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The Legend of Auntie Po

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Part historical fiction, part magical realism, and 100 percent adventure. Thirteen-year-old Mei reimagines the myths of Paul Bunyan as starring a Chinese heroine while she works in a Sierra Nevada logging camp in 1885. Aware of the racial tumult in the years after the passage of the Chinese Exclusion Act, Mei tries to remain blissfully focused on her job, her close friendsh Part historical fiction, part magical realism, and 100 percent adventure. Thirteen-year-old Mei reimagines the myths of Paul Bunyan as starring a Chinese heroine while she works in a Sierra Nevada logging camp in 1885. Aware of the racial tumult in the years after the passage of the Chinese Exclusion Act, Mei tries to remain blissfully focused on her job, her close friendship with the camp foreman's daughter, and telling stories about Paul Bunyan--reinvented as Po Pan Yin (Auntie Po), an elderly Chinese matriarch. Anchoring herself with stories of Auntie Po, Mei navigates the difficulty and politics of lumber camp work and her growing romantic feelings for her friend Bee. The Legend of Auntie Po is about who gets to own a myth, and about immigrant families and communities holding on to rituals and traditions while staking out their own place in America.


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Part historical fiction, part magical realism, and 100 percent adventure. Thirteen-year-old Mei reimagines the myths of Paul Bunyan as starring a Chinese heroine while she works in a Sierra Nevada logging camp in 1885. Aware of the racial tumult in the years after the passage of the Chinese Exclusion Act, Mei tries to remain blissfully focused on her job, her close friendsh Part historical fiction, part magical realism, and 100 percent adventure. Thirteen-year-old Mei reimagines the myths of Paul Bunyan as starring a Chinese heroine while she works in a Sierra Nevada logging camp in 1885. Aware of the racial tumult in the years after the passage of the Chinese Exclusion Act, Mei tries to remain blissfully focused on her job, her close friendship with the camp foreman's daughter, and telling stories about Paul Bunyan--reinvented as Po Pan Yin (Auntie Po), an elderly Chinese matriarch. Anchoring herself with stories of Auntie Po, Mei navigates the difficulty and politics of lumber camp work and her growing romantic feelings for her friend Bee. The Legend of Auntie Po is about who gets to own a myth, and about immigrant families and communities holding on to rituals and traditions while staking out their own place in America.

30 review for The Legend of Auntie Po

  1. 5 out of 5

    Danika at The Lesbrary

    This is a quiet, almost slice-of-life graphic novel about a 13-year-old queer Chinese American girl's life at a logging camp. Mei is the daughter of the camp cook, and she helps out in the kitchen and spends her free time spinning yarns for the other children in camp--especially about Po Pan Yin, or Auntie Po, a Chinese American matriarchal version of Paul Bunyan. She is best friends with (and obviously has a crush on) Bee, the foreman's daughter. In the background, though, is the constant hum o This is a quiet, almost slice-of-life graphic novel about a 13-year-old queer Chinese American girl's life at a logging camp. Mei is the daughter of the camp cook, and she helps out in the kitchen and spends her free time spinning yarns for the other children in camp--especially about Po Pan Yin, or Auntie Po, a Chinese American matriarchal version of Paul Bunyan. She is best friends with (and obviously has a crush on) Bee, the foreman's daughter. In the background, though, is the constant hum of anti-Asian racism. The Chinese workers eat separately from other workers. A sawmill that employed Chinese workers is burned down. Mei is keenly aware that she's losing something: she no longer prays, she doesn't know her grandparents, and her Cantonese is rusty. She is caught between traditions she feels disconnected with and an American culture that doesn't accept her. Auntie Po is the bridge between them: a blending of cultures and a way of adapting tradition to make it relevant. Full review at the Lesbrary.

