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The Roanoke Colony: America's First Mystery

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Over a hundred years before the pilgrims, the very first English settlers arrived on Roanoke Island. But without warning, these colonists abandoned their new home and disappeared without a trace. What happened to the colonists? To figure it out, we’ll need to investigate how these missing settlers got to Roanoke in the first place, and what the people already living there t Over a hundred years before the pilgrims, the very first English settlers arrived on Roanoke Island. But without warning, these colonists abandoned their new home and disappeared without a trace. What happened to the colonists? To figure it out, we’ll need to investigate how these missing settlers got to Roanoke in the first place, and what the people already living there thought about these strange foreigners. It’s a case filled with brutal battles, perilous pirate ships, ruthless queens, scheming businessmen, and enough skeletons to fill a graveyard.


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Over a hundred years before the pilgrims, the very first English settlers arrived on Roanoke Island. But without warning, these colonists abandoned their new home and disappeared without a trace. What happened to the colonists? To figure it out, we’ll need to investigate how these missing settlers got to Roanoke in the first place, and what the people already living there t Over a hundred years before the pilgrims, the very first English settlers arrived on Roanoke Island. But without warning, these colonists abandoned their new home and disappeared without a trace. What happened to the colonists? To figure it out, we’ll need to investigate how these missing settlers got to Roanoke in the first place, and what the people already living there thought about these strange foreigners. It’s a case filled with brutal battles, perilous pirate ships, ruthless queens, scheming businessmen, and enough skeletons to fill a graveyard.

30 review for The Roanoke Colony: America's First Mystery

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jon Nakapalau

    Wow - history presented as a mystery - loved this informative and entertaining look at what happened to the lost colony of Roanoke. Great art and lots of fun.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Madara

    Easy to read with fun illustrations. The story of Roanoke colony is fascinating - a colony of over a 100 people just goes missing and the only clue left behind is the word "Croatoan" etched in wood. It's something out of a horror novel yet the colony actually disappeared. This comic has some interesting and fun theories what happened to the colony but we will never know for sure. History Comics: The Roanoke Colony: America's First Mystery reminds me a bit of the Horrible Histories books but less Easy to read with fun illustrations. The story of Roanoke colony is fascinating - a colony of over a 100 people just goes missing and the only clue left behind is the word "Croatoan" etched in wood. It's something out of a horror novel yet the colony actually disappeared. This comic has some interesting and fun theories what happened to the colony but we will never know for sure. History Comics: The Roanoke Colony: America's First Mystery reminds me a bit of the Horrible Histories books but less sarcastic and less bloody. Review copy provided by the publisher and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    A fun history graphic novel that compares well to my favorite Nathan Hale's Hazardous Tales series, offering humor and facts in an engaging mix. Author/artist Chris Schweizer, who has already proven himself to me as a good historical fiction writer with his Crogan Adventures series, digs deep into the roots of why and how the colony was founded and entertains even the wildest speculation of where the colony's inhabitants disappeared to (UFO's anyone?). Very informative, engaging, and satisfying. A fun history graphic novel that compares well to my favorite Nathan Hale's Hazardous Tales series, offering humor and facts in an engaging mix. Author/artist Chris Schweizer, who has already proven himself to me as a good historical fiction writer with his Crogan Adventures series, digs deep into the roots of why and how the colony was founded and entertains even the wildest speculation of where the colony's inhabitants disappeared to (UFO's anyone?). Very informative, engaging, and satisfying.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Disclaimer: I received a free digital copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest view. I'm going to make my review in bullet points because I had a lot of thoughts on this book. * First of all, the note at the end of the book about some aspects of this story being author's liberty (like Manteo and Wanchese meeting Queen Elizabeth) is VERY IMPORTANT to keep in mind Things I like: * I like that the author is not completely sugar coating the way colonists treated Native Americans, and Disclaimer: I received a free digital copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest view. I'm going to make my review in bullet points because I had a lot of thoughts on this book. * First of all, the note at the end of the book about some aspects of this story being author's liberty (like Manteo and Wanchese meeting Queen Elizabeth) is VERY IMPORTANT to keep in mind Things I like: * I like that the author is not completely sugar coating the way colonists treated Native Americans, and that more often than not white settlers were the agressors * Actually uses tribe names to talk about the Native Americans surrounding Roanoke instead of just referring to them as "Native Americans" or "Indians" * There are numerous areas of humor which will help keep kid's interest level up * It appears (to a white person not familiar with these tribes) that the author/illustrator at least attempted to avoid using stereotypes in the illustrations) Things I'm iffy on: * While I LIKE that the author at least attempted to portray how Native Americans feel- I also feel iffy about a white (I'm assuming- since I can't find anything giving any indication otherwise) author assuming what indigenous people were feeling. And I know that seems contradictory-- but it's one of the things I'm personally struggling with right now. There was nothing that I flat out didn't like about this book. I enjoyed reading it, I enjoyed re-learning some of the history and learning new aspects that I didn't know (Or I just didn't remember ANYTHING about it).

