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Hank Williams: The Biography

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- Long considered the last word on Hank Williams, this biography has remained continuously in print since its first publication in 1994.- This new edition has been completely updated and includes many previously unpublished photographs, as well as a complete catalog detailing all the songs Hank Williams ever wrote, even those he never recorded.- Colin Escott is codirector - Long considered the last word on Hank Williams, this biography has remained continuously in print since its first publication in 1994.- This new edition has been completely updated and includes many previously unpublished photographs, as well as a complete catalog detailing all the songs Hank Williams ever wrote, even those he never recorded.- Colin Escott is codirector and cowriter of the forth-coming two-hour PBS/BBC television documentary on Hank Williams, set to broadcast in spring 2004, and coauthor of "Hank Williams: Snapshots from the Lost Highway.- HANK WILLIAMS was the third-prize winner of the prestigious Ralph J. Gleason Music Book Award.


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- Long considered the last word on Hank Williams, this biography has remained continuously in print since its first publication in 1994.- This new edition has been completely updated and includes many previously unpublished photographs, as well as a complete catalog detailing all the songs Hank Williams ever wrote, even those he never recorded.- Colin Escott is codirector - Long considered the last word on Hank Williams, this biography has remained continuously in print since its first publication in 1994.- This new edition has been completely updated and includes many previously unpublished photographs, as well as a complete catalog detailing all the songs Hank Williams ever wrote, even those he never recorded.- Colin Escott is codirector and cowriter of the forth-coming two-hour PBS/BBC television documentary on Hank Williams, set to broadcast in spring 2004, and coauthor of "Hank Williams: Snapshots from the Lost Highway.- HANK WILLIAMS was the third-prize winner of the prestigious Ralph J. Gleason Music Book Award.

30 review for Hank Williams: The Biography

  1. 4 out of 5

    Doug DePew

    As a child, I listened to old 78s of Hank Williams that I carefully pulled out of my dad's old cedar chest. Later, I got my very own 8-track player and fell asleep listening to Hank every night. All I can say after reading this book is,"Wow." I bought it at the Ryman Auditorium during a recent trip to Nashville and started reading it immediately. This is a very thorough look at Hank's short, sad life. Mr. Escott has included direct quotes from many of the people who knew Hank personally or were As a child, I listened to old 78s of Hank Williams that I carefully pulled out of my dad's old cedar chest. Later, I got my very own 8-track player and fell asleep listening to Hank every night. All I can say after reading this book is,"Wow." I bought it at the Ryman Auditorium during a recent trip to Nashville and started reading it immediately. This is a very thorough look at Hank's short, sad life. Mr. Escott has included direct quotes from many of the people who knew Hank personally or were associated with him and has put together what might be the most comprehensive picture of his life yet. I was particularly impressed with how well Hank's childhood and early life were covered. I had absolutely no idea prior to this book how far back his problems went. I was constantly doing math in my head as different incidents of Hank's drinking causing problems appeared to find dates that placed him in his mid-teens. His meteoric rise and abrupt fall are covered quite skillfully. It even includes his earnings each year. A peek into the psychology of who Hank Williams was as a person is granted through quotes from his friends and associates. Learning the sad details of his last few months was horrifying to me, but it's the truth. I appreciate the truth. We also get a summary of the extensive aftermath following Hank's sudden death and the outcome for the people involved including his children. I can't say I'm happy after finishing this book. I do feel like I know Hank Williams better than I did prior to reading it, though. This is the best Hank Williams biography I've read, and I recommend it to anyone interested in country music.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jake

