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X-Men: Fatal Attractions

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Magneto; a man embittered by loss. Avalon; a world created for the survival of his chosen people--mutants--sworn to follow a madman's lead. Charles Xavier; the most powerful mind on earth, whose Dream for peaceful co-existence between humans and mutants may be the earth's last hope. Wolverine; the berserker mutant whose adamantium skeleton may be the very thing that destro Magneto; a man embittered by loss. Avalon; a world created for the survival of his chosen people--mutants--sworn to follow a madman's lead. Charles Xavier; the most powerful mind on earth, whose Dream for peaceful co-existence between humans and mutants may be the earth's last hope. Wolverine; the berserker mutant whose adamantium skeleton may be the very thing that destroys him.X-Men! X-Force! X-Factor! And Excalibur! Still reeling from the death of one of their own--they now face their greatest enemy in a battle that could mean the end of the world! Collects X-Factor #92, X-force #25, Uncanny X-Men #304, X-Men #25, Wolverine #75 and Excalibur #71.


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Magneto; a man embittered by loss. Avalon; a world created for the survival of his chosen people--mutants--sworn to follow a madman's lead. Charles Xavier; the most powerful mind on earth, whose Dream for peaceful co-existence between humans and mutants may be the earth's last hope. Wolverine; the berserker mutant whose adamantium skeleton may be the very thing that destro Magneto; a man embittered by loss. Avalon; a world created for the survival of his chosen people--mutants--sworn to follow a madman's lead. Charles Xavier; the most powerful mind on earth, whose Dream for peaceful co-existence between humans and mutants may be the earth's last hope. Wolverine; the berserker mutant whose adamantium skeleton may be the very thing that destroys him.X-Men! X-Force! X-Factor! And Excalibur! Still reeling from the death of one of their own--they now face their greatest enemy in a battle that could mean the end of the world! Collects X-Factor #92, X-force #25, Uncanny X-Men #304, X-Men #25, Wolverine #75 and Excalibur #71.

