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Ace of Spades

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An incendiary and utterly compelling thriller with a shocking twist that delves deep into the heart of institutionalized racism, from an exceptional new YA voice. Welcome to Niveus Private Academy, where money paves the hallways, and the students are never less than perfect. Until now. Because anonymous texter, Aces, is bringing two students' dark secrets to light. Talente An incendiary and utterly compelling thriller with a shocking twist that delves deep into the heart of institutionalized racism, from an exceptional new YA voice. Welcome to Niveus Private Academy, where money paves the hallways, and the students are never less than perfect. Until now. Because anonymous texter, Aces, is bringing two students' dark secrets to light. Talented musician Devon buries himself in rehearsals, but he can't escape the spotlight when his private photos go public. Head girl Chiamaka isn't afraid to get what she wants, but soon everyone will know the price she has paid for power. Someone is out to get them both. Someone who holds all the aces. And they're planning much more than a high-school game...


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An incendiary and utterly compelling thriller with a shocking twist that delves deep into the heart of institutionalized racism, from an exceptional new YA voice. Welcome to Niveus Private Academy, where money paves the hallways, and the students are never less than perfect. Until now. Because anonymous texter, Aces, is bringing two students' dark secrets to light. Talente An incendiary and utterly compelling thriller with a shocking twist that delves deep into the heart of institutionalized racism, from an exceptional new YA voice. Welcome to Niveus Private Academy, where money paves the hallways, and the students are never less than perfect. Until now. Because anonymous texter, Aces, is bringing two students' dark secrets to light. Talented musician Devon buries himself in rehearsals, but he can't escape the spotlight when his private photos go public. Head girl Chiamaka isn't afraid to get what she wants, but soon everyone will know the price she has paid for power. Someone is out to get them both. Someone who holds all the aces. And they're planning much more than a high-school game...

30 review for Ace of Spades

  1. 4 out of 5

    Faridah Àbíké-Íyímídé

    Biased review - but I can 100% confirm that the author worked really hard on this!

  2. 5 out of 5

    chai ♡

    ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°) did someone say Get Out meets Gossip Girl but make it Black and queer ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alice Oseman

    I could not put this book down! Sex, lies, and fighting back against racism - this book is a wild ride, with an incredibly powerful message. A heart-racing and twisty thriller that grapples so much more than a simple mystery; ACE OF SPADES explores being both queer and Black, and the sinister, destructive nature of white supremacy and racism.

  4. 4 out of 5

    daph pink ♡

    Ace of spades was interesting, to say the least. I usually don't read synopsis so I was completely unprepared for what was going to come. I am in awe of this book, and it is one of the most phenomenal debuts that I have ever read. 🃏Plot [...]"The world isn’t ideal. This world, our world, the one with houses as crooked as the people in them. Broken people, broken by the way the world works.”[...]  Two Black teens become the targets of an anonymous texter and they must work together to take the Ace of spades was interesting, to say the least. I usually don't read synopsis so I was completely unprepared for what was going to come. I am in awe of this book, and it is one of the most phenomenal debuts that I have ever read. 🃏Plot [...]"The world isn’t ideal. This world, our world, the one with houses as crooked as the people in them. Broken people, broken by the way the world works.”[...]  Two Black teens become the targets of an anonymous texter and they must work together to take them down. I really appreciate how this book addressed a lot of heavy topics (racism, homophobia, elitism and white supremacy)in a short span of time all while staying within the interesting and dynamic plot line of a thriller. It doesn’t just discuss these themes but digs deeper and questions everything and it was compelling and downright chilling. And being an outsider I enjoyed reading about it, got to learn something new. I also liked how the story explores how class adds another layer of privilege, and this is exemplified in how Chiamaka, who grew up and lives in a rich neighbourhood and how it insulates her, versus Devon, from a poorer neighbourhood, differently navigate and perceive society and the spaces that they occupy. It explores joy and beauty of being queer and as well as challenges which comes with it. 🃏Characters ♠ Chimaka :- Nigerian-Italian, bisexual, popular, confident, unapologetic, logical, goal oriented girl who will take whatever it is to stay at the top of everything. I really enjoyed reading her chapters. Definitely a character which will live with me for a long time. I absolutely adored her. And she is polyglot, I can only Stan. [...]"Besides, regardless of whether it’s me or someone else, there will always be a kingdom, a throne, and a queen." ♠ Devon :- a black-american, gay, laid back , quiet student interested in music. He is like my precious baby who should be protected at all cost. [...]"I’ve felt alone a lot in this world, filled with people and faces that don’t look like me."[...] Apart from main characters all the other characters were perfectly crafted as a piece of puzzls that's fits perfectly in the story and give audience a perfect outcome. 🃏Thrill The book is pitched as a thriller, though I figured out most of the book because it was advertised as gossip girls meets "GET OUT" so I figured out most of the things. But still the truth was major and dark enough for my liking. 🃏Writing The author has a flair of creating an atmospheric and intriguing story, she has this certain way with her words which keeps you hooked. And this is her debut novel, I can't wait to read more of her work. 🃏Ending We are gonna take some time and consider the epilogue - seriously that was my fav part of the book. I had tears after reading the epilogue. A perfect ending. The combination of the haunting story and formidable characters make this book absolutely stunning. Overall the book was good but why I didn't gave it 5 perfect stars :- (✖) Pacing :- the book become somewhat slow towards the middle and then the ending was a bit rushed too. Despite me being totally in love with Chimaka I decided to put down the book in middle because it felt like I was forcing myself to read. I don't like it. (✖) I wish to see more of Devon and Chimaka's friendship because honestly I was rooting for them platonically, but I get it because it wasn't the major theme. Bottom line :- I’m happy to have gotten a glance into the struggles that different people face growing up in America. Highly recommend. ------- pre review :- We all knew this was gonna be a winner 🃏 4.25 stars ⭐/ review to come!! ------------ currently reading updates :- Honestly I can't tell you guys how excited I am to read this beauty.❤️ ----------- tbr review :- Is there a thing like cover porn? If yess then this book is one of the top contenders for it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    myo (myonna reads)

    the bar has been set and it’s extremely high now. this is all i ever wanted, dark academia that deals with racism mixed with a badass female lead. loved this book and i cant wait to see what the author does with her next book!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    ARC provided by the publisher via Edelweiss maybe the best debut i've ever read. this is going to make so many people's best of 2021 list. full review to come. <3 Blog | Instagram | Youtube | Ko-fi | Spotify | Twitch Buddy read with Maëlys & Lea! ❤ ARC provided by the publisher via Edelweiss maybe the best debut i've ever read. this is going to make so many people's best of 2021 list. full review to come. <3 Blog | Instagram | Youtube | Ko-fi | Spotify | Twitch Buddy read with Maëlys & Lea! ❤

