Hot Best Seller

Difficult Women: A History of Feminism in 11 Fights

Availability: Ready to download

Well-behaved women don’t make history: difficult women do. Feminism’s success is down to complicated, contradictory, imperfect women, who fought each other as well as fighting for equal rights. Helen Lewis argues that too many of these pioneers have been whitewashed or forgotten in our modern search for feel-good, inspirational heroines. It’s time to reclaim the history of Well-behaved women don’t make history: difficult women do. Feminism’s success is down to complicated, contradictory, imperfect women, who fought each other as well as fighting for equal rights. Helen Lewis argues that too many of these pioneers have been whitewashed or forgotten in our modern search for feel-good, inspirational heroines. It’s time to reclaim the history of feminism as a history of difficult women. In this book, you’ll meet the working-class suffragettes who advocated bombings and arson; the princess who discovered why so many women were having bad sex; the pioneer of the refuge movement who became a men’s rights activist; the ‘striker in a sari’ who terrified Margaret Thatcher; the wronged Victorian wife who definitely wasn’t sleeping with the prime minister; and the lesbian politician who outraged the country. Taking the story up to the present with the twenty-first-century campaign for abortion services, Helen Lewis reveals the unvarnished – and unfinished – history of women’s rights. Drawing on archival research and interviews, Difficult Women is a funny, fearless and sometimes shocking narrative history, which shows why the feminist movement has succeeded – and what it should do next. The battle is difficult, and we must be difficult too.


Compare

Well-behaved women don’t make history: difficult women do. Feminism’s success is down to complicated, contradictory, imperfect women, who fought each other as well as fighting for equal rights. Helen Lewis argues that too many of these pioneers have been whitewashed or forgotten in our modern search for feel-good, inspirational heroines. It’s time to reclaim the history of Well-behaved women don’t make history: difficult women do. Feminism’s success is down to complicated, contradictory, imperfect women, who fought each other as well as fighting for equal rights. Helen Lewis argues that too many of these pioneers have been whitewashed or forgotten in our modern search for feel-good, inspirational heroines. It’s time to reclaim the history of feminism as a history of difficult women. In this book, you’ll meet the working-class suffragettes who advocated bombings and arson; the princess who discovered why so many women were having bad sex; the pioneer of the refuge movement who became a men’s rights activist; the ‘striker in a sari’ who terrified Margaret Thatcher; the wronged Victorian wife who definitely wasn’t sleeping with the prime minister; and the lesbian politician who outraged the country. Taking the story up to the present with the twenty-first-century campaign for abortion services, Helen Lewis reveals the unvarnished – and unfinished – history of women’s rights. Drawing on archival research and interviews, Difficult Women is a funny, fearless and sometimes shocking narrative history, which shows why the feminist movement has succeeded – and what it should do next. The battle is difficult, and we must be difficult too.

30 review for Difficult Women: A History of Feminism in 11 Fights

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dannii Elle

    Just as the title suggests, this non-fiction was split into eleven distinct but overlapping sections that each focused on a different area in the fight for equality between the sexes. Changing societal opinion is never an easy task and these individuals, both historically and in our contemporary society, who chose to go against this accepted grain are often branded as bossy, petulant, witchy, bitchy, frigid, and so much worse. In short, they are difficult women. I found this essay collection to b Just as the title suggests, this non-fiction was split into eleven distinct but overlapping sections that each focused on a different area in the fight for equality between the sexes. Changing societal opinion is never an easy task and these individuals, both historically and in our contemporary society, who chose to go against this accepted grain are often branded as bossy, petulant, witchy, bitchy, frigid, and so much worse. In short, they are difficult women. I found this essay collection to be empowering, illuminating, highly accessible, and informative. Every chapter was well-researched, highly detailed, easy to follow, and provided me with many names, dates, laws, and areas of history to go away and research into further. This both depicted how far we have come whilst also making us aware for how far we still have to go. I was as enraged as I was engrossed and this did its job perfectly of bolstering the reader to do their own part, no matter how small, in the ceaseless fight for equality.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Emily B

    Definitely an informative and accessible book. If you have an interest in feminism then I would recommend this book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    ARC received in exchange for an honest review Feminism isn't a single idea, and is interpreted differently by every individual and their experiences. 'Difficult Women' never professes to be the definitive guide to what feminism is, but rather it is a book that is just one interpretation and one voice. However, what it does do is link a number of historical battles and difficult women together, distilled into 11 categories spill into the modern feminist era. I took a lot away from from this. From ARC received in exchange for an honest review Feminism isn't a single idea, and is interpreted differently by every individual and their experiences. 'Difficult Women' never professes to be the definitive guide to what feminism is, but rather it is a book that is just one interpretation and one voice. However, what it does do is link a number of historical battles and difficult women together, distilled into 11 categories spill into the modern feminist era. I took a lot away from from this. From the different women that are given a fresh voice, to hearing how each of them define how they view feminism or their fight for equality was incredibly facinating. None of these women are perfect, all are difficult, and all of them are complicated individuals. Some of these women included Annie Kenny, who was deeply involved in the Suffragette movement. Exasperated at lack of movement towards women's votes, she moved towards more extreme forms of activism in a heavily male dominated legal system. Any woman who fought for these rights was played down, brushed off as unimportant. Helen Lewis really helped bring to life what Annie Kenny was a person, a working class woman who just wanted to have what men had, and has somehow been left to fall into obscurity because she never fitted the Suffragette narrative of this upper class, well spoken woman. There's also Marie Stopes, who was one for the first to grant access to birth control to desperate women. Her clinics granted women a degree of sexual liberation they'd never seen before, yet she was also incredibly snobbish, conservative, anti semetic and anti lesbian. She believed in eugenics and was also vehemently against abortion. Difficult women are not perfect, and sometimes their agenda, although good for the masses, is undertaken for selfish and flawed reasons. The chapter of time was perhaps the most personal for me. It talks of the divergence of pay between men and women in their 30s, as women move to part time and unskilled work in order to take on the role of motherhood and child carer as this is what society has come to expect of women. Women as a result have less downtime, and less free time in general compared to their male counterparts because society often makes us feel guilty into doing the majority of the housework and organising. Our time never seems to be our own, and this rang so true for myself as a mother. Interesting deep dive into some facinating 'difficult women' that helps open the doors into further research on feminism and equal rights.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    Feminism is a fight for equality-- it doesn't come from or aim for perfection. Here, Helen Lewis gives a welcome intro to some of the women who might not always have got it right, but still tried to get it done. This is her attempt to make sure progress doesn't erase the struggle. We need to know how we got to now and who fought for the rights we take for granted in order to take their successes and move them forward. It's a determinedly provocative book, a call for everyone to look harder at th Feminism is a fight for equality-- it doesn't come from or aim for perfection. Here, Helen Lewis gives a welcome intro to some of the women who might not always have got it right, but still tried to get it done. This is her attempt to make sure progress doesn't erase the struggle. We need to know how we got to now and who fought for the rights we take for granted in order to take their successes and move them forward. It's a determinedly provocative book, a call for everyone to look harder at the world around them, understand diverse voices by listening to what they say, ACT for equality. There's so much more to do, but in reading this you can be bolstered by seeing what can be achieved when women decide to be DIFFICULT. ARC via Netgalley

