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The Year's Best Fantasy: First Annual Collection

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This groundbreaking anthology inaugurates an exciting new annual tradition—a giant collection of the greatest fantasy and supernatural stories published in 1987.


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This groundbreaking anthology inaugurates an exciting new annual tradition—a giant collection of the greatest fantasy and supernatural stories published in 1987.

30 review for The Year's Best Fantasy: First Annual Collection

  1. 5 out of 5

    DeAnna Knippling

    When I started the anthology, at first I felt robbed. I hadn't read this one before, so most of the stories were new to me, but I have read other books in the series, as well as other things that the editors have done together. I wasn't prepared to come back to it. Not only have both fantasy and horror moved on since this came out, but it was kind of a game changer at the time. I don't often say this, but--I want that world back, not the one where 80s horror novels were blunt instruments of vanit When I started the anthology, at first I felt robbed. I hadn't read this one before, so most of the stories were new to me, but I have read other books in the series, as well as other things that the editors have done together. I wasn't prepared to come back to it. Not only have both fantasy and horror moved on since this came out, but it was kind of a game changer at the time. I don't often say this, but--I want that world back, not the one where 80s horror novels were blunt instruments of vanity and contempt, not the one where epic fantasy was Tolkein knockoffs, but some imaginary golden age where fantasy and horror were the same thing. Isn't that awful? People did it before, people have been doing it since, and I still felt robbed. So irrational. My favorites are: Pretty much all of them. A couple that I wanted tighter endings on, that was all. An excellent read.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Richard Leis

    It took me over a year to read this 1988 collection of short stories selected by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling, but it wasn't because of any problems I had with the anthology. I'm rating this 5 stars for a very good reason: nearly ever story in the collection are themselves 5-star worthy. Some stories overwhelmed me so much with their greatness that I had to take a break to process them, which led to gaps in my reading this anthology when I fell into reading some other book. Every time I came It took me over a year to read this 1988 collection of short stories selected by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling, but it wasn't because of any problems I had with the anthology. I'm rating this 5 stars for a very good reason: nearly ever story in the collection are themselves 5-star worthy. Some stories overwhelmed me so much with their greatness that I had to take a break to process them, which led to gaps in my reading this anthology when I fell into reading some other book. Every time I came back to this anthology, though, I immediately encountered another incredible, thought-provoking story. I mean, the anthology starts with "Buffalo Gals, Won't You Come Out Tonight" by Ursula K. Le Guin! This is one of my absolute favorite stories and it is one that lingers. So many stories in this anthology are like that. I sometimes didn't want to move on; I wanted to savor and think about what I had just read. Sometimes I even fell into a jealous gloom, despairing that my own writing will ever come close to the level of craft on display here. There are other stories that simply shattered my understanding of how short stories in particular fantasy genres should work. Stories like "Haunted" by Joyce Carol Oates and "Halley's Passing" by Michael McDowell scared me half to death! These are decidedly disturbing, even icky, horror stories that showcase their author's incredible use of craft. In "Halley's Passing," for example, McDowell uses a close third-person narrator that relays real-time violence in matter-of-fact, even bureaucratic detail. That combination elevated my terror from the very beginning, so that when I reached a horrifying further revelation near the end, it wasn't all that surprising, considering. Yes, absolutely chilling and disturbing horror, often offset by other genres of fantasy that are more humorous, soaring, and absolutely gorgeous in setting and detail. Mood often shifts story by story, though there are also interesting pairings of stories with similar moods and subject matter throughout the anthology. Stories like "Words of Power" by Jane Yolen and "The Maid on the Shore" by Dalia Sherman offer powerful moments of empowerment and achievement soon after other stories of frightful horror. I would love to write a review about each and every story, but the last one I'll focus on has to be Alan Moore's "A Hypothetical Lizard." Until this last story, the one criticism I had about the anthology was the lack of diversity in characters. There are (too) few people of color, though it is possible that readers could see diverse characters in stories that don't really describe the characters in great detail. Until "A Hypothetical Lizard," there are no LGBT characters; instead, there are jarring uses of "faggot" in a couple stories, though the characters uttering this word are meant to be despicable. The last story, and Windling's pick for best fantasy story of the year, is "A Hypothetical Lizard," and it is a stunning and inclusive story to end on. Not that it has a happy ending, but Moore's characterization of the transgender character Rawra Chin is very loving, though in keeping with 1988 one would not expect Her story to have a happy ending. I think that Moore's use of homosexual and transgender characters to tell a universal story of love and betrayal is powerful and very much appreciated in an anthology of stories that otherwise ignores LGBT people. The other thing I love about "A Hypothetical Lizard" is Moore's level of craft. In fact, he's on an entirely different level than any other writer in the anthology, and this story, at least in my opinion, seems the most timeless because of it. The cinematic vividness of his descriptions includes a scene where the character imagines the black stones of the courtyard below her as a pool of water, and what it would be like for her to dive into the water and swim away. I'm going to be studying this and other passages for years as I try to improve my own writing. Another example: a perspective change that is jarring but absolutely perfect for the story. I cannot rave enough about Moore's level of craft. It's just stunning. So, yes, this anthology took me over a year to read, but it is also my most favorite book over that same period of time. It includes some of my favorite short stories ever. What Le Guin, Oates, McDowell, Moore, and everyone else in the anthology accomplish with their tales is so inspiring. I'm in awe.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kit