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea Humphrey

    "Hello Niveus High. It's me. Who am I? That's not important. All you need to know is... I'm here to divide and conquer. Like all great tyrants do. -Aces" Binge-worthy. Timely. Thought provoking. These are all phrases that come to mind when I look back at this story. I've been salivating over the teasers and early reviews of Ace of Spades, and I'd be lying if I said it wasn't my most anticipated release of 2021. A YA mystery with shades of Gossip Girl and Get Out? Yes, please! I'm pleased to repor "Hello Niveus High. It's me. Who am I? That's not important. All you need to know is... I'm here to divide and conquer. Like all great tyrants do. -Aces" Binge-worthy. Timely. Thought provoking. These are all phrases that come to mind when I look back at this story. I've been salivating over the teasers and early reviews of Ace of Spades, and I'd be lying if I said it wasn't my most anticipated release of 2021. A YA mystery with shades of Gossip Girl and Get Out? Yes, please! I'm pleased to report that this story holds up to the hype, as I found it to be equal parts entertaining and informative. It's a really tough story to review, because the entire plot is wrapped up in figuring out who exactly Aces is and why they’re targeting our two main characters, Devon Richards and Chiamaka Adebayo. Both of our POVs are Black teenagers that come from vastly different backgrounds. Devon has lived his entire life trying to claw his way out of his neighborhood; his single mom has sacrificed everything to get Devon through Niveus Private Academy so that they can have a better life when he goes off to Juilliard as a music prodigy. Chi has grown up in the lap of luxury, but still faces racial discrimination on a daily basis as a biracial young woman, as her mother is Nigerian and her father is Italian. The complex comparison to Chi and Devon's daily life is profound, and seeing how racism can rear its ugly head in many ways is a theme that needs continual discussion. Obviously one of the driving factors of this story is the mystery behind who is Aces? Why are they targeting these particular students? And how will this mysterious entity be stopped? To tell you anymore would be rude, so you should definitely pick this one up for yourself, but I will say that this was *almost* a 5 star read for me. My only issue is the fact that we spend a good bit of the book with a slow build up to what exactly is going on, which I loved, but once the big reveal happens, things are glossed over rather quickly and wrapped up without touching on some major questions that I had. I just needed a little more explanation on a few bombs being dropped that weren't addressed again, and there's something that happens at the very end that jarred me a little and made me wish we could go back and get some answers before that happened. Regardless of my personal wishes, this is a fabulous debut novel by a young woman who put so much of her own experience into this story, and I applaud her for doing so in a way that draws the reader in with entertainment but doesn't shy away from discussing uncomfortable topics. The author's note at the end is a must read, along with the acknowledgements (big shout out to the tea kettle that helped bring us this novel), so please do not skip them! *Many thanks to the publisher for providing my ALC, and to Shelly for sending me her bonus hardcover!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    2.5 stars So to sum it up I know why people will love this book. Great rep, fun characters, and a suspenseful read. However, I did not like the plot twist. So yeah, please don't hate. In the Niveus academy, everyone reeks of money. It’s simply a school for rich white kids. But that was mostly okay for scholarship student Devon and the perfectionist Chiamaka. They’re black but that never got them any particular attention. Until everyone in school starts receiving messages of Devon’s private photos 2.5 stars So to sum it up I know why people will love this book. Great rep, fun characters, and a suspenseful read. However, I did not like the plot twist. So yeah, please don't hate. In the Niveus academy, everyone reeks of money. It’s simply a school for rich white kids. But that was mostly okay for scholarship student Devon and the perfectionist Chiamaka. They’re black but that never got them any particular attention. Until everyone in school starts receiving messages of Devon’s private photos and soon later Chiamaka is targeted too. Aces seems to be exposing every secret of our main characters that they can get their hands. They have to team up eventually to catch and stop Aces. But soon it’s obvious that things are not as they seem and there are so many hidden secrets and lies. I enjoyed reading this thriller, it was fast-paced and kept me guessing. The main characters were likable. Chiamaka was strong-willed and stops at nothing to get what she wants. While Devon was caring and kind. Also, this book is shelved as LGBT so if you want to know, Devon is gay and Chiamaka is bi. I found Devon’s part in particular well-handled. My main issue however was with the ending and some revelations. I have no idea if this is based on real events and if so, I apologize in advance. I tried googling but found nothing on this topic. But if it’s not, it wasn’t believable and it was also extreme. I’ll explain why in the hidden spoiler. (view spoiler)[ These kids should be acting and winning academy awards. I simply cannot believe that most of the school was on it and Jaime simply faked a 3 years friendship (yes he secretly liked it but still). They simply did ALL this because they’re racist. In today’s world. I honestly find it difficult to believe that such things happen. On a smaller scale, I have no doubt. But for a school to do that and have a camp just to plan for their racism and EVERYONE who knows about is okay with it. They have a principal for that. AND EVEN THE MEDIA IS IN. Out of all the reporters, Chiamaka can pick, I suspected she’d choose at least a black journalist... but no, she chooses one that is part of this huge conspiracy. And again, faking it and acting like they like/are okay with the black kids. It was also mentioned that they rarely faced any issues because of their skin color. So all those racist people who were on it were able to swallow their racist remarks and hide their true opinion? FOR OVER 3 YEARS? (hide spoiler)] I know black kids face discrimination at school. And in most cases, nothing is done about it. I truly do and I love the message of this book, very powerful and important. I am not trying to undermine that in any way. I’m just saying this particular plot for a mystery isn’t believable. Still, this book had a powerful message, and discrimination against black students needs to be addressed because more often than not, the educators, too, are complicit or at least turning a blind eye. This needs to stop. PS (to those comments): I AM NOT SAYING RACISM DOESN'T EXIST. IT DOES AND SO MUCH SO. AND IT'S GREAT THAT THIS BOOK SHED LIGHT ON IT. MY ISSUE WITH THIS BOOK IS ONLY FROM A MYSTERY/THRILLER BOOK PERSPECTIVE, I HAVE LOWERED MY RATING OF MANY BOOKS FOR THAT SAME REASON. Also, I am from the Middle East. I do have a light skin color, does that make me white? I honestly do not know because I've never been outside Lebanon. Thanks to Netgally and publisher for sending me an arc of this book

  9. 5 out of 5

    Gabby

    This was so good 🤯 The comparison to Get Out and Gossip Girl are 100% accurate! I will admit the first 200 pages were kind of slow and read reaaaally young adult to me, but the ending was wild and so intense and worth it! Reading vlog where I read it: https://youtu.be/yrJOxTbNPd4 This was so good 🤯 The comparison to Get Out and Gossip Girl are 100% accurate! I will admit the first 200 pages were kind of slow and read reaaaally young adult to me, but the ending was wild and so intense and worth it! Reading vlog where I read it: https://youtu.be/yrJOxTbNPd4

