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Miss Quinces

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Scholastic/Graphix has acquired Miss Quinces by Kat Fajardo. Miss Quinces features Sue, a Honduran-American girl who, instead of going to sleepaway camp with her friends, gets stuck visiting family in Honduras and having a surprise quinceañera, which is the last thing Sue wants—until she grows to appreciate both her family and their traditions. Simultaneous publication in Scholastic/Graphix has acquired Miss Quinces by Kat Fajardo. Miss Quinces features Sue, a Honduran-American girl who, instead of going to sleepaway camp with her friends, gets stuck visiting family in Honduras and having a surprise quinceañera, which is the last thing Sue wants—until she grows to appreciate both her family and their traditions. Simultaneous publication in both English and Spanish is planned for 2020.


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Scholastic/Graphix has acquired Miss Quinces by Kat Fajardo. Miss Quinces features Sue, a Honduran-American girl who, instead of going to sleepaway camp with her friends, gets stuck visiting family in Honduras and having a surprise quinceañera, which is the last thing Sue wants—until she grows to appreciate both her family and their traditions. Simultaneous publication in Scholastic/Graphix has acquired Miss Quinces by Kat Fajardo. Miss Quinces features Sue, a Honduran-American girl who, instead of going to sleepaway camp with her friends, gets stuck visiting family in Honduras and having a surprise quinceañera, which is the last thing Sue wants—until she grows to appreciate both her family and their traditions. Simultaneous publication in both English and Spanish is planned for 2020.

30 review for Miss Quinces

  1. 4 out of 5

    Darla

    The cover of this new coming-of-age graphic novel does such a great job of portraying the struggles of Suyapa (Sue). She is turning fifteen and has a vision of a summer where she goes to camp with her friends. Instead Sue is getting on a plane with her mom, dad, and two sisters to visit family in Honduras. Then she discovers that a quinceañera has been planned for her. Sue does not want the big party, the people staring at her, and most certainly not the pink dress! This #OwnVoices graphic showc The cover of this new coming-of-age graphic novel does such a great job of portraying the struggles of Suyapa (Sue). She is turning fifteen and has a vision of a summer where she goes to camp with her friends. Instead Sue is getting on a plane with her mom, dad, and two sisters to visit family in Honduras. Then she discovers that a quinceañera has been planned for her. Sue does not want the big party, the people staring at her, and most certainly not the pink dress! This #OwnVoices graphic showcases the family cooperation in putting together a quinceañera as well as the significance of this event in the life of the honored teen. Includes photos and additional quinceañera info. This new graphic will be released on May 3 in both Spanish and English simultaneously. Thank you to Scholastic Graphix and Edelweiss+ for a DRC in exchange for an honest review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    An American teenager takes a summer trip with her family to her grandmother's home in Honduras, where she is surprised with a colorful quinceañera despite her dislike of parties and everything pink. It's a struggle between tradition and identity as a New York girl moves from resisting to connecting more fully with her family. The interesting details about the quinceañera help offset the cliched bits with the strict mother, the squabbling sister, and the wise but ailing grandmother. An American teenager takes a summer trip with her family to her grandmother's home in Honduras, where she is surprised with a colorful quinceañera despite her dislike of parties and everything pink. It's a struggle between tradition and identity as a New York girl moves from resisting to connecting more fully with her family. The interesting details about the quinceañera help offset the cliched bits with the strict mother, the squabbling sister, and the wise but ailing grandmother.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Heidi

    Heartwarming and hilarious! I was that awkward nerdy teen who did NOT want a 15 either- even though I do like dresses and pink (just not those huge uncomfortable ones). Excellent job at introducing readers to the various aspects of the culture- both directly and peripherally.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mileena