    I love anthologies, and I thoroughly enjoyed Datlow's The Faery Reel, so... ?.? stars Buffalo Gals, Won't You Come Out Tonight by Ursula K. Le Guin * * A strange story about a girl who apparently falls out of a plane, and is found and helped by Coyote and other desert denizens. A World Without Toys by T. M. Wright * * * * Alex and Blanche from the historical society are interested in an old house found under a street. The house has toys in the attic. DX by Joe Haldeman * * * A day in the life of any I love anthologies, and I thoroughly enjoyed Datlow's The Faery Reel, so... ?.? stars Buffalo Gals, Won't You Come Out Tonight by Ursula K. Le Guin * * A strange story about a girl who apparently falls out of a plane, and is found and helped by Coyote and other desert denizens. A World Without Toys by T. M. Wright * * * * Alex and Blanche from the historical society are interested in an old house found under a street. The house has toys in the attic. DX by Joe Haldeman * * * A day in the life of any given soldier - any given war. Friend's Best Man by Jonathan Carroll * * * A man saves his dog from a train, and then things start to get weird... The Snow Apples by Gwyneth Jones * * * * A new faery tale where a king tries to raise his son to be immune to the curse placed on his head. Ever After by Susan Palwick * * * * What if the faery godmother is not a faery at all, but something else entirely? My Name is Dolly by William F. Nolan * * A little girl plots revenge on her wicked stepfather. The Moon's Revenge by Joan Aiken * * * A boy throws shoes at the moon 7 nights so the moon will grant his wish to be a great fiddler. Author's Notes by Edward Bryant * * Strange musings... Lake George in High August by John Robert Bensink * * Weird, dark family vacation story. Abrupt. Csucskári by Steve Brust * * * A retelling of the Sun, The Moon, and The Stars. The Other Side by Ramsey Campbell * * A very freaky story about a disturbed teacher. Pamela's Get by David J. Schow * * The strange unraveling of the friends of the recently deceased. Voices in the Wind by Elizabeth S. Helfman * * An unusual story about a fisherman and his wife trying to listen to the wind. Once Upon a Time, She Said by Jane Yolen * * A poem sprinkled with faery tale fodder. The Circular Library of Stones by Carol Emshwiller * * An Soft Monkey by Harlan Ellison * * An Fat Face by Michael Shea * * An Uncle Dobbin's Parrot Fair by Charles de Lint * * An The Pear-Shaped Man by George R. R. Martin * * An Delta Sly Honey by Lucius Shepard * * An Small Heirlooms by M. John Harrison * * An The Improper Princess by Patricia C. Wrede * * An The Fable of the Farmer and the Fox by John Brunner * * An Haunted by Joyce Carol Oates * * An Dead Possums by Kathryn Ptacek * * An Pictures Made of Stones by Lucius Shepard * * An Splatter: A Cautionary Tale by Douglas E. Winter * * An Gentlemen by John Skipp and Craig Spector * * An Demon Luck by Craig Shaw Gardner * * An Words of Power by Jane Yolen * * An Jamie's Grave by Lisa Tuttle * * An The Maid on the Shore by Delia Sherman * * An Halley's Passing by Michael McDowell * * An White Trains by Lucius Shepard * * An Simple Sentences by Natalie Babbitt * * An A Hypothetical Lizard by Alan Moore * * An Honorable Mentions: 1987 * * An