    "Vanilla, boys," Hank Williams would say to his band members if they ever tried to get too fancy in their performances. Ol' Hank liked to keep it simple, and so, too, does Colin Escott and his co-authors in this riveting biography. No other figure in country music, not even its self-proclaimed "father", Jimmie Rodgers, is the source of so much attention and myth. Hank Williams was only on the national country music scene for about three years before that legendary last ride on New Year's Eve 195 "Vanilla, boys," Hank Williams would say to his band members if they ever tried to get too fancy in their performances. Ol' Hank liked to keep it simple, and so, too, does Colin Escott and his co-authors in this riveting biography. No other figure in country music, not even its self-proclaimed "father", Jimmie Rodgers, is the source of so much attention and myth. Hank Williams was only on the national country music scene for about three years before that legendary last ride on New Year's Eve 1952 but his footprint is broad and deep on the music and the culture. Escott peels away the layers of mythology and confusion surrounding Hank's life and death to reveal the most comprehensive, realistic view of the singer/songwriter ever published. He describes the rise and fall of the star, as well as the aftermath of his death, without ever sensationalizing the material or shying away from the cold, hard facts. It's a fine literary line to walk, and Escott and company do it deftly. The narrative will be compelling even to someone with only a passing curiosity about Hank Williams and country music. The authors allow the reader to make up their own minds about the legendary singer and his short life, while also allowing the facts to subtly add hidden layers of loneliness, fear, loss, love, and pain between the verses of his songs that give them an even deeper resonance sixty-one years after his death. His music was, and still remains emotional, real, and affecting. This biography reinforces that art with honesty, integrity, and respect, and will haunt you long after you've put it down.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tedsandi2000 Kinghorn

    Not as interesting as I had hoped.

  4. 5 out of 5

    anthony e.

    I'll say this for Hank Williams: he gives new meaning to the word 'alcoholism'. Anytime one of your friends, in that off-handed, vaguely joking way, comments that they drink too much, calmly inform them that until the begin to literally shred their body, dig under chairs like a dog, run down hotel hallways screaming of rescuing old women, and manage, in three years, to ruin his credibility, two marriages, his career, and his life. Startling. Escott's book is really quite marvelous in its account I'll say this for Hank Williams: he gives new meaning to the word 'alcoholism'. Anytime one of your friends, in that off-handed, vaguely joking way, comments that they drink too much, calmly inform them that until the begin to literally shred their body, dig under chairs like a dog, run down hotel hallways screaming of rescuing old women, and manage, in three years, to ruin his credibility, two marriages, his career, and his life. Startling. Escott's book is really quite marvelous in its account of Hank and his life- especially given his (Hank's) general reticence to tell the truth, and country music's notorious tendency to embellish. If anything could be viewed as a fault of the work, it is that Escott devotes an exorbitant amount of page space to names and dates, planting him firmly in a school of biography/history that I personally find taxing. That being said, between these large swathes of "born on ______, in _________, so-and-so was a ____________ before moving to __________", there is some really intense, illuminating narrative of a musician whose talent and personal tragedy were so eloquently, sadly entwined that he could not help but succeed, and fail, with nothing short of explosive fury. Highly recommended.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    Hank Williams is the legend of country music. I'd heard of him long before I ever heard him; my father (who stopped listening to country in the 1970s) took me to visit his grave in Montgomery back in the early nineties, and Williams was a constant Presence in the music I grew up on, haunting the singers of pieces like "Midnight in Montgomery" and "The Ride". Hank Williams: The Biography renders a thorough and sober account of Williams' life, one that appraises the man without romanticism. It is Hank Williams is the legend of country music. I'd heard of him long before I ever heard him; my father (who stopped listening to country in the 1970s) took me to visit his grave in Montgomery back in the early nineties, and Williams was a constant Presence in the music I grew up on, haunting the singers of pieces like "Midnight in Montgomery" and "The Ride". Hank Williams: The Biography renders a thorough and sober account of Williams' life, one that appraises the man without romanticism. It is exhaustively detailed, utilizing interviews with those who remember the "Lovesick Blues boy", and also features some commentary on Williams' musical craft. Part of the legend of Hank Williams' life is that he died young and tragically -- alone, in the back of his car, his heart destroyed by a mixture of alcohol and haphazardly-dosed medicine Easily the most surprising aspect of The Biography is that Williams' chronic alcoholism was not the result of his fame and fortune, but something he fought with for most of his life. From the time a thirteen year old Hank raided some loggers' booze hoard buried in the woods, the young singer would have bouts with the bottle. He did not drink constantly, but once he started on a bender he was hopeless for weeks. Time and again he submitted himself to sanatoriums, especially when he needed to focus on his career, but every time he would stumble. Although there was no shortage of excuses -- constant strife with his wives, the pressure of the road, the constant agony of spinal disease -- Williams' problems were only amplified by his success, not created by them. Williams was a genuine country boy, the son of poor strawberry farmers who lost everything they had in a fire, a man whose first memories were of living in a boxcar. The Williams moved from place to place in search of a living: after his father was stuck in a VA hospital, the family got by selling peanuts and taking in boarders. That's where Williams got his start singing and selling , down in a little town called Georgiana. Hank was a sickly boy, born with a spinal disease, and that diminished his ability to take part in the roughhousing and hard labor so common to southern men. He could sing, though, and after the family moved to Montgomery he began promoting school shows -- something that would grow into a career. From schoolhouses to bars, Williams became a local star who grew into a southern icon -- and after his death, a national figure. His success was partially his own, from his ability to turn his constant troubles, particularly with his wife, into plaintive songs rendered in simple melody that resonated in the hearts of his country audiences. Although Williams would mature as a writer in his brief window of fame, his re-use of old melodies retained a sense of familarity. He also owed success to his domineering mom, however, who opened her home to his band and who personally sold tickets at early concerts. (His wife Audrey, though she tried to use him for her own ill-conceived musical career, was also a forceful personality who replaced his mother as a manager of sorts after they moved from Montgomery to Shreveport.) Escott mentions that Williams came along at just the right time when radio was allowing hillbilly music to reach larger audiences, and become of interest to popular musicians: indeed, many of Williams' songs were performed by men on the national stage, like Tony Bennett. Although Williams' financial success came from record sales -- concerts were hit and miss when he was on a bender -- he seemed to think of himself primarily as a songwriter, and was drafting lyrics even on the night his body surrendered to a bad mixture of painkillers and booze. Escott also notes coldly that Williams died at just the right time: his back pains had only increased as time wore on, as had the stress of performing on the road, and despite steady record sales his career seemed to be stalling and on the verge of sinking when he perished. Instead of living to become a forgotten washout, a star that blazed briefly before being eclipsed, Williams became a tragic figure. As a history of Hank Williams, this appears to be the definitive work, and cushions the detail with humor. One favorite: Escott comments that if everyone who claims to have been in the car with Hank the night he penned "I Saw the Light" was, he would have needed a touring buss to accompany them. Escott also describes Audrey's show house as a tribute to what bad taste and good money can accomplish. Another lady is described as being someone who, if she had been born a canary, would have still sung bass.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Simone

