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The Umbrella Academy Library Edition Volume 1: Apocalypse Suite

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Umbrella Academy is Netflix's most watched show of 2019 with over 45 million viewers and a second season on the way! Catch up on the best selling comic series with this Deluxe Oversized Hardcover collection of the complete first series, Apocalypse Suite , with the short stories "Mon Dieu!" and "But the Past Ain't Through with You," as well as an Umbrella Academy is Netflix's most watched show of 2019 with over 45 million viewers and a second season on the way! Catch up on the best selling comic series with this Deluxe Oversized Hardcover collection of the complete first series, Apocalypse Suite , with the short stories "Mon Dieu!" and "But the Past Ain't Through with You," as well as an expanded 50-page sketchbook section featuring work by Gerard Way, Gabriel B�, James Jean, and designer Tony Ong. In an inexplicable worldwide event, forty-three extraordinary children were spontaneously born by women who'd previously shown no signs of pregnancy. Millionaire inventor Reginald Hargreeves adopted seven of the children; when asked why, his only explanation was, "To save the world." These seven children form The Umbrella Academy, a dysfunctional family of superheroes with bizarre powers. Nearly a decade after their first mission, the team disbands, but when Hargreeves unexpectedly dies, these disgruntled siblings reunite just in time to save the world once again. Now a NETFLIX original series, with a second season coming soon!


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Umbrella Academy is Netflix's most watched show of 2019 with over 45 million viewers and a second season on the way! Catch up on the best selling comic series with this Deluxe Oversized Hardcover collection of the complete first series, Apocalypse Suite , with the short stories "Mon Dieu!" and "But the Past Ain't Through with You," as well as an Umbrella Academy is Netflix's most watched show of 2019 with over 45 million viewers and a second season on the way! Catch up on the best selling comic series with this Deluxe Oversized Hardcover collection of the complete first series, Apocalypse Suite , with the short stories "Mon Dieu!" and "But the Past Ain't Through with You," as well as an expanded 50-page sketchbook section featuring work by Gerard Way, Gabriel B�, James Jean, and designer Tony Ong. In an inexplicable worldwide event, forty-three extraordinary children were spontaneously born by women who'd previously shown no signs of pregnancy. Millionaire inventor Reginald Hargreeves adopted seven of the children; when asked why, his only explanation was, "To save the world." These seven children form The Umbrella Academy, a dysfunctional family of superheroes with bizarre powers. Nearly a decade after their first mission, the team disbands, but when Hargreeves unexpectedly dies, these disgruntled siblings reunite just in time to save the world once again. Now a NETFLIX original series, with a second season coming soon!

30 review for The Umbrella Academy Library Edition Volume 1: Apocalypse Suite

  1. 4 out of 5

    Zoë

    One of the few instances in which the adaptation is way better than the source material.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Zedsdead