  4. 5 out of 5

    Deirdre

    I didn't expect this anthology to be fantasy *and* horror and I'm still a bit confused by the decision to anthologize both genres together. Mind you, I don't love horror, and this anthology is pretty old, so things may have been thought about differently back then. I'm not ashamed to say that I skipped virtually all the horror by the simple method of seeing which editor had written the little blurb before the story and avoiding all the ones that were signed 'E.D.' It did feel rather unsatisfacto I didn't expect this anthology to be fantasy *and* horror and I'm still a bit confused by the decision to anthologize both genres together. Mind you, I don't love horror, and this anthology is pretty old, so things may have been thought about differently back then. I'm not ashamed to say that I skipped virtually all the horror by the simple method of seeing which editor had written the little blurb before the story and avoiding all the ones that were signed 'E.D.' It did feel rather unsatisfactory to finish a book half of which I hadn't read, but there you go. I really can't say there were any stories that made me think, 'Wow! I must go find more of this author's work!', which was also slightly disappointing. I'm interested in the development of the genre, though, so I will probably continue to read these if the library has more.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Millerbug

    This anthology was ok. I was expecting more I think. It was more horror than fantasy, and even the horror was questionable, there were a lot of stories about serial killers. My favorite stories were Buffalo Gals, Won't You Come Out Tonight by Ursula LeGuin. DX a poem about Vietnam by Joe Haldeman. Ever After by Susan Palwick, Cinderella and Vampires... Csucskari by Steven Brust. Uncle Dobbin's Parrot Fair by Charles DeLint, Words of Power by Jane Yolen and The Maid on the Shore by Delia Sherman. This anthology was ok. I was expecting more I think. It was more horror than fantasy, and even the horror was questionable, there were a lot of stories about serial killers. My favorite stories were Buffalo Gals, Won't You Come Out Tonight by Ursula LeGuin. DX a poem about Vietnam by Joe Haldeman. Ever After by Susan Palwick, Cinderella and Vampires... Csucskari by Steven Brust. Uncle Dobbin's Parrot Fair by Charles DeLint, Words of Power by Jane Yolen and The Maid on the Shore by Delia Sherman. Other than that all the rest of the stories were OK or just depressing.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Shawn Thrasher

    All the stories are from 1987, and a few feel that way. Mostly in a bad way, although "The Other Side" by Ramsey Campbell has a 1980s Stephen King feel that was deliciously creepy. Ursula K. Le Guin starts the collection off with the fantastic "Buffalo Gals Won't You Come Out Tonight;" it's the highest point in the book. Like all short story collections, the rest is a roller coaster, some stories great fun (and/or great literature) and some (dated) duds. All the stories are from 1987, and a few feel that way. Mostly in a bad way, although "The Other Side" by Ramsey Campbell has a 1980s Stephen King feel that was deliciously creepy. Ursula K. Le Guin starts the collection off with the fantastic "Buffalo Gals Won't You Come Out Tonight;" it's the highest point in the book. Like all short story collections, the rest is a roller coaster, some stories great fun (and/or great literature) and some (dated) duds.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Erik Graff

