader in with it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Revfry

    It was okay. Not the best in the series. It's funny that he wrote/released them out of order for the chronology in the book. This falls right after Fletch (The book the movie is based on). But it doesn't hinder the story at all. It feels like a number of events in the novel don't really have much to do with the "case". Just things that happen on the way to the end of the book. But it won't kill you to stick with it. It was okay. Not the best in the series. It's funny that he wrote/released them out of order for the chronology in the book. This falls right after Fletch (The book the movie is based on). But it doesn't hinder the story at all. It feels like a number of events in the novel don't really have much to do with the "case". Just things that happen on the way to the end of the book. But it won't kill you to stick with it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    Another great Fletch mystery. Many people complain that there is too much Brazil and not enough Fletch, and compared to other Fletch books, that is true. However, the book is so well written that I really don't mind Fletch taking a back seat to Brazil. If you like Mcdonald's writing style, you'll like Carioca Fletch. Don't believe all of the negative reviews on amazon. Another great Fletch mystery. Many people complain that there is too much Brazil and not enough Fletch, and compared to other Fletch books, that is true. However, the book is so well written that I really don't mind Fletch taking a back seat to Brazil. If you like Mcdonald's writing style, you'll like Carioca Fletch. Don't believe all of the negative reviews on amazon.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Stuart Lutzenhiser

    OK - but not great. Fletch is in Brazil and has no job but does have a girlfriend. He gets embroiled in solving a murder 47 years in the past when he is mistaken for the dead man by his widow. Hijinx galore around Carnival with Fletch getting no sleep for 3 days and nearly killed by his former murderer. Enjoyable, but not fantastic.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mark Chapin

    An enjoyable read, as all Fletch titles are. A little confusing at first if you don't know that chronologically, this story occurs right after the first Fletch book (which I didn't), but I guess it doesn't really matter. McDonald paints a vivid picture of Rio at Carnivale, and as always the secondary characters are well written. An enjoyable read, as all Fletch titles are. A little confusing at first if you don't know that chronologically, this story occurs right after the first Fletch book (which I didn't), but I guess it doesn't really matter. McDonald paints a vivid picture of Rio at Carnivale, and as always the secondary characters are well written.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Steve Wald

    One of the more entertaining and memorable Fletch novels in my opinion, this one takes the lead character to Brazil, where he befriends and parties with locals, adapts to society, and tries to figure out why so many people are mistaking him for a late village hero.

  24. 5 out of 5

    J.

    I read the Fletch books for (a) the effortless writing, and (b) the oddball mysteries. This one is as easy a read as the others, but the mysteries are pretty simplistic. McDonald was way more interested in capturing the spirit of Brazil than writing a mystery. So this is what you get.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    I am re-reading this series in chronological order. This is probably my least favorite in the entire series. However, it is pivotal in tying together the early storylines and some of the latter. Still some very good writing by McDonald.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Michael Prelee

    McDonald's writing here follows his pattern of making you think things aren't important until they become important. It was nice to see this pick up the story of Fletch in Brazil after the debut novel. I really enjoyed it. McDonald's writing here follows his pattern of making you think things aren't important until they become important. It was nice to see this pick up the story of Fletch in Brazil after the debut novel. I really enjoyed it.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Shane Phillips

    Reading books older than 2000 on my to-read shelves. It’s interesting to see how they handle race, gender and other social behaviors. Fletch is actually more progressive than others. This was the worst of the series so far. It just seemed less organized and interesting then the previous.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    A distraction sometimes interrupted by plot. If the next one isn't better I suspect I will quit on this series. A distraction sometimes interrupted by plot. If the next one isn't better I suspect I will quit on this series.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Josh Newhouse

    I love Fletch in the USA a lot more than other countries... still some great moments and I love Joan's parts but as I reread the series still the least Fletch-like... I love Fletch in the USA a lot more than other countries... still some great moments and I love Joan's parts but as I reread the series still the least Fletch-like...

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sebastian Owl

    It's a slow burn at the beginning. it almost lost me, but The build up is constant. the end is masterful. It's a slow burn at the beginning. it almost lost me, but The build up is constant. the end is masterful.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.