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The Woggle-Bug Book: With 27 Illustrations and a Free Audio Link.

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The Woggle-Bug Book is a 1905 children’s book. It has long been one of the rarest items in the Baum bibliography. Baum’s Woggle-Bug was a popular character at the time; he became something of a national fad and icon. One day, Mr. H. M. Woggle-Bug, became separated from his comrades who had accompanied him from the Land of Oz. Finding that time hung heavy on his hands he The Woggle-Bug Book is a 1905 children’s book. It has long been one of the rarest items in the Baum bibliography. Baum’s Woggle-Bug was a popular character at the time; he became something of a national fad and icon. One day, Mr. H. M. Woggle-Bug, became separated from his comrades who had accompanied him from the Land of Oz. Finding that time hung heavy on his hands he decided to walk down the Main Street of the City and try to discover something-or-other of interest. The Woggle-Bug, who favors flashy clothes with bright colors, falls in love with a gaudy Wagnerian plaid dress that he sees on a mannequin in a department store window. Being a Woggle-Bug, he has trouble differentiating between the dress and its wearers – wax or human. This, in turn, causes no end of problems. Highlights of this edition are: • 27 illustrations and photos. • A free web link to the full-length audio recording of the book – to either listen to online, or download. • It is formatted for ease of use and enjoyment on your kindle reader. • An active (easy to use) Table of Contents listing every chapter accessible from the kindle “go to” feature. • Perfect formatting in rich text compatible with kindle’s Text-to-Speech features. • Plus, about the Author section. • 80 pages (in the kindle format) for a very low price. This book is unabridged and appears as it was first intended. First published in 1905.


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The Woggle-Bug Book is a 1905 children’s book. It has long been one of the rarest items in the Baum bibliography. Baum’s Woggle-Bug was a popular character at the time; he became something of a national fad and icon. One day, Mr. H. M. Woggle-Bug, became separated from his comrades who had accompanied him from the Land of Oz. Finding that time hung heavy on his hands he The Woggle-Bug Book is a 1905 children’s book. It has long been one of the rarest items in the Baum bibliography. Baum’s Woggle-Bug was a popular character at the time; he became something of a national fad and icon. One day, Mr. H. M. Woggle-Bug, became separated from his comrades who had accompanied him from the Land of Oz. Finding that time hung heavy on his hands he decided to walk down the Main Street of the City and try to discover something-or-other of interest. The Woggle-Bug, who favors flashy clothes with bright colors, falls in love with a gaudy Wagnerian plaid dress that he sees on a mannequin in a department store window. Being a Woggle-Bug, he has trouble differentiating between the dress and its wearers – wax or human. This, in turn, causes no end of problems. Highlights of this edition are: • 27 illustrations and photos. • A free web link to the full-length audio recording of the book – to either listen to online, or download. • It is formatted for ease of use and enjoyment on your kindle reader. • An active (easy to use) Table of Contents listing every chapter accessible from the kindle “go to” feature. • Perfect formatting in rich text compatible with kindle’s Text-to-Speech features. • Plus, about the Author section. • 80 pages (in the kindle format) for a very low price. This book is unabridged and appears as it was first intended. First published in 1905.

30 review for The Woggle-Bug Book: With 27 Illustrations and a Free Audio Link.

  1. 5 out of 5

    Quirkyreader

    This story was a bit on the silly side, but I can’t give it a rating. Granted it was written in the early part of the 20th Century, but some readers will find some of the language and illustrations offensive.

  2. 5 out of 5

    mark monday

    was Baum senile when he wrote this one? this is the worst Baum that i've ever read, the absolute worst. thank our merciful Lord On High that this is as short as it is uninteresting. if you want to read some obscure Baum, try the surprisingly acidic morality tale Policeman Bluejay. now that is a real bit of buried treasure there. on the other hand, Woggle-Bug Book just needs to be buried, period. was Baum senile when he wrote this one? this is the worst Baum that i've ever read, the absolute worst. thank our merciful Lord On High that this is as short as it is uninteresting. if you want to read some obscure Baum, try the surprisingly acidic morality tale Policeman Bluejay. now that is a real bit of buried treasure there. on the other hand, Woggle-Bug Book just needs to be buried, period.

