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Rowing Without Oars: A Memoir of Living and Dying

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Ulla -Carin Lindquist was happily married, with four adoring children and a successful career as a newscaster. All of that changed when her fiftieth birthday drew near, and she was diagnosed with ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. In the face of this incurable, degenerative disease, Ulla kept a journal chronicling the last years of her life, not only for her children Ulla -Carin Lindquist was happily married, with four adoring children and a successful career as a newscaster. All of that changed when her fiftieth birthday drew near, and she was diagnosed with ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. In the face of this incurable, degenerative disease, Ulla kept a journal chronicling the last years of her life, not only for her children’s sake but also to help her cope with her impending death. As powerful and moving as books such as The Diving Bell and the Butterfly and Tuesdays with Morrie, Ulla’s unflinching account is an unforgettable reminder of how precious life really is.


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Ulla -Carin Lindquist was happily married, with four adoring children and a successful career as a newscaster. All of that changed when her fiftieth birthday drew near, and she was diagnosed with ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. In the face of this incurable, degenerative disease, Ulla kept a journal chronicling the last years of her life, not only for her children Ulla -Carin Lindquist was happily married, with four adoring children and a successful career as a newscaster. All of that changed when her fiftieth birthday drew near, and she was diagnosed with ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. In the face of this incurable, degenerative disease, Ulla kept a journal chronicling the last years of her life, not only for her children’s sake but also to help her cope with her impending death. As powerful and moving as books such as The Diving Bell and the Butterfly and Tuesdays with Morrie, Ulla’s unflinching account is an unforgettable reminder of how precious life really is.

30 review for Rowing Without Oars: A Memoir of Living and Dying

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tanja Berg

    This is an extra-ordinary book written by a remarkable woman, Ulla-Carin Lindquist, after she was diagnosed with ALS. An independent career woman, a TV journalist and news anchor, suddenly has to come to terms with a devastating diagnosis with only one outcome: death. It's a very honest account, deeply felt but not depressing. In facing death, Ulla-Carina finds peace. Even as she has to face losing every facet of independence while keeping every ounce of her intellect. Even as she has to accept This is an extra-ordinary book written by a remarkable woman, Ulla-Carin Lindquist, after she was diagnosed with ALS. An independent career woman, a TV journalist and news anchor, suddenly has to come to terms with a devastating diagnosis with only one outcome: death. It's a very honest account, deeply felt but not depressing. In facing death, Ulla-Carina finds peace. Even as she has to face losing every facet of independence while keeping every ounce of her intellect. Even as she has to accept leaving her children while the two boys are very young. Highly recommended.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    Hero and heroic are words that are thrown around without much thought. Consider, Sen. John McCain's "heroic" vote against Trumpcare. What was the risk in walking to the front of the Senate, pointing his thumb down, and voting nay? Were there snipers in the gallery? Was Mitch McConnell armed? You get my point. Some authors have been heroic. Boris Pasternak comes immediately to mind, Vaclav Havel, Anna Akhmatova, any of those folks who stood up to the regime and risked life and limb through their w Hero and heroic are words that are thrown around without much thought. Consider, Sen. John McCain's "heroic" vote against Trumpcare. What was the risk in walking to the front of the Senate, pointing his thumb down, and voting nay? Were there snipers in the gallery? Was Mitch McConnell armed? You get my point. Some authors have been heroic. Boris Pasternak comes immediately to mind, Vaclav Havel, Anna Akhmatova, any of those folks who stood up to the regime and risked life and limb through their writing. And then there's someone like Stephen Hawking - heroic. Someone might want to call Stephen King or Joyce Carol Oates heroic in their productivity, but they're not, they're hard workers, but not heroic. Again, you get my point. Ulla -Carin Lindquist was heroic. Struck down at age 50 with ALS, she died within a year. ALS shuts everything down except your mind. Ms. Lindquist used her mind, and the tools provided by Swedish social welfare to chronicle her last year. Rowing without Oars is up-lifting, heart-breaking, funny, and true. It's worth your time.