  10. 4 out of 5

    katie ❀

    Sometimes, you need a soft, fluffy rom-com to cheer you up. And sometimes, you need a dark, twisty thriller to scare the crap out of you. This was one of the latter. Ace of Spades follows Chiamaka and Devon, the only Black students who attend the prestigious Niveus Private Academy. But after both are nominated as prefects, their paths begin to tangle as an anonymous force known as Aces makes themself present, bent on not only destroying their senior year, but also on ruining any chance at a futur Sometimes, you need a soft, fluffy rom-com to cheer you up. And sometimes, you need a dark, twisty thriller to scare the crap out of you. This was one of the latter. Ace of Spades follows Chiamaka and Devon, the only Black students who attend the prestigious Niveus Private Academy. But after both are nominated as prefects, their paths begin to tangle as an anonymous force known as Aces makes themself present, bent on not only destroying their senior year, but also on ruining any chance at a future. I’ve read about five mysteries and thrillers this year so far, which, all things considered, is a lot for me. Ace of Spades is by far the best one. It’s one of those books that, when completed, you can only sit in silence and weakly try to process what you just read, your desire for more tugging at your heart. This is one of the few times I loved the writing and the characters so much—both are sharp, smart, and brilliantly crafted. The writing isn’t lilting prose or elaborate description, but simplistic and compelling, cutting just as deeply. Àbíké-Íyímídé expertly wields dual points of view to maximize suspense, cleverly jumping from one to the next, ending each character with a brutal cliffhanger, something that left me gasping. Chiamaka and Devon lead very different lives, but I was equally invested in both their stories. How delicately and detailed white supremacy, classism, and institutionalized racism were portrayed was so heartwrenching and nuanced, and I appreciate how the author doesn’t shy away from the suffering injustice brings. This review doesn’t even come close to doing this book justice, not with the way it explores relevant themes that appealed to me and had me losing my mind a little bit, and certainly not with its haunting social commentary that will linger in my mind for months to come. This is truly a book I won’t forget, and I can’t recommend it enough.

  11. 4 out of 5

    may ➹

    4.5 stars there’s no better dark academia than dark academia with qpoc challenging racist institutions! (this was excellent and as usual I was terrible at guessing things, rtc) // buddy read with 😖 4.5 stars there’s no better dark academia than dark academia with qpoc challenging racist institutions! (this was excellent and as usual I was terrible at guessing things, rtc) // buddy read with 😖

  12. 4 out of 5

    literarylesbian

    This book left me speechless and literally pulling my hair out.

  13. 4 out of 5

    theresa

    I can quite honestly say that Ace of Spades blew my mind. I went into this book with high expectations after seeing so many people rave about it and somehow it still managed to exceed them. Faridah Àbíké-Íyímídé has crafted a truly unputdownable thriller that expertly builds and draws out tension all while exploring institutionalised racism and the power found in fighting back. I don’t often read thrillers but if they were all as brilliantly written as Ace of Spades I don’t think I could ever put I can quite honestly say that Ace of Spades blew my mind. I went into this book with high expectations after seeing so many people rave about it and somehow it still managed to exceed them. Faridah Àbíké-Íyímídé has crafted a truly unputdownable thriller that expertly builds and draws out tension all while exploring institutionalised racism and the power found in fighting back. I don’t often read thrillers but if they were all as brilliantly written as Ace of Spades I don’t think I could ever put them down. I was gripped from the very first page and constantly in awe of this book’s ability to up the stakes and build tension, without ever feeling ridiculous or unbelievable. In fact, what makes this book so intense is that it’s all too real. Peeling back the layers of insidiousness present in this book invoked physical reactions in me, especially once we reached the truly rotten core. Each of Aces’ attacks on Chiamaka and Devon left me reeling and sure it couldn’t get worse but get worse it did. I don’t want to go into too much detail with this because I think it’s best to go into this book blind and just let it blow your mind. What I will talk about though is the characters. I really appreciated the dual POV and felt that it was used very effectively to carry the story while also creating two distinct, convincing perspectives. Firstly, Chiamaka, the head girl with everything going for her. I adore popular mean girl characters and find them really fun to read about, especially once they’re given depth and Chiamaka did not disappoint. Her journey with owning her Blackness rather than squashing it down to fit in was a joy to read and a narrative clearly crafted with extreme care. Quiet Devon was really the stand out for me, which is not what I had originally expected. His character development and the exploration of how Blackness intersects with queerness, particularly in the rougher environment he lives in, was really touching and so gracefully written. Ace of Spades left me unable to form any thoughts beyond “holy shit ?!?!?!” upon finishing and, honestly, that still stands. The exploration into the rotten core of institutionalised racism provides the perfect, insidious backdrop to this high stakes thriller. Ace of Spades is an unforgettable master class in building a palpable tension that relentlessly propels its readers forwards, all while filling them with an ever present dread. This stunning debut is a must read that deserves to become the next big thing. I cannot wait to see what Faridah Àbíké-Íyímídé does next – she’s definitely one to watch. I also talk about books here: youtube | instagram | twitter *eARC received in exchange for an honest review via Netgalley*