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rick

    When I was in either junior high or high school (I can’t remember exactly, probably high school but my memory of doing the research seems to be of the junior high library) I did a MASSIVE research paper on the Roanoke Colony. Sadly that paper and presentation are long lost (I do recall I got an A on it though), but I do remember some of the details. Including that the colonists were not actually lost, that they had been picked up and returned to England by an unexpected passing vessel. This is a When I was in either junior high or high school (I can’t remember exactly, probably high school but my memory of doing the research seems to be of the junior high library) I did a MASSIVE research paper on the Roanoke Colony. Sadly that paper and presentation are long lost (I do recall I got an A on it though), but I do remember some of the details. Including that the colonists were not actually lost, that they had been picked up and returned to England by an unexpected passing vessel. This is a detail that I use as a bench mark for the accuracy of other accounts I read or watch that deal with the Roanoke Colony. Now it has been many years since I did that report and memory is not a absolute tool of precision, and I was just a kid (probably between 14 and 16 most likely), so I’m sure my recollection of what I’d read in the sources I used may have been distorted by time. But that one detail about the colonists being picked up by another ship is very clear and was a pivotal point of my paper And presentation. That brings us to THIS book. The author does in fact corroborate that the first colonists were in fact picked up by an expedition led by Sir Francis Drake (who had rescued them was a detail I couldn’t recall), and that the resupply ships returned to Roanoke just after these colonists had left with Drake (clearly, the author did his homework as far as I’m concerned). So my benchmark was met, but now I have to mention how much more this book contributes. Not only are events of the Roanoke Colony (actually Colonies would be more accurate) related here, but the author goes into quite a bit of background on the various players and events which led to the decision to start the colony in the first place and why the island was selected, including the disinformation and outright lies that were used to secure funds and volunteers for the colony. The author also spends several papers going over the possible theories on what happened to the colonists (some of which pretty outlandish, but they do have some crazy supporters) and then caps everything off with one last (and probably most likely) theory that nicely weaves thing into a satisfying conclusion. One last aspect that I particularly enjoyed was the authors choice of narrators, Manteo (a Croatan native) and Wanchese (a Roanoke native) had both traveled to England before the colony was even started and returned to their peoples when the colony was founded. Their involvement in these events, and inclusion as narrators in this book, elevates the narrative and adds some perspective to this colonial attempt, highlighting the atrocities that the colonists perpetrated on the native peoples, and illustrating the fundamental arrogance, ignorance and absurdities of the colonists and those funding the endeavor to begin with. This book is well constructed, entertaining and (although it is not well documented, as there are no footnotes/endnotes or a citation list; the author does offer a couple of primary sources in the afterword, but it doesn’t feel at all complete) well researched. It was definitely an engaging and educational volume, that doesn’t lose one bit of enjoyment. I would definitely recommend this for anyone interested in the Roanoke Colony or to young readers interested in history and historical mysteries.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jaime K