  3. 5 out of 5

    I don't think a paragraph went by without tears or wanting to cry. But I knew it would be such. Every word Ulla-Carin writes here has such poignancy, depth and meaning. Rowing without Oars gives a heart-rending insight into the emotional, practical, spiritual and physical impact Motor Neurone Disease can have upon a person and her family. The most striking aspect about Ulla-Carin is how she became stronger mentally as her physical condition deteriorated rapidly. She faced the disease with such c I don't think a paragraph went by without tears or wanting to cry. But I knew it would be such. Every word Ulla-Carin writes here has such poignancy, depth and meaning. Rowing without Oars gives a heart-rending insight into the emotional, practical, spiritual and physical impact Motor Neurone Disease can have upon a person and her family. The most striking aspect about Ulla-Carin is how she became stronger mentally as her physical condition deteriorated rapidly. She faced the disease with such courage and strength and, whilst extremely sad (I think I welled up with tears throughout), it made me question life as it is now, to try and appreciate each day as if it was my last and to always let those I hold dear know how much I love them. Quite inspirational. Blessings to Ulla-Carin, her family and all others whose lives have been impacted by MND/ALS in some way.

  4. 5 out of 5

    M. V.

    "what is death?" 'i imagine it as being taken out of time, bodily time, and the physical dimension. and whatever we were, our personality or what we sometimes call the soul, goes to god and we leave our body here. it returns to the earth. it belongs to the earth. but it also gives rise to new life.' "what is death?" 'i imagine it as being taken out of time, bodily time, and the physical dimension. and whatever we were, our personality or what we sometimes call the soul, goes to god and we leave our body here. it returns to the earth. it belongs to the earth. but it also gives rise to new life.'