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lou

    Difficult Women is a perfectly fitting title for this book; not because they were difficult but because it is definitely how they would’ve been portrayed at the time. Difficult in this sense actually means empowered, inspired and not afraid to speak the brutal truth. Not simply accepting that women should just put up and shut up about the lack of rights we have or once had in comparison to men. I am a firm believer in egalitarianism (equal rights for everyone) so I would class myself as a femini Difficult Women is a perfectly fitting title for this book; not because they were difficult but because it is definitely how they would’ve been portrayed at the time. Difficult in this sense actually means empowered, inspired and not afraid to speak the brutal truth. Not simply accepting that women should just put up and shut up about the lack of rights we have or once had in comparison to men. I am a firm believer in egalitarianism (equal rights for everyone) so I would class myself as a feminist but also someone who seeks equality across the board. I have read many, many books on this topic yet this was so refreshing and original showcasing those who have often been neglected in terms of their achievements. Sometimes fact-based nonfiction can be dry and a slog but I found this was eminently readable and raced through its thoroughly enjoyable pages like I would a fiction book. I urge those of you who wish to learn more about the history of feminism to pick this up. It’s well worth your time. Many thanks to Jonathan Cape for an ARC.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Vishy

    I discovered Helen Lewis' 'Difficult Women : A History of Feminism in 11 Fights' when I was browsing in the bookshop last week. There was only one copy in the bookshop and the book looked very fascinating and I couldn't resist getting it. In 'Difficult Women : A History of Feminism in 11 Fights', Helen Lewis tries to gives us an unconventional history of feminism. She looks at feminism in the past 150 years through 11 different themes, or fights as she calls them. Many of the themes are familiar I discovered Helen Lewis' 'Difficult Women : A History of Feminism in 11 Fights' when I was browsing in the bookshop last week. There was only one copy in the bookshop and the book looked very fascinating and I couldn't resist getting it. In 'Difficult Women : A History of Feminism in 11 Fights', Helen Lewis tries to gives us an unconventional history of feminism. She looks at feminism in the past 150 years through 11 different themes, or fights as she calls them. Many of the themes are familiar to us, like the right to education, the right to vote, the right to equal pay etc. But the fascinating thing about the book is this. Though Helen Lewis mentions some of the feminist pioneers, she mentions them mostly in passing. What she does is, she goes and searches for and discovers the feminists who were well known or who played important roles during their time, but who are forgotten today, either because they have complex, inconvenient histories, or they fell out with other prominent feminists and so have been written out of history, or they were not considered feminists during their time, or they have just been plain ignored. These are the difficult women that Helen Lewis writes about. What follows is an wonderful list of amazing women and their inspiring achievements – like the footballer Lily Parr who was so famous for her football skills that she and her team used to draw crowds of 50,000 during the 1910s, Jayaben Desai who led one of the biggest worker strikes in the '70s demanding better pay and benefits, Erin Prizzey who has been written out of feminist history today but who during her time ran the first refuges in Britain for victims of domestic violence, Maureen Colquhoun the first ever lesbian MP from Britain whom everyone seems to have forgotten now, Sophia Jex-Blake who alongwith six other women fought for the right of women to pursue a medical education and inspite of the universities trying every trick to deny them that education, how she and her friends finally won and became the first female doctors in Britain – the book tells the stories of these and other amazing women. When I read what Colette Devlin – who as a 67-year old, fought for abortion rights alongside two other friends in Northern Ireland – said : "I believe that I have a legal duty to uphold good law, but I have a moral duty to disobey bad law." I got goosebumps. 'Difficult Women' is a beautiful, wonderful, inspiring book, which is guaranteed to make you angry and happy, and give you goosebumps. I am glad I read it. Have you read 'Difficult Women'? What do you think about it?

