Hot Best Seller

Eye Can Write: A Memoir of a Child’s Silent Soul Emerging

Availability: Ready to download

Jonathan Bryan has severe cerebral palsy, a condition that makes him incapable of voluntary movement or speech. He was locked inside his own mind, aware of the outside world but unable to fully communicate with it until he found a way by using his eyes to laboriously choose individual letters, and through this make his thoughts known. In Eye Can Write, we read of his inten Jonathan Bryan has severe cerebral palsy, a condition that makes him incapable of voluntary movement or speech. He was locked inside his own mind, aware of the outside world but unable to fully communicate with it until he found a way by using his eyes to laboriously choose individual letters, and through this make his thoughts known. In Eye Can Write, we read of his intense passion for life, his mischievous sense of fun, his hopes, his fears, and what it's like to be him. This is a powerful book from an incredible young writer whose writing ability defies age or physical disability—a truly inspirational figure.


Compare

Jonathan Bryan has severe cerebral palsy, a condition that makes him incapable of voluntary movement or speech. He was locked inside his own mind, aware of the outside world but unable to fully communicate with it until he found a way by using his eyes to laboriously choose individual letters, and through this make his thoughts known. In Eye Can Write, we read of his inten Jonathan Bryan has severe cerebral palsy, a condition that makes him incapable of voluntary movement or speech. He was locked inside his own mind, aware of the outside world but unable to fully communicate with it until he found a way by using his eyes to laboriously choose individual letters, and through this make his thoughts known. In Eye Can Write, we read of his intense passion for life, his mischievous sense of fun, his hopes, his fears, and what it's like to be him. This is a powerful book from an incredible young writer whose writing ability defies age or physical disability—a truly inspirational figure.

30 review for Eye Can Write: A Memoir of a Child’s Silent Soul Emerging

  1. 4 out of 5

    Inderjit Sanghera

    We often take for granted our ability, even in the crudest sense of the word, to articulate how we feel about the world, to interact with our surroundings and discover the wonders of the world via art and literature. This ability was denied to Jonathan Bryan, who was born with cerebral palsy and for many years was consider incapable of expressing himself and, by extension, experience human emotions and who was seen via the prism of his disability rather than as a person. However, via a steadfast We often take for granted our ability, even in the crudest sense of the word, to articulate how we feel about the world, to interact with our surroundings and discover the wonders of the world via art and literature. This ability was denied to Jonathan Bryan, who was born with cerebral palsy and for many years was consider incapable of expressing himself and, by extension, experience human emotions and who was seen via the prism of his disability rather than as a person. However, via a steadfast mother and progressive educational methods and support mechanisms, Bryan is able to, via his eyes and an alphabet board is finally able to express his innermost emotions, his hopes and fears, his passion for literature and compassion for his family. Bryan is able to give a voice to those who previously didn't have one, who were seen as unfeeling and inarticulate due to their disability but who still had the same breadth and range of emotions as any other human beings. Combined with all of this is Bryan's laudable desire to reform special needs education and ensure everybody, irrespective of how the world perceives them due to their condition, is taught literacy as otherwise we will continue to deny disabled people the voice they so rightfully deserve. 

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I have known of Jonathan for quite a long time now as he lives in the next village to me and my children went to the same mainstream primary school that he attended one day a week. This book is a fascinating read and gives a real insight into the difficulties he faces on a daily basis (the chapters written by Chantal, his mum, are very moving), and how he has finally found his voice as an intelligent, highly articulate young man.

  3. 4 out of 5

    R.J. Amos

    This beautiful memoir should be read by anyone who has anything to do with disabled children, and anyone who reads, writes, or teaches. Basically, everyone could immeasurably benefit by reading this book. It is a gorgeous story told by a child with cerebral palsy about his journey to communication. It is not sentimental but it is very moving. And the poetry contained within is just gorgeous. If you have ever wondered, just for a second, what the life of a child with a severe disability is like, wh This beautiful memoir should be read by anyone who has anything to do with disabled children, and anyone who reads, writes, or teaches. Basically, everyone could immeasurably benefit by reading this book. It is a gorgeous story told by a child with cerebral palsy about his journey to communication. It is not sentimental but it is very moving. And the poetry contained within is just gorgeous. If you have ever wondered, just for a second, what the life of a child with a severe disability is like, what is going on inside their head, whether their life is worth living, this book will answer your questions decisively. I cannot recommend this book more highly.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Margaret Kazmierczak