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Hopkins

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This was quite a speedy read as it had me engrossed and also aghast at the rapid decline described and the decency in dealing with such a situation. There is overall a sense of calm and appreciation of quality of experience. This lady, "Ulla-Carin" begins with a burning pain in her right hand on page 3 when rowing at the start of this account and this possible peripheral injury eventually becomes suspected to be a sign of something more sinsiter. Three months after suggesting to her doctor, foll This was quite a speedy read as it had me engrossed and also aghast at the rapid decline described and the decency in dealing with such a situation. There is overall a sense of calm and appreciation of quality of experience. This lady, "Ulla-Carin" begins with a burning pain in her right hand on page 3 when rowing at the start of this account and this possible peripheral injury eventually becomes suspected to be a sign of something more sinsiter. Three months after suggesting to her doctor, following internet research, that she may have Motor Neurone Disease (or Ameliotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, as it is referred to in this Swedish translation - the American term) this diagnosis is confirmed on her 50th birthday. A doctor in Umea states "The worst diagnosis one can give a person. Fifty per cent die within eighteen months of diagnosis." Seven months after diagnosis Ulla is in receipt of palliative care. This from a lady who at 48 and 49 was bending backwards and standing on her head. A lady who trained for five months as a physiotherapist on a geriatric ward, was disappointed in some aspects of treatment and chose at this point to become a reporter to give an account of how some situations really are, going on to be a newsreader on Swedish television and then work in journalism in current affairs. There is detail of the path of impairment. Her right hand droops and her fingers stiffen - page 24 - then she sees an occupational therapist who fabricates a splint for her from thermoplastics and reassures her that it may heal in time and as a doctor she cannot diagnose. She has purchased a button buttoner, tin opener, tongs, an angled knife, a pen and scissors from the "handicapped shop." Having found fault with Canadian needles when sewing, her potato peeler when peeling potatoes and pens when writing she acknowledges reduced strength. She tires easily, trips over and has a tightness in her shoulders so she goes to physiotherapy to have further assessment and treatment. She is frustrated she cannot wrap Christmas presents (page 21). She celebrates managing to fasten her bra with her bad hand pushing the eye to the hook whilst lying on her bed (page 30) and she resorts to washing her left armpit with her left knee (page 34). The sensation she describes in her body is of "bubbles, fishtails and bees" (page 31). As her energy levels decline she feels that for each day of effort she needs two days to recover from this (page 48). There is a sense of gratitude that she can still wipe herself (page 51). She feels she has lost her right hand and her left hand is also weakened (page 60) yet she manages to celebrate getting two bullseyes with this left hand in a game of darts. There are frustrations about obtaining a carer and she has to answer questions about how long it takes her to dress and she explains she cannot at all without help. Social security want a time putting on things and her friend asks if they want to know how long it takes her to change a tampon. Doctors certificates and occupational therapy reports are presented to explain that she "cannot even pick her nose" and eventually with a thick skinned approach to bureaucracy her care is approved. She then loses her speech and has just 3 fingers that she feels of use (page 73), eventually just using her middle finger really (page 105). Knowing respiratory difficulties are usually a cause of passing, she finds herself at 54% of breathing ability (page 83) and preparing for the potential of a ventilator to help with this. When her weight drops to 49 kilos it is time to consider a feeding tube (page 138). She enjoys a treat of a last meal to mark the end of eating (page 143). Her concerns are about ability to press a button (page 147) and she talks of feeling trapped in her body. Yet with humour she jokes, when doctors say there are "secondary benefits to illness" regarding extra visits, that she wonders what the primary one is. She does describe laughter (albeit a bulbar effect) as being a blessing of this condition though (page 72). She also says that she would not wish to be without this part of life. She feels that she is living in the present for the first time and she states "Death has brought me closer to life" (page 173). She takes opportunity to make arrangements for family, seeking good advice for how she goes forward. Her older daughter Ulrica helps her with make-up (page 88) and extracts of positively framed letters laced with metaphor from her younger daughter Carin (aged 21 at the time) are featured. Her older son Pontus develops a system of blinks for communication in advance of speech loss, with three blinks for "I love you", two for "yes" and one long one for "no" and later humorously adds in an eye roll to request "pocket money, please." Her younger son chivvies her along by saying that "every second is a life." Special children's trauma therapists advise her how to help children deal with a parent who is terminally ill (page 80). She describes how she herself copes with her sense of entrapment. "A lot of dexterity exists in the head of a paralysed person." She imagines herself doing things she once did to amuse herself, drawing on her memory. When carers assist her she feels adrift as it were with them playing the part of her oars. She also says she does not mind if they talk over her as she is appreciating the passivity of the process of being helped perhaps. She does talk of enjoying receiving assistance with showers. She meets with a lady whose books she has read and discusses theology, discovering this lady is Jewish and whilst she once focused on being clever she now focuses on being good she says and provides inspiration from a Holocaust survivor who talks about death being part of life, how we live a whole life every day and how it is possible to have dignity in death. As a Christian (thanks partly to each of her Grandmothers) Ulla is grateful for support from the clergy with extracts of Job used to explain to her how it is okay to doubt (as even clergy do) and to be angry. She ponders what death is - being in a different dimension with the body returned to earth and the personality or soul going to God. She tells her son that it is part of God's plan (page 43). She is reassured by her Chaplain that some good will arise and she is reminded that her life is more than this moment and more than her illness and encouraged that she should take opportunity to have her goodbyes said. She is philosophic about adversities and when she tumbles onto a vase of roses, cutting her bottom and requiring stitches, she states "Despite everything, roses are still roses." She describes getting more vivid dreams and noticing life with enhanced attention to detail. She also discusses her imminent death with friends and how she wants things handled (page 112). She talks of a quality of death as well as life and of reassurance that she should not have to experience pain with help at home from an Advanced Care at Home team. Friends rally support. She values it when a colleague comes to read her a novel (page 169) and another friend provides her a therapeutic massage (page 172.) She values that people give her the gift of their time. Her husband (a doctor treating burns patients) reassures her or his intention to keep his vows and support her to the end and she also speaks of her brother's support. Page 168: " 'To work as a doctor is a privilege, with all the contact it gives, all the insights into life, dying and death. Sometimes you find it extremely moving, at other just very moving. 'It affects me as a human being. Perhaps I can begin to understand what is important in life and what means less.' I, so deeply involved in how my life is ending, am grateful that these people exist." Ulla takes the opportunity to raise the issue of how it is that whilst half of funds goes toward nervous system disorders, only 5% of research funds are aimed in this direction. She describes how she is well supported with equipment which her sons take great delight in, using the ramps she gets for toy cars and as a mini golf incline. She benefits from a leather armchair donated from a man who had ALS/MND and donated it for use of others in receipt of this diagnosis. Her bed is a hospital bed from the county council with, as she describes it, black balls that fill with air. She has her house adapted with a stair lift (60,000 kronor), a turbo wheelchair (worth 100,000 kronor), nose-operated computer (20,000 kronor), a page turner, which sometimes has problems with pages (20,000 kronor) and disability adaptation of the home (at least 80,000 kronor) . These items are not all self-funded, thankfully. She explains ALS as having too much glutamate on the brain and breaks down the definition of the terms as a lack of nourishment to muscles on one side of the body (how it initially begins) with nerve cells replaced with connective tissue. She is told how it often strikes high achievers. This book is quite an achievement in itself in describing a deft adaptation to a hard deal to accept and one that should surely be inspirational to others.