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    ‘The idea of role models is not necessarily a bad one, but the way they are used in feminism can dilute a radical political movement into feel-good inspiration porn.’ A wonderfully unconventional history of feminism that rejects the static image of female revolutionaries as suffering saints. Lewis has a sharp and witty style, and her objective is clear from the onset: championing lesser known figures, such as Marie Bonaparte (who conducted pioneering research into female sexual pleasure), Caroline ‘The idea of role models is not necessarily a bad one, but the way they are used in feminism can dilute a radical political movement into feel-good inspiration porn.’ A wonderfully unconventional history of feminism that rejects the static image of female revolutionaries as suffering saints. Lewis has a sharp and witty style, and her objective is clear from the onset: championing lesser known figures, such as Marie Bonaparte (who conducted pioneering research into female sexual pleasure), Caroline Norton and Erin Pizzey, and all their complications. Whilst the early chapters are highly readable – ‘Sex’ is particularly fascinating, detailing ‘the myth of the vaginal orgasm’, hell yes – the later instalments lose their authority. Lewis’ prose strays occasionally into irrelevant anecdote and becomes increasingly saturated with fact and quotation to the point where her voice no longer guides the reader. It seems that she attempts to shoehorn in as many obscure figures as possible; so many ‘difficult women’ jostle for attention in these later chapters that Lewis ultimately loses her thread of argument. As a result, the engagement wanes exponentially; I skim-read from about the halfway mark. It is an incredibly important argument that Lewis hopes to make here, and her intentions are honourable – but the lengthy execution lacks focus. With thanks to the publisher for the proof copy.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    Feminism is complicated and so are the women who fight for their rights. It is rare to read a book on this subject that does not hail the movement's heroines as perfect women, that speaks about the complicated issues that dominate the movement or even dare touch the subjects of the fighting, cancelling and namecalling of feminists amongst each other. It's a subject fraught with division. I think that Helen Lewis did a great job of giving glimpses of just how complicated and complex feminism is a Feminism is complicated and so are the women who fight for their rights. It is rare to read a book on this subject that does not hail the movement's heroines as perfect women, that speaks about the complicated issues that dominate the movement or even dare touch the subjects of the fighting, cancelling and namecalling of feminists amongst each other. It's a subject fraught with division. I think that Helen Lewis did a great job of giving glimpses of just how complicated and complex feminism is and how far there is to go. Yes, at times, she struggles a bit to make the chapters more coherent, but sleeping on it I guess this was inevitable. I did disagree with her on certain things, but this is definitely a book that invites the opinion of others to the table. It was the first book on this subject in a long time that told me things I had not heard about before and where I felt that one can be a complex woman and still have a place at the feminist table. As a very clever friend of mine once said: "You will get more things wrong in life than right, but the things you get right will make all the difference."

  9. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    This is an excellent primer on and fascinating insight into the history of feminism (UK-focused but global in reach) that I would gleefully shove into the hands of younger people in particular. I considered myself pretty across most of the topics discussed but still feel I learned a great deal, especially about lesser-known women (learning about Lily Parr, all along, was the key to getting me interested in sport!) and the infighting endemic to any struggle for progress because PEOPLE ARE PEOPLE This is an excellent primer on and fascinating insight into the history of feminism (UK-focused but global in reach) that I would gleefully shove into the hands of younger people in particular. I considered myself pretty across most of the topics discussed but still feel I learned a great deal, especially about lesser-known women (learning about Lily Parr, all along, was the key to getting me interested in sport!) and the infighting endemic to any struggle for progress because PEOPLE ARE PEOPLE and women have to be particularly so to get anywhere worthwhile! What a wonderful beacon this book is to embrace complexity and resist sanitising/ignoring/whitewashing the women's movement. I tabbed so many quotes and I want to print out the 'manifesto for difficult women' at the end to keep it on me at all times. Most of all I just really appreciated Lewis’ humanising and deeply felt portraits of the thorny and glorious women involved in the fights for feminism, because they made me feel more connected to a movement I’ve been feeling alienated from lately. Also laudable is Lewis’ push for continued collective action on specific fronts, rather than getting bogged down trying to have the best and wokest brand of feminism. She puts it well: “Since we live in a deeply individualist society, debates over women’s choices… will never struggle to get airtime. In this climate, the most radical thing we can do is resist turning feminism into a referendum on [our] choices. Let’s swim against the tide by talking about what we can do together.” Throughout this book Lewis calls for a feminism that makes demands on power, rather than what she calls “feminism-lite” - the kind that would ask women ‘lean in’. Fuck that. She writes: “If feminism doesn’t frighten people with power, it is toothless.” Lewis herself presents some difficult opinions I have no doubt some will find hard to swallow (and I wonder if at times she reigned those in so that this book would have a wider appeal). She is also very funny, especially in her footnotes. I feel more intellectually rounded and motivated for having read this, and I would recommend it to anybody seeking to understand what it really took to get to where we are today.

  10. 4 out of 5

    4cats

    Difficult Women looks at the history of Feminism, in particular it's history in the UK, although she does cite examples from around the world. The chapters look at divorce, love, the vote, education, sex, safety, work, play, abortion, time and the right to be difficult. Lewis highlights many forgotten women who challenged society and fought to be seen as equal to their male counterparts. This is not a rose coloured view of feminism, these women had to be 'difficult' and vocal in their fight, she Difficult Women looks at the history of Feminism, in particular it's history in the UK, although she does cite examples from around the world. The chapters look at divorce, love, the vote, education, sex, safety, work, play, abortion, time and the right to be difficult. Lewis highlights many forgotten women who challenged society and fought to be seen as equal to their male counterparts. This is not a rose coloured view of feminism, these women had to be 'difficult' and vocal in their fight, she also accepts that although we can admire what these women achieved we also can see that they are flawed, as we all are. As a read, this is easy to read, entertaining, inspiring and most importantly educational. It's a fascinating read, some of these pioneering women you will have heard of, others have been forgotten, she offers insights into their personal lives as well as what drove them in their fight for change. A worthy read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Will