  2. 5 out of 5

    aqilahreads

    the story focuses on mei, a 13yo queer chinese-american girl’s life at a logging camp in 1885. mei helps out in the kitchen a lot; being the daughter of the camp cook. when theres time, she shares tales about auntie po - a chinese american matriarch with a blue ox - with people at camp. she eventually became best friends with the foreman’s daughter named bee whom she also has a crush on. i particularly enjoyed reading this because of its exploration in friendships across racial/economic differen the story focuses on mei, a 13yo queer chinese-american girl’s life at a logging camp in 1885. mei helps out in the kitchen a lot; being the daughter of the camp cook. when theres time, she shares tales about auntie po - a chinese american matriarch with a blue ox - with people at camp. she eventually became best friends with the foreman’s daughter named bee whom she also has a crush on. i particularly enjoyed reading this because of its exploration in friendships across racial/economic differences. the watercolour art is nice to look at too, cant help but to admire & appreciate! i dont know if im expecting too much but as a reader who is not really knowledgeable about the historical event mentioned ((chinese exclusion act)), i just wish theres more information about its historical background - probably just a little sharing in the foreword/afterword. as for the queer content, its not really obvious but was mentioned in the author's note. this is apparently under YA section and i am not too sure if this would appeal to alot of readers but definitely would make a great conversation starter as its a topic that not a lot of authors would tackle. overall, it was a decent read - looks like its gonna be a lengthy read but its actually pretty quick!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Vianne

    oh this was so lovely and precious I mean, it's a historical magical realism graphic novel following a queer Chinese-American girl that features friendships, myth retellings, and ~immigrant feels.~ I mean, if that doesn't hit all of my buzzwords. There were so many things I loved about this book. From the delicate way it handled historical racism toward Chinese-Americans, to the way it reimagined the tale of Paul Bunyan as an old Asian woman. Mei was such an incredible protagonist who was strong a oh this was so lovely and precious I mean, it's a historical magical realism graphic novel following a queer Chinese-American girl that features friendships, myth retellings, and ~immigrant feels.~ I mean, if that doesn't hit all of my buzzwords. There were so many things I loved about this book. From the delicate way it handled historical racism toward Chinese-Americans, to the way it reimagined the tale of Paul Bunyan as an old Asian woman. Mei was such an incredible protagonist who was strong and also caring, and I loved the relationships she had with her dad and Bee. The art style and colouring were also really nice in an almost nostalgic way that reminded me of the picture books I grew up with, and overall it just made the tone and vibe of this book so incredibly comforting. My heart is full.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nat

    any review will tell you this graphic novel is a heartfelt slice of reclaimed history, so I'm just going to plug Shing Yin Khor's other projects—their installation art, keepsake games, and delightful patreon mail are such joyful oddballs! any review will tell you this graphic novel is a heartfelt slice of reclaimed history, so I'm just going to plug Shing Yin Khor's other projects—their installation art, keepsake games, and delightful patreon mail are such joyful oddballs!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    A well-written historical fiction hides how much research went into creating it. Good historical fiction takes the elements and weaves them seamlessly, so you don’t know what happened, and what might have happened. The Legend of Antie Po is one such book. The research for this book must have been amazing, especially all the parts that went into a logging camp, along with who was there, and what their jobs were, and what their equipment was. Amazing story. I swallowed in one big gulp. I love Aunt A well-written historical fiction hides how much research went into creating it. Good historical fiction takes the elements and weaves them seamlessly, so you don’t know what happened, and what might have happened. The Legend of Antie Po is one such book. The research for this book must have been amazing, especially all the parts that went into a logging camp, along with who was there, and what their jobs were, and what their equipment was. Amazing story. I swallowed in one big gulp. I love Auntie Po, the Chinese Auntie who rivaled Paul Bonyon. I loved that Mei could see her, but the white people, the white adults could not. I loved how her legend was woven into the story. Mei is queer, in love, as a 13 year old, with Bee, the white foreman’s daughter. Bt Bee has dreams that do not involve Mei, opportunities because she is white, that Mei may never have. The story takes place in 1885,in the Sierra Nevadas, after the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, after the gold rush, when the hatred against Chinese is so bad that whole Chinatowns are being burnt down. Not wanting to give too much away, because you really have to read the book without much more background then I have given you above, to get the full impact. There was a point where I had to look up The Log Driver’s Waltz song, because log driving was happening. Having had to research around that period myself, for my historical fiction, it is amazing how much is a) not taught in schools about the Chinese in America, and b) how much still is not known. Unlike many cultures, there is not as much left by the Chinese themselves. No first hand accounts of working on the railroad. Most were written by the white men amongst them. So, go out and buy or borrow the book, right now. Highly, highly recommended.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    The middle grade graphic novel has a lot of heart. A Chinese American girl whose father and her face discrimination in the logging camps in the Sierra Nevadas but whose connection with a white family who runs the logging camp brings in a historical element of prejudice and discrimination as the Chinese Exclusion Act came into being but also about the dangers of the expansion of the west particularly with logging but also a sense of community and belonging and finding your dreams whatever they ma The middle grade graphic novel has a lot of heart. A Chinese American girl whose father and her face discrimination in the logging camps in the Sierra Nevadas but whose connection with a white family who runs the logging camp brings in a historical element of prejudice and discrimination as the Chinese Exclusion Act came into being but also about the dangers of the expansion of the west particularly with logging but also a sense of community and belonging and finding your dreams whatever they may be. Interspersed is an organized few magical elements of a Paul Bunyan-like Aunti Po and her blue oxen. It's a little less sophisticated in integration than The Magic Fish, but it has the elements of deep thoughtfulness and understanding. And I enjoyed the watercolor colors of the graphic novel (as well as the font choice-- not a typical font yet easy to read and it worked with the 'paintbrush' style of the art)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Danielle T