    Great concepts, lousy execution. The Umbrella Academy is a seemingly-random collection of plot points stapled haphazardly together in a garbled attempt at creating a story. The attempt fails. Rarely has so little been communicated in so many panels. 43 babies are suddenly born to random non-pregnant women. The seven survivors are adopted and raised by a wealthy inventor who is an alien. His alienness is immediately set aside and forgotten. At age 10 the heroic children do battle with the admittedl Great concepts, lousy execution. The Umbrella Academy is a seemingly-random collection of plot points stapled haphazardly together in a garbled attempt at creating a story. The attempt fails. Rarely has so little been communicated in so many panels. 43 babies are suddenly born to random non-pregnant women. The seven survivors are adopted and raised by a wealthy inventor who is an alien. His alienness is immediately set aside and forgotten. At age 10 the heroic children do battle with the admittedly awesome Zombie Robot Gustave Eiffel. Suddenly it's ten years later and one of the seven has, for no discernible reason, died. Another is now, for no discernible reason, a giant gorilla. A woman suddenly appears that the kids call "Mom", but wait she's actually a talking dress mannequin. For no discernible reason. It continues in this vein. The lack of immediate character-info should appeal to me; I generally hate having books spell things out like I'm an idiot. In this case it just made the story difficult to follow. What the hell just happened? Oh, that guy now has a new relevant ability...I think. It put me in mind of a Simpsons episode in which Batman, confronted with a runaway carousel, pulled a can of Carousel-Reversal Spray from his utility belt. Not a good sign.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    2.5 stars This is one was fast-paced and cool, but at the same time, it teetered on awful. Does that make sense? The ideas thrown about in The Apocalypse Suite were interesting and clever, but they were just that - thrown about. It needed to be about double the size of itself to properly tell the story (I think) it was trying for, in my opinion. Unless, of course, everything and everyone gets some sort of a flashback-y kind of origin that goes quite a bit more in-depth in volume 2. The only way I 2.5 stars This is one was fast-paced and cool, but at the same time, it teetered on awful. Does that make sense? The ideas thrown about in The Apocalypse Suite were interesting and clever, but they were just that - thrown about. It needed to be about double the size of itself to properly tell the story (I think) it was trying for, in my opinion. Unless, of course, everything and everyone gets some sort of a flashback-y kind of origin that goes quite a bit more in-depth in volume 2. The only way I even kinda/sorta understood any of what the plot might be going for is because I watched a few episodes of the tv show. And I didn't quite manage all of those in their entirety, so I'm just half guessing at a lot of the comic. Usually, I could type out the gist of the comic and it would leave quite a bit left over for another reader to discover on their own. With this? Not so much. The general ideas, while extremely cool, are all you get. There's nothing else. And, in the case of most of the characters, their personality, powers, & motivation are so paper thin that you don't really get anything other than the barest look at what they might be. The same thing goes for the storyline. There just isn't much there to hang onto because the plot is just splatted onto the page with the smallest explanation possible. Weird babies are born to women who weren't pregnant because of an alien boxing match and an alien posing as a human adopts them to save the world from destruction. SPLAT! These kids save the world with comic book powers and fight comic book villains except for the one girl with no powers who feel left out. SPLAT! The father figure/alien/billionaire guy shits on all of them and ruins their childhoods. SPLAT! There are a talking chimpanzee and a robot-mom who help raise the kids. SPLAT! The violin-chick gets her feelings hurt and quickly turns evil because nefarious music composers hook her up to a machine that turns her into a world-ending villainess. SPLAT! This sort of storytelling didn't impress me. Now, on the flip side, everything about that sounds like it could be amazing. And I did finish this in one sitting. <--partly because it was interesting and partly because there really wasn't much to read. But there was also a more nuanced storyline about the kid who accidentally got trapped in the apocalyptic future, and I truly would like to read more about him. The art was ok. Kind of reminded me of a Hellboy comic for some reason? I don't know. The whole thing is 50/50 for me, but I'm not calling a time of death on it until I read at least one more volume.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    3.5 to 4 stars I had been seeing this graphic novel in my Hoopla list for quite some time. I had not been giving it much thought, but it is amazing how seeing that a title is being made into a series on Netflix will move it to the top of your list! I thought this was interesting because I hadn’t heard anything about it other than the cover popping up in passing, so I will be curious to find out what led to interest in making it into a show. This is the story of a dysfunctional family of adopted mi 3.5 to 4 stars I had been seeing this graphic novel in my Hoopla list for quite some time. I had not been giving it much thought, but it is amazing how seeing that a title is being made into a series on Netflix will move it to the top of your list! I thought this was interesting because I hadn’t heard anything about it other than the cover popping up in passing, so I will be curious to find out what led to interest in making it into a show. This is the story of a dysfunctional family of adopted miracle super babies. It has hints of X-Men and Suicide Squad (am I allowed to cross DC/Marvel lines in my comparisons?) If you like the troubled team dynamic, you know what to expect here. However, there are some interesting twists! And, while there is a lot of world saving going on here, there is a lot of world destroying happening as well. The art work was okay. In some cases, it drew me in. In others, it was not all that enthralling. While I could make some comparisons to the impressionistic/outlandish stylings of titles like Chew and American Vampire, it just felt a little too obscure to me at times. Not necessarily bad, just not my cup of graphic novel tea. So, I suppose it sounds like I wasn’t really digging this title. I was, but not super into it yet. I plan to continue the next volume and I might check out the series on Netflix to see how it translates to the big screen.