30 review for X-Men: Fatal Attractions

  1. 5 out of 5

    Frankh

    ~Lorna Dane (Polaris) When I started reading X-Men for 2015, my first ever review posted a day after New Year was the three-chaptered story about Magneto's descent to madness and eventual demise via getting blown up with his Asteroid M in X-Men (1993). It was also officially considered as writer Chris Claremont's retirement piece. Just four months later (specifically, last week), I reviewed The Uncanny X-Men issue #200 of 1985, which was about Magneto's trial in the international court and Xavier ~Lorna Dane (Polaris) When I started reading X-Men for 2015, my first ever review posted a day after New Year was the three-chaptered story about Magneto's descent to madness and eventual demise via getting blown up with his Asteroid M in X-Men (1993). It was also officially considered as writer Chris Claremont's retirement piece. Just four months later (specifically, last week), I reviewed The Uncanny X-Men issue #200 of 1985, which was about Magneto's trial in the international court and Xavier passing the torch to him to become the new mentor for the X-Men. These two events were only a hundred-plus issues apart and it's interesting how stupidly dark Magneto has become right after he supposedly started from scratch around the eighties. In that time, Claremont did an excellent job showcasing Magneto's growth and progress towards becoming a reformed villain, going so far as becoming a replacement guardian for Xavier's brood. And then the nineties and Fabian Nicieza rolled along and Magneto not only reverts backs to his evil ways but he was hence portrayed as a super-mega-douchebag that even Charles Xavier can't love or see any hope for redemption anymore. To be fair, Magneto going balls-out insane for this story arc, Fatal Attractions, was somewhat inspired by the tone and approach Claremont ended his X-Men run with that aforementioned three-chaptered piece. I remember wondering what happened to Magneto after because I know for a fact he cannot be dead permanently, and I was actually looking forward to seeing him again. AND I HAVE NEVER REGRETTED SOMETHING AS MUCH AS I DO THAT. I stumbled upon Fatal Attractions the same way I do when looking for specific storylines rich with Charles Xavier/Erik Lehnsherr subtext and tragic moments--with my heart clutched on both hands, eyes closed for whatever horrors may come. And they came, all right, like Winter fucking came for the Starks. This story arc was AWFUL in a sense that I was almost in a fetal position as I lay in bed while reading the issues on my tablet. As the story dug deeper into my skin, I found myself lying on my stomach, slamming my tablet on the pillows in front of me repeatedly because it was the safest way to physically show my outrage without wrecking my precious gadget for good. And then I got misty-eyed in some parts and then truly shed tears by the last issue during a rather unexpectedly moving scene between Kitty and Colossus. But I digress. This is probably one of the longest reviews I will ever write because there are plenty of things (and scanned panels) I'll be touching upon; a good eighty-percent of which is CHERIK. But what is the point of reading X-Men and shipping Cherik if I don't take the time being TL;DR in my reviews like this? This is also the best way I could heal after the bloody mess of hurt feelings and screw-ups that Fabian Nicieza and co. subjected me through with Fatal Attractions. * * * The nineties were truly a dark time for comics. Sales were down, lots of shitty minor titles about testorened superheroes/toy line were released which catered to no one but were collected by idiots because somehow people don't understand that what makes a comic book worthy of an investment is its rarity and not when it's in mass public circulation which a lot of these obscure nineties titles were. But the nineties X-Men were doing fine as far as 'fine' allows them to thrive in that era. There's an ongoing cartoon series that definitely helped them maintain recognization among households. One of the...notable(?) stories after Claremont gave up the mantle and passed it on to another writer, which then effectively ended his sixteen-year career for the X-Men, is motherfucking Fatal Attractions. What in the name of shit is Fatal Attractions you may ask and why did it unravel me in such a terrible, sadomasochistic way? Well, Fatal Attractions is a six-issued story arc comprised of (and in order of appearance): X-Factor #92, X-Force #25, The Uncanny X-Men #304, X-Men #25, Wolverine #75, and Excalibur #61. Those are six separate titles coming together to tell the story delivered in lieu of a Greek tragedy clusterfuck that is definitively Magneto, and as a tribute to the cheese-tastic soap opera awesomeness that is Claremont's literary signature for the X-Men. Basically, it's enjoyable with different shades of 'mildly sickening' and 'unforgivably heartbreaking', depending, of course, on how heavily invested you are about the fragile relationships among the mutant families. The first two installments in X-Factor and X-Force read together as one story, focusing more on the said X-teams and their struggles that are actually quite similar in spite of their different fields of expertise (one is working alongside the government while the other is essentially a private outfit). At midpoint, they found themselves facing the collective acolytes led by Fabian Cortez (who left