    I won this in a Goodreads giveaway, and it is utterly fantastic. The introduction gives some great historical context while the concluding author notes provide research-based context. Manteo and Wanchese, two native Secotans, tell the story and help us all explore the clues among the facts about the Roanoke colony...and how it may have disappeared. Manteo was of the Croatan subtribe and Wanchese was Roanoke. I'm not a huge fan as to how the people are drawn but I love the scenes, colours, diagrams I won this in a Goodreads giveaway, and it is utterly fantastic. The introduction gives some great historical context while the concluding author notes provide research-based context. Manteo and Wanchese, two native Secotans, tell the story and help us all explore the clues among the facts about the Roanoke colony...and how it may have disappeared. Manteo was of the Croatan subtribe and Wanchese was Roanoke. I'm not a huge fan as to how the people are drawn but I love the scenes, colours, diagrams, and the multiple ways in which the story/information is presented. I love the reminder that America WAS settled before the English (and Spanish) arrived. It's very interesting to learn of how the natives farmed, made things, ate, and lived overall. They all encompassed spiritual and warrior aspects, which are also detailed. We get some information on Queen Elizabeth I as well as the Spanish Empire. Grenville was a scary tyrant; Lane was arrogant and demanded servitude from the natives. They were among the first English colonists before making bad connections with the natives and packing up all of Roanoke to head back and let everyone know that Roanoke is not a good place for them to settle. But before that, someone else left 300 freed slaves left on the Roanoke Island. Mystery #1. We learn about how an artist named White, who was among the first group, was named governor to head the second group of colonists to head to Chesapeake. Their pilot Fernandez had other ideas and led them all back to Roanoke. Why? Mystery #2. White ends up going back to England and three years later arrives back to find a palisade around a non-empty village. Thus we are at the heart of the Roanoke mystery, the one that has had everyone scratching their heads and seeking answers since the 1580s. I finally learned what Croatoan is, so that is awesome. I like that the multiple theories are presented at the end, with facts/true history woven into the theories. I also liked the info on Captain John Smith!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    The cover of this new History Comics title caught my eye, and I immediately checked to see if it had been reviewed yet on the American Indians in Children's Literature blog. Since it hadn't, I thought I'd read it for myself to see if I thought the representation of Native Americans was problematic. Every person in the book is a cartoon, so I didn't consider the drawing style to necessarily be a factor. Immediately I noticed that there's a "Consultant on Algonquin culture" listed on the copyright The cover of this new History Comics title caught my eye, and I immediately checked to see if it had been reviewed yet on the American Indians in Children's Literature blog. Since it hadn't, I thought I'd read it for myself to see if I thought the representation of Native Americans was problematic. Every person in the book is a cartoon, so I didn't consider the drawing style to necessarily be a factor. Immediately I noticed that there's a "Consultant on Algonquin culture" listed on the copyright page. There are several pages at the beginning of the book dedicated to the Native American tribes of North Carolina, with specific information about the individual tribes and how they lived. Essentially, I believe the content to be well-researched and presented, but will be interested to see if it eventually is reviewed on the blog. The details of this story are actually pretty complex, covering the politics of Europe, the motivations of a lot of different characters, and the challenges of the people who weren't just trying to be pirates. This book does a good job of trying to explain the specifics in kid-friendly but extensive detail. The author's note at the end has a great explanation of primary and secondary sources. This series is a great option for those who have read all of the Nathan Hale historical graphic novels already.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Helen

    I recently read another History Comics and really liked that one. However, I am not feeling the same about the Roanoke Colony. The main thing that is missing is that the storytelling in this one was not as interesting to follow. When I was reading the Great Chicago Fire, there was a main story between a brother and sister as they traveled through Chicago during the fire. As the reader you learned facts along the way, while also reading what was happening with the characters. The author did a gre I recently read another History Comics and really liked that one. However, I am not feeling the same about the Roanoke Colony. The main thing that is missing is that the storytelling in this one was not as interesting to follow. When I was reading the Great Chicago Fire, there was a main story between a brother and sister as they traveled through Chicago during the fire. As the reader you learned facts along the way, while also reading what was happening with the characters. The author did a great job and even thought it was informative I didn't feel like I was reading something for school or a textbook. Sadly, the history comics for The Roanoke Colony felt exactly like that, a boring textbook. There was a storyline but it was not interesting and it didn't feel important to the book. It was more of facts overload with two narrators. I would recommend the previous book I read in the series but not this one. I think that kids will also have difficulty reading it unless they are history lovers or reading it for their fourth grade VA History learning.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    A fascinating and engaging look at the facts and the theories about what happened to the colonists of Roanoke Island. Told from the perspectives of two disagreeing Algonquians, who also traveled and studied in England, the story is very well rounded, giving perspectives not often heard. I was delighted to read accounts that I had not heard before mixed in with sections and names that I have heard before. This was really well done and I would highly recommend it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Meredith Ann