    I'm a Big Fan of Helen Lewis. I've read her writing for the New Statesman for years, listened to her on the NS podcast, and have seen her speak publicly twice (including an event for the release of this book). So it's no surprise I thought this was great. But I did. As the name says, it's a history of feminism through 11 'fights'. Some of these are what you'd expect - fundamental rights to vote, get divorced, equal pay, abortion. And some of them are a little less prominent in our collective hist I'm a Big Fan of Helen Lewis. I've read her writing for the New Statesman for years, listened to her on the NS podcast, and have seen her speak publicly twice (including an event for the release of this book). So it's no surprise I thought this was great. But I did. As the name says, it's a history of feminism through 11 'fights'. Some of these are what you'd expect - fundamental rights to vote, get divorced, equal pay, abortion. And some of them are a little less prominent in our collective history - the right to safety (at women's refuge centres, set up in the 1970s), lesbian-specific discrimination, university places for women and the understanding of female orgasms. The narrative of 'Difficult Women' is also really interesting. She looks at pioneers of the women's movement that have since had key aspects of their politics erased, or simply been ignored, because they don't conform well to modern politics. For example, the Pankhursts are well known now. But how many people know that their tactics would arguably be described as terrorist-like in the modern era? Who knows about the woman who set up the British refuge centres, Erin Pizzey - could it be because she rejected contemporary mainstream politics of 1970s feminism, and now associates with men's rights activists? The first openly gay MP is often quoted as Chris Smith, but what about Maureen Colquhoon, who was outed 9 years earlier - how many prominent lesbians are there in British history? The structure of the book in these 11 chapters is great, so you can read one evening about Jayaben Desai leading a British Asian women's strike in the 1970s (who knew?), and then pop off to sleep and learn about something completely different the next night. Fascinating and different. 4.7 / 5

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ioana-Maria Puscas

    Very important topic and stories. The book has the merit of highlighting the plight and fights (most often, against the odds) of important feminist figures but I found it to be absolutely terribly written. I had to do extra research after each chapter to understand better what particular cases, movements or feminist figures represented. I found the writing to be very chaotic, overloaded with useless examples and interposing random facts in the middle of a story. You're better off reading other b Very important topic and stories. The book has the merit of highlighting the plight and fights (most often, against the odds) of important feminist figures but I found it to be absolutely terribly written. I had to do extra research after each chapter to understand better what particular cases, movements or feminist figures represented. I found the writing to be very chaotic, overloaded with useless examples and interposing random facts in the middle of a story. You're better off reading other books on these subjects or online sources.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dana Stabenow

    A lively history of the struggle for women's rights in the UK that will make you wish Lewis would migrate to the US to write one for us, too. With lots of snark without getting nasty, Lewis creates a series of vignettes of various rights (divorce, the vote, gay rights, equal pay, etc.) each based around the life and times of a single iconic woman and always a "difficult" one. Great epigrams and great footnotes, too. An informative and amusing read. A lively history of the struggle for women's rights in the UK that will make you wish Lewis would migrate to the US to write one for us, too. With lots of snark without getting nasty, Lewis creates a series of vignettes of various rights (divorce, the vote, gay rights, equal pay, etc.) each based around the life and times of a single iconic woman and always a "difficult" one. Great epigrams and great footnotes, too. An informative and amusing read.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Jane

    See more of my book reviews on my blog, Literary Flits In reading Difficult Women by Helen Lewis I was reminded of Roaring Girls by Holly Kyte which I read late last year. Both works introduced me to women who should be household names but, in the majority of cases, have been forgotten. As We Need New Stories by Nesrine Malik pointed out, as women we need to both create our own new narratives and to remember the stories of our female forebears. Lewis' selection, other than law reform campaigner C See more of my book reviews on my blog, Literary Flits In reading Difficult Women by Helen Lewis I was reminded of Roaring Girls by Holly Kyte which I read late last year. Both works introduced me to women who should be household names but, in the majority of cases, have been forgotten. As We Need New Stories by Nesrine Malik pointed out, as women we need to both create our own new narratives and to remember the stories of our female forebears. Lewis' selection, other than law reform campaigner Caroline Norton, brought to my attention women from more recent years than those Kyte featured. Annie Kenney and Marie Stopes were familiar names - although I soon realised my ignorance of much more than that about their lives. What particularly shocked me though was learning about women such as strike leader Jayaben Desai, women's refuge founder Erin Pizzey, lesbian MP Maureen Colquhoun, ... These women were politically active within my own lifetime, yet I knew nothing about them! When is the Grunwick film going to be made? Surely it could be as big a hit as Made In Dagenham! Lewis organises Difficult Women by topics with each chapter focusing on a theme such as Divorce, The Vote, Sex, Play, Work, etc. I liked that the progression is roughly chronological so I could understand how new changes built on what had changed before. I didn't agree with all Lewis' interpretations of events, but did appreciate her recognition that we need to remember each of these women as they actually were, rather than being tempted to airbrush out aspects of their characters that don't agree with our current worldviews. Personally I don't want my heroines to be made to appear perfect in every way because then I feel less encouraged to step out behind them. Realising that real women could effect such huge changes through sheer determination is inspiring, and knowing that they didn't always look fabulous whilst doing so or got some things wrong makes it seem more feasible that I too can have the courage to quietly rebel in my own way.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sonya Dutta Choudhury

    If you have ever found someone a ‘difficult women’, this is the book for you to understand why. And for anyone called a ‘difficult woman’ this the perfect book to laugh and cry over and understand why. A book that tells the stories of why feminists fought each other, why Brigitte Schultz hates the phrase ‘me time’, what the Cat and Mouse Act is and much more , all in 11 sparkling chapters that irradiate the history of the fight for equal rights for women. From suffragette Christabel Panthurst to f If you have ever found someone a ‘difficult women’, this is the book for you to understand why. And for anyone called a ‘difficult woman’ this the perfect book to laugh and cry over and understand why. A book that tells the stories of why feminists fought each other, why Brigitte Schultz hates the phrase ‘me time’, what the Cat and Mouse Act is and much more , all in 11 sparkling chapters that irradiate the history of the fight for equal rights for women. From suffragette Christabel Panthurst to footballer Lily Parr to writer activist Selma James, Helen Lewis makes a compelling case for fighters for women rights through the last few centuries. She does a deep dive into their writings, their diaries, their letters, talks to people who researched them or knew them in person. The portraits that emerge of these challengers , their obstinacies and blind spots, their energy and their doughty ability to dispute on, makes this book an erudite and absorbing read. One of my favourite stories comes early in the book. About the infamous El Vino law in England , that banished women to a back room away from the bar, where they waited patiently for table service. And this till as late as the 1980’s. Which is when journalists Tess Gill & Anne Hook schemed, strategised and invoked the courts to change this outrageous law. While the El Vino story has a funny ridiculous aspect to it , the stories of suffragettes being force fed are heart rending. It is chilling to note , looking at the history of laws like El Vino or the Cat and Mouse law, how laws were framed deliberately excluding women , from everything from work to playing football. Difficult Women is packed with history, with varied voices, with opinions, with recommendations for reading. With cogent arguments on so many things. Including why Brigitte Schultz hates the phrase ‘me time’, and ending with a manifesto on how to be a difficult women ! Because no one ever changed the world by being nice.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine

    3.5/5 Difficult Women was really interesting, a collection that talks quite a lot about intersectional feminism referring to women globally across centuries rather than just about women in the UK gaining the vote. There were some points (opinions, perhaps) that Lewis made that I disagreed with personally but this was, overall, very insightful. I'd never heard of many of these women before -- Jayaben Desai, for one -- so I really enjoyed hearing their stories. This was highly informative for people 3.5/5 Difficult Women was really interesting, a collection that talks quite a lot about intersectional feminism referring to women globally across centuries rather than just about women in the UK gaining the vote. There were some points (opinions, perhaps) that Lewis made that I disagreed with personally but this was, overall, very insightful. I'd never heard of many of these women before -- Jayaben Desai, for one -- so I really enjoyed hearing their stories. This was highly informative for people who want a book detailing intersectional feminist stories. Within the same vein, I can highly recommend She Speaks by Yvette Cooper.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kirti Upreti

    "In every struggle, there is a period of extreme difficulty, when success seems well-nigh hopeless, but once that success is attained, there is, I think, a tendency to forget how hard was the battle, and how strong the forces marshalled against the cause of progress." - Sophia Jex-Blake Reading History is important but - at the risk of reiterating myself - all the more important for women, for even the slightest tilt in the balance of the universe throws its unbearable burden on women just about "In every struggle, there is a period of extreme difficulty, when success seems well-nigh hopeless, but once that success is attained, there is, I think, a tendency to forget how hard was the battle, and how strong the forces marshalled against the cause of progress." - Sophia Jex-Blake Reading History is important but - at the risk of reiterating myself - all the more important for women, for even the slightest tilt in the balance of the universe throws its unbearable burden on women just about anywhere. It gives us sound reasons for how we ended up here. Just a few days ago, abortion got decriminalized in the traditionally catholic nation of Argentina. But before we cry 'progress', we must go back a few months when Poland put a near blanket ban on it. The fights, the victories and the defeats - all but tell just one thing that society deems women to be the least eligible ones to take decisions on matters pertaining to their own life and death. Racism and Casteism - are the torture tools of women's cruel stepfather called Sexism. The right to education still eludes so many, leave aside the right to marry by one's choice. Discrimination at work is ignored on the grounds that women are now "allowed" to work. The list goes on. This book did a Schrödinger on me. I both liked it and didn't. What I liked: It introduced me to the various battles fought by the 'sheroes' who got lost in the chronicles of the history dominated by masculine conquests. I owe my position as an educated, independent person to, who knows how many of, these women in the past. What I didn't like: I might be biased here but I believe that retelling the tales of the past requires a penmanship (or 'penwomanship', if I may) that acts like a mirror that reflects the gravity and makes a reader see themselves against that reflection. The writing in the book, sometimes, seemed to be verbose and flippant. Nevertheless, the book does open your eyes and makes you see things that get hidden behind the fancy feminists of the Twitter and Instagram age. And seeing beyond that haze of a noise is important for, as Dr. Maria Bellini remarked, "You cannot be what you cannot see."

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bella Briška

    When I started this book, I was sure I was going to like it. The premise - honest stories about the imperfect lives of the women in feminist history - is so good, and after the first chapter, I was so keen to read more, learn more and be inspired of the struggles and successes of other women. And partially this book lived up to the promise. The historical stories were fascinating, empowering, and very necessary. But, boy, was I let down by Lewis's ignorant opinions throughout the middle section When I started this book, I was sure I was going to like it. The premise - honest stories about the imperfect lives of the women in feminist history - is so good, and after the first chapter, I was so keen to read more, learn more and be inspired of the struggles and successes of other women. And partially this book lived up to the promise. The historical stories were fascinating, empowering, and very necessary. But, boy, was I let down by Lewis's ignorant opinions throughout the middle section of the book. I have 3 problems with this book - 2 minor ones, which I would've let pass pretty easily, and 1 major, which ruined the reading experience for me. 1) Lewis is explicitly negative towards sex work. That wouldn't be a problem in itself if she would explain herself properly, but instead, she just uses strawman arguments and presents sex work as something no woman would choose if she had other options. As she states herself, she doesn't watch porn, and when she tries to talk about it.. well it's clear she hasn't seen much of it. 2) Within the education chapter the topic is suddenly changed to the boys' challenges in schooling. That is an important thing to talk about, but it completely falls out of the narrative of the book, and I just couldn't understand why Lewis decided to dedicate the room in her book to this. 3) And now for the major one - total misrepresentation of what trans people and the contemporary LGBTQ + community stand for. It is very upsetting knowing how little the general public knows about the trans issues to read this woman - who either doesn't bother to gather information on what trans people think or decides to misrepresent them intentionally - rambling on about how "gender ideology" goes against what women have been fighting for. Her arguments on the subject are different variations of "I am all for trans people, BUT..." These "but"s make a strawman out of trans activists, for example, by claiming that they think it's transphobic if a lesbian is not interested in pursuing a relationship with trans women with male genitalia. The thing is - no one, except some anonymous marginal twitter account owners actually think this way. I don't know any trans people who think that people not being interested in sleeping with them are transphobes, but Lewis presents it as a default opinion of the trans community. Lewis artificially juxtaposes femininity with deviances of the traditional gender binary and creates conflict where there shouldn't be any. And I don't believe she is doing this accidentally, since she goes to describe how she has been criticized by others about these views - which means that she's had plenty of reason to examine the validity of her claims. Which she hasn't. It's one thing to be a difficult woman - persistent, not willing to be nice, shy, and put your needs last - but it's another thing to be a bigoted woman, and we shouldn't mix two of those together. There are good aspects of "Difficult Women", and I enjoyed reading parts of it. I also learned something new about history. But I think if you want to read the book, listen and read more about the lives of trans people in addition to it because the author clearly hasn't.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Em