    A middle grade graphic novel featuring a queer Chinese girl cook in a logging camp, yes please- this has been on my radar for a while, and I'm so glad to have it in my hands. The watercolors are vivid, and Mei & Bee's friendship is so lovely. Though written for a middle-grade audience, it doesn't shy away from the tension and threat of violence Chinese in America faced in the Exclusion era (this takes place in 1885-6, so the early years but before people knew it was going to last for another 60 A middle grade graphic novel featuring a queer Chinese girl cook in a logging camp, yes please- this has been on my radar for a while, and I'm so glad to have it in my hands. The watercolors are vivid, and Mei & Bee's friendship is so lovely. Though written for a middle-grade audience, it doesn't shy away from the tension and threat of violence Chinese in America faced in the Exclusion era (this takes place in 1885-6, so the early years but before people knew it was going to last for another 60 years). I also really want pie now.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cy

    great story about an oft-overlooked and undertaught part of u.s. history. there was a lot happening in this book, and i feel like it could have been longer to explore the themes a little deeper and give the reader more time to digest them. i've been thinking about it a lot after reading. great story about an oft-overlooked and undertaught part of u.s. history. there was a lot happening in this book, and i feel like it could have been longer to explore the themes a little deeper and give the reader more time to digest them. i've been thinking about it a lot after reading.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Carmen

    It was not always easy to find information about the history of Chinese immigrant communities in North America, much less in contemporary fiction and graphic novels. When I first read the synopsis of The Legend of Auntie Po, I knew that I needed to add it to my reading list. Thank you to Penguin Random House Canada for the gifted copy. Mei is a young Chinese girl who lives on a Sierra Nevada logging camp in the 1880s with her father, who cooks for the logging crew. As Mei navigates her friendshi It was not always easy to find information about the history of Chinese immigrant communities in North America, much less in contemporary fiction and graphic novels. When I first read the synopsis of The Legend of Auntie Po, I knew that I needed to add it to my reading list. Thank you to Penguin Random House Canada for the gifted copy. Mei is a young Chinese girl who lives on a Sierra Nevada logging camp in the 1880s with her father, who cooks for the logging crew. As Mei navigates her friendship with the camp foreman’s daughter and her aspiring (and impossible) dreams, the Chinese Exclusion Act changes things at the logging camp. While the Chinese workers have never been treated fairly or equally, things get even worse when her father is fired and there are racist and violent attacks against those in Mei’s community. Mei finds comfort and support in the stories she tells about Auntie Po, a legendary elderly Chinese matriarch who can protect her and those around her. This is a story about family, friendship, doing what’s right, and the resilience of the immigrant communities in America. I connected with Mei through her experiences and challenges as growing up as a minority. My own family’s history and story of arriving in Canada is also one of hardship and systemic racism. The resilience and determination of Mei, her father, and her friends are a sign of hope for all of us who come from these immigrant communities who contributed to North America’s history. These stories are important, not just for those within our own communities, but for the general population to see how vital immigrant communities have always been. TW: Racism, racial slurs, violence, death, xenophobia

