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The Man Watching: A Biography of Anson Dorrance, the Unlikely Architect of the Greatest College Sports Dynasty Ever

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Anson Dorrance - Pioneering Soccer Coach, Visionary Leader, Absent-minded Shepherd, and Unlikely Architect of the Greatest College Sports Dynasty Ever. Anson Dorrance may be the most successful coach ever - in any sport. He has won 18 National Championships, 95 percent of his games, and has coached and mentored some of soccer's greatest stars - Mia Hamm, Christine Lilly, a Anson Dorrance - Pioneering Soccer Coach, Visionary Leader, Absent-minded Shepherd, and Unlikely Architect of the Greatest College Sports Dynasty Ever. Anson Dorrance may be the most successful coach ever - in any sport. He has won 18 National Championships, 95 percent of his games, and has coached and mentored some of soccer's greatest stars - Mia Hamm, Christine Lilly, and Cindy Parlow. The Man Watching takes a revealing look into the mind's eye of a motivational genius. How did he create a soccer factory at the University of North Carolina? How does he motivate his teams to achieve greatness? Why has he developed more national-level players than any other coach?


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Anson Dorrance - Pioneering Soccer Coach, Visionary Leader, Absent-minded Shepherd, and Unlikely Architect of the Greatest College Sports Dynasty Ever. Anson Dorrance may be the most successful coach ever - in any sport. He has won 18 National Championships, 95 percent of his games, and has coached and mentored some of soccer's greatest stars - Mia Hamm, Christine Lilly, a Anson Dorrance - Pioneering Soccer Coach, Visionary Leader, Absent-minded Shepherd, and Unlikely Architect of the Greatest College Sports Dynasty Ever. Anson Dorrance may be the most successful coach ever - in any sport. He has won 18 National Championships, 95 percent of his games, and has coached and mentored some of soccer's greatest stars - Mia Hamm, Christine Lilly, and Cindy Parlow. The Man Watching takes a revealing look into the mind's eye of a motivational genius. How did he create a soccer factory at the University of North Carolina? How does he motivate his teams to achieve greatness? Why has he developed more national-level players than any other coach?

30 review for The Man Watching: A Biography of Anson Dorrance, the Unlikely Architect of the Greatest College Sports Dynasty Ever

  1. 4 out of 5

    Angelina Refice

    This was an absolutely incredible read. It is perfect for anyone that has been touched by college athletics, in any sport.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ben Campopiano