    Are you trapped by your inability to see? How often have you looked at a person and only noticed the disability? In shame, I confess that this is me. I notice the wheelchair that speaks incapability And respond with an apology. Eyes stare back knowingly Looking at me with certainty Oceans are crossed by seeing beyond the deformity To a brain’s digestibility. Eye can write intelligently If you give me time to learn like every other child without differentiality. (Margaret Kazmierczak, inspired by Jonathon B Are you trapped by your inability to see? How often have you looked at a person and only noticed the disability? In shame, I confess that this is me. I notice the wheelchair that speaks incapability And respond with an apology. Eyes stare back knowingly Looking at me with certainty Oceans are crossed by seeing beyond the deformity To a brain’s digestibility. Eye can write intelligently If you give me time to learn like every other child without differentiality. (Margaret Kazmierczak, inspired by Jonathon Bryan) No one should be trapped Jonathan Bryan has broken free from his trapped world and shares with us his journey. He is an incredible young man of twelve years old. Along with his mother, they fight for Jonathan’s right to be heard, to be taught reading, writing, spelling and maths. Outwardly his body looks too damaged to be educated in a mainstream school. Inwardly Jonathon has an incredible mind. Unlike Stephen Hawkins who already had access to regular schooling before his illness took hold of his body and had shown his intelligence, Jonathon has no such claim to fame. A determined hero I am so glad Jonathan and his family have put pen to paper. Yes, it was a painstakingly slow process using a spelling board, but we need to know and see that disability does not stop the brain from wanting to learn. And we should not see the broken body as an excuse to refuse proper education to creative minds that are trapped within. And what a mother - an unsung hero behind Jonathon who deserves an accolade too. Don't look at the disability see the potential Jonathan’s book has the potential to change mindsets. To challenge the norm. How many other children and adults are trapped in a system that disregards and dismisses the disabled their rights. Why should only the likes of Stephen Hawkins have centre stage when Jonathan Bryan has lived in his silent world since he was born. Who ought to read Eye Can Write This book is brilliant especially as it is the voice of a twelve-year-old. It is intelligent, well written and has beautiful poetry as chapter openings. All educators of special needs and mainstream schools as well and professionals involved with the care of disabled children ought to read  this book. We must all champion their cause. If we don’t then, we are failing the geniuses of the future who could change our world. Let's hear from Jonathan as no words speak louder than the authors. "All my life, people have done things for me. I am washed, dressed, fed via a tube and wheeled around. Now I have found my voice, I want to use it to help other children to read and write so that they can communicate with the world. My body is weak, but my desire to make a difference for children like me is very strong." Thank you, Jonathan, for writing this inspirational book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Amy Brydon Jones

    What an incredible story of courage and giving a voice to the voiceless. There were many times whilst reading that I shed some tears. Jonathan’s story is not unique, and many children who are mislabelled as PMLD will have experienced the same as him. This book is a reminder to me as a trainee teacher that every child regardless of their label or disability deserves a literacy education. Well done Jonathan!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Faith Spinks

    Jonathan is loving, funny, clever, passionate and determined young boy, who also happens to have cerebral palsey and is unable to speak or communicate, or in fact do much for himself. But he hasn't let that get in his way! Jonathan's story, told by his mum and then by himself is a testament to the courage this boy has and the love of his brave family. It is in turn a beautiful story of victory and championing by Jonathan, at the same time as a heartbreaking reflection on an education system whic Jonathan is loving, funny, clever, passionate and determined young boy, who also happens to have cerebral palsey and is unable to speak or communicate, or in fact do much for himself. But he hasn't let that get in his way! Jonathan's story, told by his mum and then by himself is a testament to the courage this boy has and the love of his brave family. It is in turn a beautiful story of victory and championing by Jonathan, at the same time as a heartbreaking reflection on an education system which doesn't always take the time to really see and unlock the potential of many children who already have so much stacked against them. I know there are many special education teachers who go above and beyond but in a system where it seems that children's academic level can be based purely on their physical limitations. "Give the spelling to more people"... giving the final words of the book to his friend Will is a perfect summary of all that Jonathan is determined to champion for all those who, like he once was, have no voice of their own.