    I sometimes get at upset thinking about not having had a quinceañera, and this felt like the closest thing I would have to that experience. And for that I am grateful. When I was younger (and he’ll even to this day) I was this wild haired tomboy who was socially awkward, hated heels, and preferred wearing the color black and being comfortable above all else. I spent clothes money on books! And these are just the similarities I had with Sue that do not stem from us both being Hispanic. I could re I sometimes get at upset thinking about not having had a quinceañera, and this felt like the closest thing I would have to that experience. And for that I am grateful. When I was younger (and he’ll even to this day) I was this wild haired tomboy who was socially awkward, hated heels, and preferred wearing the color black and being comfortable above all else. I spent clothes money on books! And these are just the similarities I had with Sue that do not stem from us both being Hispanic. I could relate to every family dynamic in this book from her relationship with her mother, her sister, and her Abuelita. Family reunions did look like a thousand cousins screaming and us all stuffed in a house sleeping on the floor. I love the focus on tradition and food and culture and just what a beautiful lush experience being Latin is and man I wish I get to go to my mothers homeland one day. The only thing that threw me off is while I prepared to have a feel good time going in, I wasn’t aware that this would tackle grief and considering just how close I am with my Abuelita this hit too hard and I almost put the book down. But I’m glad I pushed through. I am most definitely going to buy a finished copy of this one (not just to support the author which I want to do but because so much of Hispanic culture is rooted in vibrant colors and I feel like I missed out on half the experience reading this in black and white) and passing my ARC down to one of the kids. (Who is also Honduran 🥰)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Vicki

    I cried real tears reading this. I was so moved by the family bonds, ridiculous hijinks, annoying but lovable little kids, and general vibe of this whole story.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus **Spoiler alert** Sue (Suyapa) is involved in a graphic novel club that she has told her mother is a study group, and she's devastated that she won't be able to join them at camp. Her overprotective mother won't allow it, and the family is going to visit family in Honduras for a month. Since Sue needs to have a produce a graphic novel that is a travelogue for her club, she feels that this trip is far too boring to provide good material, although her sister points o E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus **Spoiler alert** Sue (Suyapa) is involved in a graphic novel club that she has told her mother is a study group, and she's devastated that she won't be able to join them at camp. Her overprotective mother won't allow it, and the family is going to visit family in Honduras for a month. Since Sue needs to have a produce a graphic novel that is a travelogue for her club, she feels that this trip is far too boring to provide good material, although her sister points out that maybe the trip is boring because Sue holes up inside and reads manga the entire time. When the family arrives at the grandmother's house, they find that she is ill and very weak. Sue also finds out that her mother is planning a quinces celebration for her, which she does NOT want. She objects to the pink dress, high heels, public dancing, and many other aspects of the celebration, and agrees only when her grandmother wants her to have it AND her mother agrees to her demand that she be allowed to go to camp with her friends. Her mother, because of everything that is going on, forgets to sign Sue up, and she is very angry. Preparations are made anway, but the celebration is canceled when the grandmother passes away. Because her grandmother wanted her to have the celebration, Sue decides to go forward with it, but demands that it be on her terms. The aunts help design a new dress in her favorite color, Sue designs her own favors, and the ceremonies go forward. Sue even has a decent time dancing, and improves her relationship with her sister. The family returns to the US, and Sue goes back to school with her graphic novel group, pleased with the project she was able to do. Strengths: The illustrations reminded me strongly of Katy Farina's entires in the Babysitters' Club graphic novel series, so this would be immediately popular. The color palette, despite Sue's love of black, is bright and cheery. I liked the Latine (the author's term) representation, and the discussion of the quinces celebration. Books where teens go to another country to visit family are always interesting to me, and since I have a friend from Honduras, I found this doubly interesting. The family interactions are realistic, and the grandmother's death is treated in a life affirming way. T Weaknesses: The moral of this story seemed to be that if you complain to your parents enough, they will do what you want. Sue is unkind to her parents, demanding, and not willing to compromise much, even though her mother is dealing with the loss of her mother. As a reward, she gets her way about almost everything concerning the celebration; her father even buys her combat boots instead of heels. This may be a generational difference, but I was deeply disturbed by this, since I see this sort of behavior in my students all too often. Young readers will not mind this, but as a parent, I would have definitely handled Sue in a completely different way, which made this book hard for me to enjoy personally. What I really think: I will probably buy this, because I would like to have graphic novels with difference cultural representations, but it will be hard for me to recommend.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Zeman

    Loved this graphic novel. I enjoyed the relationship between the grandmother and Sue, how she tells her its ok to be weird. Sue learns more about her background than she expected. Thanks for the afterwards by the author, explaining all the different aspects of a quincenera. Helped me to understand it a little more. I look forward to reading this again when the whole graphic novel is colored in.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tia