    I'm a fan of First Second's Maker Comics and Science Comics so I was excited when I heard they'd be starting a new series of History Comics. This is a nice start to it. There's a lot presented here and sometimes I wasn't quite sure of the intended age range (middle grade? YA? in between?) but overall, it's a great way to get more history into kids' hands and a really useful resource. I can see these being used for many a research project! I'm a fan of First Second's Maker Comics and Science Comics so I was excited when I heard they'd be starting a new series of History Comics. This is a nice start to it. There's a lot presented here and sometimes I wasn't quite sure of the intended age range (middle grade? YA? in between?) but overall, it's a great way to get more history into kids' hands and a really useful resource. I can see these being used for many a research project!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    Fun, educational, full of theories and light research that’s just enough to get kids into wanting to read more about the subject.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tedi

    This was a very comprehensive and fairly easy to follow graphic novel telling the history of the Roanoke Colony. I found this to be a very compelling way to share significant moments in history and especially enjoyed the humor that was added into the text. I am thinking about using this graphic novel series as part of a historical research report unit with students and am slightly concerned that this will be a bit too much for my sixth graders, as it is a lot to follow - not because of any choic This was a very comprehensive and fairly easy to follow graphic novel telling the history of the Roanoke Colony. I found this to be a very compelling way to share significant moments in history and especially enjoyed the humor that was added into the text. I am thinking about using this graphic novel series as part of a historical research report unit with students and am slightly concerned that this will be a bit too much for my sixth graders, as it is a lot to follow - not because of any choice the author made but because history does not follow linear timelines no matter how much we would like it too. This graphic novel would be best used independently by older students. However, from a pure enjoyment standpoint, I really liked this approach and learned a lot about Roanoke that I had not known before.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Becky B