  7. 4 out of 5

    maggie waugh

    Truly Amazing It challenges our perception of what is inside a body which doesn't conform to a "normal boy" I particularly like the fact that we see photographs of him and the rest of his truly amazing family. I will try to encourage friends to read it too. Truly Amazing It challenges our perception of what is inside a body which doesn't conform to a "normal boy" I particularly like the fact that we see photographs of him and the rest of his truly amazing family. I will try to encourage friends to read it too.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jan

    Appearances are deceiving. Don't judge the person by the wheelchair or other visible disabilities, especially when that person is a child. Don't limit them to YOUR expectations! An auto accident, a detached placenta, an emergency birth, cerebral palsy, kidney failure, kidney transplant, multiple admissions to ICU, needing oxygen forever, meeting Jesus in the garden, Locked in Syndrome, needing to communicate, learning to read, bringing the message that all need to be taught to the maximum of the Appearances are deceiving. Don't judge the person by the wheelchair or other visible disabilities, especially when that person is a child. Don't limit them to YOUR expectations! An auto accident, a detached placenta, an emergency birth, cerebral palsy, kidney failure, kidney transplant, multiple admissions to ICU, needing oxygen forever, meeting Jesus in the garden, Locked in Syndrome, needing to communicate, learning to read, bringing the message that all need to be taught to the maximum of their abilities not the minimum. Jon has lived through all of this and much more, but he is ever forward thinking and has written this book at the age of 12 ! Buy it, read it, talk about it!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sarah-Jayne Windridge-France

    WOW! One of the most poignant and 'special' books I've read in a very long time. I was passed this book by a PA/Carer of my son's who knew of Jonathan Bryan from a teacher who knew him. I started the book in earnest and literally read the whole book in a few hours ... only taking stock to give my tear ducts a break and to let my emotions settle. As a mother of a young man with profound medical and complex special needs, a wheelchair user and someone who is pre-verbal ... the one thing that I took aw WOW! One of the most poignant and 'special' books I've read in a very long time. I was passed this book by a PA/Carer of my son's who knew of Jonathan Bryan from a teacher who knew him. I started the book in earnest and literally read the whole book in a few hours ... only taking stock to give my tear ducts a break and to let my emotions settle. As a mother of a young man with profound medical and complex special needs, a wheelchair user and someone who is pre-verbal ... the one thing that I took away from this book was guilt. I love my son, unconditionally, he is now my life's work and to say we've been through a lot is an understatement. The first half of the book could have been written by me, so many similarities, so many hospital visits and 'near death experiences' and shall we say 'new starts!' Every time my son had a big upheaval in his health, spent any time away from school, or in hospital, it meant/means retracing his steps, re-learning some simple skills and re-building all the securities that are lost. My son is nearing his 18th birthday ... yet at 5 years old was pretty much 'written off!' Your son's understanding is minimal, he will never speak, 'he has the mental age of a 9-12 month old infant' are the words that resonate again and again... but, as his mother and the one that spends the most time in his company, caring, feeding, nursing, educating and loving him with every fibre of my being, I know that there is more going on inside his head than anyone gives him credit for. He knows things - the smirks, the knowing smiles, the tell tale side-glances, and being in his constant presence tell me that. My biggest fear, my biggest regret and my biggest question is why hasn't my son been given the same opportunities, and is it now too late? Jonathan has overcome such a huge obstacle in his path and as a mother of a son with special needs, I am so ridiculously proud of what he has achieved and the questions he has posed ... but there is also, I cannot lie, a hint of underlying jealousy - that I'm hoping will spur me on to seek out and to challenge what indeed resides inside my own son's head. If I can ever manage to unlock even a hint of what he wants me to know then I am most definitely winning. For me this book is not over. Thank you Jonathan, for opening my eyes, my heart and unleashing a ferocity of 'questions' that only a special needs mother will fight tooth and nail to get answered.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Katie Mote