    This was a very interesting, well and fairly researched, approachable biography, with lots of charming if salty opinions ("Jessie Lillybelle Skipper was a delicate name for a woman who, had she been a canary, would have sung bass." Right off the bat - hilarious.). Hank's story is one of tremendous talent combined with tragic addiction - his story shares so many parallels to the Winehouse story. It's well worth reading and understanding (and yes, I'm looks forward to the movie).

  7. 4 out of 5

    Gregory Jones

    You can't fault a biographer for the feelings that a historical person gives you, but there's something spine-tinglingly disturbing about Hank Williams. Had he lived in the modern era, health professionals probably would have helped him with his depression (and maybe more). Certainly the alcohol and medicine he consumed did not cure what ailed him. But the musical legacy he left for the rest of us seems almost spiritual in its depth and sincerity. Escott's book does a great job of getting at the You can't fault a biographer for the feelings that a historical person gives you, but there's something spine-tinglingly disturbing about Hank Williams. Had he lived in the modern era, health professionals probably would have helped him with his depression (and maybe more). Certainly the alcohol and medicine he consumed did not cure what ailed him. But the musical legacy he left for the rest of us seems almost spiritual in its depth and sincerity. Escott's book does a great job of getting at the essence of Hank Williams. The book includes numerous anecdotes and moments from his breakthrough at the Opry to many dirty, dusky honky tonks along the way. But if you're looking for an uplifting story about a country music legend, Hank's not the one you want to read about. His broken marriages, broken home, and constantly fractured career make for a tough read, even when well written. I'll give Escott credit for writing an evocative book, but truthfully he did his job a little too well. I went into this book thinking of Hank as a grandfatherly figure. Sure he might have started a few bar fights or drank a few too many whiskeys, but then again who in grandpa's generation didn't do that? Finding out about the philandering, near-constant drunkenness, and the depths of Williams's despair makes this more than a "poor southern boy makes it big" story. It's more explaining how the fledgling music industry made extreme wealth on the back of a broken man singing songs that broken people needed. This is a hard book to read, but if you're interested in American music history and/or the history of country music, it's a must read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Catherine