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus In 1885, Mei Hao lives with her father, who is a cook for a logging camp in California run by Mr. Andersen. Because Mei and her father are Chinese, there is a lot of prejudice against them, even though Mr. Andersen thinks of them as "family". Sometimes, this is true. Mei is best friends with Bee, and the two often plan their futures together. Since Mei has a crush on Bee, she has conflicted feelings when Mei talks about getting married and prefers the scenario whe E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus In 1885, Mei Hao lives with her father, who is a cook for a logging camp in California run by Mr. Andersen. Because Mei and her father are Chinese, there is a lot of prejudice against them, even though Mr. Andersen thinks of them as "family". Sometimes, this is true. Mei is best friends with Bee, and the two often plan their futures together. Since Mei has a crush on Bee, she has conflicted feelings when Mei talks about getting married and prefers the scenario where the two move to the city and run a pie shop together. In other ways, the differences are clear. The Chinese loggers are fed separately from the white loggers, Mei is not paid, and the treatment of Chinese workers is not equal. There are also a few black workers, who hold a place somewhere in between. Mr. Andersen hires his brother to "help" in the kitchen, which Mr. Hao doesn't particularly like, although he keeps silent, and when the people who own the camp complain, Mr. Hao and his Chinese assistant are both fired. The food is awful, and the white men in the camp eventually approach Mei to help feed them, and go to Mr. Andersen with their complaints. Mei is known for telling stories to keep the children happy, and has told many stories about Auntie Po, a Paul Bunyan-like character who also has an ox, and who takes care of the miners. As the tensions in camp worsen, Mei begins to think that she actually sees Auntie Po. This happens more often when tragedy occurs in Bee's family, and the whole logging camp struggles to deal with this event. In the aftermath, Mr. Andersen starts to realize how badly he has treated the Chinese miners, and especially the Hao's, and tries to make amends. Strengths: This was a great historical story with a unique spin on the Paul Bunyan tales. Reimagining them with a Chinese Auntie makes perfect sense, since folklore is always adapted to fit different cultures. The information about logging camps is well researched and informative. Mei does not have a lot of hope for her future at the beginning of the story, but it is good to see that by the end, there are other options for her. The LGBTQIA+ representation is not a large part of the story, but it's nice to see it represented in a historical context. Certainly, there were "Boston marriages" (a term in use around this time) even on the west coast! Mr. Andersen's portrayal as someone who thought he was progressive for the time but who still didn't treat his employees equally in interestingly done. The story moves along quickly. Weaknesses: This was such an intriguing piece of history that I wished it wasn't a graphic novel, so I could have gotten more information! I also spent a lot of time trying to understand the color palette and being confused by Auntie Po's bright pink shirt. On the bright side, this kept me from being obsessed with the noses, which is usually how I interact with graphic novels, which are just not my cup of tea. What I really think: This was a really interesting story; I just wanted more information! A great addition to a slowly growing collection of graphic novels with cultural connections.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    In this delightful graphic novel thirteen-year-old Mei bakes scrumptious pies and helps her father, the camp cook, at a Sierra Nevada lumber camp in 1885. Mei is a gifted storyteller, and she puts all her powers at work in spinning a series of tales for herself and the youngsters in the camp about Auntie Po, a much-larger-than-life figure reminiscent of the mighty Paul Bunyan. Auntie Po is strong, powerful, and able to move the large trees in the area without breaking a sweat. Mei is smart and d In this delightful graphic novel thirteen-year-old Mei bakes scrumptious pies and helps her father, the camp cook, at a Sierra Nevada lumber camp in 1885. Mei is a gifted storyteller, and she puts all her powers at work in spinning a series of tales for herself and the youngsters in the camp about Auntie Po, a much-larger-than-life figure reminiscent of the mighty Paul Bunyan. Auntie Po is strong, powerful, and able to move the large trees in the area without breaking a sweat. Mei is smart and dreams of attending a university someday although she knows the likelihood of her being able to do so is slim. She is also close to Bee, the daughter of the lumber company's foreman, and has romantic feelings for her. The two girls have conversations about love, marriage, and the future, but Bee never seems to get a clue that Mei loves her. Racial tensions and anti-Chinese sentiment swirl in town and touch the camp as well, and Hels Anderson, the foreman, is forced to fire Mei's father. He regrets his actions and rehires him, but Hao has a few conditions before agreeing to return. And Anderson begins to embrace parts of Chinese culture as he realizes the value of his cook. The text and color-filled illustrations effectively depict the rugged life at a lumber camp, complete with tragedies and small moments of happiness. While I'm not sure I could completely buy the transformation of Mr. Anderson, the book touched me, reminding me that stories can save us and offer hope and explanations for why certain things happen. And the story spinner herself realizes that as much as she might wish it to be so, her story and Bee's will play out quite differently. Fans of folklore or stories of the Wild West will find this graphic novel well worth their time.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tasha