    A few days into self-isolation I posted a picture on Instagram of my quarantine reading pile (with compulsory yawning cat in the background). Within a few hours my oh-so-witty teenage brother had commented, referring to the fluorescent yellow spine of Helen Lewis’ new book: “‘Difficult Women’ I didn’t know you had a biography.” He thought he was delivering a devastating burn but the joke was on him because I took that as the highest of compliments. Helen Lewis “reclaims the history of feminism” A few days into self-isolation I posted a picture on Instagram of my quarantine reading pile (with compulsory yawning cat in the background). Within a few hours my oh-so-witty teenage brother had commented, referring to the fluorescent yellow spine of Helen Lewis’ new book: “‘Difficult Women’ I didn’t know you had a biography.” He thought he was delivering a devastating burn but the joke was on him because I took that as the highest of compliments. Helen Lewis “reclaims the history of feminism” by repopulating it with forgotten activists, difficult women who refused to conform to societal expectations, often to the point of offending even modern sensibilities. Lewis argues that “we have to resist the modern impulse to pick one of two settings: airbrush or discard. History is always more interesting when it is difficult. We can’t tidy away all the loose ends and the uncomfortable truths without draining the story of its power.” Uncomfortable truths are what make Difficult Women stand out. Lewis’ most striking example is Erin Pizzey, who set up the first women’s refuge in Britain off her own bat with no official help or funding. Her work changed social attitudes to domestic violence, so by all accounts she should be immortalised in the Feminist Hall of Fame. However, later in life Pizzey fell out with ‘mainstream’ feminists such as the Women’s Liberation Movement, both personally and ideologically. To cut a long and fascinating story short (the full one is in chapter 6, Safety), Pizzey is now a Men’s Rights Activist, a notorious anti-feminist movement whose leaders say things like “a feminist is a loathsome, vile piece of human garbage.” Understandably, this doesn’t endear Pizzey to feminists, especially not those writing the history of the movement in order to further its cause. But as Lewis says, our habit of covering up such unsavoury behaviour or cutting its perpetrators out of our histories entirely is neither truthful nor helpful. Erin Pizzey’s work directly resulted in the 276 refuges with over 3000 beds throughout England in 2017, and thousands of women are indebted to her for that. We cannot forget the good work she did, but by the same token, we should not cover up her position as editor of the MRA website A Voice for Men. Erin Pizzey, like all of us, and like feminism itself, is complicated and contradictory. Each of Lewis’ chapters deals with a different aspect of feminism’s complicated history, with the gritty bits left in. On top of learning about historical figures that have been left off the school curriculum, my biggest take away from Difficult Women is the importance of feminism’s fight for everyone to have the freedom to make their own decisions even if – and this is the crucial part – others such as myself do not agree with those decisions. This includes women having access to safe abortions even if they aren’t what many would deem ‘good’ abortions (the result of rape or medical necessity) and are instead considered ‘bad’ abortions (the result of carelessness). Equal rights cannot be contingent on someone’s perceived morality or popularity. Feminists need to fight for the rights of all women, even the ones we don’t like. Helen Lewis puts it best: “There is only one argument to make, and it’s the one Kitty O’Kane made when knocking doors for Repeal the Eighth: ‘Trust women… How far do you expect a woman to have to suffer so that you can decide on her behalf?’ Isn’t that revolutionary? Trust women. Even when they’ve messed up, even when they were drunk, even when they’re sleeping around, even when they are any one of the million other flavours of ‘difficult.’ Trust women.” Lewis has given me a lot of food for thought, and I have a new appreciation (often paired with revulsion) for difficult women in feminist history. What I have learnt will inform my politics and make me think twice before endorsing the ‘cancel culture’ that expects women to be perfect and unproblematic at all times. Anyone who’s ever questioned the feminist canon of saints and sinners should read Lewis’ book, and have their mind opened to people’s complexities. Trust women to be difficult.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Claire (Book Blog Bird)

    This was such a great book. I 'read' it on audiobook and it was narrated by the author, which I think really made it. Throughout history, feminism has been fought by difficult women. Difficult in the sense that they have been awkward and annoying (according to the patriarchy) in order to achieve their aims because when you're fighting for a cause, you don't really get anywhere by being liked. People like the status quo - it's comforting, even if you're not really benefiting from it - and when so This was such a great book. I 'read' it on audiobook and it was narrated by the author, which I think really made it. Throughout history, feminism has been fought by difficult women. Difficult in the sense that they have been awkward and annoying (according to the patriarchy) in order to achieve their aims because when you're fighting for a cause, you don't really get anywhere by being liked. People like the status quo - it's comforting, even if you're not really benefiting from it - and when someone tries to change it, a lot of people get upset. The women Helen Lewis focuses on are also have also been difficult to like by fellow feminists. Lewis makes a really salient point in this book, in that one cause cannot hope to speak for 3.5 billion people. My experience of the world, as a woman, is going to be totally different from how a disabled, black woman experiences it and what I need from feminism will be different too. There's no one single aim in feminism, but there is crossover with fights for equal rights for other marginalised groups. She also points out areas where feminism has clashed with fights for other rights (e.g. transgender rights). Although the chapters each focus on are different aspects of the feminist movement (time, abortion, sex etc) I'd never heard of most of the women mentioned. I now want to go out and find out more about them! Lewis's writing style reminded me of that of Caitlin Moran and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie - intelligent and incisive and approachable. Have the women in Lewis's book been effective? Undoubtedly, yes. Are they nice people? Not always, no. Feminism isn't about being nice, though. That's the point. It's an imperfect fight for the right to be imperfect.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Gayle Noble