    I was provided an ARC from the publisher for review. I loved everything about this book. The illustrations are lovely. The characters will put a smile on your face (Abuela Rita and Suyapa) are my favorites. Learning about different cultures and their traditions is enriching. I knew, from friends about quinceañera's, but by reading this book I learned so much more. The family dynamics made me feel warm and reminiscent of my own large family. This book has a lot to say with many important lessons. I I was provided an ARC from the publisher for review. I loved everything about this book. The illustrations are lovely. The characters will put a smile on your face (Abuela Rita and Suyapa) are my favorites. Learning about different cultures and their traditions is enriching. I knew, from friends about quinceañera's, but by reading this book I learned so much more. The family dynamics made me feel warm and reminiscent of my own large family. This book has a lot to say with many important lessons. I'm better for reading it and happy I did.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dax

    I really felt Sue's struggle with her family and a completely lack of shared interests and understanding. This book showed the lovely ways family can really show up for each other. Plus, tons of cultural information and just plain fun! I really felt Sue's struggle with her family and a completely lack of shared interests and understanding. This book showed the lovely ways family can really show up for each other. Plus, tons of cultural information and just plain fun!

  10. 4 out of 5

    The Bookish Austin

    I received an ARC of this title from the publisher. It was so cute - coming-of-age, emotional. Loved it. :)

  11. 5 out of 5

    Stefanie

    So lovely to see Honduras represented in a children’s graphic novel! A mirror for my sisters. 💕🇭🇳

  12. 4 out of 5

    Krissi Charsha

    Thank you again to @graphixbooks for sending me an ARC of Miss Quinces. As my first graphic novel I really enjoyed it. This was such a sweet story, and taught important lessons to the readers that flowed really well throughout the storyline. This is definitely something i will share with my kiddos as they get a little older. The graphics were well done and easy to follow along. I did not know much about Quinceaneras but I really appreciated the author providing information in the back of the book Thank you again to @graphixbooks for sending me an ARC of Miss Quinces. As my first graphic novel I really enjoyed it. This was such a sweet story, and taught important lessons to the readers that flowed really well throughout the storyline. This is definitely something i will share with my kiddos as they get a little older. The graphics were well done and easy to follow along. I did not know much about Quinceaneras but I really appreciated the author providing information in the back of the book. Solid⭐️ 5/5

  13. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    A largely predictable book, but enjoyable. Sue is resenting that she has to go to Honduras, when she would rather hang out with her American friends, doing American things, like sleep-away camp. She does not want to go down to visit family, although she loves her abolita. Then she learns that while she is down there, she has to have a Quinceanera, a coming of age party when a girl turns 15, she resents that too. So, of course the book goes through how she learns to love having the party after all, A largely predictable book, but enjoyable. Sue is resenting that she has to go to Honduras, when she would rather hang out with her American friends, doing American things, like sleep-away camp. She does not want to go down to visit family, although she loves her abolita. Then she learns that while she is down there, she has to have a Quinceanera, a coming of age party when a girl turns 15, she resents that too. So, of course the book goes through how she learns to love having the party after all, and embraces her Honduran side of things. Good for includsian about learning other cultures, but Sue is a bit of a brat, and some of the things that happen and were meant to pull at the heart strings didn't for me.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Frank Chillura (OhYouRead)

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I am completely fascinated by the LatinX tradition of Quinceañeras. As someone who has never experienced anything of the sort, I love reading about them and the extravagance performed for a girl’s coming of age. Miss Quinces is such a well crafted story that I found myself more and more invested in the outcome. Suyapa could be any kid labeled “weird” at school, so I definitely felt a kinship to her in that. Her family is traveling to Honduras to spend time with her Abuela and all of the rest of I am completely fascinated by the LatinX tradition of Quinceañeras. As someone who has never experienced anything of the sort, I love reading about them and the extravagance performed for a girl’s coming of age. Miss Quinces is such a well crafted story that I found myself more and more invested in the outcome. Suyapa could be any kid labeled “weird” at school, so I definitely felt a kinship to her in that. Her family is traveling to Honduras to spend time with her Abuela and all of the rest of the family who lives there, but it’s definitely not the ideal summer plans to her. While her friends are living it up at the pool, she’ll be bored spending time with her “devil” cousins. And her strict mother refuses to allow her to spend any time away from home or with her friends unchaperoned (by her older sister). Sue’s Abuela is very sick and can’t do anything besides be in her bedroom, so she spends time with her, asking questions and getting to know her. That way she can create a travelogue for her school newspaper art project. We learn that the two of them are very much alike. This story is mainly about the Quinceañera she doesn’t want to have, but her mother surprises her (forces more like it) with anyway. But the actual moral has more to do with being true to yourself, letting your true colors show and not being afraid to learn new things. TW: death of a grandparent