    He summed up what it all meant to him. “The rose is symbolic of wherever each of you are athletically, and it’s symbolic of championships because you’re all responsible for them. What I like about the symbolic use of flowers is that we’re celebrating our past, but after a while, the flower shrivels and dies. That glory is dead. Athletics is about renewal, and you guys are sitting in the places of all the previous classes who have tried to send their seniors out as champions. If we lose a game in He summed up what it all meant to him. “The rose is symbolic of wherever each of you are athletically, and it’s symbolic of championships because you’re all responsible for them. What I like about the symbolic use of flowers is that we’re celebrating our past, but after a while, the flower shrivels and dies. That glory is dead. Athletics is about renewal, and you guys are sitting in the places of all the previous classes who have tried to send their seniors out as champions. If we lose a game in this tournament, there’s no tomorrow for them. Their careers have died. So we play for them.” Location 162 "Let me tell you this. I’m watching practice yesterday and we’re wrapping it up, doing our set pieces at the end, and I’m watching Catherine Reddick practice free kicks. All season she’s so afraid to hit anyone in the wall that most of her shots are skying over the crossbar or going wide. Well, Catherine knows now that it’s time to go after it. All of a sudden she smacks one, and it almost tore a couple of ribs off Johanna. I wanted to set Johanna free so I said, “All right Johanna, that’s it. You’re outta the wall.” And she didn’t move. She didn’t move. It looked like a tear started to well up in Jo’s eye, and I know she was in pain. But I was wondering, what was she in pain from? That the ball hit her? Or that this was all she could do to help us win, and she did not feel complete or satisfied, and would anyone even notice or care? So remember this. When you’re out there tonight, playing out the last minutes of someone else’s career, don’t waste a second. Don’t avoid a physical risk. Don’t not make a run. Don’t dishonor the wonderful nobility of the reserves you are playing before. You will never eliminate the quiet pain they are all suffering, but you will make it a bit more bearable, and if you are truly valiant it might even feel inside that all of their sacrifice is worthwhile. All right." L238 Life is either a daring adventure, or nothing. –Helen Keller L243 Life is change. Growth is optional. —Karen Kaiser Clark L521 “When I stepped on the field I never, ever, expected to lose,” Ellis says. “I don’t know if that’s because I was smart and I knew the quality of players on our team, or whether it was Anson making us feel like we were better than we were. He made me feel like I was awesome." L1796 overtime scoreless... Dorrance walked over to his exhausted men who were in need of some inspiration for the extra session. Listen, I don’t care what you do in this overtime technically and tactically. I want you to get the ball and whack it toward the Maryland goalmouth and go charging in there like a bunch of Neanderthals. Take the ball, the Maryland defense, and the goalkeeper, and stuff them all into the back of the net. I want you to reach down and find that gift of fury that all of you guys naturally possess, and I want you to unleash it upon them. L1836 “Men love public praise. When a young man dominated for us in a game, in the locker room afterward I’d say, ‘Mark, today you carried our team on your back.’ Every guy in the room says, ‘Yeah, Mark!’ It’s great because Mark’s heart is soaring like a hawk, and the whole team rallies behind him.” L1947 “To coach men, you’ve got to dominate them, drive them with the intensity of your personality and walking up and down the sidelines burying them always seems to get them going,” Dorrance said. L1974 "but I really believe in my heart that what Anson professes as the best way to coach women is simply the best way to coach. Men or women. Believe in your athletes as people as well as athletes, set a high standard, demand the best from them, and accept them regardless of the outcome on the field. Over the years I think Anson has just evolved to be a better coach.” L2053 “Players tend to be more forgiving of their faults if it’s in a nebulous fog of subjective criticism,” Dorrance says. “We wanted to make it very clear with numbers. Charting was a way for me to coach women without the intensity of my personality. Instead of me whipping them verbally, the numbers would be whipping them. It would not be personal. We wanted to create a competitive fury in practice so that once they got into a game it would be like Brer Rabbit in the briar patch. We wanted our kids to feel at home in intense competition.” L2289 Chicago Bulls practice because of a disagreement over the score of a scrimmage. . . “I want every kid I train to compete in every drill like it’s for a world championship,” Dorrance says. “Is winning that drill important? No. But does it matter? Yes! The environment we create here is cold-blooded. You either win or you lose. Recording stats forces everyone to know that it matters to try to win at all times.” L2338 “Anson made me a believer in 1 v. 1,” Confer says. “It encompasses so much more than just being able to beat somebody. It’s a huge mental battle, a huge physical battle, an ego battle. It teaches you so much about yourself. Are you going to crumble, or are you going to find a way to win? You’re so exposed. It tells you how tough you really are.” L2504 In team scrimmages he regularly scripts his starters behind by one goal with just ten minutes left to play. He wants his players to grow accustomed to adversity, even to losing, so they won’t fear it. L2509 The challenge isn’t someone else. The challenge is within. It’s the aching in your lungs. And the burning in your legs And the voice that yells can’t But you don’t listen You just push harder Then you hear a voice whisper can And you realize the person you thought you were Is no match for the one you really are. L2523 “Anson created an environment where there wasn’t any sympathy for ‘I don’t feel good’ or ‘I’ve got my period.’ Girls who couldn’t hack it just disappeared.” L2560 “The Mundanity of Excellence,” which states: Excellence is not out of reach. It is accomplished through deliberate actions, ordinary in themselves, performed consistently and carefully, made into habits, compounded together, and added up over time. L2576 “Let’s get better!” His favorite phrase to encourage an individual is “There’s another level in you.” L2585 Dorrance believes the three key ingredients to every player’s success are self-discipline, competitive fire, and self-belief, and he tries to identify hardworking and disciplined? What can I do to create a more competitive soccer warrior? He proclaims that he can make poor players fair, fair players good, and good players extraordinary. L2617 I like to ask all of my players, ‘What separates you?’” Dorrance says. “There’s something that truly separates a great one from the rest. I’m going to push her to her psychological edge because I’m convinced that sort of agitation is what creates the pearl inside the oyster. She has to embrace the phrase, To whom much has been given, much will be expected. She has to want to be a champion, to do things that ordinary people would not do, because talent at our level is very common, but what you invest on your own to develop. L2634 The vision of a champion is someone who is bent over, drenched in sweat, at the point of exhaustion when no one else is watching. L2645 “Evil is anything that imperceptibly lowers our standards just a hair.” L2765 Find a core of people who just refuse to quit, and then surround them with these talented dancers and magicians, and then you’ve got a team that can win championships.” L2844 If someone is cringing on a 50-50 ball, call her out on it. And when someone does something absolutely courageous, they should hear from everyone then as well. Does this make sense? At the core of every successful team that plays a contact sport is fight. Not one player fighting. All eleven that fight. You understand what I’m saying? L2852 "I told them that I think sports are environments where you take physical risks, where you can get hurt, where someone can come after you. And what I admire about you guys when you play your best is that those are the sorts of risks you take. You get to demonstrate your courage tonight. Can you show everyone that you care so much about this team that you will take a risk to make shit happen? I can handle a loss, but what I can’t handle are people who don’t try, people who play without passion, who play without caring, who play without risk. That tells me something about their character that I don’t like. What I’m talking about is not something that you’re born with, it’s not a talent that you’re given by God. It’s a choice you get to make about who the fuck you are. That’s how the great ones are remembered until the end of recorded time. It’s a statement about their humanity that is unique. Do you know what I’m trying to say? . . . Are you guys ready? . . . All right, let’s demonstrate to them who the fuck we are." L2864 Dorrance’s favorite speech is one that Churchill delivered on June 18, 1940, before the Battle of Britain...if the British Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will still say, “This was their finest hour.” L2879 has learned over the years to coach with calm, because that communicates confidence and eliminates any anxiety in his players about potentially being afraid. L2900 “They think we suck! Is there a better motivation than that? It’s fabulous. It’s simple. It’s visceral. In soccer, it’s worth a goal or two a game. As the UNC coach I know that they don’t really think we suck, but whether or not they think we really suck, it’s guaranteed to stir our players into a froth.” L2953 “Sometimes he’ll hold up a newspaper and say, ‘You should see what it says in here about you guys,’” Sander says. “Then he’ll spew out some quote, but if you look closely, you’ll find that there’s nothing in that paper about UNC soccer.” If Dorrance doesn’t create quotes altogether he will often sensationalize the propaganda for a more insulting effect. L2969 Motivation is not a skill; it’s an art form. L2999 “It’s just a decision, a light-switch decision,” the coach said. “That’s all it takes, but you have to make that decision every single day. You can’t make it today and then say, ‘Whew, glad that’s over.’ You have to make it tomorrow and the next day and the day after that for the rest of your career.” L3036 He conducts three player conferences each year: during the first month of the soccer season, shortly after the season, and at the end of the spring semester. L3044 “Anson busts on them to fire them up to go to the next level,” Palladino says. “I like to describe the humor as felt-tipped darts. It hits you and bounces off. The remarks are not L3159 “Anson constantly reminded me of what I did best, which was great for my confidence.” L3174 An army of deer led by a lion is more to be feared than an army of lions led by a deer. —Philip II of Macedon L3240 Dorrance decided that his animals would learn by falling on their faces. He wouldn’t just coach the basic stuff, he’d coach everything and push his players beyond their comfort zone no matter how uneasy that made them or him. “I realized that a leader’s challenge is to somehow assert yourself into the session you’re running and be a powerful life force,” Dorrance says. “I saw that my strength in coaching is having the courage to constantly deal with the athletes that unconsciously try to take things a bit easier, and the way I’d lose the respect of my team is by making a passionate, stressful investment. My challenge would be to never surrender my standards to be more popular with my team, but to push my players to transcend ordinary effort in every training session and every match.” L3285 “Dino allows Anson to be the cold, hard, insensitive decision-maker,” Sander says. “Dino’s the warm-hearted, fuzzy guy that comforts them after Anson chews them out.” L3331 Dorrance studies great leaders ... from President Lyndon Johnson to John D. Rockefeller, to Charles Lindbergh. L3430 Man’s Search For Meaning. The book was written by a Holocaust survivor, Jewish psychiatrist Viktor Frankl. L3452 If there is a meaning in life at all, then there must be a meaning in suffering. Suffering is an ineradicable part of life, even as fate and death. Without suffering and death, human life cannot be complete. The way in which a man