    It was a very good book; but I wish that the author had left some of it out; like how gross it got when Hank was very drunk. It was brutally honest. He had a terrible life; despite the fame. Hank had a terribly painful back and that's why he got into drinking and drugs; to ease the pain. Unfortunately; he was so addicted that people didn't want to be around him. He lost his family and his livelihood because of the addiction. He was the best country singer; yet he had a tragic life. His father le It was a very good book; but I wish that the author had left some of it out; like how gross it got when Hank was very drunk. It was brutally honest. He had a terrible life; despite the fame. Hank had a terribly painful back and that's why he got into drinking and drugs; to ease the pain. Unfortunately; he was so addicted that people didn't want to be around him. He lost his family and his livelihood because of the addiction. He was the best country singer; yet he had a tragic life. His father left when he was a child; leaving his mother to raise him and his sister. They were very poor. Hank was a kind person that helped others; but the addiction turned him into another person when he was drunk. The doctors that gave him the drugs should have been sued. Hank died at the age of 29; it was so tragic. He was a wonderful singer and song writer. R.I.P. Hank Williams.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lucas

    An interesting and well written book, which keeps the reader engaged throughout. It definitely chips away at the romantic image of Hank that has been created since his death nearly 70 years ago. Escott doesn't hold back on the negative, but also shows the determination and hard work that Hank put in. You feel for the guy - he was worked to death. Escott is especially hard on Hank's first wife, Audrey. While it may be granted (she seems like a piece of work), I felt like sometimes he was just bela An interesting and well written book, which keeps the reader engaged throughout. It definitely chips away at the romantic image of Hank that has been created since his death nearly 70 years ago. Escott doesn't hold back on the negative, but also shows the determination and hard work that Hank put in. You feel for the guy - he was worked to death. Escott is especially hard on Hank's first wife, Audrey. While it may be granted (she seems like a piece of work), I felt like sometimes he was just belabouring the point. Overall I really enjoyed "Hank Williams: The Biography" and would recommend to anyone interested in the history of the music business.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Slagle Rock

    This book set out to present the true story of Hank Williams and separate out all the legendary, hero-worship stuff. I think the objective was accomplished but it came at the expense of creating well-fleshed out Hank Williams character. It does bring to life the cultural context in which the country star rose to fame and describes how Williams was a game changer. I certainly know a lot more about pre-rock&roll era of music than before I read the book. The final pages of the book describing Willi This book set out to present the true story of Hank Williams and separate out all the legendary, hero-worship stuff. I think the objective was accomplished but it came at the expense of creating well-fleshed out Hank Williams character. It does bring to life the cultural context in which the country star rose to fame and describes how Williams was a game changer. I certainly know a lot more about pre-rock&roll era of music than before I read the book. The final pages of the book describing Williams decline and death were macabre and fascinating as well.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Macke

    Tons of details, and maybe this isn't the author's fault, but in this telling, this is a story of a drunk not a musician - and that makes the journey a mostly depressing one ... Lots to love about Hank's music, (but if these 400 pages are a fair representation) not too much to love about Hank the person

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mary Jeanne

    Great Story so sad but so good. He was a genius.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jordan Sopinsky

    Colin Escott is thorough in detailing the sad short life of "Luke the Drifter."