  5. 4 out of 5

    mark monday

    as the back cover states, this is a comic with an arch Victorian sensibility. steampunk superheroes, i love it! in an alternate world, "43 extraordinary children were born..." and seven of them were collected, to form a super-powered super-team. they have powers like time travel and mind control and super-strength and super-agility and the ability to spawn cthulhic tentacles. they are pretty awesome. my favorite is the devious, cold-blooded little killer Number Five, a 10-year old with a 50-year as the back cover states, this is a comic with an arch Victorian sensibility. steampunk superheroes, i love it! in an alternate world, "43 extraordinary children were born..." and seven of them were collected, to form a super-powered super-team. they have powers like time travel and mind control and super-strength and super-agility and the ability to spawn cthulhic tentacles. they are pretty awesome. my favorite is the devious, cold-blooded little killer Number Five, a 10-year old with a 50-year old mind, whose sinister travels in the timestream have earned him a host of implacable enemies. apparently steampunk will never go away... yahoo! possibly i'm one of a diminishing number of folks who still feel such affection for this overly-hyped mongrel genre. ah, so what. this was a smart, witty, and sometimes dark pleasure from beginning to end. well, i could have done without the (view spoiler)[panels of the tortured little girl with one arm devoured (hide spoiler)] - ugh, disgusting and unnecessary. but overall this was great. if i called the shots, there would be a lot more flashbacks to our heroes as super-kids; hopefully there will be more to come. there was a feeling of being shown very small, sometimes random parts of the narrative and the history of the characters themselves. that can be frustrating, but i enjoyed it as well. it leaves a lot of room for growth in future episodes, and if not, well i personally love questions that aren't answered, that let me try to connect the dots and figure things out. the narrative and the characters live in a fully-realized, lavishly detailed world, one i'm looking foward to jumping into again. the art by Gabriel Ba is fantastic. the idea-smith is Gerard Way, apparently a member of a band called My Chemical Romance. i don't know them - do they do the theme song for some tv show or movie? eh, whatever, the writing and the ideas on display are a lot of fun and surprisingly moving at times. good job, Gerard Way, whoever you are! what a clever and multi-talented lad. i hope he sticks with this.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Umbrella Academy looks like another case of Saga - a comic everyone loves that I didn’t like at all. I honestly don’t know what people see in UA that makes it so beloved. It’s a mix of sci-fi and superhero comics starring a group of weird kids with powers that on paper reads a bit like a Grant Morrison comic - the Eiffel Tower goes “crazy”, one of the characters turns themselves into a living instrument - all of which I should love except Gerard Way has none of the artistry of Morrison. The plot Umbrella Academy looks like another case of Saga - a comic everyone loves that I didn’t like at all. I honestly don’t know what people see in UA that makes it so beloved. It’s a mix of sci-fi and superhero comics starring a group of weird kids with powers that on paper reads a bit like a Grant Morrison comic - the Eiffel Tower goes “crazy”, one of the characters turns themselves into a living instrument - all of which I should love except Gerard Way has none of the artistry of Morrison. The plot of the book is threadbare at best - some kids born at the same time are arbitrarily given superpowers. Why, how, it’s never explained. Flash forward several years and one of them has grafted his head onto a giant ape’s body (why?) and lives on the moon with a robot servant (why?). Again, reads like a great idea but never goes beyond its description. Anyway, the others all have similarly bizarre situations - one of them travelled forwards in time for some reason then went back and somehow became a kid forever or something (why?!) - except for one girl who’s somehow included with the other kids but doesn’t have any special powers and isn’t included in their superhero outings so I’m not sure why she’s part of the UA. And why is it called Umbrella Academy anyway? So a bad guy wants to kill the world with music for some reason and recruits the poor girl without superpowers who does know how to play the violin really well, turning her into the human violin you see on the cover (why death by music?). Because she’s been left out, etc., she becomes evil and tries to blow up the world with a death song or something and the UA have to stop her. Events happen without any rhyme or reason, they just happen because, while the characters are completely flat. I couldn’t tell you their names or their character traits, or why they were whisked away by some alien professor, or why anything that happened in this book happened at all. It’s just one big blur of derivative nonsense. As most people will know, Gerard Way is the frontman for the rock band My Chemical Romance (who I do like) so its easy to see where the musical themes central to the book come from and the chapter titles read like rejected song titles for MCR: Apocalypse Suite; The Day The Eiffel Tower Went Beserk; We Only See Each Other At Weddings and Funerals; Baby, I’ll Be Your Frankenstein; Brothers and Sisters, I Am An Atomic Bomb. Each could fit in nicely on their records The Black Parade or Danger Days. The best thing about the book by far is Gabriel Ba’s art, which is, as usual, sublime. Ba does a simply gargantuan task of bringing Way’s hyper-crazy script to life, creating the bizarre cast of the Umbrella Academy in imaginative and interesting styles while imbuing the comic with shades of surrealism, gothic horror and classic sci-fi. If you enjoyed the art in this book I highly recommend checking out his and his twin brother Fabio Moon’s books Daytripper and De:Tales. Way is a gifted songwriter and lyricist and while he definitely possesses one hell of an imagination, Umbrella Academy: Apocalypse Suite shows that he’s a long way from becoming a good comics writer. UA is all swagger, bombast, and barely engaging with zero substance.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Trin

    I found Netflix's The Umbrella Academy joyous and silly and energetic and fun. The source material absolutely pales in comparison. Literally pales: the lack of diversity in the comic, compared to the show, is just one of many profound bummers one gets to experience by coming to this in reverse order. But there's also: --comparatively moronic character motivations --the characters reduced to thinness and blandness all around --Allison rendered utterly useless --Diego rendered unsympathetic (and his tou I found Netflix's The Umbrella Academy joyous and silly and energetic and fun. The source material absolutely pales in comparison. Literally pales: the lack of diversity in the comic, compared to the show, is just one of many profound bummers one gets to experience by coming to this in reverse order. But there's also: --comparatively moronic character motivations --the characters reduced to thinness and blandness all around --Allison rendered utterly useless --Diego rendered unsympathetic (and his touching relationship with Mom excised) --Klaus' love interest excised --an icky and pointless "loyal servant" character who, with all the kids whitewashed, is the only character of color in the story, yet has no lines --the really gross way Vanya's body is portrayed/sexualized It's just a mess. I hated it. I'm amazed that it inspired the adaptation that it did. I guess the one thing I'm grateful for is that I only read this after I watched, because otherwise, I absolutely never would have tried the show.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alejandro