  14. 4 out of 5

    Bookishrealm

    FUCKING PERFECTION! If you haven't read this book yet you're doing a disservice to yourself. If ya'll think that this won't end up on my 2021 top books of the year you're losing your mind! Ace of Spades is what I look for in thrillers. It's engaging, it's creepy, it screws with your mind, and when the big reveal comes your jaw hits the floor. This book definitely has vibes that can be closely related to Get Out, Gossip Girl, and Pretty Little Liars, but my oh my it's so much more. The story itsel FUCKING PERFECTION! If you haven't read this book yet you're doing a disservice to yourself. If ya'll think that this won't end up on my 2021 top books of the year you're losing your mind! Ace of Spades is what I look for in thrillers. It's engaging, it's creepy, it screws with your mind, and when the big reveal comes your jaw hits the floor. This book definitely has vibes that can be closely related to Get Out, Gossip Girl, and Pretty Little Liars, but my oh my it's so much more. The story itself initially feels simplistic. It focuses on two students: Devon and Chiamaka as they are nominated to become prefects at the predominately white, elite high school. And I say predominately with an emphasis on the fact that Devon and Chiamaka are the only Black students. Everything is great UNTIL Aces appear. Aces is apparently this anonymous individual who begins to reveal some pretty heavy secrets about both Devon and Chiamaka and that's when the real drama begins. Ace of Spades is pure brilliance in terms of character development. The internal dialogue of both Devon and Chiamaka helps readers connect with them on a different level. They not only have their personal struggles, but they deal with a lot at school. Being a Black person in a predominately White space is not always easy to navigate and it's clear that both characters struggle with it. I liked Chiamaka, but I fell in love with Devon. His story is one that broke my heart and soul. And knowing everything that he had been through made me want to kick everyone's ass by the time the big reveal occurred. The relationship between Devon and Chiamaka is interesting. I think that as a reader it would have been easy to assume that the two would get along and effectively work together to figure out who was revealing all of the information about their personal lives; however, I liked that the author didn't make it that easy. In the real world, I think it's easy to assume that people of the same racial group, particularly Black people, will instantly get along or have the same thought process in the time of crisis or in regard to certain social issues. This is the farthest thing from the truth and the way that this is illustrated through their relationship is gold. It was a constant reminder that Black people are not a monolith. The pacing of Ace of Spades is interesting. It's slow and it needed to be slow. It was important that readers see everything unfold layer by layer. I'm typically not a fan of books that have slow pacing, but for the style of this book is was necessary. By the time readers get to the big reveals, the ultimate purpose of the book becomes shocking. What's even more creepy/frightening about this book is that it's not that far removed from things that have happened or things that could happen. Of course, some things are exaggerated for the purpose of the book, but there is a lot truth to this book that is the real live experience for a lot of Black youth. I'm usually the queen of figuring things out, but I didn't see a lot of this book coming. And the added social commentary especially those parts that focus on racism, classicism, white privilege, and more take this book to another level. Listen, if there is any book that you need to read before the year ends THIS IS THE BOOK YOU NEED TO PICK UP. I'm so excited to see what this author is going to do in the future.

  15. 5 out of 5

    emma

    sheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeesh. review to come / 4 stars ------------- my hold on this book came in and i started reading immediately.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Aiden Thomas

    Faridah Àbíké-Íyímídé is an absolute artist of crafting tension and suspense. ACE OF SPADES will leave readers tearing through chapters, desperate to see what happens next. Packed with killer twists that gave me goosebumps, ACES OF SPADES is a phenomenal debut here to knock you off your feet and send your heart racing.

  17. 5 out of 5

    ☆Pelumi☆ (On major hiatus)

    OUT OF FIVE ACTUAL RATING: Infinity stars* PLOT: 5 CHARACTERS: 4 MYSTERY: 5 WRITING: 4.5 TWIST:5 People be like "There's no perfect book" and all I'm thinking is, have you met Ace of Spades yet. "Hello Niveus High. It's me. Who am I? That's not important. All you need to know is... I'm here to divide and conquer. Like all great tyrants do. -Aces" First of all, I just want to say WHATTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT The bar for all YA books have been raised so high, at this point not even SJM stands a chance. I OUT OF FIVE ACTUAL RATING: Infinity stars* PLOT: 5 CHARACTERS: 4 MYSTERY: 5 WRITING: 4.5 TWIST:5 People be like "There's no perfect book" and all I'm thinking is, have you met Ace of Spades yet. "Hello Niveus High. It's me. Who am I? That's not important. All you need to know is... I'm here to divide and conquer. Like all great tyrants do. -Aces" First of all, I just want to say WHATTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT The bar for all YA books have been raised so high, at this point not even SJM stands a chance. I said what I said. When I read this, I tried to keep in mind that this is a debut, the author is pretty young and my hopes shouldn't be so high that I'll end up hating it but towards the end of the book, I had to sit down and really ask myself, Is this debut? Because I've never read one that's this insanely intense Ace of Spades is entertaining, thought provoking, fast paced, adrenaline inducing(my heart beat rate was just sky high), actually thrilling as well as chilling This book follows our two MCs, Chiamaka and Devon who are the only black students attending Niveus Academy. Even though they have the same skin colour, they couldn't be anymore different. Chiamaka Adebayo is absolutely badass, cutthroat and wealthy. She is biracial, with her mom being Nigerian and her dad Italian. She has grown up to realise that racial discrimination is something she'll always have to fight no matter how much money she owns. She decides to take her own life into her hands and get the respect she deserves. She makes a lot of sacrifices, some bad, some good. She believes the end justifies the means and because of this all she's able to survive and even be called elite in her school. Until Aces shows up and things go a bit crazy. As regard to her sexuality, this book was shelved by some as lesbian but its really not. Sapphic? yes, the author described Chiamaka as queer. Devon on the other hand, is so sweet, vulnerable, a closeted gay and has a poor background. His neighborhood is very dangerous, he's seen bullies, he's been closeted for a while now because he don't wanna disappoint his mom. I loved his arc so much. Th struggles of growing up with a single mom, to have his dad taken away by the system(police), experiences with bullying and even his attempted suicide was all very tear jerking. I think he's a sweetheart who needs to be protected at all costs. At Niveus, he feels invisible somehow, like its his safe spot. Combined with the music he's able to practice in school, Niveus feels like home away from home. Unlike Chi he isn't popular but he has one friend, Jack who he clings to despite his annoying personality. When he suddenly gets appointed as a prefect, he's so surprised. However, he has no idea that his once normal life is about to take a real dark turn, especially since Aces is on to him now. The mystery itself revolves round unmasking Aces. I won't talk much on it so as not to give away spoilers but I'll just say that no one saw that ending coming! I had a few guesses and they were all wrong! I couldn't have imagined it in a million years so, Get out meets Gossip girl might as well be the most perfect description for this. Its dark, twisty, sickening but still informative at the same time. The way it takes on white supremacy and institutionalized racism still baffles me till now. I'm never getting over this book and honestly, I'm not complaining. 10/10! When you read a thriller you want the plot to be fast paced but not too fast paced that the big reveal at the end becomes underwhelming, Ace of Spades did just that and I'm so here for it! The plot was fast when it had to be and slow when it had to be. The build up , the suspense, the climax omg it was so good! Faridah is either a writing genius or an alien from another planet because her skills are out of this world! I love the plot please, when you see something good you have to say it and this was really good. The characters both main and side were just *chef kisses* très magnifique! They all had their roles and their development was amazing. I think they're are not the strength of this book as the plot and writing was way better than the characterization but still....It was good and slightly better than your average YA book. When I rate thrillers, I rate in terms of mystery, plot and characters and all these get an A+ in this book! The writing was great! The author gave us a multiple POV from both Devon and Chiamaka and I think they flowed really well into each other, Starting off where the other stopped and all that. When Faridah said she took her time on tis, she meant she took her time on this and oh boy, did it pay off! The LGBTQ+ representation and cultural representation were done really well. I'm Nigerian and the references to Nigerian food, cities and so on gave me a pride boost! I love it and well, its own voices so I'm really proud. I don't know if the LGBTQ+ rep was own voices but I think Devon's sexuality was handled pretty well but Chi's own was a bit obscure but maybe that's what the author was going for since, she pretty much didn't label her and declared that she's queer. I think I've found the best read of 2021: an amazing cover, great story, good characters, original plot, unique tropes and still debut?! Ace of Spades deserves and award and all my money too! GO BUY THIS NOW! Pre review thoughts WHAT IN THE HOLY FUCKERY DID I JUST READ???!!!!! RTC when I get my braincells in line... THIS IS THE BEST THING OMG ********************************************* I take back all I said about Netgally, those bitches are the best please... Also, I got a decline on Eldeweiss(b4 I deleted the acct ofc so its good how things turned out ehehe) EDIT: THIS IS SO GOOD OMGGGG