  15. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Tournas

    Sue is bummed to miss out on a summer of fun with her friends – her family is dragging her on a vacation to visit relatives in Honduras. While she’s there, Sue’s parents decide that she will have a quinceañera. That means a pink fluffy dress, high heels, dancing and being the center of attention, all things Sue cannot stand! She loves the color black; leggings and sneakers are her favorite attire. She’d rather be reading than doing anything else and when people look at her she gets the hives. Bu Sue is bummed to miss out on a summer of fun with her friends – her family is dragging her on a vacation to visit relatives in Honduras. While she’s there, Sue’s parents decide that she will have a quinceañera. That means a pink fluffy dress, high heels, dancing and being the center of attention, all things Sue cannot stand! She loves the color black; leggings and sneakers are her favorite attire. She’d rather be reading than doing anything else and when people look at her she gets the hives. But her beloved abuela, who is very sick, convinces Sue that she can do it. I loved this funny, relatable book about being a teenager trying to balance her family’s cultural expectations with figuring out how to be true to herself. In the end she draws a travelogue of the trip she thought she would hate. Her bossy older sister becomes a friend, and the quinceañera ends up being a blast, thanks to some flexibility from her parents. Even her abuela’s unexpected death brings her family closer together. It was great to learn about all the rituals associated with turning fifteen in Latin culture. Fajardo makes it so interesting and fun, and she makes Sue and her family feel like the fun neighbors you want to get to know better.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amy Pickett

    This graphic novel checks all the boxes: authentic, endearing, and funny! Suyapa (Sue) would love to spend all summer creating comics and attending sleepaway camp with her friends. They’re even introducing LARPing to the activities this year and she’s going to miss it, because instead Sue’s family is taking a trip to Honduras to visit her mom’s relatives. With no texting, Internet, or cable to distract her, she hopes to spend her days reading and avoiding family drama (particularly with her olde This graphic novel checks all the boxes: authentic, endearing, and funny! Suyapa (Sue) would love to spend all summer creating comics and attending sleepaway camp with her friends. They’re even introducing LARPing to the activities this year and she’s going to miss it, because instead Sue’s family is taking a trip to Honduras to visit her mom’s relatives. With no texting, Internet, or cable to distract her, she hopes to spend her days reading and avoiding family drama (particularly with her older sister, Carmen). But despite Sue’s specific and repeated request NOT to have a quinceañera, her Mami has already sent out a hundred invitations behind her back. With the guidance of her doting abuela, Sue compromises with Mami: if she participates in the celebration without complaint, she can attend sleepaway camp with her friends in August! Can a soon-to-be “Miss Quinces” who hates the spotlight, frilly dresses, and dancing in public, possibly survive this festive family tradition, or maybe even enjoy it? This incredibly appealing graphic novel debut features bright, digitally rendered artwork and a loving, boisterous extended family.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Carmen

    I received a copy of Miss Quinces by Kat Fajardo from Scholastic Canada in exchange for an honest review. Sue really wants to go to summer camp with her friends this summer but unfortunately for her, her mother refuses to allow this. Instead, she will be going to the Honduras with her family to visit their relatives there. While Sue is looking forward to spending time with her abuela, she is not happy about spending time in a place with no internet. Even worse, her mother has planned a surprise q I received a copy of Miss Quinces by Kat Fajardo from Scholastic Canada in exchange for an honest review. Sue really wants to go to summer camp with her friends this summer but unfortunately for her, her mother refuses to allow this. Instead, she will be going to the Honduras with her family to visit their relatives there. While Sue is looking forward to spending time with her abuela, she is not happy about spending time in a place with no internet. Even worse, her mother has planned a surprise quinceañera for her - something that she has made very clear that she wants nothing to do with. Things seem to be looking up when she is able to work out a deal with her mother - if she does the quincerañera, her mother will allow her to go to summer camp. Now Sue just has to get this over and done with - but what she discovers through this process is the importance of family, tradition, and making memories. This was a beautiful and heartwarming story about a young girl, conflicted about growing up and the conflicts that can arise from different perspectives within a family. Readers are sure to bond with Sue and also find the story hilarious, emotional, and charming as they get to know Sue and her family.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Arminzerella