    Wow!!! I got this TPB since I had read good comments about this Umbrella Academy stuff but without knowing about what was about. Wow!!! I never had read something so creative, original and entertained that it wasn't written by Alan Moore and in my case, it's the best compliment that I can do to a comic book. Gerard Way & Gabriel Ba did a joint work so good, so exciting to read and watch that it's without a doubt one of the true new masterpieces of the modern age of comic books. Even I want to co Wow!!! I got this TPB since I had read good comments about this Umbrella Academy stuff but without knowing about what was about. Wow!!! I never had read something so creative, original and entertained that it wasn't written by Alan Moore and in my case, it's the best compliment that I can do to a comic book. Gerard Way & Gabriel Ba did a joint work so good, so exciting to read and watch that it's without a doubt one of the true new masterpieces of the modern age of comic books. Even I want to compliment the work of Nate Piekos as letterer. That's why I tend to compare with the works of Alan Moore since he always look for not only good artists but also good letterers that many time people tend to overlook and not to value the weight of a good letterer in a comic. I like that this is not a static book, people die, people change, nothing is ever the same on each issue. They created even their own reality to make function the story of the team. Highly recommended!!!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    If you: A) hate comic books B) love comic book C) feel indifferent about comic books D) have never picked up a comic book in your life READ THIS TRADE PAPERBACK. This is one of the greatest comic books ever written, drawn, inked, etc. I hate to oversell it, but it's totally true. A group of kids, adopted by a scientist, time-traveling, killing for the good of mankind and having all of the dysfunctional problems kids have. In this installment, we jump back and forth between their childhoods and their If you: A) hate comic books B) love comic book C) feel indifferent about comic books D) have never picked up a comic book in your life READ THIS TRADE PAPERBACK. This is one of the greatest comic books ever written, drawn, inked, etc. I hate to oversell it, but it's totally true. A group of kids, adopted by a scientist, time-traveling, killing for the good of mankind and having all of the dysfunctional problems kids have. In this installment, we jump back and forth between their childhoods and their adults lives, slowly putting pieces together, and are never given the whole story. Which makes this trade (and the 2nd trade known as "Dallas") impossible to put down. Backstory: Gerard Way of MY CHEMICAL ROMANCE (yes, the crappy band that you've never given a chance, that the kids are always talking about) knows the comic genre, and has created one that redefines the genre. Artwork by Gabriel Ba is phenomenal (for those who know of Mike Mignola's style, this will remind you of it). PICK THIS UP. If you hate it, I'LL refund you money.* * offer not valid.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Calista

    The art is stylish and compelling. The story was difficult for me to follow and keep up with what was going on. They didn't do a lot of connecting dots so the story moves fast and I had to simply flow with it. I had to fight to keep up. I can't say that it was an enjoyable story. There was no joy in it, simply pain and angst. The hero's were hard and burnt out and the world burned around them. I might continue on with this one. The art is stylish and compelling. The story was difficult for me to follow and keep up with what was going on. They didn't do a lot of connecting dots so the story moves fast and I had to simply flow with it. I had to fight to keep up. I can't say that it was an enjoyable story. There was no joy in it, simply pain and angst. The hero's were hard and burnt out and the world burned around them. I might continue on with this one.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ashleigh (a frolic through fiction)

    This is...something, huh?? I flew through this comic even quicker than you would expect to, largely because there’s very little build up to anything. Stuff just kinda happens and that’s that. Nothing about it felt authentic, too much was crammed into one volume, and the art style just wasn’t for me. I could barely tell the characters apart for half of it. I won’t say it’s awful, because it has so many interesting concepts and storylines that have potential. But it wasn’t fleshed out enough at all This is...something, huh?? I flew through this comic even quicker than you would expect to, largely because there’s very little build up to anything. Stuff just kinda happens and that’s that. Nothing about it felt authentic, too much was crammed into one volume, and the art style just wasn’t for me. I could barely tell the characters apart for half of it. I won’t say it’s awful, because it has so many interesting concepts and storylines that have potential. But it wasn’t fleshed out enough at all, and so just felt like someone shouting “we have aLIENS AND TIME TRAVEL AND APOCALYPSE AND ORCHESTRAS AND FAMILY DRAMA AND -“ ...you get the idea. I will admit I’m coming into this having seen the tv show first, and falling head over heels with that. So my perspective was always going to be biased towards that. But had I not seen the tv show first, I honestly don’t think I would’ve had the foggiest clue what was going on - even though the story was changed pretty dramatically. A story of this scope needed more time than the comic gave it, so I’m glad to see it got a tv show at least.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    So I'm coming at this from the wrong side of things. I watched two seasons of the great TV show based on this comic and then got the bright idea to pick up the comic. Sometimes it works out fine. Even great. But this time, I'm all... Where's the depth, the pathos, the brilliant timing? This volume is QUICK. So many of the iconic details are there but if you blink, you miss them. But the CORE of the story is all there if you have eyes to see and not only the core -- but the tiny and wonderful inter So I'm coming at this from the wrong side of things. I watched two seasons of the great TV show based on this comic and then got the bright idea to pick up the comic. Sometimes it works out fine. Even great. But this time, I'm all... Where's the depth, the pathos, the brilliant timing? This volume is QUICK. So many of the iconic details are there but if you blink, you miss them. But the CORE of the story is all there if you have eyes to see and not only the core -- but the tiny and wonderful interpersonal interactions as well. I can totally get why normal comic readers might have picked this up in the deluge of so many other titles about superheroes and go... Wait. This really is edgy and totally adult and it has some really messed up portions and yet it still has heart, tragedy, and oh, wow, did THAT JUST HAPPEN? Taken in isolation without seeing the great tv series, it really IS good. But when compared directly to what came after IN the tv show? Give me the tv show. I wonder if I would have said something different had I read these before the show. *sigh*

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kelly (and the Book Boar)

    Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ I’m not going to waste much time on this review because it was simply a case of this just wasn’t for me. I’m not a huge graphic novel reader to begin with and when I do pick one up they aren’t often superhero/save the world types of stories. Buuuuuuuuuuut my kid totally geeked out and binge watched the new season of this when it debuted awhile back to the point where I thought he might get a bedsore, so I decided to give it a whirl. An Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ I’m not going to waste much time on this review because it was simply a case of this just wasn’t for me. I’m not a huge graphic novel reader to begin with and when I do pick one up they aren’t often superhero/save the world types of stories. Buuuuuuuuuuut my kid totally geeked out and binge watched the new season of this when it debuted awhile back to the point where I thought he might get a bedsore, so I decided to give it a whirl. And also, that one illustration. You know what I’m talking about . . . . It was my misunderstanding due to being completely unfamiliar with the plot that had the title leading me to believe the story would center around these sorts of characters . . . . Little did I know that only about 12 seconds would be spent providing an “origin story” regarding 47 women simultaneously giving birth like some sort of awful TLC program where none of them even knew they were knocked up. Seven get adopted by a Daddy Warbucks and that’s pretty much all you ever get to know about that. Then they save the world . . . . twice and rather than ever experiencing life in any sort of “Academy” like I was hoping for, the children I was so looking forward to getting to know are all instantly groweds up and look like this instead . . . . Meh.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lamski Kikita

    "Our souls are tainted...painted black by the very deeds that make us so wonderfully individual..." Dark yet hopeful, sinister and yet has a hint of innocence, cruel yet witty, full of love and hate, music, family, neurosis, heros that hate, villains that love, aliens, robots, superheros, war, the eiffel tower, the end of the world, and a full orchestra. This isn't just a comic book, this is an accumilation of a lifetime of talent and pain. If i had not known that Gerard Way had written this gra "Our souls are tainted...painted black by the very deeds that make us so wonderfully individual..." Dark yet hopeful, sinister and yet has a hint of innocence, cruel yet witty, full of love and hate, music, family, neurosis, heros that hate, villains that love, aliens, robots, superheros, war, the eiffel tower, the end of the world, and a full orchestra. This isn't just a comic book, this is an accumilation of a lifetime of talent and pain. If i had not known that Gerard Way had written this graphic novel, i would have guessed it by page two. Apocalypse Suite is not your usual comic book of normal superheros (yes, there are normal and abnormal superheors), it touches upon subjects of creation, of immaculate conception, of original sin, of evolution, and the plight of the human race. A story of murder and music, and the beauty of them both. Vanya is me. Her low self esteem and lack of confidence in being special drives her to hurt those who love her the most, and those she loves the most. Love and distruction sometimes go hand in hand, and create a plot full of crazy common sense. Gerard put his soul on the papers of this comic, and was not afraid to reveal himself in each and every character exploding in a mix of blood and creativity. Who says that a rock star can't tell a story?

  15. 5 out of 5

    Marnie (Enchanted Bibliophile)

    2020 This was a quick re-read, from last year. I remember reading it and wanting to get my hands on the rest of the volumes and then life happened... So getting all 3 volumes at once seemed to be the best solution to my problem. I must say reading this the second time was way more fun. I remember the first time there was a lot of going back to check and refresh my memory. This time I knew all the characters and just enjoyed the ride. And what a ride… Family, you have to love them, right? Or you can tr 2020 This was a quick re-read, from last year. I remember reading it and wanting to get my hands on the rest of the volumes and then life happened... So getting all 3 volumes at once seemed to be the best solution to my problem. I must say reading this the second time was way more fun. I remember the first time there was a lot of going back to check and refresh my memory. This time I knew all the characters and just enjoyed the ride. And what a ride… Family, you have to love them, right? Or you can try and kill them. Now on to the next one... 2019 “It's okay to be different”

  16. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    I decided to do a re-read of this before watching the Netflix show. Before becoming a rock star as the lead singer of My Chemical Romance, Gerard Way ran a comic book shop. His love of early Vertigo comics shows through in his storytelling. This has the same weird strangeness of Grant Morrison's Doom Patrol run. That shouldn't surprise anyone at this point now that Way just wrote a year's worth of Doom Patrol stories himself. The basic premise is that these kids with superpowers were adopted by I decided to do a re-read of this before watching the Netflix show. Before becoming a rock star as the lead singer of My Chemical Romance, Gerard Way ran a comic book shop. His love of early Vertigo comics shows through in his storytelling. This has the same weird strangeness of Grant Morrison's Doom Patrol run. That shouldn't surprise anyone at this point now that Way just wrote a year's worth of Doom Patrol stories himself. The basic premise is that these kids with superpowers were adopted by an eccentric genius and eventually became superheroes. I think readers' biggest complaint with the series is that there's not enough backstory. There are a few flashback scenes, but what other little nods to the past are very subtle, often told through a device like a framed newspaper headline on the wall. Overall, I enjoyed the nonstop action and weirdness, it worked very well with Gabriel Ba's art.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bea