    This is a creditable attempt to do for fantasy collections in the eighties and beyond what Judith Merrill did for science fiction collections decades before. I don't usually like fantasy very much, but a lot of these items were quite good. This is a creditable attempt to do for fantasy collections in the eighties and beyond what Judith Merrill did for science fiction collections decades before. I don't usually like fantasy very much, but a lot of these items were quite good.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kenny

    Great Anthology, first of the series. All the stories are worth reading, but some I like more than others. My favorite is "Fat Face" by Michael Shea. Also has an excellent year-in-review for an introduction. Highly Recommended. Great Anthology, first of the series. All the stories are worth reading, but some I like more than others. My favorite is "Fat Face" by Michael Shea. Also has an excellent year-in-review for an introduction. Highly Recommended.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    There are some very good stories in here. I actually thought I was picking up a different volume that follows along the more traditional pairing of SF&F, rather than fantasy and horror. As a person who is more than enough terrified of everyday life events - I skipped a good 40% of the book that was exclusively dedicated to horror. The names presented were all excellent authors, and I'm certain that if I was a horror reader that I would have enjoyed them. An exceptional look back into the 80s! There are some very good stories in here. I actually thought I was picking up a different volume that follows along the more traditional pairing of SF&F, rather than fantasy and horror. As a person who is more than enough terrified of everyday life events - I skipped a good 40% of the book that was exclusively dedicated to horror. The names presented were all excellent authors, and I'm certain that if I was a horror reader that I would have enjoyed them. An exceptional look back into the 80s!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Some great stories in here, and a good way to acquaint yourself with a variety of writers. The editors lean more toward horror and dark fantasy than traditional fantasy, and this is reflected in the title change the series soon got ("The year's best fantasy and horror..."). I read this for a quarantine book club (we'd read about 50-60 pages and discuss weekly) and it made for some enjoyable conversation. Some great stories in here, and a good way to acquaint yourself with a variety of writers. The editors lean more toward horror and dark fantasy than traditional fantasy, and this is reflected in the title change the series soon got ("The year's best fantasy and horror..."). I read this for a quarantine book club (we'd read about 50-60 pages and discuss weekly) and it made for some enjoyable conversation.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Vince Darcangelo

    Faves: "Author's Notes" -- Edward Bryant "The Other Side" -- Ramsey Campbell "Voices in the Wind" -- Elizabeth S. Helfman "Haunted" -- Joyce Carol Oates Faves: "Author's Notes" -- Edward Bryant "The Other Side" -- Ramsey Campbell "Voices in the Wind" -- Elizabeth S. Helfman "Haunted" -- Joyce Carol Oates