    Told from the perspective of Manteo and Wanchese, two Native Americans from Algonquin tribes who met the Roanoke colonists and visited England, this graphic novel relates the history we know about the settling of Roanoke Island in present North Carolina, USA in the 16th century before and after the English arrived (so detailed info on the way of life of the Algonquin tribes there and then the settlers’ set up), the challenges the English settlers faced and their relationship with the surrounding Told from the perspective of Manteo and Wanchese, two Native Americans from Algonquin tribes who met the Roanoke colonists and visited England, this graphic novel relates the history we know about the settling of Roanoke Island in present North Carolina, USA in the 16th century before and after the English arrived (so detailed info on the way of life of the Algonquin tribes there and then the settlers’ set up), the challenges the English settlers faced and their relationship with the surrounding Native Americans, and then the disappearance of the 2nd round of settlers when their governor returned from England after a 3 year absence. Following that, various theories people have developed about what happened to the missing colonists are presented, and a look at what evidence really exists and which theory the evidence most supports. This was a highly informative look at life for both Native Americans and English colonists in Roanoke. If you’re looking for a great crash course on the history and culture of Algonquin tribes, this does a great job presenting that at the beginning of the book. I thought the author did a very fair presentation of all the sides involved: Manteo, Wanchese, their tribes and other tribes, the English, the Spanish, the privateers and pirates, the Queen of England, the King of Spain, etc. No one comes out looking perfect. Everyone was flawed, and nobody handled everything perfectly. Of course, some, like the first blood-thirsty, power-crazed, greedy governor of Roanoke had very little positive qualities and he is presented thus. Those who were doing what they thought best and were possibly misguided or overly optimistic are presented as flawed but well-meaning with the reader left to draw their own conclusions. And cultural misunderstandings are also enlightened. I feel like every US history book has to make at least a passing mention of the Roanoke colony, but very few present what collective historical knowledge now presents as the most likely answer to the mystery so I learned a lot about what we do know from historical sources. I think some just want to preserve the mystery so they don’t really talk about actual evidence. Of course, the book is fair in presenting ALL kinds of theories including Algonquin folklore and alien involvement. The theories are then evaluated based on the evidence available. It provides a good model of how to approach historical mysteries where maybe we don’t have 100% conclusive information but we have some pretty good evidence that can point us to a theory that seems the most plausible. While the other debut History Comics book on Chicago’s Great Fire seems aimed at the middle grade crowd, this one seems more aimed at the young adult crowd due to the amount of information and the violence level. They have very different feels. Both are great at presenting history in engaging ways, but different. So even if you’ve read one of these don’t assume every book will have the same style/feel. Highly recommended to anyone interested in unsolved mysteries, US history, Native American cultures, and graphic novel fans. Notes on content [based on the ARC]: No language issues. No sex scenes. It talks about how Queen Elizabeth I like to flirt a lot and Sir Walter Raleigh was considered a sexy man and like to flirt with her, but nothing beyond talking about flirting. Violent clashes between privateers and ships, Spanish/English, English colonists and Native Americans, Native Americans with each other, and humans vs nature are described. Some gruesome details about some of these events are included, violence depicted on page is cartoon-ized so not as gory as if it were realistically painted but some still disturbing things presented and deaths on page. I received an ARC of this title from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kate Waggoner

    Thank you to #NetGalley and First Second Books for allowing me the opportunity to read a digital ARC of History Comics: The Roanoke Colony by Chris Schweizer. This graphic novel will be released June 30, 2020. All opinions are my own. This graphic novel focuses on the question what happened to the Roanoke colonists. To answer this question, the novel investigates how the settlers ended up in Roanoke and what the people already living in Roanoke felt about the newcomers. It is full of history, qu Thank you to #NetGalley and First Second Books for allowing me the opportunity to read a digital ARC of History Comics: The Roanoke Colony by Chris Schweizer. This graphic novel will be released June 30, 2020. All opinions are my own. This graphic novel focuses on the question what happened to the Roanoke colonists. To answer this question, the novel investigates how the settlers ended up in Roanoke and what the people already living in Roanoke felt about the newcomers. It is full of history, queens, battles, sea voyages, disputes, violence, and pirates. Schweizer uses information from primary and secondary sources, archaeological findings, and a little bit of speculation to present the story of the missing colonists and theorize about what may have happened to them. I really enjoyed this graphic novel. The lost colony of Roanoke is a topic I use in my classroom to teach evidence based writing and my students love learning about the colony and all the theories of what may have occurred. One of my favorite things about this novel is that it doesn't start with the colonists disappearing or even landing in Roanoke. Rather, it goes back even further to provide a historical and political understanding of what led the settlers to Roanoke in the first place and why it was so difficult for White to get back to the colonists after he left for fresh supplies. There is so much information in this graphic novel that at times it is almost overwhelming, but I think it would be an excellent tool to use in the classroom to discuss the topic and develop a deeper understanding of it (I even pre-ordered a copy for my classroom library). I honestly can't wait to share this book with my students to see their reactions and to build it into my current writing unit.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Carin