  18. 4 out of 5

    Peyton Reads

    Everything I love in a book wrapped up in one and so many important messages as well!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Lanz

    Ace of Spades made me want to bolt my chair to the ground so I couldn't fall out of it. So much suspense from the get-go! This dark and adrenaline-filled thriller tackles several hard-hitting themes that left me reeling; Faridah Àbíké-Íyímídé does a masterful job portraying the struggles of black students trying to succeed in a system that only seems to work against them. ~★~ What is this book about? ~★~ Chiamaka Adebayo and Devon Richards are polar opposites; she’s popular and wealthy, he ha Ace of Spades made me want to bolt my chair to the ground so I couldn't fall out of it. So much suspense from the get-go! This dark and adrenaline-filled thriller tackles several hard-hitting themes that left me reeling; Faridah Àbíké-Íyímídé does a masterful job portraying the struggles of black students trying to succeed in a system that only seems to work against them. ~★~ What is this book about? ~★~ Chiamaka Adebayo and Devon Richards are polar opposites; she’s popular and wealthy, he has one friend and lives in a struggling neighbourhood. When they’re both chosen as prefects during senior year, an anonymous texter named “Aces” begins putting Chiamaka and Devon’s lives on blast, revealing their secrets one by one to the entire academy. Unless they can catch the culprit, their bright future’s remain in the hands of a faceless enemy. ────── {⋆★⋆} ────── Ace of Spades took my breath away time and time again. Àbíké-Íyímídé wastes no time jumping into the brunt of the mystery, creating a tremendous amount of suspense only a few pages in. The stakes never lessened at any point—my shock continued to heighten at almost every reveal. Knowing Chiamaka’s big secret weighed on me throughout the story, I shared her fear as we got closer to what would probably be aces’ final reveal. “I can ‘fix’ the kinks in my hair, but not the kinks in this whole system that hates me and Devon and everyone who looks like us” The messages about racism, classism and homophobia within Ace of Spades were powerful enough to leave me reeling for days after I finished reading. I think what makes this YA thriller so dark and twisted is the fact that a lot of what took place probably isn’t a stretch from the horrible things that did—or still do—happen to people of colour. I loved Chiamaka and Devon as narrators because their situations and struggles put into perspective a lot that I’ve never previously given much thought to. Chiamaka is a girl plentiful of secrets and fake friends (whom she needed to get to the top in school). She’s bisexual and mixed race, with the white side of her family distancing themselves because she’s “too dark”. Devon lives in a poor neighbourhood, dealing drugs to support his mother and constantly hiding his relationships with boys to avoid her disapproval—and that of the gang members on his block, who he knows will hurt him for being gay. Knowing that Aces threatened all of this and more, putting both their personal lives and academic futures on the line, I was completely invested in the outcome of events (and that Chiamaka and Devon would get their happy ending). “This world isn’t ideal. This world, our world, the one with houses as crooked as the people in them. Broken people, broken by the way the world works. No jobs, no money; sell drugs, get money. That’s what the world is, that’s how it works.” I highly recommend reading Ace of Shades. Whether you enjoy thrillers or not, this is book that packs a punch. It’s endlessly entertaining, though emotional and appalling at times too. I’ve already talked three people’s ears off regarding this book; my sister and two close friends have heard it all. So, if you like reading anything, I implore you to consider giving this a try. You won’t regret it. “I wish he didn’t find comfort in temporary highs. I want to tell him that his path could be something different, but I’d be lying.”

  20. 4 out of 5

    Maëlys

    ☆ 5 / 5 ☆ “The world isn’t ideal. This world, our world, the one with houses as crooked as the people in them. Broken people, broken by the way the world works.” This book left me stunned and speechless, and I wouldn’t be surprised if it ends up as my favourite debut of 2021. Chiamaka and Devon are the only two Black students attending Niveus Private Academy but their paths couldn’t be more different. Chiamaka loves the sciences, she’s climbed up to the top of the social ladder, and designer cl ☆ 5 / 5 ☆ “The world isn’t ideal. This world, our world, the one with houses as crooked as the people in them. Broken people, broken by the way the world works.” This book left me stunned and speechless, and I wouldn’t be surprised if it ends up as my favourite debut of 2021. Chiamaka and Devon are the only two Black students attending Niveus Private Academy but their paths couldn’t be more different. Chiamaka loves the sciences, she’s climbed up to the top of the social ladder, and designer clothes are her best friends. On the other hand, Devon attends the school on a scholarship, his mother has to work three jobs to put food on the table, and he keeps his head down as best he can, finding refuge in the music room. However, Chiamaka’s and Devon’s lives start getting tangled in each other when they respectively get nominated as Head Prefect (for the third year in a row) and Senior Prefect (to everyone’s surprise) respectively. But after this promising start to the new school year, Aces, an anonymous bully, is out to ruin not only their last year of highschool, but the futures they’ve both dreamt for themselves. While it seems like Aces also exposes a couple other people, it quickly becomes apparent that Chiamaka and Devon are their prime targets. “I think anyone can be nice, but it’s not about being nice. You can’t escape a history like that and not be affected.” I’d like to say that things start out a little more trivial but there is truly no levity to anything that comes out about these characters, it is only that things become darker and more and more dangerous with each passing day and revelation. This bullying and targeting unmistakably reflects and takes root in institutionalised racism and how it has shaped society and the future of Black people until this day. I’m in awe with how seamlessly and unapologetically Faridah Àbíké-Íyímídé incorporates so many layers and complexities to her social commentary. It all starts with the contrast between Chi’s and Devon’s financial situation but shows that beyond the money (which Chi’s family has) what comes with generational wealth are influence and power. Their classmates are not only rich but they have direct contacts with people who can set the trajectory of a life. “What I felt was a desperation to be powerful in a world that doesn’t let girls be. Especially girls like me.” While the main plot showcases a very peculiar case of racism, it actually highlights how it manifests itself in many ways. From the policing of Black bodies (certain hairstyles being forbidden for example) and white beauty standards (Chi doesn’t “hate” her hair but she knows her classmates’ perspective on it and makes herself fit in that mold) to how it is the basis of the prison system. It is in how quickly society will condemn Black people as guilty and how it lingers in the media's silence and wrapped narratives. One thing I also loved is how social media is used as a platform for information and activism. Of course, it’s far from perfect, but it is sometimes the only place where people can have a voice and platform to tell their stories, for people to come together. There’s also an emphasis on the complicity of the “nice” white people who don’t want to say anything to their friends or challenge their families, sometimes even participating in extremely violent acts. This goes so far as Chi’s father staying silent when his family is outwardly racist to his own wife and daughter. “In this home of worn leather sofas, tabletops with cracked edges, mismatched chairs, and exposed pipes, there is so much love. Even if that love is for a version of me that isn’t real.” Devon’s character particularly touched me as Faridah Àbíké-Íyímídé takes the time to show us what it means to be gay and Black for him. While for some of his classmates queerness doesn’t negatively impact their lives because it is intuitively accepted by most (let’s say a white guy who’s into theater), he is seen as an oddity in the eyes of these same people as if Black boys can’t be gay. Living in his neighbourhood as a gay boy also means deep rooted trauma, being beaten up for not being masculine enough, having to hide his relationships. He’s also frightened to come out to his religious mother and lose her love, and they have such a moving scene together about it. I also really enjoyed how Chi’s sexuality was explored in this and showing that she never truly liked boys and her boyfriends, but that they were only pieces in what she sees as the journey she has to take to achieve success.We see her come to that understanding very seamlessly and I really adored it. “I have to stop myself from apologizing- because what would I even be sorry for? Existing too loud?” What impressed me with this book as well is that in the midst of all of this there were some very funny, lighthearted, and heartwarming moments. We see Chi and Devon experience small joys and love. Some of my favourite scenes included their mothers and there was something so special with each of those moments. This was a stunning debut with what I thought was a perfect ending! It unpacks so much and is so intriguing and well-written, it was truly impossible to put down. I can’t recommend this enough, and I’m excitedly waiting for so many to love this. Youtube ☆ Twitter Buddy read with Melanie ♡