    Such a powerful and moving story about Jonathans life. It shows the importance of communication and how we need to be not settling for things we already do, but look and think about other ways in which we can approach learning. Look at children as individuals and think about what works for them, encouraging everyone to find their voice. Thank you Jonathan for being so honest and it was a privilege to meet you at Oxford Brookes

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sally O'Loughlin

    What a challenge and encouragement!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jo

    This is an astonishing and wonderful account of a young man about whom there is so much more than might be assumed based on appearances. His faith, his intelligence and his love for others all shine out of the pages of this short book which should be read by all!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Becca

    Fully recommend, very inspiring

  14. 4 out of 5

    J.A. Evans

    Amazing Eye Opener A book everyone should read. My God daughter has a parallel condition and limits to Jonathan . We e mail all the time using the eye control. She lived independently with 24 hour care. This book is an absolute revelation to me both from her parents' point of view and anxieties and their daughter's. I can only say thank you. I am so glad both parents' and daughter share Jonathan's faith. Amazing Eye Opener A book everyone should read. My God daughter has a parallel condition and limits to Jonathan . We e mail all the time using the eye control. She lived independently with 24 hour care. This book is an absolute revelation to me both from her parents' point of view and anxieties and their daughter's. I can only say thank you. I am so glad both parents' and daughter share Jonathan's faith.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mrs Rachel

    Wow! What an inspirational book. I haven't been gripped by a book like this in a long time. Jonathan has a gift with words to communicate an important message of the importance to teach ALL children regardless of their disability. Well worth reading. Short but profound. . A great gift. Wow! What an inspirational book. I haven't been gripped by a book like this in a long time. Jonathan has a gift with words to communicate an important message of the importance to teach ALL children regardless of their disability. Well worth reading. Short but profound. . A great gift.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mrs S M Tyrwhitt

    Amazing biography An amazing biography to read. Helps those of us who have so much to appreciate the gift we have. His selfless spirit and deep faith come through every page. I pray that those with the power will listen to his message and enable others to find their voice.

  17. 4 out of 5

    SRH

    Phenomenal, eye-opening and challenging This book should be read by everyone, particularly those in education. It is wonderful that because of Jonathan, those trapped in their own minds can speak for themselves and people will start to listen.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Cathy

    Wow, this book should be essential reading for anyone in the medical profession, education or social care. Jonathan writes beautifully about his life and illness. I will be reading this again before sharing it far and wide. Fantastic

  19. 4 out of 5

    S.J. Higbee

    Jonathan Bryan has severe cerebral palsy, a condition that makes him incapable of speech or voluntary movement. He was locked inside his own mind, aware of the outside world but unable to fully communicate with it until he found a way by using his eyes to laboriously choose individual letters, and through this make his thoughts known. I knew this was a special book, but was unprepared for the emotional impact. It is a book of two halves – the first part is written by Jonathan’s mother and charts Jonathan Bryan has severe cerebral palsy, a condition that makes him incapable of speech or voluntary movement. He was locked inside his own mind, aware of the outside world but unable to fully communicate with it until he found a way by using his eyes to laboriously choose individual letters, and through this make his thoughts known. I knew this was a special book, but was unprepared for the emotional impact. It is a book of two halves – the first part is written by Jonathan’s mother and charts the events leading up to the accident that caused Jonathan’s problems. The list of life-threatening difficulties he has endured is shockingly long, as is the number of medical interventions and trips to hospital he had needed. His gritted courage and determination were evident in the fact that he simply hung on in there and refused to die when the odds were stacked against him, time and time again. But what for me was a source of heartbreak and intense frustration was his treatment at the special school where he was simply being warehoused. It brought back far too many unhappy memories of another bright boy whose education was severely compromised because expectations about his ability were set far too low. This book is a testament to Jonathan’s own intelligence and passion, as well as a tribute to a mother who refused to listen to the experts and was guided instead by her own instincts about her son. She taught him to read and over time, they found a way to allow him to express himself, even though it is laborious. Jonathan’s own feelings about being trapped within his body without any way to express himself, while forced to watch the same TV programme designed for developing infants should be a wake-up call for everyone in Special Needs education. I very much hope the politicians he has met will take note of what he is saying and realise that while he is remarkable, there are probably many other children and adults with active, creative minds also trapped by their bodies. I’d like to think as a country we will take on board Jonathan’s plea that everyone should be taught to read and write, using all the technology available, unless it becomes apparent that it isn’t appropriate, which is not the case now. In the meantime, go and track this book down. It is an emotional read, but also very uplifting. Jonathan’s poetry will stay with me for a long time… 10/10