Magneto stranded for dead in Asteroid M), and they are a bunch of fanatics who are determined to wipe out humanity (whom they deemed as 'flatscans') in the name of their fallen god Magneto. These two issues also covered the significant roles of Quicksilver (Pietro Maximoff, son of Magneto) and Cable (Nathan Summers) respectively. Now, I'm not entirely familiar with these two titles which was why there are some references from their previous arcs that I don't get, but overall I was still immensely intrigued with what was happening. I though their contributions to the overall structure of Fatal Attractions were necessary. They certainly contextualized and deepened the ongoing strife between the X-heroes and the acolytes. It was The Uncanny X-Men issue #304 that ruined me slowly. I was very much looking forward to this one the most, considering this is where the most epic and hurtful of Cherik quarrels was brought forth. However, the equally important sublot concerning Colossus was particularly painful for me as well. His sister, Illyana, was just killed by the Legacy virus, a misfortune that Professor X himself feels like a personal failure of his, and Colossus eagerly agrees with him. I just read and reviewed Giant-Size X-Men #1 so that issue being referenced here as Colossus spitefully recalls the time the professor recruited him back in Russia kindda stings me a little. Colossus is just one of those traditional good guys, you know, who have faith in their leaders and always do the right thing. To see him lose that faith in someone he considered a mentor was definitely shocking. And then super-mega-douchebag Magneto, with obvious disregard for the mourning process, crashes the funeral. The bastard is just classy that way. And when I say he's a douchebag of only the epic proportions, this scene more than testifies to that. He freezes the X-Men through the iron in their blood (like, wut? When did he ever start doing this?) and disassembles Charles' wheelchair so that the professor literally has to crawl during their conversation. EPIC. DOUCHE. BAG. The next five scans I'm going to drop here--trust me, you are not prepared for the amount of assholery and pitiful blows that these two have mercilessly attacked each other with: [For better viewing of this TL;DR post, better just read the entire damn thing HERE] I...don't know where to begin. The shippy aspect of me whenever I read anything Cherik together is suddenly, and quite terrifyingly, quiet for the first time, and has hastily retreated to a happy place somewhere. Meanwhile, the rational part of me is annoyed as hell to witness these two best friends verbally compensating, punishing and degrading each other. The rest of the characters are just there to duke it out with the acolytes who landed much later to kick some ass. So it's basically the worst funeral in recent memory for the X-Men. Colossus is surely not thrilled but he's just too mad with grief to feel sympathetic towards Xavier so HE JOINS MAGNETO AND THE ACOLYTES, justifying that the cause they are fighting for is something he should have chosen long ago. Maybe, if he did, he never would have lost his sister. At this point, y'all know that things have taken a grim turn for more clusterfucks when a good guy like Colossus turncloaks like this. What can I say about Xavier/Magneto at this point that those scans did not do already? I suppose I should comment on the last line that Charles said: "If you will not take responsibility for yourself, Magneto, then so god help me, I will." The professor eventually does prove that this is the case by the next issue on the roster, X-Men #25, when he put on some exoskeleton suit from the Shi'ar (an alien tech) so he can start walking and join his fellow students in confronting Magneto and the acolytes yet again. Aided by Jean Grey, Cyclops, Gambit, Rogue, Wolverine and Quicksilver, Professor X crashes Magneto's base of operations, this kingdom he proclaimed as AVALON. I would appreciate the Arthurnian reference a lot more if Magneto for this story did not make me want to throw up in his face. So the X-Men arrived and yet another bloody fucking hissy fit between Xavier and Magneto of the upsetting proportions ensue. Earlier on, Beast (and Storm) emphasizes this tragic circumstances with a literary reference: Storm's quoted response: "Our kinship has a strange power, that and our life together was SPOT-ON in capturing Xavier's long-running justification as to why he still thinks Magneto could change; why he hasn't given up on the idea that his best friend will come back to him and they can work together; why he can forgive Magneto even when he least deserves it. That 'kinship' drives him to always find a better, humane way to communicate with Magneto, that and their history and dream together. Well, Magneto is now a super-mega douche who claims that their dream together is dead, and he's going around preaching absolute genetic cleansing of humans because he's unironically the new Hitler, so Professor X most certainly ain't gonna put up no more with his shit. Especially when Magneto ATTACKS HIS OWN SON PIETRO AND MAKES A DECISION TO KILL HIM ON THE SPOT because it's a sacrifice that he is prepared to make. Wolverine disagrees violently and tries to kick his ass but Magneto, as I've stressed, is no longer a sane person, so he does this utterly horrific thing that actually became an iconic panel in X-Men comics. Let me present this moment when