  21. 5 out of 5

    Monte Price

    I'm going to publish a full review closer to the actual release date... but you need to have this book on your list of things to preorder. The game has been changed, the bar has been raised, Faridah Àbíké-Íyímídé is coming for the girlies. It took me far longer to publish my full thoughts, but here they are from a yearish ago when I actually finished the book. While I was given an arc of this, as always the thoughts to follow are all mine. I just need you to know that this is hands down required re I'm going to publish a full review closer to the actual release date... but you need to have this book on your list of things to preorder. The game has been changed, the bar has been raised, Faridah Àbíké-Íyímídé is coming for the girlies. It took me far longer to publish my full thoughts, but here they are from a yearish ago when I actually finished the book. While I was given an arc of this, as always the thoughts to follow are all mine. I just need you to know that this is hands down required reading for all those looking for a good book. In fact on some levels simply calling this a good book doesn’t really convey just how great my reading experience was and how I didn’t want to start. The story picks up immediately and doesn’t let up until the last sentence of the book, all while slowly ratcheting up the tension. It’s mastery on a level that I could only ever hope to attain. Devon and Chiamaka are the only Black students at their private school and as their senior year commences they are thrown together as a mysterious force starts to expose things about their lives that they’d definitely like to keep underwraps. What follows was a heartwarming and heartbreaking story of institutional racism, coming out, breakups, and new relationships. The book manages to tackle so much ground. I was a little impressed at how everything still managed to weave together and not feel as thought it was lagging behind at any point. If for some reason this book wasn’t on your radar I’m happy I was able to get you to at least look into it because again, this is required reading. I don’t have a bad thing to say about this book, I enjoyed the wild ride it took me on and I am going to be slightly envious of others who get to experience the twists and turns for the first time.

  22. 4 out of 5

    mwana

    This world isn't ideal. This world, our world, the one with houses as crooked as the people in them. Broken people, broken by the way the world works. No jobs, no money; sell drugs, get money. That's what this world is, that's how it works. This book was WILD. I almost stayed up all night to do that but as a burgeoning old woman, I lost the battle to sleep. The story starts with Devon, a music prodigy and Chiamaka, head girl and queen bitch. The only two black students at Niveus Privat This world isn't ideal. This world, our world, the one with houses as crooked as the people in them. Broken people, broken by the way the world works. No jobs, no money; sell drugs, get money. That's what this world is, that's how it works. This book was WILD. I almost stayed up all night to do that but as a burgeoning old woman, I lost the battle to sleep. The story starts with Devon, a music prodigy and Chiamaka, head girl and queen bitch. The only two black students at Niveus Private Academy. It's their senior year. The year where everything is supposed to come up daisies and get them enrolled into their dream colleges. Devon at Juilliard and Chi at Yale. Unfortunately, someone has it out for them. In the same vein as Gossip Girl, an anonymous person reveals personal details about Devon and Chi that they'd rather stay hidden. But as the story progresses, Gossip Girl progresses into Uber A levels of malevolence. Trying to get Chi arrested at a candy store, outing Devon when he comes from a neighbourhood that could kill him for being gay, torturing Chi, following Devon. Making them distrust their world. Making them feel alone. The stakes were high in this story. Eventually it became clear it was less about just messing with Devon and Chi but something more sinister. More insidious that just some sick fuckos out to mess with their rivals. I can see why the book gets compared to Get Out. The elements of institutionalised racism are undeniable. Going as far as turning into a neoKKK situation that our protagonists find themselves in. But for once, the system didn't beat them down. There was a lot of heavy subject matter dealt with apart from institutionalised racism. Such as incarceration, death of a parent, police brutality, gay bashing. There's a lot of ugliness, violence in modern day America. The book touches on it in a way suitable for a YA novel. It wasn't as overwhelming as my twitter feed. The book also briefly touches on being a second generation immigrant, and it made me think of how much history has been lost to a specific generation of Africans. In my case, it is because of colonialism. As well as a break down in sharing oral history which Chi's mum did. If those who came before us won't tell us, how else will we know? Unlike white families, we can't trace our history going all the way to when Napoleon got his milk teeth pulled. The characters and the plot are the best thing about this book. I hated the dual 1st POV and the present tense. I will never understand what mandates present tense in YA contemporary novels. The ending also felt a bit rushed but I could forgive a few hastened conclusions and a few frayed incomplete plot threads for that glorious ending. Abike-Iyimide wrote this because she wished she'd seen the PLLs and Gossip Girls with people who look like us. I'd go as far as saying, she far surpassed them all. Ace of Spades isn't "Get Out meets Gossip Girl", it's its own fucking story. One that will resonate with generations to come. Thank you to netgalley for providing me with a copy in exchange for a review.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nenia ✨ I yeet my books back and forth ✨ Campbell

    Utterly fantastic. GR review to come, or read it early HERE. Utterly fantastic. GR review to come, or read it early HERE.