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tanya Marlow

    I absolutely loved this memoir as a unique and important book, and it has really stuck with me. You may already have heard of twelve-year-old Jonathan Bryan, as the '"locked-in" boy who learned to write with his eyes', as he's been featured on national TV and press as a remarkable writer, poet and campaigner. Born with severe cerebral palsy, incapable of controlling his movements, it was assumed that Jonathan had very little brain activity. However, his mother, Chantal, always believed that he was I absolutely loved this memoir as a unique and important book, and it has really stuck with me. You may already have heard of twelve-year-old Jonathan Bryan, as the '"locked-in" boy who learned to write with his eyes', as he's been featured on national TV and press as a remarkable writer, poet and campaigner. Born with severe cerebral palsy, incapable of controlling his movements, it was assumed that Jonathan had very little brain activity. However, his mother, Chantal, always believed that he was more alert than the doctors told her, and she persevered with teaching him the alphabet and basic words until they hit upon a system where he could learn to 'write' using an alphabet board and eye movements. What she discovered was astonishing: a clever, thoughtful, funny boy who was also a firm Christian, having encountered Jesus in visions. Jonathan's memoir was 'dictated' by him and transcribed by his mother in a painfully slow process, letter by letter. The world now has access to the inside of Jonathan’s mind, and we are the better for it. The first part of the book is written from his mother’s perspective, telling the story of his traumatic birth after a car accident, her battle with medics and schools to allow him access to learning. The remainder is Jonathan’s own reflections of his life. Jonathan's writing has its own mature voice, distinct from his mother’s, with an amazing range of vocabulary, consistent with those who have learnt to read before speaking. His poetry is remarkable and deeply moved me. Highly intelligent and with a poet’s soul, Jonathan's perspective on life and faith is unique and beautiful. I devoured the book and it’s one of my favourites from last year – I recommend it to everyone as a unique and important story, beautifully written. Buy it immediately.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Liz Wilson

    What words to use to describe this book? How do you begin, knowing that each word was painstakingly written letter by letter using the blinking of a boys eyes? Each word in this review seems somehow more important to take care over, to choose wisely, as a result. There is no doubt that Jonathan has a profound gift with words. The fact that his voice was silenced for so long is a travesty, but it is amazing that he had the support of a loving family and skilled professionals who helped him find i What words to use to describe this book? How do you begin, knowing that each word was painstakingly written letter by letter using the blinking of a boys eyes? Each word in this review seems somehow more important to take care over, to choose wisely, as a result. There is no doubt that Jonathan has a profound gift with words. The fact that his voice was silenced for so long is a travesty, but it is amazing that he had the support of a loving family and skilled professionals who helped him find it. I found some of the religious rhetoric a little uncomfortable, but I can appreciate that this accurately reflects the author’s views, if not my own. The story was broadly linear - articulating Johnathan's experience of the life events outlined by his mother in the Intro. The final chapter focuses on his charity work and impact in the education sector, which is so inspiring. Hearing how he felt when he met Michael Morpugo (who wrote the Foreword for the book) brought me to tears. Johnathan never outwardly condemns his special school or the education system, but the inference is clear that students with complex needs are being failed in the UK schooling system. His legacy, and that of this book, is hopefully that they will bring real and meaningful change to the system - they certainly showed me a whole new view of the world through hopeful and grateful eyes.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Sanders