Magneto pulled out the adamantium from Wolverine's body: WHAT THE FUCKING FUCKITY FUCK FUCK FUCK, ERIK FUCKING MAGNUS FUCKING LEHNSHERR? He just TORE THE ENTIRE FUCKING THING out of Wolverine, extracted that shit out of him like it was nothing. It was gruesome, that's what it is. I don't think Wolverine can heal fast enough from those gaping wounds. And that was it. Charles Xavier knows his best friend needs to be put down. And he's the only one who could do it. CONSIDER YOURSELF FUCKING MIND-WIPED, MISTER MUTANT HITLER. What a horrible day for everyone involved. Colossus arrives to pick up the now vegetative-state Magneto. Scooping him in his arms, he allows the X-Men to escape so they can rush Wolverine for some serious medical treatment and the professor who has understandably fainted after doing some serious mind-wipe on a man he used to consider his equal and likeness. HORRIBLE FUCKING DAY. The last two issues (Wolverine #75 and Excalibur #61) were the stories that wonderfully closed this motherfucking grueling saga of Fatal Attractions. The Wolverine one is the most personal, and quite possibly my favorite installment of them. It examined just what makes Wolverine such an adaptable, enduring badass. Magneto may have ripped the adamantium from his body permanently but he was not de-clawed at all. In the end, it was shown that--through sheer willpower and agony--he can still pull some claws out of his knuckles--but this time he's using his own bone structure to do it. So...ouch? Good thing, he has a healing power. But he does need time to recover both mentally and physically, from all that drama, so he says his goodbyes to Jubilee in a very sweet and touching letter. These two had become close all throughout Jubilee's membership in the X-Men and he acted as a big brother to her so I thought it was only fitting that she's the only one he cares enough to say goodbye to as he leaves the team for a while to gather his bearings. I was happy that this issue was rather optimistic and intimate, especially after the terror of the midway issues earlier. Speaking of big brothers, in Excalibur #61, we zero in on Colossus at last, who himself is most definitely grieving and suffering during the most untimely of moments. His decision to leave the X-Men for good may have been hasty and spiteful of the professor, but after a while when Kitty Pryde was able to reach out to him, he finally calmed down while the others forcefully reverted him back to his flesh form. It's worth mentioning that he has been in full-metal mode the entire time after his sister's death, a symbolic defense mechanism to shield himself from the pain of losing the one person he felt that he should have saved and never could. Illyana is a doomed character from the start, and Colossus refuses to forgive himself because he thinks he has control over his sister's fate, but he doesn't. Kitty comforts him and holds his vulnerable form in her arms AND OH MY GOD WHY ARE THERE TEARS IN MY EYES, FLOWING DOWN TO STAIN MY CHUBBY CHEEKS????!!! Sadly, even after this cathartic scene, Colossus still decides to go with the acolytes. He does, however, stopped blaming the professor for everything. His anger was replaced with something more painful for Charles though: disappointment Colossus believes that Charles Xavier wasn't doing anything MORE that could have a lasting impact and change for mutantkind, and that's why his dream is beginning to fail not just the two of them but everyone who ever followed him and became an X-Man. That's why Colossus is leaving. He simply does not believe in Charles Xavier anymore. On the plus side, he's forging his own path and is finding a way to fight again for something he must figure out by himself, and hopefully he will find that. It's just not with the X-Men. With Magneto comatosed, Wolverine bailing out and Colossus choosing another side--all these personal failures to protect his dream and the loved ones who became a part of it--it's no wonder they eventually put a strain on Charles's psyche later on, hence the Onslaught saga of 1996 (I might read the collected volumes of that if I can find time to squeeze them in this year but no guarantees). For this closing Excalibur issue, we also had some tender moment between Jean Grey and her alternate-universe teenage daughter Rachel Summers, and this fascinating parallel made between Rachel and Pietro later on. Now to contrast Colossus' choice, Kurt Wagner (Nightcrawler) explained that he would still stand by the professor's dream. He then made the decision that the new Excalibur team which he belongs to should renew their vision-mission statement, and do whatever they can to smooth down things between the mutants and humans during these most trying times in their civil rights movement. My rating for this story arc has strong subjective bias. It moved me in many ways, both positive and negative, which was why it's getting the perfect rating. If you're into all that soap opera drama that is the X-Men in general, and prefer them especially dark like this nineties comics story, then Fatal Attractions will not disappoint you. There are genuinely earnest moments of emotional depth in the last two issues that for me added to my enjoyment. It was such a relief that this was how the writers closed the story. I was fairly satisfied and definitely looking forward to reading the Onslaught saga someday which comes after these events. RECOMMENDED: 10/10 DO READ MY REVIEWS AT:

  2. 4 out of 5

    Malum

    3.5 stars. A hard one to rate. If I were just rating the two X-Men and the one Wolverine issue, this would probably be a five (The Wolverine vs Magneto fight alone is enshrined in comic book history). Unfortunately, they chose to pad this story out with a few other issues that really don't add much to it. 3.5 stars. A hard one to rate. If I were just rating the two X-Men and the one Wolverine issue, this would probably be a five (The Wolverine vs Magneto fight alone is enshrined in comic book history). Unfortunately, they chose to pad this story out with a few other issues that really don't add much to it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Wreade1872

    4 stars out of 5 for personal fun but qualitywise its very much the DCEU of X-Men comics. So little plot so many plot holes. A complete garbage fire of continuity errors, poor motivations and confusing ill-explained story turns. Even the artwork seems sporadic in quality even during a single issue. A lot of good ideas in the theoretical sense but little made it onto the page in one piece.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ανδρέας Μιχαηλίδης

    Rereading old favorites from your teens may not be such a grand idea... You realize that the plot holes and the senselessness attributed to much of today's popular culture is really nothing new and it applies to the things you have enshrined through the passage of time. Fatal Attractions is no different. Make no mistake, there is some of the grandest art in action comics in there (which makes today's situation seem all the more deplorable), but reading the collected edition with an adult's mind f Rereading old favorites from your teens may not be such a grand idea... You realize that the plot holes and the senselessness attributed to much of today's popular culture is really nothing new and it applies to the things you have enshrined through the passage of time. Fatal Attractions is no different. Make no mistake, there is some of the grandest art in action comics in there (which makes today's situation seem all the more deplorable), but reading the collected edition with an adult's mind for detail, you realize just how bad an idea multi-title crossovers are. That said, individual issues from this storyline have withstood the test of time, such as Wolverine #75, written by the incomparable Larry Hama and drawn by master Adam Kubert. I think that one of the nigh unbreakable Wolverine's most defining moments was when he was broken, almost with the flick of a finger - but survived through sheer stubbornness and fixation on one of the three soft spots in his entire, adamantium-hard life.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    Recent reread thoughts: The long reviews I wrote 10 or so years ago are funny. Sometimes I am blatantly wrong or have no idea of a creator’s career so I say something foolish. This review holds up decently, though in this recent experience, John Romita Jr’s Art has been water in the desert of Kubert and Peterson... First Review: This is where characterizations start getting a little murky. I think the chief cause is new writers coming in with new takes (or misunderstandings) on characters. The ot Recent reread thoughts: The long reviews I wrote 10 or so years ago are funny. Sometimes I am blatantly wrong or have no idea of a creator’s career so I say something foolish. This review holds up decently, though in this recent experience, John Romita Jr’s Art has been water in the desert of Kubert and Peterson... First Review: This is where characterizations start getting a little murky. I think the chief cause is new writers coming in with new takes (or misunderstandings) on characters. The other problem is that for this book the writers had a very obvious couple events they wanted to cause, so they were writing character motivations with the chief end in mind. Overall it is still a fun read. This was considered the X-Men 30th Anniversary celebratory event. It collects one issue from each of the X-titles running at the time. Though the core of the story takes place in three of the six titles. This also means you get to see different artists for each issue. The overall premise of the story is that the X-Men's biggest baddie is back and he's bigger and badder than ever... of course. I wonder why they never get weaker... The X-Factor book has Scott Lobdell writing and Joe Quesada on art. I am loving Joe Quesada's art this run through. I couldn't remember it well enough from my last read through, but I think it will stick this time. Great stuff. Lobdell does a decent job continuing Peter David's writing. He doesn’t have quite the knack for the humor that David has, but the characters have made the transition well. X-Force has the return of you-know-who. Okay you don't know who, because you haven't been reading along with me, but let us just say it isn't a surprise. Fabian Nicieza is trying to create a new direction for X-Force. Which is good. Liefield's course had been run, and I think everyone was sick of the angsties. Art is Greg Capullo still figuring out his stuff. Not my preference, but it is better than a kick in the shins. Uncanny is Scott Lobdell writing about the funeral of a recently deceased character and a certain "interruption" at the funeral. There's betrayals, flashbacks, and mullets. John Romita Jr has the chief art duties to further my frustration. I keep thinking I don't especially care for his art, and then I find myself enjoying it. It also has Jae Lee (yay!), Brandon Peterson (meh!), Paul Smith (what happened?), and possibly someone else I am not remembering. X-Men has Fabian Nicieza writing about the X-Men's counter move to that interruption. Here's where the big events happen, that were obviously the lasting effects intended for the event. They certainly were important. They are perhaps the first steps away from the status quo that was established by Jim Lee. Though they would have a problem ever leaving this status quo fully behind, until perhaps Morrison. Andy Kubert on art. I don't care for him, but he's not terrible in this issue. Wolverine still has Larry Hama writing, but they bring on Adam Kubert for art. Whereas I complain about Andy, I for some reason like Adam, even though there are some times when their art looks similar. But this issue in particular showcases some of Adam's strengths at storytelling. Anyways, this shows the after effects of the events in the X-Men story. Excalibur is a forced addendum to the event. They never really try too hard to bring Excalibur into the rest of the X-Universe so this is a bit awkward. Scott Lobdell is writing and Ken Lashley is the chief penciller with a couple other hands in the pot as well. Not great art. But ignorable. Basically this book tries to wrap up a loose end while making it relevant to the Excalibur team. If you never read it, you'd be fine.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Alazzar