  24. 4 out of 5

    CW (The Quiet Pond) ✨

    Read my full review on my book blog, The Quiet Pond. This was AMAZING. I was utterly shook by the end and just kinda leaned back against my chair, staring at the ceiling wide-eyed, but wow. wow. wow! A phenomenal, nail-gnawing, and terrifying story about elitism, secrets, and racism. - Follows Nigerian-Italian teen Chiamaka, head girl, popular, and unapologetic in what she will do to stay in power, and Devon, a Black American teen and talented musician who just wants to keep his head down and get Read my full review on my book blog, The Quiet Pond. This was AMAZING. I was utterly shook by the end and just kinda leaned back against my chair, staring at the ceiling wide-eyed, but wow. wow. wow! A phenomenal, nail-gnawing, and terrifying story about elitism, secrets, and racism. - Follows Nigerian-Italian teen Chiamaka, head girl, popular, and unapologetic in what she will do to stay in power, and Devon, a Black American teen and talented musician who just wants to keep his head down and get into a college for his music. - When an anonymous texter texts the whole student body Chiamaka and Devon's secrets, the two reluctantly work together to take down the texter when things begin crumbling under their feet. - This book is terrifying. TERRIFYING. But in a compelling and fascinating and wondrous way. I felt this story's claws sink into me and I just could not look away. The mystery and thriller elements of this book were incredible. - As well as being an amazing story, this book is also very thematic, and explores the intersection between class, race, and sexuality, and how racism isn't just microaggressions but is also an insidious thing. - LOVED this. I'm calling it - this book is going to be one of the best books of the year. Content warning: flashbacks of death, murder, blood mentions, blackmailing, stalking, outing (of queer character), physical violence, drugs, alcohol consumption

  25. 5 out of 5

    Elle

    I just love YA thrillers. Can’t get enough of them! Ace of Spades was no exception. Although it started out similarly to a lot of other books in the genre, by the halfway point it diverged into a completely unique and sinisterly clever story all its own. Chiamaka Adebayo is Niveus Private Academy’s reigning ‘It Girl’, so it comes as no surprise when she’s named Head Prefect for the fourth year in a row. What does come as a surprise is that Devon Richards, a music student who keeps largely to hims I just love YA thrillers. Can’t get enough of them! Ace of Spades was no exception. Although it started out similarly to a lot of other books in the genre, by the halfway point it diverged into a completely unique and sinisterly clever story all its own. Chiamaka Adebayo is Niveus Private Academy’s reigning ‘It Girl’, so it comes as no surprise when she’s named Head Prefect for the fourth year in a row. What does come as a surprise is that Devon Richards, a music student who keeps largely to himself, is awarded one of the Senior Prefect slots alongside her. Despite being on scholarship, Devon has a lot going for him as a student, and as Chiamaka dreams of Yale, he has his sights set on Juliard. Their new student leadership positions only strengthen their chances of success, and it seems like the world is at their fingertips. But because this is a thriller, it obviously does not all go according to plan. Immediately after receiving their titles, an anonymous source that goes by ‘Aces’ starts spreading rumors and gossip about the pair. Some of it is more harmful than others, but it appears Aces is doing their best to ruin the bright futures that were all but guaranteed to them. It also doesn’t escape notice that the only two students being targeted, Devon and Chiamaka, are the only two Black kids in their school. I’ve seen this kind of a set-up before, where an anonymous cyber bully gleefully reveals characters’ deepest and darkest secrets to a captive student body, usually via text message. The first half largely sticks to this formula, and I found myself a little underwhelmed initially if I am being honest. But the second half really takes off running, and I could not turn the page fast enough. If you’re worried about this being the same sort of book you’ve read a dozen times, there’s no need. Faridah Àbíké-Íyímídé revives a familiar plot line with new twists and perspectives that kept me guessing until the very end. I’d say the greatest strength of Ace of Spades was how I never felt like I had a solid footing when it came to the characters apart from Chiamaka and Devon. You never know who you can really trust, and I think Àbíké-Íyímídé does an excellent job and exposing the more diabolical aspects of a dark academia setting. Are your friends your friends and your enemies your enemies? Take no chances; trust nobody. I did think the ending was a little rushed, especially compared to how detailed the 150 pages or so were. I think we needed a little more development as far as the big finale was concerned too. I did like the epilogue, but I still had a lot more questions than we were given answers to. Though, I’d still recommend this wickedly fun thriller to anyone in the market for something fast-paced and entertaining that also contains smart social commentary. *Thanks BookishFirst and Feiwel & Friends (Macmillan) for my finished copy! **For more book talk & reviews, follow me on Instagram at @elle_mentbooks!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Katie Zhao

    I devoured Faridah's stunning debut in one breathless sitting. I love a good thriller, and this is one of the best I've ever read. One thing I've noticed about thrillers is that for the most part, they don't tend to be very deep. (Possibly bc for the most part, they are *cough* about rich white kids and their non-problems *cough*) ACE OF SPADES does not have this problem. This book grapples with heavy, timely, important themes: institutionalized racism, educational gatekeeping, being LGBTQ in PO I devoured Faridah's stunning debut in one breathless sitting. I love a good thriller, and this is one of the best I've ever read. One thing I've noticed about thrillers is that for the most part, they don't tend to be very deep. (Possibly bc for the most part, they are *cough* about rich white kids and their non-problems *cough*) ACE OF SPADES does not have this problem. This book grapples with heavy, timely, important themes: institutionalized racism, educational gatekeeping, being LGBTQ in POC communities, socioeconomic status and the way it affects POC most of all - whew. This book packs in so much social power. My jaw literally dropped, and I got goosebumps at some of these emotional, stunning lines and scenes. AND THAT TWIST. HOLY WOW. I DID NOT SEE THAT COMING. I'm so thrilled (ha? get it? hahaha ok sorry) that this book will soon be out in the world. Prepare to decease with me, world. ACE OF SPADES will knock your socks off and force you to grapple with tough, complex, and incredibly important themes.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Marieke du Pré

    This YA is so, so powerful! It’s Black, it’s queer, it’s uncomfortable, it’s dark, it’s twisted and so fucked up until the very end. There are so many secrets. Terrifying incomplete memories. Nasty messages that put Devon and Chiamaka in the spotlights and make them spiraling out of control.