  6. 5 out of 5

    jamaicaska

    Its hard enough to know that you have an incurable disease, and harder if you know that you only have a couple of months to live. But to wait for your dying day while your limbs and other body parts to slowly stop functioning, I think thats way too much. Ulla-Carin's story is inspiring and very touching. Despite her condition, she continued to share her story up to the point that she can only move 3 of her fingers to type. She remains positive despite the physical and emotional pain shes going t Its hard enough to know that you have an incurable disease, and harder if you know that you only have a couple of months to live. But to wait for your dying day while your limbs and other body parts to slowly stop functioning, I think thats way too much. Ulla-Carin's story is inspiring and very touching. Despite her condition, she continued to share her story up to the point that she can only move 3 of her fingers to type. She remains positive despite the physical and emotional pain shes going through. Its difficult to imagine the hardships she had to go through. Physically, her body lost most of its functions. Ulla-Carin had ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis), a rare disease that cannot be cured. A person diagnosed with this disease will find it difficult to move as the motor neurons responsible for voluntary and muscle movement will be affected. (I had to research on this matter to further understand.) In Ulla-Carin's words, "The lack of nerve impulses leads to the wasting of the muscles which are controlled by will. We cannot control the heart but we can hold our breath. So the lungs are controlled by the nerves that are knocked out by ALS. Patients with ALS die when their breathing is put out of action." She initially lost control of her arms until such time that she cant walk, and had to be taken care of someone who will feed her. Even her speech was slurred. Emotionally, she had to deal with the pain of leaving her husband and 4 kids. Her son Pontus created a blink language to help her express what she needs. Its a touching story that will help a reader realize the value of life and the importance of being surrounded by the people who will love and never leave us in difficult times. It will teach you to appreciate the things that you have now because life is full of surprises. Ulla-Carin had a successful career as a broadcaster, happily married and had kids, then this thing happened. The story shows that having a positive outlook in life during trying times makes all the difference.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alison Anderson