accepts his fate and all the suffering it entails, the way in which he takes up his cross, gives him ample opportunity—even under the most difficult circumstances—to add a deeper meaning to his life. L3466 For Dorrance the quote is a scathing indictment of whining, which he sees as one of the most destructive aspects of athletics. He believes that whining not only degrades the person indulging in it, but also anybody who listens to it and tolerates it. “Frankl writes about the nobility of suffering. L3468 program. You guys will make a lot of collective decisions about what we do from here. Basically you are being placed in positions of leadership. Does that necessarily give you any leadership power? No. You’re going to have to earn your right to lead anyone, and the first person you’ve got to lead is yourself. Most of you in this room don’t lead yourselves very well, and the best way to establish credibility is to work. Your teammates are not going to listen to a damn thing coming out of your mouths if you don’t work with them. They’ll be thinking, “You’re telling me to do this when I’ve been carrying your fucking ass all year?!” You’ve got to demonstrate through your leadership that you’re not just taking care of yourself, you’re taking care of everybody. Let’s face it, our soccer team is a laboratory of the human spirit. Some people are going to respond to you, and some are going to be a royal pain in the ass. Great leaders never quit on anyone. They’re not judgmental, and this loyalty toward everyone on the team is critical. You’ve got to make uncomfortable decisions that aren’t going to be popular. You’ve got to say uncomfortable things to people who are not going to like you because you called them out. Your job is not to be anyone’s friend. Your job is to take the people who are following you to their full potential, and some people are going to fight you every step of the way. Your challenge is to take them there anyway. Are you with me? L3510 George Bernard Shaw: Be a force of fortune instead of a feverish, selfish little clod of ailments and grievances complaining that the world will not devote itself to making you... L3616 We must walk consciously only part way toward our goal, and then leap in the dark to our success. —Henry David Thoreau L3681 Selling Nothing in this world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. —Calvin Coolidge L4097 Nothing in this world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. —Calvin Coolidge L4098 “The wonderful lesson I learned as a young man is that success is all about grinding, grinding, grinding,” Dorrance says. L4116 “What I like about Anson the most, and I’m still just in awe of, is how he’s always overwhelmingly positive,” L5611 To fly, we have to have resistance. —Maya Lin L5860 “In a good coach/player relationship there should be a tension,” Dorrance says. “It’s my job to bring them to their potential, and that’s never entirely comfortable for them. Maybe some of them don’t like the way I push them. Bummer. There may be times when I’m driving a player when all she’s hearing is, ‘I don’t like you’ or ‘I don’t respect you,’ but I obviously respected her game enough to pick her to play for me. My players don’t have to like me for me to like them. You have to coach through your own personality, so I’m never going to be their fairy godmother. I’m going to get after them, because that’s who I am and who I’ve always been.” L6782 If you can keep your head when all about you Are losing theirs and blaming it on you, If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you But make allowance for their doubting too, If you can wait and not be tired by waiting, Or being lied about, don’t deal in lies Or being hated, don’t give way to hating, And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise: If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue, Or walk with kings—nor lose the common touch, If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you; If all men count with you, but none too much; If you can fill the unforgiving minute With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run, Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it, And—which is more—you’ll be a Man, my son! L6788 No man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main . . . any man’s death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind, and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee. —John Donne L6811 I have to walk a precarious tightrope of caring for you and challenging you at the same time. Too much of one side or the other are not the best for you . . . L6865 “Why create all these ridiculous rules to entrap your players?” L7134 Anson works his butt off. Most coaches would never admit this, but sometimes when I’m sitting in my office I’m thinking, “Anson Dorrance is out there somewhere outworking me.” He’s just grinding harder, writing more letters to recruits, talking tirelessly to his players about how to maximize their potential, just doing a little better job than the rest of us coaches, and you have to respect that. L7657 “I respect talent, but I admire courage.” L7772 competitive cauldron ... L7800 No Tar Heel practice ever lasts more than ninety minutes, and many are cut shorter, because Dorrance wants his players to avoid burnout by stopping while they’re still enjoying themselves. As a result, few teams play less soccer during a season than the Tar Heels. “Most coaches think they must do everything to prepare perfectly for a game, which salves their consciences, but that’s athletics ad nauseum,” Dorrance says. “You want your players to be excited about playing, to have some juice, so you have to do something that is very hard for a coach to do, which is stop the meetings, stop the practice, stop the frigging madness. We really don’t teach them that much in practice, and we win more games with enthusiasm than anything else, so our construct here is that in order to prepare them to play at their utmost, sometimes we have to coach at our least.” L8090 Win Forever. L8109 Jack Kerouac’s On The Road: The only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars. L8214 Our souls are not hungry for fame, comfort, wealth, or power.... L8220 What we are sharing with you now are your final rankings from the competitive cauldron this season.... L8307