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Suyapa loves manga and drawing comics and wishes she could go to summer camp with her friends (who are into the same things), but her mami is very strict (she says NO, absolutely not), and the family is going to Honduras to visit family. While they are there, Suyapa learns that her mami has planned a surprise quinceañera for her (a big birthday bash with music and dancing and speeches to celebrate a girl’s transformation into a young woman). And Suyapa SPECIFICALLY told her that she didn’t want Suyapa loves manga and drawing comics and wishes she could go to summer camp with her friends (who are into the same things), but her mami is very strict (she says NO, absolutely not), and the family is going to Honduras to visit family. While they are there, Suyapa learns that her mami has planned a surprise quinceañera for her (a big birthday bash with music and dancing and speeches to celebrate a girl’s transformation into a young woman). And Suyapa SPECIFICALLY told her that she didn’t want one. Her abuela manages to find a compromise that everyone can live with – Suyapa will have her quince, and if she does everything her mami tells her, she’ll also be able to go to camp when they get back home. Preparations for the big party are still excruciating for Suyapa, but she does her best. When tragedy strikes, the whole family has to decide what to do – should they still celebrate in the midst of their sadness? Celebrate Suyapa’s personal growth and burgeoning new confidence as you learn about quinces.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

    In Miss Quinces, Sue (Suyapa) is disappointed she has to miss summer camp to travel to Honduras with her family, and she is furious when she finds out her mother has plan surprise quinceañera. Sue just wants to draw, read manga, and chill with her abuelita. She doesn't want to learn to dance (in heels!), wear a frilly dress, or give a speech in Spanish. Sue begrudgingly agrees to the quinceañera and tries to fulfill all of her mom's wishes on the condition she can go to summer camp in July. Thro In Miss Quinces, Sue (Suyapa) is disappointed she has to miss summer camp to travel to Honduras with her family, and she is furious when she finds out her mother has plan surprise quinceañera. Sue just wants to draw, read manga, and chill with her abuelita. She doesn't want to learn to dance (in heels!), wear a frilly dress, or give a speech in Spanish. Sue begrudgingly agrees to the quinceañera and tries to fulfill all of her mom's wishes on the condition she can go to summer camp in July. Through the process, she learns more about her abuelita's own quince, her art, and how she supported her family. When abuelita's health declines, Sue has the opportunity to abandon her quince or choose to make it her own. Moving depictions of family, acceptance, tradition, and growth. A must read graphic novel for all middle graders and anyone who loves a coming of age story! All readers will fall in love with Sue, her family, and Kat Fajardo.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kimi Loughlin

    Full disclosure, this graphic novel made me sob. But where it was heartbreaking, it was also heartwarming and life affirming. When Sue is dragged to Honduras to see her mother's family during her summer break, it is against her will. She's convinced that being in the Honduran countryside with her crazy family is boring and uncool. And then when her mother decides to surprise her with a quinceañera, all bets are off as manga-loving, black-clad Suyapa is forced into a frilly pink nightmare. Truly Full disclosure, this graphic novel made me sob. But where it was heartbreaking, it was also heartwarming and life affirming. When Sue is dragged to Honduras to see her mother's family during her summer break, it is against her will. She's convinced that being in the Honduran countryside with her crazy family is boring and uncool. And then when her mother decides to surprise her with a quinceañera, all bets are off as manga-loving, black-clad Suyapa is forced into a frilly pink nightmare. Truly a story of acceptance and love, Miss Quinces brings Sue and her family on a rollercoaster journey of despair and joy as they navigate a sudden death and learn to come together in support of each other, despite differences. Fajardo teaches us that it is okay to be ourselves and love what we love while also making room for our familial culture and tradition.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Pineo