    The Paul Bunyan myth gets transformed by a young Chinese-American girl growing up in the logging camps in this graphic novel. Mei shares her stories about Auntie Po just as freely as she shares her stellar pies. She is the daughter of the camp cook and helps out her father in the kitchen. The manager of the camp loves her pies and is friends with her father, but that only goes so far. The Chinese men logging are fed separately. When her father is fired, Mei is left behind at the camp with her be The Paul Bunyan myth gets transformed by a young Chinese-American girl growing up in the logging camps in this graphic novel. Mei shares her stories about Auntie Po just as freely as she shares her stellar pies. She is the daughter of the camp cook and helps out her father in the kitchen. The manager of the camp loves her pies and is friends with her father, but that only goes so far. The Chinese men logging are fed separately. When her father is fired, Mei is left behind at the camp with her best friend. Mei uses her stories of Po Pan Yin, Auntie Po, to give all of the children in the camp a heroine they can believe in. Mei must find a way through the politics of race and privilege to find a future for herself and her father in America. Khor offers a mix of tall tale and riveting real life in this graphic novel. She weaves in LGBT elements as Mei has feelings for Bee, her best friend. The use of sharing tales to provide comfort combines seamlessly with also offering food. Mei is a girl with a future that seems out of reach much of the time, but comes into focus by the end of the book. The book looks directly at racism in the years after the Chinese Exclusion Act and offers a mixture of characters that are racist and allies for Mei to encounter and deal with. The art focuses on the characters themselves, sometimes offering glimpses of the Sierra Nevada scenery too. Chapters begin with different logging tools being featured and described. The art is full of bold colors, the huge Auntie Po, and the busyness of a logging camp and its kitchen. A fascinating look at logging from a Chinese-American point of view combined with some really tall tales. Appropriate for ages 9-12.

  13. 4 out of 5

    BiblioBrandie

    I really loved this graphic novel, which is part historical fiction, part magical realism, and part mythology. This is a beautifully crafted and illustrated coming-of-age story set in 1885. Following the passage of the Chinese Exclusion Act, 13-year old Chinese American Mei works alongside her father at a California logging camp. Mei tells stories of Auntie Po and her faithful blue buffalo, Pei Pei, and these legends help her through some tough times. This story touches on mythology and in her a I really loved this graphic novel, which is part historical fiction, part magical realism, and part mythology. This is a beautifully crafted and illustrated coming-of-age story set in 1885. Following the passage of the Chinese Exclusion Act, 13-year old Chinese American Mei works alongside her father at a California logging camp. Mei tells stories of Auntie Po and her faithful blue buffalo, Pei Pei, and these legends help her through some tough times. This story touches on mythology and in her author's note Khor asks, who gets to tell and own myths? She also explains how she wanted to tell a story of a queer Chinese American. I feel like this is a fresh take on the historical graphic novel. Loved it!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Lorenz