  3. 5 out of 5

    Juan Chavez

    This an awesome and inspiring book. It It was super detailed and I would say sometimes too detailed. But it had some great lessons. 1 - All great teams and coaches need great players. I havent read one book of a great coach or team without great players. 2-Culture is built over years and years of fighting for your culture everyday. We can look at their culture today and say.."I want that" but like many times in our lives, if we dont get it right away or fast enough we give up. But he was provided This an awesome and inspiring book. It It was super detailed and I would say sometimes too detailed. But it had some great lessons. 1 - All great teams and coaches need great players. I havent read one book of a great coach or team without great players. 2-Culture is built over years and years of fighting for your culture everyday. We can look at their culture today and say.."I want that" but like many times in our lives, if we dont get it right away or fast enough we give up. But he was provided a framework, which he then molded into his culture. That took years. Think of a rose garden, you have to constantly prune the roses otherwise the roses dies. John Wooden didnt win his first championship until his 15th year. Everyone remembers the 10 in a row, but Wooden was constantly pruning his rose bush. 3-It takes a great sacrifice to reach those levels. You need a strong support system at home. One that will understand and support your vision. Anson was not home much, at not as much as he should have, but his wife held down the fort. 4-Great teams are not as organized and structure as they seem. Anson was always running around trying to be on time. Desk was always a mess, when his players walked into his office, he stop everything he was doing and gave them his full attention. He wrote personal letters to them, often remembering some details of games or practice. It should that Anson was more than a coach. He values and built relationships. Focus on what matters. 4-Culture development -Is built on relationships and connections. The top 3 organizations that foster the best culture: Military College Teams Work High School Teams Total immersion is a key factor. The circle is tight and outside influences are held at bay. When kids go home and around people not about the culture they bring some of that back with them. Maturity plays such a big part of the lessons. Some time the players/person is not ready emotionally and maturity wise for the culture. Remember to read - The Little Prince Favorite part of the book. - 1- I respect talent but I admire courage 2- His son telling him he has no idea what he talking about. A very inspiring book. One that gave me so many ideas. I couldnt read it at night because it would fuel me up and not let me sleep. Could be a little long with details tho. Alots of info and I feel really covered his life. Sometimes a little too detailed. But worth the read. Highly recommend.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Robert Klug

    Good thoughts and ideas from a legendary coach! However, it drug on towards the end and I lost interest after about the twelve chapter.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kayla

    Anson Dorrance is the man.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Peter Chalfin

    Excellent book about a truly impressive and fascinating man.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Brian O'Leary

    Must read for any coach of any sport at any level.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Phillip

    An interesting telling of an incredible coach and dynasty i had never even heard of.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    I really enjoyed this book! It was fun to read more in depth about the UNC women’s soccer program and the coach who helps the players to be their best on and off the field.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Reader Variety