    I was given this 8 years ago by my friend and his wife, who has since died of cancer. found it very moving then. HOwever picked it up again this week and read it again - this time it is 6 months since my own best friend died of a brain tumour and went through a lot of the deterioration of function , albeit spread over a number of years, that Ulla-Carin describes in her book. So it feels very real and very poignant. This book though is in fact a celebration of life as well as a diary of dying and h I was given this 8 years ago by my friend and his wife, who has since died of cancer. found it very moving then. HOwever picked it up again this week and read it again - this time it is 6 months since my own best friend died of a brain tumour and went through a lot of the deterioration of function , albeit spread over a number of years, that Ulla-Carin describes in her book. So it feels very real and very poignant. This book though is in fact a celebration of life as well as a diary of dying and her joy in spending time with her 4 children - 2 who are grown up, and 2 quite young, is inspiring. It strikes me that it would be better to live like this now, rather than wait until we are told we, too, are dying...... given 5 stars as would unhesitatingly recommend to anyone.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    Nearly ten years ago Swedish newscaster Ulla-Carin Lindquist passed away from ALS, but before she left, as she dealt with the year or so of gradual deterioration she wrote her thoughts and experiences in this small volume. It is very moving and sad, and I probably shouldn't have read it, because it made me melancholy. I wonder how I would measure up in a similar plight. ALS is such a cruel disease, because one's mind remains active while the rest of the body rebels and eventually shuts down. Yet Nearly ten years ago Swedish newscaster Ulla-Carin Lindquist passed away from ALS, but before she left, as she dealt with the year or so of gradual deterioration she wrote her thoughts and experiences in this small volume. It is very moving and sad, and I probably shouldn't have read it, because it made me melancholy. I wonder how I would measure up in a similar plight. ALS is such a cruel disease, because one's mind remains active while the rest of the body rebels and eventually shuts down. Yet, "Every second is a life," and you continue to have a relationship with your loved ones, I guess savoring each moment you have left. As I get older I start thinking about mortality. I need to stop! :) Anyway, this is a nice little book, and it may be helpful to some, and hard for others.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Anna Lundberg

    I cried through most of this. I wanted to quit halfway through but that would have been cowardly. The insights on how Ulla-Carin and above all her children deal with her sudden diagnosis of motor neurone disease and her subsequent deterioration are heart-breaking. You can't help but wonder how you would react in a similar situation, and as it says on the back of the book: it might just change the way you live. I cried through most of this. I wanted to quit halfway through but that would have been cowardly. The insights on how Ulla-Carin and above all her children deal with her sudden diagnosis of motor neurone disease and her subsequent deterioration are heart-breaking. You can't help but wonder how you would react in a similar situation, and as it says on the back of the book: it might just change the way you live.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Miss Nessa

    Heart-breaking... difficult to read and yet so easy. The difficulty is knowing that her story ends much too soon and her illness happens so rapidly. Easy, as in her story telling style, her memories, her sheer honesty are compelling and draw you in. This has moved me and I often think of her, her Family and those she left behind. Thank you Ulla-Carin

  11. 4 out of 5

    Belebe

    Ulla-Carin is one of those courageous and strong people I admire and respect. "Every second is a life" -- came from her young son. I am reminded how precious our gift of life is, be happy and live life fully as God desires. Ulla-Carin is one of those courageous and strong people I admire and respect. "Every second is a life" -- came from her young son. I am reminded how precious our gift of life is, be happy and live life fully as God desires.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Yoko Nemchinova

    She opens her life, her heart and fear for us...we live her pain as we turn the pages of her life...so painful