    I can't wait to add this to my library collection. The Legend of Auntie Po is a fascinating, nuanced story of Mei, a young queer Chinese girl growing up in a logging camp. Auntie Po is the gender-flipped, Chinese version of Paul Bunyan and with Minnesota's love of Paul and history of logging, I think kids will connect with this story. I love how it tells this story that has been overlooked and relegated to the sidelines. I'm glad to know more about Chinese cooks and laborers in logging camps. Th I can't wait to add this to my library collection. The Legend of Auntie Po is a fascinating, nuanced story of Mei, a young queer Chinese girl growing up in a logging camp. Auntie Po is the gender-flipped, Chinese version of Paul Bunyan and with Minnesota's love of Paul and history of logging, I think kids will connect with this story. I love how it tells this story that has been overlooked and relegated to the sidelines. I'm glad to know more about Chinese cooks and laborers in logging camps. The illustrations of this text are gorgeous and convey so much atmosphere and emotion. A wonderful addition to middle grade literature.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Great Books

    At a 19th century Sierra Nevadas logging camp, during the period of the Chinese Exclusion Act, thirteen-year-old Mei bakes pies and helps her father, Hao, run the kitchen to feed the white lumberjacks, as well as the Chinese workers. Mei also loves reading and telling stories around the campfire to the other children, and she loves her best friend Bee, the white daughter of her father’s boss, the camp foreman. Gorgeous watercolors bring Auntie Po and her blue water buffalo Pei Pei to life from M At a 19th century Sierra Nevadas logging camp, during the period of the Chinese Exclusion Act, thirteen-year-old Mei bakes pies and helps her father, Hao, run the kitchen to feed the white lumberjacks, as well as the Chinese workers. Mei also loves reading and telling stories around the campfire to the other children, and she loves her best friend Bee, the white daughter of her father’s boss, the camp foreman. Gorgeous watercolors bring Auntie Po and her blue water buffalo Pei Pei to life from Mei’s campfire myth, invented to rival Paul Bunyan and to help Mei, and others, through difficult times at the logging camp. Reviewer 19

  16. 4 out of 5

    CC

    I started reading this on the train and had to stop because I started getting more emotional than I'm comfortable being in public. Then I came home and ugly cried through this beautiful book in one sitting. What an incredible, important book, and one that I am so glad exists. We need more stories like these. I've been following Shing Yin Khor for some time now. Everything they create has always profoundly resonated with me, and this in particular really hit me as a child of immigrants, an Asian I started reading this on the train and had to stop because I started getting more emotional than I'm comfortable being in public. Then I came home and ugly cried through this beautiful book in one sitting. What an incredible, important book, and one that I am so glad exists. We need more stories like these. I've been following Shing Yin Khor for some time now. Everything they create has always profoundly resonated with me, and this in particular really hit me as a child of immigrants, an Asian woman navigating spaces where I've felt othered, and a storyteller. Will be thinking about (and revisiting, and rereading) this for days.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jes McCutchen

    Review! This book gets 5 full waterbuffalos from me.💧🦬 "The Legend of Auntie Po" by Shing Yin Khor is a graphic novel exploring who makes folk tales and what they can mean to a culture. It follows the life of Mei a young Chinese American in a Sierra Nevada logging camp in 1885, as she and her friends and family navigate racism and the Chinese Exclusion Act. The illustrations are absolutely charming, and I read a lot of it aloud to my kiddo. Really good example of great representation of stories w Review! This book gets 5 full waterbuffalos from me.💧🦬 "The Legend of Auntie Po" by Shing Yin Khor is a graphic novel exploring who makes folk tales and what they can mean to a culture. It follows the life of Mei a young Chinese American in a Sierra Nevada logging camp in 1885, as she and her friends and family navigate racism and the Chinese Exclusion Act. The illustrations are absolutely charming, and I read a lot of it aloud to my kiddo. Really good example of great representation of stories we often don't read about. The way Shing Yin Khor creates a Chinese American folk tale as a foil to the Paul Bunyan myth is thoughtful and thought provoking.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jenn Adams