    Difficult women - women who refuse to be told what they can do, and limited in what they can achieve, and they don't let tradition stand in the way. Difficult women have campaigned, marched, and pushed on through various setbacks, which means that today we can sometimes take for granted what our forebears went through to get to vote and the right to be considered an individual person in the eyes of the law and government. It's a very interesting read. I agreed with many of the author's points, e Difficult women - women who refuse to be told what they can do, and limited in what they can achieve, and they don't let tradition stand in the way. Difficult women have campaigned, marched, and pushed on through various setbacks, which means that today we can sometimes take for granted what our forebears went through to get to vote and the right to be considered an individual person in the eyes of the law and government. It's a very interesting read. I agreed with many of the author's points, especially when it comes to the expectation of perfection within feminism. If women do one thing wrong or say the wrong thing, they are unceremoniously ejected. Of course problematic issues should not be glossed over or brushed under the carpet, but the speed of condemnation (which sometimes has been formed on misconstrued evidence) is brutal, and often with little chance of redemption. No-one is perfect so why do we expect women to always get on with other women and to never put a foot wrong? The author examines some of the issues that surround controversial figures such as Marie Stopes and Emmeline Pankhurst. There are also several other women, many of whom I had not heard of such as Lily Parr, a women's football pioneer and lesbian from the early twentieth century. She played on even when the FA banned women's teams from their football grounds and apparently scored over 900 goals in her career. The book looks at several areas including work, love, and sex. The whole theme of the book can be summed up as this: difficult women are despised by the patriarchy, and viewed with suspicion by the establishment, but they are the ones who get things done.

  22. 4 out of 5

    J8J8

    Fantastic. Witty. Interesting. Intelligent. Honest. These are definitely the words that for me, best describe this book. The first book I have ever read about feminism and what it seems, a great starter or introduction to the subject in cause. Difficult women is a book not only about women but also about men, about society in general. It covers many of the fights battled by women throughout the centuries in a insightful and interesting way, with many practical examples and experiences (mainly on Fantastic. Witty. Interesting. Intelligent. Honest. These are definitely the words that for me, best describe this book. The first book I have ever read about feminism and what it seems, a great starter or introduction to the subject in cause. Difficult women is a book not only about women but also about men, about society in general. It covers many of the fights battled by women throughout the centuries in a insightful and interesting way, with many practical examples and experiences (mainly on England and Ireland). Like one of the pillars of feminism, it is a book that was conceived to target every member of society regardless the gender, age, skin color since patriarchy is a problem that goes beyond the gender. Anyone can read it. Everyone probably should read it. Difficult women was and will always be a book that lead to a internal change in terms of how I see society, men and most specifically, other women. It talks about the most basic fundamentals of the movement itself while also advancing interesting questions about the future, past and present and how the past influences every day life of the society we live on. Terribly blunt and clear, this book strips down the fairy dust of all the fights and women that have been worshiped throughout many generations until the days of today because the movement, feminism, isn't perfect, neither were the women fighting for several rights like the vote, sexual freedom, the ability to work etc. But again... This fight is also about fighting the tirany of niceness, the tirany of perfection imposed to women and it is a book beautifully achieved in that regard. Strongly recommend it! Absolutely loved it!!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This was honestly a breath of fresh air and rather invigorating. Firstly, the layout is a great time and just makes it enjoyable and accessible to read. I think the pacing of the book was quite well done with good sign posting as you continue throughout the chapters. Although each chapter is obviously a different fight, the main theme (that I got anyways) of imperfection and the value of compromise remained strong throughout culminating to a great ending of needing more organisation and less foc This was honestly a breath of fresh air and rather invigorating. Firstly, the layout is a great time and just makes it enjoyable and accessible to read. I think the pacing of the book was quite well done with good sign posting as you continue throughout the chapters. Although each chapter is obviously a different fight, the main theme (that I got anyways) of imperfection and the value of compromise remained strong throughout culminating to a great ending of needing more organisation and less focus on women's individual choices. I think this book just really resonated with me and took me back to the roots of feminism and collective fights rather than personal choices women make, which does seem to be the current mainstream in feminism (perhaps because that's a nice easy distraction to avoid any real needed conversations.) Even the chapters you might think you know loads about, you end up learning a lot so a great time. It was well written, she has a strong voice and quite funny at times. It nice to see someone not shy away from difficult people or difficult conversations that are not popular or palatable. Yeah overall v happy with this, thx @ will for reading this or I would never have heard of it. Love goodreads, just brings me endless joy.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dramatika

    One of the best books I've read this year, and I've read many wonderful and good books so far! We've been spoiled for choice by the sheer amount of the feminist literature available (at least from the western part of the world) so far. Yet I'm still both struggling with the concept of feminism itself and its various waves and positions on the important issues. It doesn't help that where I live we are still in the difficult part of being both over some long ago fought won and forgotten battles and One of the best books I've read this year, and I've read many wonderful and good books so far! We've been spoiled for choice by the sheer amount of the feminist literature available (at least from the western part of the world) so far. Yet I'm still both struggling with the concept of feminism itself and its various waves and positions on the important issues. It doesn't help that where I live we are still in the difficult part of being both over some long ago fought won and forgotten battles and new unexpected and silly ones that are so important for some people for reason of their sheer visibility. This book provides me for the analysis which I would have found difficult to put into words myself. There are some issues I myself choose to disagree with the author, but still respect and understand her position. Afterwards she didn't have awful experience of the cruelty of the USSR regime to understand how the whole concept of socialism disgust someone. I can also assure that even under socialism women didn't exactly raced to the great wonders of families and child bearing despite numerous advantages of that era such as almost free or heavy subsidized childcare and generous pregnancy leave. I think the rate of abortion was very high then as it is now (lack of contraception then and the cost of pills now one of the reasons). I myself find the idea of paying for domestic duties ridiculous, since children are responsibilities of the people who have them . They are expensive and time and money, so that's why I choose not to have any (and suffer the enormous pressure of the hostile society blaming me for our country population decline and increase in migrants). And the author forgets that someone else must pay for these ridiculous ideas! I enjoyed this book tremendously because the author chose to provide many different examples of faulty controversial women and their ideas. I especially loved the section on the current struggles of modern day feminism. I consider myself a feminist yet I have to explain that I support LGBT rights, but consider transwomen as a special case as well as the author. An exciting book to read highly recommend it to everyone who would love to find something more than the usual staff focused mainly on identity politics found in many books.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lizzie