  13. 4 out of 5

    Pam Coon

    This is the poignant memoir of Ulla-Carin Lindquist, a TV news reporter from Sweden. She is in her late 40's, the mother of 4 children, 2 young adult daughters from her first marriage, and two young sons, 7 and 9 years old, at the time of her writing. Her memoir opens as she is helping her husband with rowing their boat into a harbor. Ulla realizes that she has lost strength in her hands and arms, and despairs at that discovery. Her husband notices it too. Her difficulties increase, she stumbles This is the poignant memoir of Ulla-Carin Lindquist, a TV news reporter from Sweden. She is in her late 40's, the mother of 4 children, 2 young adult daughters from her first marriage, and two young sons, 7 and 9 years old, at the time of her writing. Her memoir opens as she is helping her husband with rowing their boat into a harbor. Ulla realizes that she has lost strength in her hands and arms, and despairs at that discovery. Her husband notices it too. Her difficulties increase, she stumbles and falls in her living room. She seeks advice from doctors, and is treated seriously for a possible misalignment of a disc in her neck. But as days and weeks go by, Ulla sees things worsening. She suspects ALS, and eventually this diagnosis is confirmed by her doctors. She has bulbar ALS and her hands, arms are affected first and she knows that breathing and swallowing will follow. This is the memoir she wrote during those days. She is given an approximate time span of 18 months. She wants to follow her illness and give her children something to remember her by. By the book's end (it is a very short book), it is approaching Christmas. Ulla will live to March of the following year. I wish I had read this book years ago, as I had a friend diagnosed with ALS. Ulla's writing would have helped me understand what my friend was going through.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Tuite

    Reading 2019 Book 12: Rowing Without Oars by Ulla-Carin Lindquist A memoir about a former Swedish newscaster who is diagnosed with ALS. The book chronicles her joys and struggles as we see life through a woman with a terminal disease. The book is one you know from the start is not going to end happily, but you find nuggets of inspiration along with her. As her life slows down she is able to enjoy her personal relationships, especially with her four children, that she did not have time for before th Reading 2019 Book 12: Rowing Without Oars by Ulla-Carin Lindquist A memoir about a former Swedish newscaster who is diagnosed with ALS. The book chronicles her joys and struggles as we see life through a woman with a terminal disease. The book is one you know from the start is not going to end happily, but you find nuggets of inspiration along with her. As her life slows down she is able to enjoy her personal relationships, especially with her four children, that she did not have time for before the diagnosis. A small book, and quick read, it was something a bit different.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    Inside information about what it's like living (and dying) with ALS. I was in tears through most of the book - and especially in the end. Inside information about what it's like living (and dying) with ALS. I was in tears through most of the book - and especially in the end.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Cat

    An emotional read that i couldn't put down, the ending was poignant and well done. An emotional read that i couldn't put down, the ending was poignant and well done.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Rynn

    Poetic, beautifully written. Full of sorrow yet not depressive at all. Makes me think a lot

  18. 5 out of 5

    Les

    Sweet. An active life cut short by ALS. Notes chronicling her last couple of years. Incredibly strong. "Every second is a life." Sweet. An active life cut short by ALS. Notes chronicling her last couple of years. Incredibly strong. "Every second is a life."

  19. 5 out of 5

    André Habet

    Devastating and also the most comforting book I've recently read. Going for a walk now. Devastating and also the most comforting book I've recently read. Going for a walk now.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Diana

    Successful Swedish television newsreader Ulla-Carin Lindquist sought medical help for back pain, weakness in her hand and a new tendency to stumble. The previously fit and energetic fifty-year old mother of four was diagnosed with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, (ALS) also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. The progressive and incurable neurological illness affects voluntary muscle action, eventually rendering paralysis and ultimately death. Choosing “to make something worthwhile of the misfortune” an Successful Swedish television newsreader Ulla-Carin Lindquist sought medical help for back pain, weakness in her hand and a new tendency to stumble. The previously fit and energetic fifty-year old mother of four was diagnosed with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, (ALS) also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. The progressive and incurable neurological illness affects voluntary muscle action, eventually rendering paralysis and ultimately death. Choosing “to make something worthwhile of the misfortune” and so that her young sons have something from her to read, comes this honest and poignant memoir. Her words, translated from Swedish, hold nothing back and draw in the reader, heart and soul. She spends the brief time she has left in the company of those she loves often having difficult yet essential conversations. Birthdays and holidays pass with all knowing that it will be her last. Self-pitying never enters in. She savors each second. As her health deteriorates, she stoically gives up her autonomy and relies on family, friends and caretakers for the bare essentials of life: bathing, eating and toileting. She ends her journal with words her young son spoke to remind her that each moment counts. “Every second is a life.”