    This was an incredibly short read (21 minutes according to the Libby app) so it should be pretty short for the middle grade/very young YA audience it was created for too. That aside, it was a sweet look at a young Latina girl trying to find her place when she doesn't feel understood by her friends and family in America or by her family in Honduras. The comic covers finding a way to bridge Sue's feeling of being an outsider everywhere, her relationships with her family (especially her grandmother This was an incredibly short read (21 minutes according to the Libby app) so it should be pretty short for the middle grade/very young YA audience it was created for too. That aside, it was a sweet look at a young Latina girl trying to find her place when she doesn't feel understood by her friends and family in America or by her family in Honduras. The comic covers finding a way to bridge Sue's feeling of being an outsider everywhere, her relationships with her family (especially her grandmother), being forced into having a quinceañera but finding a way to show her true self, making art for a school assignment, a death in the family, and building a tighter relationship with her older sister and mom. Great for young Latinas, kids/teens who don't feel they belong in their community or even just want a way to express themselves with art.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Katie Reilley

    Suyapa (Sue) is turning fifteen, and she’d love to spend her summer going to camp with her friends, making comics all day long. Instead, she’s stuck going to Honduras with her parents and two sisters to visit family. Once there, Sue learns her family has planned a surprise quinceañera for her even though it’s the last thing she wants! Themes of finding your voice and holding true to who you are and honoring family traditions combine with beautiful, vivid artwork to make this graphic novel engagi Suyapa (Sue) is turning fifteen, and she’d love to spend her summer going to camp with her friends, making comics all day long. Instead, she’s stuck going to Honduras with her parents and two sisters to visit family. Once there, Sue learns her family has planned a surprise quinceañera for her even though it’s the last thing she wants! Themes of finding your voice and holding true to who you are and honoring family traditions combine with beautiful, vivid artwork to make this graphic novel engaging and relatable. The back matter from the author includes additional information about the traditions followed during a quinceañera and photos of her own. Bought for my middle grade classroom library and looking forward to sharing with student readers!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Beatriz Arango

    Lupita gifted me this Spanish copy of MISS QUINCES when I met her last weekend, and it definitely lived up to my expectations 🥹❤️. Caribbean quinces are very different from Central American ones, but this definitely took me back to planning and celebrating my foster kiddo's quince here in the States. A lot of things in this gave me deja vu 😭. Kat Fajardo wrote a really genuine story about family, traditions, fitting in, and being yourself - I think MISS QUINCES is going to become a fast favorite w Lupita gifted me this Spanish copy of MISS QUINCES when I met her last weekend, and it definitely lived up to my expectations 🥹❤️. Caribbean quinces are very different from Central American ones, but this definitely took me back to planning and celebrating my foster kiddo's quince here in the States. A lot of things in this gave me deja vu 😭. Kat Fajardo wrote a really genuine story about family, traditions, fitting in, and being yourself - I think MISS QUINCES is going to become a fast favorite with many middle grade and young adult readers alike. (P.S. Most of it takes place in Honduras! Love to see it 😍.)

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    A cute coming of age story centered around an unwanted quinceañera. The themes of conflict between a parent and child and between tradition and being unique are done well, and so is the resolution. I just didn't like either the mother or the daughter. Both are very stubborn and don't listen to each other, and the daughter is consistently rude to almost everyone except her abuela. It made some parts of the book pretty cringe. I'm not sure how the middle grade audience I think this is targeted for A cute coming of age story centered around an unwanted quinceañera. The themes of conflict between a parent and child and between tradition and being unique are done well, and so is the resolution. I just didn't like either the mother or the daughter. Both are very stubborn and don't listen to each other, and the daughter is consistently rude to almost everyone except her abuela. It made some parts of the book pretty cringe. I'm not sure how the middle grade audience I think this is targeted for would take her, but they may get her and envy her ability to say what she thinks to her family.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    All Sue wants to do is go to camp with her friends, and focus on her art, but the only thing on her mother's mind is their upcoming trip to visit family in Honduras...or so Sue thinks. Before she knows it, she's extricated in her mother's obsession with throwing her a quinceañera, which is pretty much the opposite of everything Kat is about. If she plays ball, she might be able to get the trip she really wants, but at what cost? A great, relatable, and moving story about family, mothers and daugh All Sue wants to do is go to camp with her friends, and focus on her art, but the only thing on her mother's mind is their upcoming trip to visit family in Honduras...or so Sue thinks. Before she knows it, she's extricated in her mother's obsession with throwing her a quinceañera, which is pretty much the opposite of everything Kat is about. If she plays ball, she might be able to get the trip she really wants, but at what cost? A great, relatable, and moving story about family, mothers and daughters and traditions. The characters are compelling and layered. Although we can't help but sympathize with Sue, the author does a fantastic job of giving insight into Sue's other family members, including her strict mother and her older sister (definitely a sister vibe akin to Mirabel and Isabela's dynamic for any Encanto fans out there). Family is messy and in this spirit--not everything ties up perfectly, but it's satisfying nonetheless. Highly recommend. Great for fans of realistic slice-of-life coming of age graphic novels along the lines of Raina Telgemaier, Hope Larson, or Lucy Knisley's books.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    All kids go through a stage where they're terminally embarrassed by their parents. Sue has it worse, because her parents are immigrants, and are super strict. How can she balance her artistic oddness with her family's grandiose expectations that she go through with a frothy pink quinceanera? Give this to tweens who are trying to balance 2 cultures, both writ large (American versus other) and writ small (themselves versus parental expectations). Light mentions of tools to deal with panic attacks, All kids go through a stage where they're terminally embarrassed by their parents. Sue has it worse, because her parents are immigrants, and are super strict. How can she balance her artistic oddness with her family's grandiose expectations that she go through with a frothy pink quinceanera? Give this to tweens who are trying to balance 2 cultures, both writ large (American versus other) and writ small (themselves versus parental expectations). Light mentions of tools to deal with panic attacks, and a plug for school counselors.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dina