    My friend gave me her copies to borrow of this series since she was really excited about the new The Umbrella Academy TV series that has just come out. She really enjoyed the graphic novels and therefore recommended them to me, hoping I'd become just as interested. This was a nice read although confusing at times since the art style (although unique) was not the easiest to comprehend what was going on in every box. I liked the concept of the story very much but don't think the execution was as g My friend gave me her copies to borrow of this series since she was really excited about the new The Umbrella Academy TV series that has just come out. She really enjoyed the graphic novels and therefore recommended them to me, hoping I'd become just as interested. This was a nice read although confusing at times since the art style (although unique) was not the easiest to comprehend what was going on in every box. I liked the concept of the story very much but don't think the execution was as good as it could've been. I will the checking out the new TV series after reading this. Would recommend. 2.5 stars.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    Years ago, an unrevealed number of children were spontaneously born to women who weren't pregnant. Reginald Hargreeves, aka The Monocle, gathered all of them he could find, 47 of them, and formed the Umbrella Academy. Why? To save the world! I picked this up because people said it's a lot like Grant Morrison's Doom Patrol. While I thought it was, it reminded me more of The Royal Tenenbaums. There are sequences were the academy members were youngsters but the series is mostly about them as adults Years ago, an unrevealed number of children were spontaneously born to women who weren't pregnant. Reginald Hargreeves, aka The Monocle, gathered all of them he could find, 47 of them, and formed the Umbrella Academy. Why? To save the world! I picked this up because people said it's a lot like Grant Morrison's Doom Patrol. While I thought it was, it reminded me more of The Royal Tenenbaums. There are sequences were the academy members were youngsters but the series is mostly about them as adults and coping with their relationship with the now deceased Monocle. And they take on an old foe and deal with one of their own but that's secondary in my view. The writing was delightfully weird and the art suited it perfectly. I enjoyed the characters even though I'm still not clear on some of their powers. Number 5 is easily my favorite though I love that Spaceboy's head is on a gorilla's body. I recommend this to anyone that likes something different from their comics. I could see this appealing to fans of the Doom Patrol easily, as well as Madman and the early issues of Generation X. It's a quick read but very interesting.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Danielle The Book Huntress (Back to the Books)

    This one's been in my tbr pile for a long time, and I finally got around to reading it. I don't follow the music group My Chemical Romance, but I did see one of their videos, and I found it visually appealing. I can definitely see the artist in Gerald Way from that video sequence, and it carries over to this graphic novel. The story takes the concept of superhuman abilities and the onus to protect humanity at one's personal cost and examines it closely. In this case, it focuses on seven children This one's been in my tbr pile for a long time, and I finally got around to reading it. I don't follow the music group My Chemical Romance, but I did see one of their videos, and I found it visually appealing. I can definitely see the artist in Gerald Way from that video sequence, and it carries over to this graphic novel. The story takes the concept of superhuman abilities and the onus to protect humanity at one's personal cost and examines it closely. In this case, it focuses on seven children who were born under strange circumstances, and subsequently adopted by an eccentric older man. He goes on to raise these children to be superheroes who step in to counter threats against humanity on earth. The story goes twenty or so years into the future, and the remaining children are dealing with the aftermath of years under the tutelage and dubious parenting of their father. Each and every one of them is emotionally scarred, but one in particular. These emotional scars are ruthlessly exploited to create a very vicious instrument that could lead to the apocalypse. The artwork is by a Brazilian artist (known for his work with his twin brother) based on scripts and concepts by Way, and there is a real meeting of the minds and collusion evident in the pages. Like a good graphic novel, a mix of dialogue and action tell the story very well. The story is relatively easy to follow, although it leaves this reader with some questions that probe me to continue the series. This is dark, but nothing less than expected. Dark subject matter is the obvious result when a story centers around children who were reared from birth to be superheroes by a poor substitute for a parent who has a specific endgoal and ruthlessly exploits his children to achieve that goal. Despite that darkness, there is also a bit of welcome and quite quirky humor. Of course, even with this dysfunctional family, we see a sibling dynamic that feels realistic for the situation. A tenuous, but surprisingly strong bond of loyalty between the erstwhile adopted siblings that is reactivated as a result of their recent reunion and the need to go back to work defending the denizens of earth. This is a good graphic novel to experience, especially for aficionados of the visual arts. Different, but recognizable for readers who appreciate the superhero theme. The characters are tortured and broken, morally conflicted to some extent, but yet no less heroic; and the dark, twisted villains that exist only in the fictional landscape of superhero fiction.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

    Honestly I judged this one by the cover and it was a lot better than I thought. 7 quasi siblings raised by a scientist reunited by his death and pending disaster. Hope to continue reading the series.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mizuki

    3.7 stars. I don't care about Gerard Way and his music but the artwork is undeniably lovely. and this: "Can I interest you in destroying the world?" Now, you have my full attention, nothing is more exciting than destroying the world. Well, the setting is refreshing, the artwork is doubtlessly lovely with a pink-ish color tone (the coloring and the style do look really European to me), the story is exciting enough. However, aside from a few main characters e.g. Spaceboy and Vanya, the rest of the 3.7 stars. I don't care about Gerard Way and his music but the artwork is undeniably lovely. and this: "Can I interest you in destroying the world?" Now, you have my full attention, nothing is more exciting than destroying the world. Well, the setting is refreshing, the artwork is doubtlessly lovely with a pink-ish color tone (the coloring and the style do look really European to me), the story is exciting enough. However, aside from a few main characters e.g. Spaceboy and Vanya, the rest of the characters and their personalities are not very well defined and explained. I got bits and pieces of characters' backstories alongside the plot development, but nothing more. I feel like I had only read half of the story. As to the bonus short stories at the back, I don't know what to make of them. Other book review: Batman and Robin by Peter Tomasi & Patrick Gleason Omnibus https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

  22. 4 out of 5

    Stacee

    I probably would have loved this more if I read it before I saw the show. Yes, I’m guilty of loving the show more than the source material. However. I did enjoy the story here and the look of the comic. Of course, there’s a bit of a different plot line and I really liked getting more detail than we got in the show. Volume 2, here I come.