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    Ulla-Carin Lindquist was a high-achiever, with a fulfilling career as a newscaster, combined with running her household and caring for her children. Then, as she approached fifty, she was struck by a disabling, terminal disease called Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, a disease of the nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord that control voluntary muscle movement (from Wikipedia) This memoir is the story of her last year of life. I found it difficult to even pick up this book, having lost a Ulla-Carin Lindquist was a high-achiever, with a fulfilling career as a newscaster, combined with running her household and caring for her children. Then, as she approached fifty, she was struck by a disabling, terminal disease called Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, a disease of the nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord that control voluntary muscle movement (from Wikipedia) This memoir is the story of her last year of life. I found it difficult to even pick up this book, having lost a dear friend (at the age of 48) to cancer recently. It was indeed a sad book, but there was great positivity in it. Ulla-Carin’s strength was amazing, recalling to mind the strength shown by my friend. Knowing that your disease is terminal is one thing: the loss of strength, abilities and dignity would be frightening, making the whole process so much more difficult. Ulla-Carin told her story simply and honestly, making her words so much more poignant. Ulla-Carin Lindquist was a well-known figure in Swedish television. Her journal was an instant best-seller when it was first published. An amazing an emotional read.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Deborah

    In today's culture we are not supposed to think about our own inevitable death. We are to pretend we will go on forever. Forced to meet death head-on like Ulla-Carin, how would we cope? I hope that I will find the strength that she did to focus on those who love me instead of just feeling sorry for myself. This is a remarkable little book and a lasting legacy of a woman whose terminal illness taught her that every second is a life. In today's culture we are not supposed to think about our own inevitable death. We are to pretend we will go on forever. Forced to meet death head-on like Ulla-Carin, how would we cope? I hope that I will find the strength that she did to focus on those who love me instead of just feeling sorry for myself. This is a remarkable little book and a lasting legacy of a woman whose terminal illness taught her that every second is a life.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Elin

    So touching, so sad. For me having grown up with Ulla-Carin Lindquist as the serious, always correct newsanchor this was very heartbreaking to read. Ulla-Carin Lindquist was a recognised news anchor when she suddenly got sick with ALS (Lou Gehrig's disease). This is her own story about her last months So touching, so sad. For me having grown up with Ulla-Carin Lindquist as the serious, always correct newsanchor this was very heartbreaking to read. Ulla-Carin Lindquist was a recognised news anchor when she suddenly got sick with ALS (Lou Gehrig's disease). This is her own story about her last months

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    An immensely thought provoking book about one ladies battle with Motor Neurone Disease. A quick read but also very difficult due to the nature of the subject. Really helped open my eyes to this dreadful disease. Well worth a read.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jo

    the moving memoir of a strong mother struck down with ALS - makes you think about life and the blessings of simple things like movement and privacy and living to see your children have children - read and admire the strength and courage of a remarkable woman

  26. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    Oh. I cried, and then I cried some more. Her voice is fearless (yet scared at times) and courageous.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Trena

    This is sort of a memoir written by a woman from diagnosis with ALS through death. Very sad, but interesting. The prose is beautiful, as are the thoughts.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jean

    Very touching and real book considering what we are going through with my mother-in-law. Live each day as it were your last.Savior every moment with your loved ones we only get one chance.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tina

    Sad story but very informative and profoundly written in the perspective of the one living with death at the back door. As a PSW it was indeed helpful to see it from the 'Clients' eyes. Sad story but very informative and profoundly written in the perspective of the one living with death at the back door. As a PSW it was indeed helpful to see it from the 'Clients' eyes.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Roberta

    As a mother, I found this book moving beyond words.

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