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Haslam

    I've gone on a bit of a Tom Hiddleston related reading spree in recent weeks and I picked this up ahead of seeing him take on the role of the American singer in upcoming biopic 'I Saw The Light'. I had already listened to more than 20 of Hank's songs so was familiar with his music, but as for his personal life, aside from his rocky first marriage and death at the age of 29 in the back of a car, I found this book hugely informative, detailed and well written. Escott has clearly put a lot of time I've gone on a bit of a Tom Hiddleston related reading spree in recent weeks and I picked this up ahead of seeing him take on the role of the American singer in upcoming biopic 'I Saw The Light'. I had already listened to more than 20 of Hank's songs so was familiar with his music, but as for his personal life, aside from his rocky first marriage and death at the age of 29 in the back of a car, I found this book hugely informative, detailed and well written. Escott has clearly put a lot of time and effort into producing this book, having spoken with a number of his former band-mates (AKA The Drifting Cowboys) and featured snippets from various interviews Hank gave throughout the central six years of his life. There are also some photographs in the centre pages which offer, for those unaware of Williams, a look at him through the years, with members of his family such as his mum Lilly and sister Irene, and with his first wife Audrey. I had thought, given the size of this book (it's well over 300 pages), that I might get a little fed up or bored by the content, but instead I read over 200 pages of it in one sitting alone, and for a look into the life of one of the most iconic music artists ever, certainly in America, this is pretty good.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Simeon Readingape

    p. 285 " "He wanted to destroy the Hank Williams that was making the money that fair-weather friends and relatives were getting," said Marshall. "Although he had a multiplicity of personal problems, basically he was a very lonely person, and couldn't stand being alone . . . He had a host of fair-weather friends, most of whom were parasites, who fawned on him, played up to him, and kept him supplied with liquor." Several of those who worked with Hank during his last year lend credence to Marshall p. 285 " "He wanted to destroy the Hank Williams that was making the money that fair-weather friends and relatives were getting," said Marshall. "Although he had a multiplicity of personal problems, basically he was a very lonely person, and couldn't stand being alone . . . He had a host of fair-weather friends, most of whom were parasites, who fawned on him, played up to him, and kept him supplied with liquor." Several of those who worked with Hank during his last year lend credence to Marshall's theory. Don Helms says that he sometimes dreaded coming into Hank's hotel room for fear that the window would be open and Hank would be gone. Whether he jumped on that final trip will forever be conjecture, though. Setting out, he seemed determined to show his Nashville costars that he could arrive on time and put on a hell of a show, but we'll never know the thoughts that beset him on that long, final ride."

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ellen

    Sickly, prone to drink, volatile temper, determined to make a name for himself Williams cleans up, falls and goes on writing songs, performing in small venues, showing up drunk and disappointing audiences, only to do it all again. It was in the last two years of his life that he experienced his highest of highs (Grand Ol' Opry) and lowest of lows leading to his death. As his father was raised without a father's presence, so was Williams' fate and eventually his own son's. Drinking like his father Sickly, prone to drink, volatile temper, determined to make a name for himself Williams cleans up, falls and goes on writing songs, performing in small venues, showing up drunk and disappointing audiences, only to do it all again. It was in the last two years of his life that he experienced his highest of highs (Grand Ol' Opry) and lowest of lows leading to his death. As his father was raised without a father's presence, so was Williams' fate and eventually his own son's. Drinking like his father, determined like his mother but never learning the valuable lessons each could teach (control the alcohol; save your hard earned dollars) led him to a destructive relationship with his wife as well. His star became even bigger after his death.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Garrett Cash

    This is without a doubt the best biography that could possibly be done on country music's second greatest artist, and it's well worth reading for any fans of music. Don't even think about reading Lovesick Blues: The Life of Hank Williams, this is the good (and accurate) stuff. We'll probably never really know Hank Williams the man from the scant information we possess (his own friends felt like they didn't know him), but this is the closet you can get. This is without a doubt the best biography that could possibly be done on country music's second greatest artist, and it's well worth reading for any fans of music. Don't even think about reading Lovesick Blues: The Life of Hank Williams, this is the good (and accurate) stuff. We'll probably never really know Hank Williams the man from the scant information we possess (his own friends felt like they didn't know him), but this is the closet you can get.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Phillip

    a well detailed account of the life and music of hank williams, one of the finest songwriters of the 20th century. hank was just off the charts prolific from 1950 - 1953, when he died at the ripe old age of 29. plagued by a disastrous marriage, chronic back pain, drinking problems and a record industry that didn't know how to let the man do his thing, mr williams was still able to record hundreds of songs during the short tenure of his three year contract with mca records. one of the better musi a well detailed account of the life and music of hank williams, one of the finest songwriters of the 20th century. hank was just off the charts prolific from 1950 - 1953, when he died at the ripe old age of 29. plagued by a disastrous marriage, chronic back pain, drinking problems and a record industry that didn't know how to let the man do his thing, mr williams was still able to record hundreds of songs during the short tenure of his three year contract with mca records. one of the better music bios, in terms of prose and an appreciate for subject. i don't always agree with colin escott's assessment's of hank's work, but that's a small consideration.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Pete