    I was intrigued by this new history graphic novel series, brought to you by the same folks who make Science Comics, and since this is near where I used to live (kinda. Adjoining state) and one of my accounts had a question about it, I jumped in. The two native peoples on the front cover are actually the narrators, and while one guy likes the colonists and lives with them, the other guy, who was at first welcoming, ends up thinking the English people should leave, and fighting them. Yes, they look I was intrigued by this new history graphic novel series, brought to you by the same folks who make Science Comics, and since this is near where I used to live (kinda. Adjoining state) and one of my accounts had a question about it, I jumped in. The two native peoples on the front cover are actually the narrators, and while one guy likes the colonists and lives with them, the other guy, who was at first welcoming, ends up thinking the English people should leave, and fighting them. Yes, they look rather like caricatures, but so does everyone in the book (except for the dreamy Sir Walter Raleigh.) That's just the illustration style. You learn lots of fun facts and then there's the disappearance. With that, they present several theories, from the likely to the cockamamie (aliens!) which is rather fun. As the other History Comics won't have a mystery at their core, I'm not sure how structurally different they are. But this was a lot of fun, really informative, and I especially liked how the story was told from the perspectives of the Native Americans. (No, the author is not Native American, which is unfortunate, but not, to my mind, reason to dismiss the book.)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Molli B.

    While I enjoyed The Great Chicago Fire from this series, I really liked this one. I learned a lot more from this one (the narrators make a lot of asides to educate us about things that were happening around that time—we get good lessons about Queen Liz, Walter Raleigh, privateers, all that stuff (it made me miss those huge pirate books I read a few months ago!!!)). As with the first, I think this book does a great job with the framing—it's from the viewpoint of two Native Americans who lived dur While I enjoyed The Great Chicago Fire from this series, I really liked this one. I learned a lot more from this one (the narrators make a lot of asides to educate us about things that were happening around that time—we get good lessons about Queen Liz, Walter Raleigh, privateers, all that stuff (it made me miss those huge pirate books I read a few months ago!!!)). As with the first, I think this book does a great job with the framing—it's from the viewpoint of two Native Americans who lived during the time in which the book is set. I feel like this one is aimed at slightly older kids than the Chicago book. 11-13 maybe? There are a lot of references to how hot Sir Walter Raleigh is :) It's also much funnier (despite how terrible a lot of the story is! Folks, spoiler alert, White people are pretty awful!!). I think the author does a good job handling how terrible things were in a way that was age appropriate and not horribly depressing. I know there's a fine line... I think the author did okay with it. If you have a young history buff in your family and they're looking for something new, I bet this will lead to hours and hours of their own research!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    A fairly balanced and informative exploration of one of the oldest mysteries of American history. Schweizer starts his story well before the actual foundation of the Roanoke colony, something that makes sense when it's time to start laying out theories. A few of the crazier theories are represented (aliens! wendigo!) but there's enough ambiguity that there are several plausible possibilities. I felt like Schweizer was fair towards the perspective of the Native population, but I'd like to see the A fairly balanced and informative exploration of one of the oldest mysteries of American history. Schweizer starts his story well before the actual foundation of the Roanoke colony, something that makes sense when it's time to start laying out theories. A few of the crazier theories are represented (aliens! wendigo!) but there's enough ambiguity that there are several plausible possibilities. I felt like Schweizer was fair towards the perspective of the Native population, but I'd like to see the perspective of somebody from a tribe in that area to see their reaction, too. As a note, this is a series in the same way that Science Comics is a series. They'll all be about some subject in the general field of history, but there will be different authors and, likely, different approaches. As such, some will be better than others.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Donald

    "The greatest unsolved mystery in American history!" Well, it's always fascinated me, for as long as I can remember... and I'm 50! And this may very well be the most thorough book about it, even if it is a 'comic' book! Lots of background history about what lead up to the colony, and lots of theories about what happened to those settlers. I still don't know what to believe, though alien abduction seems to be the least likely to me! Good use of humor to keep it interesting, especially for younger r "The greatest unsolved mystery in American history!" Well, it's always fascinated me, for as long as I can remember... and I'm 50! And this may very well be the most thorough book about it, even if it is a 'comic' book! Lots of background history about what lead up to the colony, and lots of theories about what happened to those settlers. I still don't know what to believe, though alien abduction seems to be the least likely to me! Good use of humor to keep it interesting, especially for younger readers. Good illustrations too, especially of the colony layout and the ship! Not as good - Queen Elizabeth looks a lot like the evil entity from Stephen King's "It"!?!? But overall, a fine book about an amazing mystery!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Marie