  23. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    This was my first Gerard Way comic. I'm about to pick up Doom Patrol so wanted to give this a whirl. With spunky art, a way out there yet interesting story, is Umbrella Academy worth checking out? Yes. However, it's not without it's flaws. What I liked: The art was alive and fun. The world itself was interesting. The action is top notch and can be brutal as fuck. I enjoyed the interaction between most character and the world building they do with dialog alone. It's not easy. I also enjoyed the t This was my first Gerard Way comic. I'm about to pick up Doom Patrol so wanted to give this a whirl. With spunky art, a way out there yet interesting story, is Umbrella Academy worth checking out? Yes. However, it's not without it's flaws. What I liked: The art was alive and fun. The world itself was interesting. The action is top notch and can be brutal as fuck. I enjoyed the interaction between most character and the world building they do with dialog alone. It's not easy. I also enjoyed the themes of family and betrayal and it's done pretty well here. What I didn't like: The pacing felt a bit too fast. A mini-series only has so many issues but 5 issues felt short for the story being told. 8 would have been perfect. Also sometimes the characters just act rash, or yell, and for no reason. Maybe due to not getting enough backstory on certain characters I felt confused at these moments. Overall I enjoyed this, a fun quick read with a interesting world. I hope that the rest of Way's work is as fun and enjoyable as this.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Eilonwy

    2-1/2 stars Seven super-powered children, born all over the world on the same day to single, non-expectant mothers, are collected by an eccentric (and alien!) millionaire and brought up to be superheroes. But they've all gone their own way as adults, until their "father" dies and they return to their childhood home to bury him -- and save the world one more time. Well, meh. I wanted to read this after watching Season One of the TV series, which I found addictive and intriguing. Plus I liked M 2-1/2 stars Seven super-powered children, born all over the world on the same day to single, non-expectant mothers, are collected by an eccentric (and alien!) millionaire and brought up to be superheroes. But they've all gone their own way as adults, until their "father" dies and they return to their childhood home to bury him -- and save the world one more time. Well, meh. I wanted to read this after watching Season One of the TV series, which I found addictive and intriguing. Plus I liked My Chemical Romance and had this on my radar for years anyway. And yet ... if I hadn't seen the TV version, I'm not sure I would have had any clue what was going on in the six short issues that make up this collected volume. I can't tell if the comic would have felt this empty and un-filled-out if I'd read it cold, because the series packed in a lot more backstory and detail. But I found the comic really sketchy (haha) and lacking. I didn't care about the characters, and the stuff that happened didn't make a ton of sense. Everything felt rushed. It does say in the opening notes that Gerard Way wrote the scripts between shows on an MCR world tour -- and that's exactly what it reads like, as if it was written by someone who had no time. And also by someone who knew the "head story" so well that they kept forgetting that the readers don't know it (this is not an uncommon problem for writers in general, but editors are supposed to catch it and fix it). I did like a couple of the differences from the TV series -- for instance, there's an evil orchestra in the comic that I found very intriguing (and who was the leader? That dude needs his own comic series leading up to this one). A difference I really did not like was the male-gaze-y treatment of Vanya, who is introduced in skimpy underwear and later shown essentially naked (as in the cover illustration, which I was not especially happy to be seen holding on the train). But the comic also left me with so many questions. In the present, there are only six adults, and I couldn't find any explanation for what happened to the seventh child (this is explained on the show, thank goodness). Also, it bugged me a little on the TV show that no one seems to know what happened to the other 40 unexpected babies born the same day -- shouldn't they all have superpowers too, and be easy to track down? -- but it really annoyed me that it's not addressed in the comic. Reginald Hargreeves, the father figure, is introduced as an alien wearing a human mask -- and then the subject is completely dropped. Plus I'm not sure I could have figured out what Rumor and Seance's superpowers were supposed to be if I hadn't seen the TV show. There is just so not enough to the comic. Argh, it's not worth saying any more about such a slender, slight volume. Mostly, I am very impressed that the TV series writer managed to take this story and make it so much richer and fuller. I guess I'll read the next volume after I watch Season Two, but honestly, I'd recommend watching the TV show and skipping the book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Gabrielle

    Somewhere between 3 and 4 stars. I’m going to create a new shelf called « awesome garbage » and it will be for craptastic stuff like this graphic novel. Despite my intense dislike for Gerard Way and his stupid band, I ended up with a copy of “The Umbrella Academy” after getting sucked into a Netflix vortex, which included the first season of the show. I wasn’t aware that the former My Chemical Romance frontman was behind what I immediately dubbed “Emo X-Men”, but as soon as I knew, some nostalgic Somewhere between 3 and 4 stars. I’m going to create a new shelf called « awesome garbage » and it will be for craptastic stuff like this graphic novel. Despite my intense dislike for Gerard Way and his stupid band, I ended up with a copy of “The Umbrella Academy” after getting sucked into a Netflix vortex, which included the first season of the show. I wasn’t aware that the former My Chemical Romance frontman was behind what I immediately dubbed “Emo X-Men”, but as soon as I knew, some nostalgic stylistic touches were unmistakably his. But I like deconstructed superhero stories, and I tend to sympathize with characters who deal with parental damage, so I kept watching and decided to get reading. The idea behind this graphic novel is admittedly fantastic: A strange man named Reginald Hargreeves adopts 7 children, who were all born as the result of an inexplicable event where forty-three women all gave birth on the same day without having shown any sign of pregnancy before. Those children all have bizarre and remarkable abilities, and their adoptive father grooms them to become superheros, convinced that they are meant to eventually save the world. But as they get older, cracks start to show (who wouldn't be messed up by such an upbringing?) and they leave the house they were raised in... until a dramatic event forces them to reunite. The problem with this book is how rushed the narrative is. There is hardly any time for character development, and while interesting things happen, you can't tell what motivates the characters to do the things they do, or what their powers are, exactly. I don't read that many graphic novels, so perhaps this is not unusual, but it left me wanting more. I'll read the follow up books, because now my curiosity demands satisfaction, and hopefully there are more answers in the sequels. But so far, I enjoyed the show more, as it dug deeper...