    clear-eyed bio of the dude, with nice depth on the musical side (not that i know good music talk from bad, but i still enjoyed hearing which melodies were stolen from whom and the stuff about how hank insisted that his band play low when he went high and vice versa). the biographer flashes some teeth here and there in discussing hank's inability to do right/audrey's singing/the motivations of other parties, but it's not over the top and tempers the inevitable adoration. good music bio. i am not clear-eyed bio of the dude, with nice depth on the musical side (not that i know good music talk from bad, but i still enjoyed hearing which melodies were stolen from whom and the stuff about how hank insisted that his band play low when he went high and vice versa). the biographer flashes some teeth here and there in discussing hank's inability to do right/audrey's singing/the motivations of other parties, but it's not over the top and tempers the inevitable adoration. good music bio. i am not too proud to admit i am looking forward to seeing the tom hiddleston biopic later this year although i do not expect it will be any good.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    What a fascinating and tragic life! Like many musicians, Hank Williams' life is shrouded in legend, rumors, and assumptions made to fill in unknown gaps. This book takes every story and gives all versions of each one, giving a sometimes clearer, sometimes murkier, image of Hank's life, and it made me sad to think that there are still so many unknowns about him. Already knowing something about Hank, I still feel like I learned more about him.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Bobbi

    Even if you don't like Hank Williams, his songs made an enormous impact on rock and roll, country music and gospel. People thought he was a tortured soul, a vagabond and an alcoholic. He was all of those things, but the pain from undiagnosed spina bifida which caused him lifelong pain. He probably used drugs and alcohol to ease the constant pain. His legacy can't be understated and this is a good biography.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Johnson

    I read this biography after going to the Country Music Hall of Fame and becoming intrigued by the salacious details of Hank Williams's life. Reading this meticulous biography, I felt a little like an imposter since I'm not as familiar with his music as I should be. For true fans, this bio can't be beat. For me, well I skipped around to piece together the soap opera parts. And even those parts alone made for a great book.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Klega50

    I never realized that Williams' 'star' status lasted only a couple years. And he was bigger in death than he was at the time of his death. An interesting story well written. I guess it's true of many celebrities that their star shines brighter after death when people seem to forget their flaws and frailties. I don't know if I would have liked Hank Williams personally but I do like some of his songs.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Bosco Farr

    If you're looking for a book on Hank, this is THE ONE. Well researched and engagingly written. The life of country music's biggest star and biggest enigma is in many ways a mystery. Escott takes the enormously difficult task of finding the real man and does a bang up job. There's a great companion piece produced by the Author for the American Masters series on PBS called "Honky Tonk Blues."

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    Awesome job referencing the myths and detailing where they do (and don't) stand up to scrutiny. In the end, the book dismantles more myths than it adds reality, leaving you with the impression that even in his lifetime, the character of Ol' Hank that he and those around him promoted eclipsed whatever was left inside.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jodell

    The only way Hank Williams could communicate was in song. The fact that he was so broken and lost and no one did much about it say's alot about Hank and also nothing new about addiction and life. He did a whole lot of livin in his short year's on earth and even though He said frequently, "let's do this vanilla", He did vanilla with a soulful twist.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Cade

    A great look into Hank's life. It gave me an even better appreciation of his music and the roots of Country music. Very interesting to see how the record companies owned and controled so much of the industry.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    this book quickly dispels many myths about the life and death and family of Hank Williams. I am only on the second chapter and am up to age 17, so I wonder how the rest of the book will discuss his remaining 12 years. well written.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    This book might be better if so much of the information about Hank wasn't so incomplete and/or sketchy. The writing, however, would likely be dry and lifeless no matter how much verifiable data existed.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mike Bloom

    The story of Hank Williams illustrates what happens when the life of a bona fide world-changing artist intersects with the trappings of fame and celebrity. A very compelling read for anyone interested in the history of blues- and/or folk-based popular music.

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