    A fantastic upper-elementary/middle grades read! Nonfiction graphic novel that presents all the known facts about the lost Roanoke colony and lets the reader decide what might have happened. I loved that the whole book is "told" by two Native Americans who were present with the colonists. They are presented as good friends who each have a slightly different take on the settlers and their good-natured disagreements sometimes made me laugh. The author does a good job infusing a little humor in a l A fantastic upper-elementary/middle grades read! Nonfiction graphic novel that presents all the known facts about the lost Roanoke colony and lets the reader decide what might have happened. I loved that the whole book is "told" by two Native Americans who were present with the colonists. They are presented as good friends who each have a slightly different take on the settlers and their good-natured disagreements sometimes made me laugh. The author does a good job infusing a little humor in a lot of other places too while still presenting all the facts. I'm a North Carolinian who has been to Roanoke and I learned new things in the reading of this book. I immediately looked up the author to see if they have more Mystery History comics... they don't, and that made me sad. Very well done!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kennedy

    It's easy to see that this book is inspired by the Nathan Hale graphic novels: they are both graphic novels of historical events with narrators who are directly addressing readers. I enjoy Hale's books a great deal and find that even as an adult I learn new information; this book was no different. I've read about the Roanoke colony before and find the mystery fascinating and this book added to my understanding of it. I really liked the short write-up at the end giving a little more information. It's easy to see that this book is inspired by the Nathan Hale graphic novels: they are both graphic novels of historical events with narrators who are directly addressing readers. I enjoy Hale's books a great deal and find that even as an adult I learn new information; this book was no different. I've read about the Roanoke colony before and find the mystery fascinating and this book added to my understanding of it. I really liked the short write-up at the end giving a little more information. With the popularity of Hale's books and a limitless number of historical events to cover, I suspect that this new series will be a hot item for kids. All in all, a great book!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rosemary

    Before the pilgrims set foot on Plymouth Rock; before Captain John Smith landed at Jamestown, the first English settlers arrived in what we now call the United States, on Roanoke Island. Colony governor John White returned to England to get supplies for the colony, but we delayed for three years. When he returned, the colony was abandoned; the settlers, gone. No trace. It's one of the biggest mysteries in American history, and Chris Schweizer investigates in this History Comic. Similar in format Before the pilgrims set foot on Plymouth Rock; before Captain John Smith landed at Jamestown, the first English settlers arrived in what we now call the United States, on Roanoke Island. Colony governor John White returned to England to get supplies for the colony, but we delayed for three years. When he returned, the colony was abandoned; the settlers, gone. No trace. It's one of the biggest mysteries in American history, and Chris Schweizer investigates in this History Comic. Similar in format to Science Comics, we get two guides through the story: in this case, Wanchese a Roanoke Indian, and Manteo, a Croatan chief, inspired by the actual Native Americans who met with the settlers and Sir Walter Raleigh in the earliest days of the settlement. At once a history of the Roanoke Colony and the politics behind its settlement and a discussion of Native Americans and the settlers' condescending treatment of them from the beginning, The Roanoke Colony is an historical mystery filled with explorers, pirates, jealous queens, shady businessmen, and a brewing war. Very readable and with cartoon-realistic illustrations, this will enchant a new generation of budding historians the same way In Search Of pulled me in when I was a kid. The book examines theories, some plausible and some... well, out there, that persist as people try to work out what happened to the colonists at Roanoke. An afterword from the author on what we know about Roanoke includes a discussion of primary and secondary sources: hugely helpful when working on research reports!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    As a native North Carolinian, I have always been interested in the mystery of the Roanoke Colony and what happened to Virginia Dare, the first English child born in America, and the other colonists who disappeared without a trace except for the word “Croatoan” carved into a tree. This children’s graphic novel does a great job of explaining the history of the story and offering theories as to what happened to the lost colony. The book is narrated by Manteo and Wanchese, Native Americans with ties As a native North Carolinian, I have always been interested in the mystery of the Roanoke Colony and what happened to Virginia Dare, the first English child born in America, and the other colonists who disappeared without a trace except for the word “Croatoan” carved into a tree. This children’s graphic novel does a great job of explaining the history of the story and offering theories as to what happened to the lost colony. The book is narrated by Manteo and Wanchese, Native Americans with ties to the Roanoke story, and includes enough juvenile humor to appeal to the younger set while still providing historical facts.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    I received a digital ARC of this book from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. This graphic novel reminded me a lot of the Nathan Hale's Hazardous Tales series, in a good way. It explained a lot about Roanoke and early Native American and English relations. I liked that it did not skirt over the horrible things the settlers did to the natives and how much they disrupted their way of life. I also liked the Native narrators. I think kids will find this one enterta I received a digital ARC of this book from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. This graphic novel reminded me a lot of the Nathan Hale's Hazardous Tales series, in a good way. It explained a lot about Roanoke and early Native American and English relations. I liked that it did not skirt over the horrible things the settlers did to the natives and how much they disrupted their way of life. I also liked the Native narrators. I think kids will find this one entertaining and intriguing.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    Really enjoyed the presentation of this, with both fact and humor. Very reminiscent of Nathan Hale's Hazardous Tales, which is a favorite of mine. I especially appreciated how there was no sugar-coating how violent and destructive the English were, how they left death and misery in their wake. There was no "positive" spin, just plain and simple facts. Again, I appreciated this approach. Thank you to First Second/Macmillan and Goodreads for the First Reads review copy! Really enjoyed the presentation of this, with both fact and humor. Very reminiscent of Nathan Hale's Hazardous Tales, which is a favorite of mine. I especially appreciated how there was no sugar-coating how violent and destructive the English were, how they left death and misery in their wake. There was no "positive" spin, just plain and simple facts. Again, I appreciated this approach. Thank you to First Second/Macmillan and Goodreads for the First Reads review copy!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Suzan Jackson