    I was going to give this 3 (or maybe 3.5) stars due to the unimpressive last few issues in the arc (one of them spends half the pages tracking a crashing plane that never seems to crash, while the other seems largely removed from the main story line), but when I thought back on some of the big things that happened earlier, I decided this collection was worth the full four stars. Fatal Attractions has a recurring theme between several of its characters: people pushing themselves to their moral lim I was going to give this 3 (or maybe 3.5) stars due to the unimpressive last few issues in the arc (one of them spends half the pages tracking a crashing plane that never seems to crash, while the other seems largely removed from the main story line), but when I thought back on some of the big things that happened earlier, I decided this collection was worth the full four stars. Fatal Attractions has a recurring theme between several of its characters: people pushing themselves to their moral limits and (in some cases) finally snapping. I'm reminded of a complaint I had about the original Phoenix Saga (or maybe not a "complaint" so much as a missed opportunity), where the X-men were faced with a decision: fight alongside their friend who had (unwittingly) committed terrible crimes, or stand back and let her be judged for her actions. In that story, what happened was (view spoiler)[everyone sided with Jean/Phoenix, despite the reasons they had not to. (I'm thinking of Nightcrawler in particular, whose internal reasoning seemed to indicate he shouldn't have been on-board with the "Save the Phoenix" campaign.) And, while it was all very lovely to see the team come together and support their friend, I felt it would have been much more powerful if someone hadn't joined the cause--particularly because we'd get to explore how that character may have been treated by his/her teammates in the aftermath of the battle. (hide spoiler)] Anyway, the reason I bring that up is because I was impressed by the willingness of the writer(s) in Fatal Attractions to push these characters to their limits and not necessarily give us what we wanted to see. (As a great man once said, what the reader wants is not necessarily what they need.) Overall, the execution of the arc was a little weird (I'm not convinced there was enough content to stretch over all six X-titles), but the trials of the characters therein make it all worthwhile.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Cristhian

    Creo que este fue uno de esos momentos en los que los 90s quedaron fijos en la memoria del colectivo de todos los que leíamos cómics en esos tiempos: -la muerte de Superman -la caída de Batman -la muerte del sueño/triunfo de Magneto/lo peor que le ha pasado a Wolverine (todo en un solo arco!) Esto vino a revolucionar las historias de los X-Men y se convirtieron, sin lugar a dudas, una máquina de imprimir dinero. Maravilloso, de principio a fin. 10/10