    An outstanding book in every possible way. Jonathan Bryan not only has cerebral palsy but locked-in syndrome as well. He wrote his story using his eyes through a laborious but highly effective system that he learned with the help of his Mum and his carers. His brutal honesty caught me off balance more than once and I defy you to read the book without tears. Learning to communicate gave Jonathan wings and he uses them to great effect. his story is humbling, unnerving and poignant. His evocative po An outstanding book in every possible way. Jonathan Bryan not only has cerebral palsy but locked-in syndrome as well. He wrote his story using his eyes through a laborious but highly effective system that he learned with the help of his Mum and his carers. His brutal honesty caught me off balance more than once and I defy you to read the book without tears. Learning to communicate gave Jonathan wings and he uses them to great effect. his story is humbling, unnerving and poignant. His evocative poetry is nothing short of beautiful. I finished it with huge admiration for his whole family who are obviously very close, but with absolute astonishment at the level of care and commitment of his Mum (who wrote the first half of the book) through all the years of fighting for him, spending time teaching him, reading books to feed his imagination and encouraging him even in a system which put a lid on the expectations of his learning very early on. His 'conversation' with the Head teacher at his special needs school is an excoriating and unnerving one which caused me to wonder how much help those with special needs really receive as uniquely created individuals.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Summer

    Went to a conference at uni. This talk was emphasising how students can be mislabelled -difficult access to learning does not correlate with the child's ability level. Aim of talk: increasing awareness of the moral obligation to increase access to learning e.g. through the use of technology and students with difficulties accessing their learning to have additional support from trained teachers. Short read, very interesting. Such a courageous child. I was expecting the entire book to be written by J Went to a conference at uni. This talk was emphasising how students can be mislabelled -difficult access to learning does not correlate with the child's ability level. Aim of talk: increasing awareness of the moral obligation to increase access to learning e.g. through the use of technology and students with difficulties accessing their learning to have additional support from trained teachers. Short read, very interesting. Such a courageous child. I was expecting the entire book to be written by Jonathan, but most of it was written by the mother - apart from the ending. The story told about the car accident, conception and early life of Jonathan... it was compelling to hear the story from the perspective of the mother, of the challenges she faced... and how Jonathan was underestimated and mislabelled, how this affected him and effects others.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Penelope

    This book tells a stunning story of bravery, battles and brilliance. It is a very powerful story, of a young boy locked within a disabled body and how, with the help of his mother in particular, discovers a way to communicate and to tell of his amazing achievement. My 10 year old granddaughter has just read it and has responded to what she read; it's easy enough for her to read yet with a profound and momentous message which all can understand. What an amazing way for her to lean about what disa This book tells a stunning story of bravery, battles and brilliance. It is a very powerful story, of a young boy locked within a disabled body and how, with the help of his mother in particular, discovers a way to communicate and to tell of his amazing achievement. My 10 year old granddaughter has just read it and has responded to what she read; it's easy enough for her to read yet with a profound and momentous message which all can understand. What an amazing way for her to lean about what disability is like from the inside, and the attitudes towards those with disability and what can be done to help. So it's a book for a wide variety of ages, a book to read and to re-read in order to fully understand the pain and the determination and the encouragement contained within it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This book refreshed my soul. For anybody who knows anyone who is differently abled (surely, that means everyone), this book is a must read. A friend shared about this book to me and I purchased it the next day. I finished it in two days because I couldn’t seem to put it down. The way Jonathan threaded together heartache, poems, hope, memoir and advocacy is incredible. I still sit here speechless that he wrote this book with his eyes as his voice. Jonathan is inspiring, articulate, a poet and ena This book refreshed my soul. For anybody who knows anyone who is differently abled (surely, that means everyone), this book is a must read. A friend shared about this book to me and I purchased it the next day. I finished it in two days because I couldn’t seem to put it down. The way Jonathan threaded together heartache, poems, hope, memoir and advocacy is incredible. I still sit here speechless that he wrote this book with his eyes as his voice. Jonathan is inspiring, articulate, a poet and enabled me to catch a glimpse of what it might be like to live in someone else’s story. We truly cannot underestimate, devalue or deem something impossible no matter a person’s physical, neurological, vocal, etc abilities. Wow.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    Eye Can Write A memoir of a child’s silent soul emerging by Jonathan Bryan I was having a conversation with a small group of people, when one of them put a book into my hand without saying anything. I had heard of the book and thought I’d like to read it. It didn’t take long, because the print was a good size and the story was gripping. It is a truly inspirational book. I recommended it to hubby, who was more reluctant to read it because of the subject-matter. However, he is also finding it very Eye Can Write A memoir of a child’s silent soul emerging by Jonathan Bryan I was having a conversation with a small group of people, when one of them put a book into my hand without saying anything. I had heard of the book and thought I’d like to read it. It didn’t take long, because the print was a good size and the story was gripping. It is a truly inspirational book. I recommended it to hubby, who was more reluctant to read it because of the subject-matter. However, he is also finding it very interesting. Profits from the book go to a charity to help disabled youngsters access a proper education. This book could be described as an antidote to Me Before You by Jo Jo Moyes.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Elissa