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sophie DiNola

    “Buffalo Gals, Won’t You Come Out Tonight” by Ursula K. Le Guin ** Honestly, I just didn’t quite get this one. Maybe someday I’ll reread it. The premise was interesting though. A girl falls out of an airplane and is adopted by desert animals. “A World Without Toys” by T.M. Wright **** A good story. I wish it had been developed a bit more though, because it was too vague in certain spots. Workers tearing up a street find an old house that calls to them. “DX” by Joe Haldeman *** This was a poem about “Buffalo Gals, Won’t You Come Out Tonight” by Ursula K. Le Guin ** Honestly, I just didn’t quite get this one. Maybe someday I’ll reread it. The premise was interesting though. A girl falls out of an airplane and is adopted by desert animals. “A World Without Toys” by T.M. Wright **** A good story. I wish it had been developed a bit more though, because it was too vague in certain spots. Workers tearing up a street find an old house that calls to them. “DX” by Joe Haldeman *** This was a poem about Vietnam...pretty gruesome stuff... and sad “Friends’s Best Man” by Jonathan Carroll ***** This was one of my favorite stories in the collection. Anything I say about it would be a spoiler, so I’ll just say read it and decide for yourself. “The Snow Apples” by Gwyneth Jones ** I honestly did not really understand this one. It had a fairy tale quality, and some interesting characters, but I wasn’t able to completely follow the plot which had something to do with a love story. “Ever After” by Susan Palwick ***** This story was another favorite from this collection. Anything I can say would be a spoiler so... just read it and enjoy. “My Name is Dolly” by William F. Nolan * Girl gets revenge in a supernatural way. “The Moon’s Revenge” by Joan Aiken ** Folk tale. It was okay. “Author’s Notes” by Edward Bryant * I did not understand this one. “Lake George in High August” by John Robert Bensink * A bit too depressing for me. “Csucskari” by Steven Brust ** Another folk tale. “The Other Side” by Ramsey Campbell *** Good story. “Pamela’s Get” by David J. Schow * I did not understand the plot. One star, though, for keeping me in suspense while I tried to figure it out! “Voices in the Wind” by Elizabeth S. Helfman **** Sweet (and wistful) little story. “Once Upon a Time, She Said” by Jane Yolen *** This was a short, interesting poem. “The Circular Library of Stones” by Carol Emshwiller ** I didn’t really understand the plot of this one. Something about it didn’t work for me. “Soft Monkey” by Harlan Ellison ***** Loved this. Some really gory parts, but a riveting story. Kept me in suspense. “Fat Face” by Michael Shea *** Genuinely suspenseful, and it was part of the Cthulhu mythos. “Uncle Dobbin’s Parrot Fair” by Charles de Lint **** Good story. Weird though. Magical realism. It’s a little slow in the beginning, but starts to pick up after a couple of pages. “The Pear-Shaped Man” by George R. R. Martin ***** It had me hooked from the first paragraph. Very suspenseful. It was creepy and gave me an uncomfortable feeling. Well written. “Delta Sly Honey” by Lucius Shephard *** Creepy, supernatural story about soldiers in Vietnam. “Small Heirlooms” by M. John Harrison DNF. Might try reading another time. I just wasn’t getting into it at the time. “The Improper Princess” by Patricia C. Wrede ** Cute fairy tale. “The Fable of the Farmer and Fox” John Brunner * I couldn’t figure out the moral or message on this one. Will reread maybe another time. “Haunted” by Joyce Carol Oates ** Oh Joyce, you are a strange one. “Dead Possums” by Kathryn Ptacek ** Creepy. “Pictures