  8. 5 out of 5

    C

    Reread in July 2020. This is an interesting crossover and I feel like if I didn't have the nostalgic connection to it reading it out of continuity would not be much of a rewarding experience (so if you are new to the X-books, this is probably not a great starting point). I do miss the days when comics weren't written for the trade, when crossovers didn't have to be a more-contained story... (Which is kind of funny considering I prefer owning the trade paperbacks - much easier to shelve than indivi Reread in July 2020. This is an interesting crossover and I feel like if I didn't have the nostalgic connection to it reading it out of continuity would not be much of a rewarding experience (so if you are new to the X-books, this is probably not a great starting point). I do miss the days when comics weren't written for the trade, when crossovers didn't have to be a more-contained story... (Which is kind of funny considering I prefer owning the trade paperbacks - much easier to shelve than individual issues...) but reading this one outside of the ongoing issues around it definitely hurts it. The (melo)dramatic heart of it is probably Colossus dealing with the loss of his sister but without witnessing all of that, it falls a bit flat. The acolytes seem cartoony here where I remember them (and this could be nostalgia speaking) as a more nuanced group of villains. Overall, I remember this crossover fondly but outside of the stories surrounding it, it leaves you a little bit cold.

  9. 5 out of 5

    توفيق عبد الرحيم

    all reviews are with the single issues

  10. 4 out of 5

    Janet Jay

    Holy characters, batman! No but seriously if you've not read every x-man spinoff then you'll spend half your time trying to figure out who said what, much less their name / backstory / whatever. This was a collection of COMICS that took me SIX DINGDANG MONTHS TO FINISH. Finally forced myself past the finish line, no longer caring about almost any character, just wanting out. Holy characters, batman! No but seriously if you've not read every x-man spinoff then you'll spend half your time trying to figure out who said what, much less their name / backstory / whatever. This was a collection of COMICS that took me SIX DINGDANG MONTHS TO FINISH. Finally forced myself past the finish line, no longer caring about almost any character, just wanting out.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jdetrick

    Kind of a mixed bag, as these large crossovers often are, but with enough high points (particularly Larry Hama's Wolverine issue) to make it worth your while. Kind of a mixed bag, as these large crossovers often are, but with enough high points (particularly Larry Hama's Wolverine issue) to make it worth your while.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Gonzalo Oyanedel

    Una de las últimas sagas de la etapa "clásica" en los títulos mutantes, Atracciones Fatales es un típico producto de su época con un dramatismo algo desatado (que echa en falta la guía de Claremont) y la pirotecnia gráfica tan explotada en los '90. Guarda, sin embargo, varios puntos de interés; particularmente aquellos entroncados al -entonces- definitivo enfrentamiento entre Xavier y Magnus, cuyas consecuencias marcan los destinos de Coloso, Kitty Pryde y Wolverine. Para leer con perspectiva. Una de las últimas sagas de la etapa "clásica" en los títulos mutantes, Atracciones Fatales es un típico producto de su época con un dramatismo algo desatado (que echa en falta la guía de Claremont) y la pirotecnia gráfica tan explotada en los '90. Guarda, sin embargo, varios puntos de interés; particularmente aquellos entroncados al -entonces- definitivo enfrentamiento entre Xavier y Magnus, cuyas consecuencias marcan los destinos de Coloso, Kitty Pryde y Wolverine. Para leer con perspectiva.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tim B

    This was an enthralling story. Magneto is kind of suffering from a god complex and goes crazy. Really good intent vs execution discussion between Magneto’s and Xavier’s paths. Captain Britain is still stuck in the time stream and does not really appear. This is playing out the impacts of Stryfe’s legacy virus and all the emotional overwhelming that the mutants are feeling.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    Magneto attacks the earth, Xavier over reacts. Everyone else has fallout. The first part of this has a lot of action, and the reader starts to question Xavier. The rest are decent character led plots about how people are coping with the aftermath. It includes a Colossus and Kitty interlude, as well as X Force after some bad guys. A good read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Difficult realities. Extremely shocking moments. A collision of ideals that will leave almost nobody immensely unharmed.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Fugo Feedback