    Even those who have heard of Anson Dorrance will learn a lot about him, and likely become more fascinated, by reading this book. And those who don't know anything about him should read this both to understand the remarkable story of the rise of women's soccer in the U.S., and also to read about one of the more interesting sports figures in our country. The biography is particularly powerful because Tim Crothers had access to Dorrance, his family and players, but he also dealt directly with some o Even those who have heard of Anson Dorrance will learn a lot about him, and likely become more fascinated, by reading this book. And those who don't know anything about him should read this both to understand the remarkable story of the rise of women's soccer in the U.S., and also to read about one of the more interesting sports figures in our country. The biography is particularly powerful because Tim Crothers had access to Dorrance, his family and players, but he also dealt directly with some of the controversies in the life of Dorrance and did not skirt around the issues. Some of the more interesting points/passages: Amazing Dorrance family military background, with one member fighting in every major US conflict, Anson's grandfather flying the Hump and being held captive by the Japanese, and Anson's uncle perishing in WWII after being shot down in a C-47. Anson's sister, Maggie, was a better athlete than him growing up. He led his dorm to begin a string of 17 residence hall intramural championships. At UNC, Dorrance led league in fouls every year, but had no yellow cards. At 16, his dad told him, "Anson, you are the most confident person without any talent that I've ever met." Some of the girls on his early teams relieved themselves during play rather than being subbed out. Most coveted UNC soccer award is not MVP, but the Gift of Fury award.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    Any coach of any sport needs to read this book. It explores different ways to coach and why you have to be your own person. Anson Dorrance talks about his philosophies on coaching and how they came about. Players talk about how things effect them and how to get through them. It discusses recruiting and how parents are part of a program. This book talks about relationships and how important they are between a player and a coach. It was great to see how unorganized and flighty Anson Dorrance can b Any coach of any sport needs to read this book. It explores different ways to coach and why you have to be your own person. Anson Dorrance talks about his philosophies on coaching and how they came about. Players talk about how things effect them and how to get through them. It discusses recruiting and how parents are part of a program. This book talks about relationships and how important they are between a player and a coach. It was great to see how unorganized and flighty Anson Dorrance can be about everything but the game. I would highly recommend this book to anyone wanting to learn more about coaching not just a sport but people. Not to mention anyone just wanting to learn more about UNC soccer.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

    Anything Dorrance or UNC WSOC is great, but this book is cool because it comes from a third party. Overal great book; Crothers imbeds with the greatest dyansty in all of sports and gives a snapshot of an incredible coaching mind. I took a lot away from this book in terms of the psychology behind motivating athletes, but also the way rigor and passion can create something special. Maybe most interestingly is looking at the organized chaos of how the UNC program is run. The only knock on this book i Anything Dorrance or UNC WSOC is great, but this book is cool because it comes from a third party. Overal great book; Crothers imbeds with the greatest dyansty in all of sports and gives a snapshot of an incredible coaching mind. I took a lot away from this book in terms of the psychology behind motivating athletes, but also the way rigor and passion can create something special. Maybe most interestingly is looking at the organized chaos of how the UNC program is run. The only knock on this book is that it gets a little tedious (and maybe off topic?) when they get into some of the legal issues that have hovered around Anson in the past. I don't buy them, which is why they may have seem misplaced. A must-read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    I really did not thing I was going to like this book. It was given to me, by someone related to the subject of the biography, and I read it because I had nothing else to read when I started it. As a general rule of thumb, I'm not much of a fan of biography's of people who are still alive. However, this one was very very good. Part of my affinity for it might come from the fact that I kind of know the subject. Another part of it might be because I also coach soccer. I found myself quoting things I really did not thing I was going to like this book. It was given to me, by someone related to the subject of the biography, and I read it because I had nothing else to read when I started it. As a general rule of thumb, I'm not much of a fan of biography's of people who are still alive. However, this one was very very good. Part of my affinity for it might come from the fact that I kind of know the subject. Another part of it might be because I also coach soccer. I found myself quoting things from Anson in my classroom as well as on the soccer field. Any book that can provide ammo for both of those locales must be good.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Paciolla

    Truly a wonderful book, and one that should be read by anybody that is interested in becoming a coach of any sport or for that matter a leader in any industry that their life journey takes them. On a personal level as someone who has lived with the game of soccer either playing or coaching his whole life, this book was so inspiring to me. If I can become half the leader/coach/mentor to my players as Anson was and still is to his players I will be a better person, and what can be better than that. Truly a wonderful book, and one that should be read by anybody that is interested in becoming a coach of any sport or for that matter a leader in any industry that their life journey takes them. On a personal level as someone who has lived with the game of soccer either playing or coaching his whole life, this book was so inspiring to me. If I can become half the leader/coach/mentor to my players as Anson was and still is to his players I will be a better person, and what can be better than that. This book will definitely stay in my personal library and I will reference it over and over again.