    Miss Quinces deals with so many topics: Sue does not quite belong to two cultures, but yet is part of both, losing her grandmother in the story, a mom that seems overprotective to her, traveling to Honduras to visit family, siblings and her upcoming quinceanera (that she is not so happy to learn about). Put all of these topics together, and the author created a powerful graphic novel! I added this title to our next book order and look forward to recommending it to my students in the next school Miss Quinces deals with so many topics: Sue does not quite belong to two cultures, but yet is part of both, losing her grandmother in the story, a mom that seems overprotective to her, traveling to Honduras to visit family, siblings and her upcoming quinceanera (that she is not so happy to learn about). Put all of these topics together, and the author created a powerful graphic novel! I added this title to our next book order and look forward to recommending it to my students in the next school year. Two thumbs up!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    I've been reading Kat's comics and zines for years now. As a latine who is also "ni de aquí ni de allá" I've always found her works to be relatable and necessary additions to my library. Her work highlights how it feels to be very different from your family while still loving them, and as someone who eschewed a quinceañera this book was very relatable. Cannot wait for more of her stories as it's very nice to see myself and my friends in the books we didn't get growing up. And if you see this Kat I've been reading Kat's comics and zines for years now. As a latine who is also "ni de aquí ni de allá" I've always found her works to be relatable and necessary additions to my library. Her work highlights how it feels to be very different from your family while still loving them, and as someone who eschewed a quinceañera this book was very relatable. Cannot wait for more of her stories as it's very nice to see myself and my friends in the books we didn't get growing up. And if you see this Kat, gracias.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ellen

    Oh my goodness, I just sobbed my eyes out over this lovely family story. Manga-loving Sue wants to go to comic camp with her diverse friends, but has to go to Honduras to spend a month with family instead. And guess what? Mom has already sent out invites to the quinceanera Sue thought they agreed she didn't have to suffer through, since she's not a "girly girl" and hates attention. Combine family expectations, family shenanigans, and a sick grandma and you end up with a tale that hit me where I Oh my goodness, I just sobbed my eyes out over this lovely family story. Manga-loving Sue wants to go to comic camp with her diverse friends, but has to go to Honduras to spend a month with family instead. And guess what? Mom has already sent out invites to the quinceanera Sue thought they agreed she didn't have to suffer through, since she's not a "girly girl" and hates attention. Combine family expectations, family shenanigans, and a sick grandma and you end up with a tale that hit me where I live.

  30. 4 out of 5

    A.

    Loved seeing this story represented. I read an ARC so the artwork wasn't finished (or colored), but I found the book heavily plot/scenario focused with precious little character development. Will be great for kids who like a sweet, action-driven comic. Reads quite young -- in appearance and in emotional development, far younger than the 15yo protagonist suggests. Loved seeing this story represented. I read an ARC so the artwork wasn't finished (or colored), but I found the book heavily plot/scenario focused with precious little character development. Will be great for kids who like a sweet, action-driven comic. Reads quite young -- in appearance and in emotional development, far younger than the 15yo protagonist suggests.

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