    History Comics - I loved these! Fascinating, engrossing, and beautifully illustrated. Check out my reviews of The Roanoke Colony: America's First Mystery & The Great Chicago Fire: Rising from the Ashes. History class in school was never this fun or interesting! Full reviews of both books, plus sample illustrations: https://bookbybook.blogspot.com/2020/... History Comics - I loved these! Fascinating, engrossing, and beautifully illustrated. Check out my reviews of The Roanoke Colony: America's First Mystery & The Great Chicago Fire: Rising from the Ashes. History class in school was never this fun or interesting! Full reviews of both books, plus sample illustrations: https://bookbybook.blogspot.com/2020/...

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sheri S.

    I appreciate how the author interests children and teens with a comic book style history lesson. I've always been curious about what happened to the colony at Roanoke and the book provides a thorough look at the mystery. He proposes possible explanations for the disappearance and reviews where and how his theories originated. I appreciate how the author interests children and teens with a comic book style history lesson. I've always been curious about what happened to the colony at Roanoke and the book provides a thorough look at the mystery. He proposes possible explanations for the disappearance and reviews where and how his theories originated.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Katie Haasch

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Fun and easy comic on the mystery of the Roanoke Colony. It’s told through the eyes of two Native Americans leading up to the settlement of Roanoke and the disappearance of the colonists. Both Natives offer a number of theories as too what has happened to the colonists. The question remains- what happened to them?

  28. 5 out of 5

    Brian Clopper

    Excellent history comic! I've always loved the Lost Colony mystery. I even used it in my book, Ghost Coast. This book is beautiful and well written! Excellent color choices too! Would love to see a book on the Bill of Rights in this line as that's a big topic in fifth grade. Excellent history comic! I've always loved the Lost Colony mystery. I even used it in my book, Ghost Coast. This book is beautiful and well written! Excellent color choices too! Would love to see a book on the Bill of Rights in this line as that's a big topic in fifth grade.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tara A

    History in a graphic format. What a fun way to learn history! This tells the story of the Lost Colony, including background into English/Spanish relations, English/American Indian relations, and various theories as to what happened to the colonists.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sonic

    The first colony was set up as a base for British privateers i.e. Pirates to help them steal gold from the Spanish who were stealing from, exploiting, and murdering, the peoples and cultures of the Americas. Interesting.

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