  15. 4 out of 5

    towner77

    Partial to this book because my daughter is a select soccer player and she was born at UNC Memorial in 1996. For me, this book was riveting. It is loaded with insight toward handling female athletes. Anson explains how his coaching style developed over the years as he was building this dynasty, rivaled by only a few programs throughout the entire landscape of team sports. I highly recommend this book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tracy

    I loved this. I enjoyed learning of Anson's younger days and his very competitive nature. There were also so many insights into coaching women from Anson that anyone coaching girls should read this book. It also intrigued me enough to check the UNC women's soccer schedule and try to see if we can fit in a time to see them play. Creating a dominant team that has remained competitive for several decades is an amazing accomplishment. I loved this. I enjoyed learning of Anson's younger days and his very competitive nature. There were also so many insights into coaching women from Anson that anyone coaching girls should read this book. It also intrigued me enough to check the UNC women's soccer schedule and try to see if we can fit in a time to see them play. Creating a dominant team that has remained competitive for several decades is an amazing accomplishment.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Camryn

    "The Man Watching" by Tim Crothers is a book about the UNC Womens Soccer dynasty. It talks about the head coach Anson Dorrance and his coaching tactics. It gives good examples on what he looks for in players he recruits and players he found interesting over the years. If your into soccer, recruiting, and you like UNC I would recommend this book for you! "The Man Watching" by Tim Crothers is a book about the UNC Womens Soccer dynasty. It talks about the head coach Anson Dorrance and his coaching tactics. It gives good examples on what he looks for in players he recruits and players he found interesting over the years. If your into soccer, recruiting, and you like UNC I would recommend this book for you!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mikedariano

    Better than I expected and lots of lessons. Most of all I think this book helps me be a better husband and father (2girls). At a larger level this book is about being your best and finding the maximum output you are capable of. I don't care one way or another for soccer, but if that's the medium for a message like that, I'll take it. Better than I expected and lots of lessons. Most of all I think this book helps me be a better husband and father (2girls). At a larger level this book is about being your best and finding the maximum output you are capable of. I don't care one way or another for soccer, but if that's the medium for a message like that, I'll take it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    This is an excellent biography that is more than a story about Anson Dorrance. It is an amusing combination of a review of the UNC Woman's Soccer Team, a collection of motivational and leadership techniques for women and men, a powerful example of the way passion can influence outcomes, and the founding and maintenance of a living dynasty. This is an excellent biography that is more than a story about Anson Dorrance. It is an amusing combination of a review of the UNC Woman's Soccer Team, a collection of motivational and leadership techniques for women and men, a powerful example of the way passion can influence outcomes, and the founding and maintenance of a living dynasty.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

    Yes I am reading my dad's book for the second time. It amazes me how fascinating his life is and that I am related to him! How different our upbringings were. This book is so entertaining and well written. I recommend you read it even if you aren't a Dorrance. Yes I am reading my dad's book for the second time. It amazes me how fascinating his life is and that I am related to him! How different our upbringings were. This book is so entertaining and well written. I recommend you read it even if you aren't a Dorrance.

  21. 5 out of 5

    John Cook

    All of his books are great books....

  22. 4 out of 5

    Pete

    Dorrance is not an easy person to like but he is a hell of a coach and reading about his philosophy and methods was interesting, especially as the dad of daughters.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Katy Arris-wilson

    Very insightful regarding women athletics and the associated psychology. Overall biographical story of Anson was interesting, but at the end a bit slow.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Connie

    Excellent book. Forbes rated UNC Women's Soccer one of the top 3 all time sure bets. This book gives you a look inside. Excellent book. Forbes rated UNC Women's Soccer one of the top 3 all time sure bets. This book gives you a look inside.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Thompson

    Really enjoyed this book!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bea

    I'm a sucker for soccer ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ I'm a sucker for soccer ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rif

    Great book on the the creator of a dynasty in collegiate women's soccer...Oh...at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Great book on the the creator of a dynasty in collegiate women's soccer...Oh...at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tammy

    the man is a genius

  29. 4 out of 5

    Paige

    a must read for any female soccer player, past or present.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Karah Bell

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