    A ver, a ver... ¿Qué recuerdo de esta historia? Que lo leí en su momento en la edición de dos tomos que sacó Vid. Que el promedio de los dibujos no era particularmente destacable. Que la famosa escena en la que Magneto le quitaba el adamantium a Wolverine estaba mejor dibujada en la portada que dentro del cómic. Que en un sueño mientras se moría, Logan aparecía como un saco deshuesado (imagen que me impactó bastante en su momento). Y muy poco más. No creo que sea una historieta particularmente r A ver, a ver... ¿Qué recuerdo de esta historia? Que lo leí en su momento en la edición de dos tomos que sacó Vid. Que el promedio de los dibujos no era particularmente destacable. Que la famosa escena en la que Magneto le quitaba el adamantium a Wolverine estaba mejor dibujada en la portada que dentro del cómic. Que en un sueño mientras se moría, Logan aparecía como un saco deshuesado (imagen que me impactó bastante en su momento). Y muy poco más. No creo que sea una historieta particularmente resaltable, pero como me gustan las cosas que escribe Nicieza (por lo general), quedará como una de tantas relecturas que quizás haga un día de estos si pinta.

  17. 4 out of 5

    RoChe Montoya

    Magneto and his Acolytes vs. Xavier and his X-Men, this came out so long ago, but the craziest thing to happen that I can remember was Magneto pulling the Adimantium out of Wolverines through his skin, after that he is feral Wolvie. It has been so long since I looked at these, I think these were the ones that had the hologram image on the cover, I do enjoy a good cross over, and I don't think i have all the individual copies but I would like to read this again. Magneto and his Acolytes vs. Xavier and his X-Men, this came out so long ago, but the craziest thing to happen that I can remember was Magneto pulling the Adimantium out of Wolverines through his skin, after that he is feral Wolvie. It has been so long since I looked at these, I think these were the ones that had the hologram image on the cover, I do enjoy a good cross over, and I don't think i have all the individual copies but I would like to read this again.

  18. 4 out of 5

    L. Esteban

    Meh... De los 6 números que componen el crossover solo puedo rescatar 2. Como buen cómic noventero, llega a ser pesado leerlo por la gran cantidad de texto con la que uno se llega a encontrar por sus páginas. Otro buen aspecto es su valor de colección por los famosos hologramas que vienen en la portada si es que lo conseguiste por números individuales.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Ledrew

    "Even devoid of this intellectuality that I'm bringing into it Fatal Attractions is one of the crown jewels in the unraveling saga of the X-Men, and a good example that the title was not lost when Claremont left the series." Read the full review on TheBookCloset "Even devoid of this intellectuality that I'm bringing into it Fatal Attractions is one of the crown jewels in the unraveling saga of the X-Men, and a good example that the title was not lost when Claremont left the series." Read the full review on TheBookCloset

  20. 5 out of 5

    Knotty

    The Death of Illyana Rasputin to this day is still one of the hardest comics for me to read. The story of Colossus abandoning "The Dream" because of her death is truly sad. Let's not forget the biggest shock of all- Wolverine's Adamantium being ripped out. Who. Knew. Magneto. WOULD. Do. It!!!!! The Death of Illyana Rasputin to this day is still one of the hardest comics for me to read. The story of Colossus abandoning "The Dream" because of her death is truly sad. Let's not forget the biggest shock of all- Wolverine's Adamantium being ripped out. Who. Knew. Magneto. WOULD. Do. It!!!!!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Marc Hampson

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jane Isles-Rizzoli

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nickviola

  24. 5 out of 5

    Caleb

  25. 5 out of 5

    Iantony

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nick Carter

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

  28. 4 out of 5

    Dave

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mcfly

  30. 4 out of 5

    Samuel Reyes

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