    Now I've read the hardback book, I want to listen to the audiobook. Insightful. Relevant. Important. Funny. Put it on your 'want to read' list immediately. Now I've read the hardback book, I want to listen to the audiobook. Insightful. Relevant. Important. Funny. Put it on your 'want to read' list immediately.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kirsty Clarke

    This book is so well written and articulated, so accessible and presents such well spoken balanced arguments that highlights the nuances needed in conversations about topics that are often spoken of in reductionist language. I think everyone should read this book, I wish I could eat it and absorb all its facts so I can vomit them on to anyone who dares to listen THATS HOW GOOD IT IS. Bottom line. We Stan difficult women.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    As seen in The Atlantic: https://www.theatlantic.com/internati... As seen in The Atlantic: https://www.theatlantic.com/internati...

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tracy B

    Thank you Netgalley for sending me the audio version of this book. Helen Lewis talks us though so many strong, inspirational, pioneering women who are deemed to be “difficult” for speaking out, challenging opinions and making change over the past two centuries. I learnt so much from this book about what these so-called difficult women have done not only for getting the vote, but for women’s football, women’s employment rights, access to higher education, rights for LBTQ, abortion, birth control, d Thank you Netgalley for sending me the audio version of this book. Helen Lewis talks us though so many strong, inspirational, pioneering women who are deemed to be “difficult” for speaking out, challenging opinions and making change over the past two centuries. I learnt so much from this book about what these so-called difficult women have done not only for getting the vote, but for women’s football, women’s employment rights, access to higher education, rights for LBTQ, abortion, birth control, divorce, the list just goes on and on. Where would we be without these women who were willing to give up so much for other women. The things we don’t hear about are the sometimes illegal lengths they went too and how disgracefully they were treated for that, the force feeding in the prisons sounded absolutely unbearable! I’m going to buy the paperback version purely to go back and read some of the stats, and also because I want to do more research. There’s “difficult women” we have heard of many times Emmeline Pankhurst, Rosa Parkes but there’s women in here that did so much that I had never heard of; Marie Stopes, Lily Parr, Annie Kenney, Jayaben Desai to name a few. Lewis also covers more current topics of debate such as the battle between mothers trying to work, look after the children and the home and talks about the “2nd shift” that we start at home once we finish work. She also mentions a stat that was published in the New York Times that says college educated parents now spend double the time interacting with their kids than in the 1980’s because of helicopter parenting - constantly hovering over them rather than letting them run freely in the neighbourhoods. I honestly found it all fascinating. I really recommend that everyone reads this book to fully appreciate our history. “Together difficult women can change the world”

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    While I’ve always considered myself an advocate for feminism (seeking female mentors to build an ethos in life and work promoting standards of equality) I’ve never formally studied feminism. “Difficult Women: Feminism in 11 Fights” provided the necessary “buckle up” moment with a deep dive across 11 topics highlighting lesser known pioneers. It’s packed with historical and statistical information solidified through insights and interviews provided by the author. Helen Lewis did a fantastic job in While I’ve always considered myself an advocate for feminism (seeking female mentors to build an ethos in life and work promoting standards of equality) I’ve never formally studied feminism. “Difficult Women: Feminism in 11 Fights” provided the necessary “buckle up” moment with a deep dive across 11 topics highlighting lesser known pioneers. It’s packed with historical and statistical information solidified through insights and interviews provided by the author. Helen Lewis did a fantastic job in providing a diversity of thought and approach across feminist heroes rising to the challenge divided by topic/cause in each chapter. I appreciated how She covered so much ground in an informative and engaging manner! While I didn’t agree with every point made, reading this book allowed me an opportunity to pour a strong cup of coffee and form an individual opinion - a luxury not given for many in this book. Lewis states near the end that there will be many areas in which we may find ourselves at odds intellectually or ethically with one another, nevertheless we must engage and seek justice where injustice lives. I recommend this book for those wanting an overview of feminism, but as a heads up, it does focus more primarily on the UK area. The good news is that the concepts and approach can be applied globally. 4.5/5

  30. 4 out of 5

    Fiona Howells

    I found this very interesting, exactly what it says, divided into very distinct sections about landmark cases in the history of feminism, including the case of Caroline Norton who tried (and failed) to change the divorce law to allow a woman to divorce her husband (rather than vice versa) and still retain the right to see her children, the story of the Suffragette movement, the campaign to allow the free access to birth control and the opening of the Marie Stopes clinic, the fight for the right I found this very interesting, exactly what it says, divided into very distinct sections about landmark cases in the history of feminism, including the case of Caroline Norton who tried (and failed) to change the divorce law to allow a woman to divorce her husband (rather than vice versa) and still retain the right to see her children, the story of the Suffragette movement, the campaign to allow the free access to birth control and the opening of the Marie Stopes clinic, the fight for the right to safe legal abortion, the opening of the first woman’s refuge and the fight for the law to be changed to allow women to study medicine (among other “fights”). The personalities of the “difficult” women shone through, and they were not written about as if they were saints, but real women with real struggles. The author freely admits that while she admires Marie Stopes greatly for what she did, the woman herself must have been an absolute nightmare to work with. Well paced and interesting – a very good read. I found it shocking that feminism and women’s rights have still such a long way to go, for example it was illegal for GPs to give unmarried women the Pill in my lifetime, and there are still women living in the UK who have no access to safe, legal abortion. I will be making it required reading for my daughters, and am now resolved to be more “difficult” myself .

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.