    Enjoyed this historical fiction graphic novel about a young Chinese-American girl living with her father on a logging camp. The titular Auntie Po is more of a thread woven through the story than the actual focus - the bulk of the story is the actual day-to-day life and struggles of Mei and her family/friends. Seemed long at first glance, but the text is appropriately concise and the art style lends itself well to the feel of the story. Thanks to Edelweiss and the publisher for this eARC in exchan Enjoyed this historical fiction graphic novel about a young Chinese-American girl living with her father on a logging camp. The titular Auntie Po is more of a thread woven through the story than the actual focus - the bulk of the story is the actual day-to-day life and struggles of Mei and her family/friends. Seemed long at first glance, but the text is appropriately concise and the art style lends itself well to the feel of the story. Thanks to Edelweiss and the publisher for this eARC in exchange for my honest review

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ryn Baginski

    *review based on an ARC This book is going to be stunning in full color. The story itself shows how complicated relationships can be when navigating vast differences in privilege. It also explores how a myth and reality can both be true, can both be valid at the same time depending on how you see the world in front of you. The friendships and grief and discrimination and families are all complex and real in their complexity. I knew nothing about Chinese immigrants in the 1880s logging industry, a *review based on an ARC This book is going to be stunning in full color. The story itself shows how complicated relationships can be when navigating vast differences in privilege. It also explores how a myth and reality can both be true, can both be valid at the same time depending on how you see the world in front of you. The friendships and grief and discrimination and families are all complex and real in their complexity. I knew nothing about Chinese immigrants in the 1880s logging industry, and learning about this was also a bonus to this already amazing story.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Heidi

    I liked this diverse driven graphic novel, that I was able to access via digital arc. The concepts are made approachable and give a great start to talking points. The added information pages for history of logging is great too, my older child is really into history, so this would be perfect to add to his shelf.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Piss lizard boi

    I like Po. Po swaggy - Po makes me make magic yogurt. Have you watched teletubbies? I read it. I'm an OG. I'm better than you. If I tell you to eat cheese would you listen to me? I need customers they need to taste my yummy cheese, it comes straight (gay) from The cows onndies. (Don't report me - I have a family) I like Po. Po swaggy - Po makes me make magic yogurt. Have you watched teletubbies? I read it. I'm an OG. I'm better than you. If I tell you to eat cheese would you listen to me? I need customers they need to taste my yummy cheese, it comes straight (gay) from The cows onndies. (Don't report me - I have a family)

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ann Williams

    I enjoyed this story about a Chinese girl growing up in a lumber camp with her father and her friends. I really enjoyed the new American myth and in particular, the author's note and acknowledgement of Native People and their contributions to the lumber industry in its early days. I enjoyed this story about a Chinese girl growing up in a lumber camp with her father and her friends. I really enjoyed the new American myth and in particular, the author's note and acknowledgement of Native People and their contributions to the lumber industry in its early days.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Megan Mann

    I thought this was really fantastic. It had so many amazing elements. And of course showing that it wasn’t just white people in logging camps is super important. I loved the blending of historical fiction and myth and also Chinese tradition. I just loved this.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa

    The artwork is... interesting. I'm not a fan of the people. But the back drops and scenery are amazing. And the use of of color and mini-illustrations in the gutter really takes things to a new level. The story is ok. I'm always glad to have historical work told from a minority perspective. The artwork is... interesting. I'm not a fan of the people. But the back drops and scenery are amazing. And the use of of color and mini-illustrations in the gutter really takes things to a new level. The story is ok. I'm always glad to have historical work told from a minority perspective.

  25. 5 out of 5

    TheNextGenLibrarian

    I loved this historical fiction graphic novel with magical realism thrown in as a retelling of Paul Bunyon but with Chinese characters. Books like this are necessary to show that American culture and folklore isn’t all there is.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Crflag10

    this book is one my favorites tells us a creative and interesting story,recommended

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lonna Pierce

    Review to follow in School Library Connection.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Andréa

    Note: I accessed a digital review copy of this book through Edelweiss.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Pinguino

    A wonderful slice of history and friendship Shing is a masterful storyteller, and her distinctive watercolor painted a part of history rarely mentioned. Loved this so much.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    Wonderful!

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