Made of Stones” by Lucius Shepard * “Splatter: A Cautionary Tale” by Douglas E. Winter DNF “Gentlemen” by John Skipp and Craig Spector ** Interesting illustration of toxic masculinity. “Demon Luck” by Craig Shaw Gardener * Strange tale. Didn’t really get it. “Words of Power” by Jane Yolen ** Fairy tale of female empowerment/ coming of age. “Jamie’s Grave” by Lisa Tuttle *** Suspenseful, creepy little story. “The Maid on the Shore” by Delia Sherman ** I wanted to like this one a lot more more than I actually did. It was too bleak for me. “Halley’s Passing” by Michael McDowell *** This got a trigger warning (from the editors) for graphic violence. In 1987. It was suspenseful, unnerving, and the ending was quite interesting. “White Trains” by Lucius Shephard * This was a five page poem. And it was basically some kind of erotic dream I think. “Simple Sentences” by Natalie Babbitt ** Brief, clever tale. “A Hypothetical Lizard” by Alan Moore * It was a bit depressing for me.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    ♦ Buffalo Gals, Won't You Come Out Tonight by Ursula K. Le Guin A World Without Toys • (1986) • shortstory by T. M. Wright DX • (1987) • poem by Joe Haldeman Friend's Best Man • (1987) • shortstory by Jonathan Carroll The Snow Apples • (1987) • shortstory by Gwyneth Jones Ever After • (1987) • novelette by Susan Palwick My Name Is Dolly • (1987) • shortstory by William F. Nolan The Moon's Revenge • (1987) • shortstory by Joan Aiken Lake George in High August • (1987) • shortstory by John Robert Bensink C ♦ Buffalo Gals, Won't You Come Out Tonight by Ursula K. Le Guin A World Without Toys • (1986) • shortstory by T. M. Wright DX • (1987) • poem by Joe Haldeman Friend's Best Man • (1987) • shortstory by Jonathan Carroll The Snow Apples • (1987) • shortstory by Gwyneth Jones Ever After • (1987) • novelette by Susan Palwick My Name Is Dolly • (1987) • shortstory by William F. Nolan The Moon's Revenge • (1987) • shortstory by Joan Aiken Lake George in High August • (1987) • shortstory by John Robert Bensink Csucskári • (1987) • novelette by Steven Brust The Other Side • (1986) • shortstory by Ramsey Campbell Pamela's Get • (1987) • novelette by David J. Schow Voices in the Wind • (1987) • shortstory by Elizabeth S. Helfman Once Upon a Time, She Said • (1987) • poem by Jane Yolen The Circular Library of Stones • (1987) • shortstory by Carol Emshwiller Soft Monkey • (1987) • shortstory by Harlan Ellison Fat Face • [Cthulhu Mythos] • (1987) • novelette by Michael Shea ♥ "Uncle Dobbin's Parrot Fair" by Charles de Lint RE-read 7/1/2015 The Pear-Shaped Man • (1987) • novelette by George R. R. Martin Delta Sly Honey • (1987) • shortstory by Lucius Shepard Small Heirlooms • (1987) • shortstory by M. John Harrison The Improper Princess • [Enchanted Forest] • (1987) • shortstory by Patricia C. Wrede The Fable of the Farmer and Fox • (1987) • shortstory by John Brunner Haunted • (1987) • novelette by Joyce Carol Oates Dead Possums • (1987) • shortstory by Kathryn Ptacek Pictures Made of Stones • (1987) • poem by Lucius Shepard Splatter: A Cautionary Tale • (1987) • shortstory by Douglas E. Winter Gentlemen • (1987) • novelette by Craig Spector and John Skipp Demon Luck • (1987) • shortstory by Craig Shaw Gardner Words of Power • (1987) • shortstory by Jane Yolen Jamie's Grave • (1987) • shortstory by Lisa Tuttle The Maid on the Shore • (1987) • shortstory by Delia Sherman Halley's Passing • (1987) • shortstory by Michael McDowell White Trains • (1987) • poem by Lucius Shepard Simple Sentences • (1987) • shortstory by Natalie Babbitt A Hypothetical Lizard • [Liavek] • (1987) • novelette by Alan Moore