  26. 5 out of 5

    GrilledCheeseSamurai (Scott)

    I wanted to get this read before the Netflix show comes out right away. It also helped that Comixology had a sale. :P I admit that I originally never bothered with this comic mostly because the writer is a rock star and usually when something like that happens it's just a cash grab. Turns out I really enjoyed it. Truth be told, I wasn't even really aware what the premise of the book was, but when I saw the shows trailer I immediately became intrigued. *Shrugs* I can be a snob just like everyone else I wanted to get this read before the Netflix show comes out right away. It also helped that Comixology had a sale. :P I admit that I originally never bothered with this comic mostly because the writer is a rock star and usually when something like that happens it's just a cash grab. Turns out I really enjoyed it. Truth be told, I wasn't even really aware what the premise of the book was, but when I saw the shows trailer I immediately became intrigued. *Shrugs* I can be a snob just like everyone else. The story is pretty out there.' Sometimes it's so out there that I can't help but feel like its being weird and quirky just so it can be weird and quirky. like its trying too hard. The art is fabulous though - as are the colors. Overall, I had a fun time with the book and I am looking forward to vol. 2 which I also picked up during the sale. I'd probably give this 3 and a half stars if Goodreads would let me - but felt comfortable rounding up to 4 stars for this review. :)

  27. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    With all the talk/praise surrounding The Umbrella Academy TV show on Netflix, I was intrigued to at least give it a shot with its first trade. Well, it sure is something... The theme is about a dysfunctional family. It's a bit weird with it's setting. You just sometimes gotta accept whatever the writer is throwing at you. The characters are fine, umm.. Overall, I didn't hate it ... I guess, I can call it okay? 🤔 Kinda... It gets 2.5 stars out of 5 With all the talk/praise surrounding The Umbrella Academy TV show on Netflix, I was intrigued to at least give it a shot with its first trade. Well, it sure is something... The theme is about a dysfunctional family. It's a bit weird with it's setting. You just sometimes gotta accept whatever the writer is throwing at you. The characters are fine, umm.. Overall, I didn't hate it ... I guess, I can call it okay? 🤔 Kinda... It gets 2.5 stars out of 5

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey Rey

    [4.5 Stars]

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alison

    review here: https://youtu.be/l9c4rNh3UcA review here: https://youtu.be/l9c4rNh3UcA

  30. 5 out of 5

    Wing Kee

    The art, the story...shitting my pants. World: The art, what can I said about Ba's art, it's stylish, it's beautiful, it's melancholy and small and intimate...and then guts and blood fly everywhere. It's just so beautiful. I loved his work in the Mignolaverse and I love it here. Those splash pages, soooo good. The world building is phenomenal, it's doesn't hand hold, it's doesn't info dump, but rather just pulls the reader into the world and let's them see and learn about the world and characters The art, the story...shitting my pants. World: The art, what can I said about Ba's art, it's stylish, it's beautiful, it's melancholy and small and intimate...and then guts and blood fly everywhere. It's just so beautiful. I loved his work in the Mignolaverse and I love it here. Those splash pages, soooo good. The world building is phenomenal, it's doesn't hand hold, it's doesn't info dump, but rather just pulls the reader into the world and let's them see and learn about the world and characters through their interaction. This world is same but not quite, cliche but not quite, it's steampunk but not quite. The layers of this world is found in the art and the quiet moments and there are so many layers you feel that are just beyond the readers reach until the creative team decides to share, this world is fucking awesome, it makes sense but does not, it's logical but is not. This reminds me of the best of Doom Patrol from Morrison. Story: This is Doom Patrol but it's not and that's the best thing I can say about this series. It's so well paced, the emotions hit so hard and given that these are all new characters and there are only 6 issues is a testament to the creative team. The art really informs the story and between the lines shows how this visual storytelling can bring things that pure prose simply cannot. The story is so retro yet modern I can't express how much I loved it. I've said it above and I can say it again, if you love Doom Patrol by Morrison this series is for you. Characters: The kids are brilliant, they are just fully formed enough for the story but you feel the weight and the layers in the art and want to know more about them. We get the glimpses we need for the story and it's beautiful. There are a lot of quiet moments in the book in between the action that really build the characters and their voices are so distinct, from Spaceboy to Kraken to No. 5 they are all so different, so messed up, so heroic and so flawed, it's beautiful. I love this series, it's so good. Onward to the next book!

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