This story is a real gem, messages sent by Aces, first ugly but then getting more and more dangerous. Devon and Chiamaka are the only Black students at Niveus. Devon is gay and doesn’t want to stand out, bu This YA is so, so powerful! It’s Black, it’s queer, it’s uncomfortable, it’s dark, it’s twisted and so fucked up until the very end. There are so many secrets. Terrifying incomplete memories. Nasty messages that put Devon and Chiamaka in the spotlights and make them spiraling out of control.

This story is a real gem, messages sent by Aces, first ugly but then getting more and more dangerous. Devon and Chiamaka are the only Black students at Niveus. Devon is gay and doesn’t want to stand out, but he does as he gets outed by Aces' text. Chiamaka is at the top of the hierarchy as Head Prefect. And she will do anything to stay there. But then Aces put her in other spotlights, and her world is spiraling out of control. And this is only the beginning. Aces are getting into people’s minds; it’s creepy and terrifying. And Devon and Chiamaka don’t know how to stop it ...

Devon is such a sweet and caring guy, trying to survive in the harsh world he’s living in, doing things he shouldn’t, to help his mom. Chiamaka seems arrogant, but all she does is survive; because she doesn’t want to be the other, not good enough. She wants to find her way into the world, to become a doctor.

Faridah’s writing is outstanding. She pulls the reader into the story and doesn’t let go. The story is captivating and keeps you on the edge of your seat. It doesn’t show which POV is talking; you just know. So well done! And she wrote this story at a very young age, she’s only 22, and Usborne Publishing pre-empted the story in 2018! I can only say: WOW, such a fantastic debut!

I received an ARC from Usborne Publishing and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  28. 4 out of 5

    cossette

    prior to ace of spades, no book has ever left me physically shaking from shock + awe. it's been an hour later, and i'm still thinking about this book and how absolutely brilliant it is. i had the highest of expectations for it, especially after seeing it being pitched as "dair but queer & platonic", "gossip girl meets get out" and it met every single one of them and more. just phenomenal. no words. but also many words. a full review will be on teatimelit.com at some point once i get my thoughts prior to ace of spades, no book has ever left me physically shaking from shock + awe. it's been an hour later, and i'm still thinking about this book and how absolutely brilliant it is. i had the highest of expectations for it, especially after seeing it being pitched as "dair but queer & platonic", "gossip girl meets get out" and it met every single one of them and more. just phenomenal. no words. but also many words. a full review will be on teatimelit.com at some point once i get my thoughts together but ohhhh my god. just. wow. i cannot wait for faridah's next book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dannii Elle

    Chiamaka is head girl at her elite private academy and isn't ashamed of who she had to stamp on to get there. Devon is a musical prodigy who makes it his daily mission to keep as low a profile as possible. These two had nothing in common, apart from being the only non-white individuals to attend their school. That was, until the arrival of Aces. Aces is an unknown entity targeting both Chiamaka and Devon by putting their past dark deeds on blast and revealing every private secrets to the rest of Chiamaka is head girl at her elite private academy and isn't ashamed of who she had to stamp on to get there. Devon is a musical prodigy who makes it his daily mission to keep as low a profile as possible. These two had nothing in common, apart from being the only non-white individuals to attend their school. That was, until the arrival of Aces. Aces is an unknown entity targeting both Chiamaka and Devon by putting their past dark deeds on blast and revealing every private secrets to the rest of the school. Their friendships are disintegrating, their grades are slipping, their dreams are crumbling, and their happiness is declining. They can either leave Aces to ruin them completely, or fight dirty and beat them at their own game. This novel started out like Gossip Girl and ended up like Get Out. I was interested enough in the onslaught of petty drama and teenage angst, that formed the primary focus, but became super engaged with the twisted second half. The direction of the novel completely altered and Àbíké-Íyímídé completely fooled her readers into expecting a well-worn trajectory, before delivering something far more chilling and entirely different. Despite my interest in the unearthed past secrets and solved current mysteries, it was the larger implications of this novel that so completely held my attention. The racial politics that Chiamaka and Devon had to navigate every single day was harrowing to read about. They were the minority in their elite school and were never allowed to forget it. Every aspect of their day was controlled by rules that supported their fellow white peers, from the hairstyles that were accepted to the esteem and allowances granted to heirs of the 'old money' families surrounding them. They had to fight harder just to get anywhere near the vicinity of the futures that were expected for their peers, and the colour of their skin was treated as a barrier to their success at every juncture. This was an interesting novel, in its own right, but its exposure of the systems, politics, history, and ideologies that support white skin were where its power lay. It was an unapologetic, emotional, and harrowing read, which also ensured it to be an unforgettable one. I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Thank you to the author, Faridah Àbíké-Íyímídé, and the publisher, Usborne Publishing, for this opportunity.

  30. 4 out of 5

    julianna ➹

    first of all, look at this joker card emoji this is very important because i did not know it existed until recently and it's very cool: 🃏 anyways, we (me, you, your mom) all thought i would rate this five stars and... expectations::: ACHIEVED!!! ”It sounds wild, I know, but racism is a spectrum and they all participate in it in some way. They don’t all have white hoods or call us mean things; I know that. But racism isn’t just about that-- it’s not about being nice or mean. Or good versus bad. I first of all, look at this joker card emoji this is very important because i did not know it existed until recently and it's very cool: 🃏 anyways, we (me, you, your mom) all thought i would rate this five stars and... expectations::: ACHIEVED!!! ”It sounds wild, I know, but racism is a spectrum and they all participate in it in some way. They don’t all have white hoods or call us mean things; I know that. But racism isn’t just about that-- it’s not about being nice or mean. Or good versus bad. It’s bigger than that. i guessed the plot twist pretty soon in, because i am not white, (and i feel like the tagline of this book kind of spoils it) but i am still rating this five stars because it was so good!! with the suspense!! and god that ending was just one of the most gratifying things in the universe i think that this book presents a pretty powerful message illuminating just how terrifying racism can be, particular for black people, because i feel like we often forget that the basis of racism is people (this includes all people of color) believing others are Literally Inferior than them because of how they look. like, believing they are scientifically and fundamentally different. and that kind of justification can serve to cause people to do some Pretty Bad Things! all in all, i recommend this book a lot (re: i rated this book five stars. but also i give out a lot of five stars...) especially if you're in a reading slump! v easy to read (view spoiler)[thank god we got a happy ending though. thank god. i was so terrified for a second (hide spoiler)] (i didn't fully read the synopsis so i was just like :o is this racism? they're the only two black students there and may was like... u idiot) buddy read with a hater // we are NOT going to talk about the way i saw a ton of hype for this book and confused it with one of my fav books ace of shades & i was just like huh!! when did they do a cover redesign!!

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