    What a read! I had to stop reading in public places because I was constantly holding back tears. Jonathan’s talent is evident and I loved how his passion for every child to learn to read and write came through in this work. To Jonathan if you ever read this: To strengthen your voice work on narrowing down your choice words. While your vocabulary is extensive your audience will be impacted more by one well placed word than by many. Also I hope your next book is written entirely by you. I sped-rea What a read! I had to stop reading in public places because I was constantly holding back tears. Jonathan’s talent is evident and I loved how his passion for every child to learn to read and write came through in this work. To Jonathan if you ever read this: To strengthen your voice work on narrowing down your choice words. While your vocabulary is extensive your audience will be impacted more by one well placed word than by many. Also I hope your next book is written entirely by you. I sped-read Through your Mom’s first chapters trying to get to your story. And I certainly hope that any of your editor or publishers would be supportive of a short but poignant story of your own! 😁

  28. 4 out of 5

    Darla

    A story of miracles I read Jonathan’s story for a selfish reason. My grandchild is also locked inside, nonverbal because she has Rett Syndrome. I know she’s in there, but the efforts to help her have been frustrating and disappointing so far. Jonathan’s story gives us encouragement to keep trying, and to search out options to help her unlock her cage. He and his family are courageous and inspire people like my family to not give up. The book is beautifully written, speaks of a selfless, brave you A story of miracles I read Jonathan’s story for a selfish reason. My grandchild is also locked inside, nonverbal because she has Rett Syndrome. I know she’s in there, but the efforts to help her have been frustrating and disappointing so far. Jonathan’s story gives us encouragement to keep trying, and to search out options to help her unlock her cage. He and his family are courageous and inspire people like my family to not give up. The book is beautifully written, speaks of a selfless, brave young boy who writes better than many accomplished adults.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Bridcut

    This is a memoir written by a 12 year old boy, who has cerebral palsy and is non-verbal, and by his mother. It starts before Jonathan's birth and Chantal tells his story up until the point where a means is found by which Jonathan can communicate in words by using a spelling board and his eyes. After that Jonathan takes up the story himself, with one further chapter by his Mum. Jonathan loves words and particularly loves poetry which allows him to express himself succinctly (while spelling out wo This is a memoir written by a 12 year old boy, who has cerebral palsy and is non-verbal, and by his mother. It starts before Jonathan's birth and Chantal tells his story up until the point where a means is found by which Jonathan can communicate in words by using a spelling board and his eyes. After that Jonathan takes up the story himself, with one further chapter by his Mum. Jonathan loves words and particularly loves poetry which allows him to express himself succinctly (while spelling out words liberates him it is also very time consuming) and that makes this book a pleasure to read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Gosia Maria

    I was in tears several times reading this book. The story in his words of how Jonathan was, at age 9, finally able to communicate and write is touching, tender and extremely powerful. The saddest part was the description of the "special school" and how instead of giving disabled children an actual voice, it treats them like babies and takes away any dignity. His work with Teach Us Too was incredible. Most powerful was the thread of how Jonathan lives in the hope of the Lord Jesus Christ, and how I was in tears several times reading this book. The story in his words of how Jonathan was, at age 9, finally able to communicate and write is touching, tender and extremely powerful. The saddest part was the description of the "special school" and how instead of giving disabled children an actual voice, it treats them like babies and takes away any dignity. His work with Teach Us Too was incredible. Most powerful was the thread of how Jonathan lives in the hope of the Lord Jesus Christ, and how his life has purpose and dignity because God has given it to him.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.