  14. 5 out of 5

    John

    Sorry for virtually the same review on whole anthology set I own a Book Club hardcover edition. I started this anthology with the 5th Annual and I loved it so much I started collecting the whole set including finding copies of those before it. What sets this anthology apart from many others is that I always find two or three gems within its pages, many liked stories and very few I have to force myself through. More importantly, from those people I have noted who read these anthologies too, they say Sorry for virtually the same review on whole anthology set I own a Book Club hardcover edition. I started this anthology with the 5th Annual and I loved it so much I started collecting the whole set including finding copies of those before it. What sets this anthology apart from many others is that I always find two or three gems within its pages, many liked stories and very few I have to force myself through. More importantly, from those people I have noted who read these anthologies too, they say the same thing. I rated this whole anthology based on the variety of the stories within, how many people seem to report finding the same ratio of gems & well received stories. I am happy to own this whole anthology and keep them in excellent shape, no matter how many times I have read them.

  15. 4 out of 5

    [on hiatus] The rockabilly werewolf from Mars

    This is the first entry in a now classic series of anthologies, and possibly the best book in the series. This one came out at the peak of the golden age of horror fiction, and the table of contents reflects that with stories by people like Michael McDowell, Lisa Tuttle, David J. Schow, Ramsey Campbell, T. M. Wright, and other classic authors of the era. Buffalo Gals Won't You Come Out Tonight A child ends up in some sort of village of talking animals. Excellently written, as expected for the auth This is the first entry in a now classic series of anthologies, and possibly the best book in the series. This one came out at the peak of the golden age of horror fiction, and the table of contents reflects that with stories by people like Michael McDowell, Lisa Tuttle, David J. Schow, Ramsey Campbell, T. M. Wright, and other classic authors of the era. Buffalo Gals Won't You Come Out Tonight A child ends up in some sort of village of talking animals. Excellently written, as expected for the author. A World Without Toys The discovery of a perfectly preserved house buried under a street leads to unsettling events for a pair of local historians. Wright is an odd writer for me. I love the atmosphere of his work, but something about the way he writes dialogue vaguely bothers me. Still, a neat piece of 80s quiet horror just the same.

  16. 4 out of 5

    O. Ouellette

    Some of the short stories were very imaginative, funny or even a little inspirational, but most of them were mediocre and seemed either half-heartedly thrown together or not very well developed. Some of them were just plain random. It makes me sad when I read an anthology and feel like I could have done better than the writers in the book...and I don't think I'm too arrogant, so I don't feel this way often. At times, I almost felt like I was reading contest entries for the L. Ron Hubbard writing Some of the short stories were very imaginative, funny or even a little inspirational, but most of them were mediocre and seemed either half-heartedly thrown together or not very well developed. Some of them were just plain random. It makes me sad when I read an anthology and feel like I could have done better than the writers in the book...and I don't think I'm too arrogant, so I don't feel this way often. At times, I almost felt like I was reading contest entries for the L. Ron Hubbard writing contest than professional works from published authors. I didn't finish this book because it was overdue back to the library and accruing fines...and honestly I didn't see any reason to go through the trouble of keeping it or getting it back later.... It wasn't really worth it. Entertaining, but not particularly memorable.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    So I can say that I liked George R.R. Martin before it was cool because his story "The Pear Shaped Man" is the story that I remember the most from this collection. And it is one of those stories that holds up to a re-read. Yolen's short fiction and poetry are also good. But watch out for these cheese curls with Martin. Honesty, you thought you get worried about characters dying? You have to worry about cheese curls now. There are several quiet fantasy stories here as well and a Le Guin that is qu So I can say that I liked George R.R. Martin before it was cool because his story "The Pear Shaped Man" is the story that I remember the most from this collection. And it is one of those stories that holds up to a re-read. Yolen's short fiction and poetry are also good. But watch out for these cheese curls with Martin. Honesty, you thought you get worried about characters dying? You have to worry about cheese curls now. There are several quiet fantasy stories here as well and a Le Guin that is quite lovely. Charles de Lint is also here.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    The best fantasy/horror published in 1987. Roster of contributors is impressive: Harlan Ellison; Ursula K. Le Guin; Craig Spector and nonprolific, Michael Shea who is a pleasure to find. Many more; like Forrest Gump says about box of chocolates; "You never know what you're going to get." The best fantasy/horror published in 1987. Roster of contributors is impressive: Harlan Ellison; Ursula K. Le Guin; Craig Spector and nonprolific, Michael Shea who is a pleasure to find. Many more; like Forrest Gump says about box of chocolates; "You never know what you're going to get."

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jake

    Poised on the brink, he looked forward.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Roya

    So many stories but hardly any of them good

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dave Peticolas

    Features fantasy and horror short stories from lots of different writers.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    The first volume in what would become The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror. Nothing really memorable apart from the Jonathan Carroll story. The first volume in what would become The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror. Nothing really memorable apart from the Jonathan Carroll story.

  23. 4 out of 5

    bluetyson

    The Year's Best Fantasy: First Annual Collection by Ellen Datlow (1988) The Year's Best Fantasy: First Annual Collection by Ellen Datlow (1988)

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mark

  25. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

  26. 5 out of 5

    Shalini Latchman

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nita

  28. 4 out of 5

    Julie

  29. 4 out of 5

    David Gorgen

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kat

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