  3. 4 out of 5

    TJ

    So im reading all the Oz books plus the side books but feeling a little sick so review to come when i'm feeling better So im reading all the Oz books plus the side books but feeling a little sick so review to come when i'm feeling better

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sandy

    Now, I've heard about it before but I wasn't aware that it was a part of Oz. However, when I first met Woggle-bug in the second book, I was like.. Aha. so this is a part of it. It's funny, short and pretty ridiculous too. The endless sarcasm is not absent in this book either. I liked it. Loved the illustrations, they were quite hilarious. Book #72 of 2021.. Book #2.5 of Oz series Now, I've heard about it before but I wasn't aware that it was a part of Oz. However, when I first met Woggle-bug in the second book, I was like.. Aha. so this is a part of it. It's funny, short and pretty ridiculous too. The endless sarcasm is not absent in this book either. I liked it. Loved the illustrations, they were quite hilarious. Book #72 of 2021.. Book #2.5 of Oz series

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lucy Dawson

    What did I just read? 😳 A bug is obsessed with a dress and stalks various people as they keep exchanging the dress for other things. Add to the mix references to 'n*ggers' and 'ch*nks' and you've got an odd little book which really hasn't aged well. Considering how progressive Baum was in regards to gender, it's a shock. What did I just read? 😳 A bug is obsessed with a dress and stalks various people as they keep exchanging the dress for other things. Add to the mix references to 'n*ggers' and 'ch*nks' and you've got an odd little book which really hasn't aged well. Considering how progressive Baum was in regards to gender, it's a shock.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Garrett Zecker

    Doma Publishing's Wizard of Oz collection has taken me several years to read with my son at bedtime. It was interesting revisiting the texts that I read swiftly through my youth, as I was about his age when I read them and remembered little beyond some of the characters that don't appear in any of the books. I picked up a copy of this version since, for 99c, I could have the complete series along with "All the original artwork by the great illustrator W.W. Denslow (over 1,000 classic illustratio Doma Publishing's Wizard of Oz collection has taken me several years to read with my son at bedtime. It was interesting revisiting the texts that I read swiftly through my youth, as I was about his age when I read them and remembered little beyond some of the characters that don't appear in any of the books. I picked up a copy of this version since, for 99c, I could have the complete series along with "All the original artwork by the great illustrator W.W. Denslow (over 1,000 classic illustrations)", and to read the complete 14-book text at bedtime with all original color illustrations on my Kindle Fire knowing that there would be cross-linked tables of contents and no layout issues, it was worth my buck rather than taking them all out of the library. We read these books before bed at home and under the stars by a campfire in the forest, in a hotel in Montreal and in a seaside cottage in Nova Scotia, on a boat and in a car. We read it everywhere, thanks to the Kindle's mobility. You may be reading this review on one of the individual pages for the original books on Goodreads or Amazon, and if so, all I did was cross-link the books along with the correct dates we read the original texts. The only book I did not cross-link with original dates was the Woggle-bug book, which if you know, is short. Instead, I counted that final book as the review for Doma's Kindle version. You may notice that some books have longer reading spans – probably for two reasons. One, I traded off reading with my wife sometimes, and two, sometimes we needed a little Baum break and read some other books. It did get a little old sometimes, and there are fourteen books totaling 3500 pages in their original library printing. The first thing I think is worth mentioning is that when I first read these books, it was as a child would read them. I remember them being repetitive but familiar. Comforting and revealing. An antiquated adventure, but a serial adventure with recurring characters unparalleled in any other literature. As an adult with an MA in literature (and soon and MFA in fiction), I am actually somewhat unimpressed with the series. Baum wrote a whimsical set of tales, but they are torturously repetitive and would be easy to plug-and-play by replacing characters and moments with a computer to make an entirely new book. But, they are children's books, and we are completely enthralled and comforted by the familiar. Is not Shakespeare the same play-to-play structurally? Are not Pixar or Star Wars movies definitively archetypal in timing, execution, structure, and character so that they can be completely replaced and reapplied to a new story? Even the films – heck, even the trailers - are cut the same, and if you play them all at once, magic happens (see: youtube, "all star wars movies at once"). I suppose where the real magic of these books happens is in their origin. Baum wrote something completely original that took the world by storm and continues to be a whimsical American bellwether for children's fantasy. It is one of the original series specifically for children, spanning fourteen books written almost yearly and gobbled up by a hungry public. It still remains at the forefront of American culture in many revisits in Hollywood (let no one forget the horrific beauty that is Return To Oz) and capitalizing on nostalgia (as recently as six months ago I received a mailing from The Bradford Exchange that was selling original library-bound volumes signed by – get this – Baum's great-grandson... I love an autographed book if only for the idea of the magic it transmits even though it is somewhat meaningless, but maybe someone can convince me where the magic is in having it signed by a probably elderly great-grandchild who likely never met his great-grandfather?). So, while some of the books were awesome and some of them were difficult to slog through, I have my favorites. I will also say that the introductions that each volume opens with were sweet letters from the author to his fans, and it was easy to tell that he truly, truly loved his job writing for children. He knew his audience, he knew what worked, and he sold books. Furthermore, I imagined with great sentimentality mailbags upon mailbags arriving at his house filled to the brim of letters from children all over the world, and the responsibility he probably felt to personally respond to each of them. For my career, that is the best anyone can hope for. What follows is my (and my son's) short reviews of the individual books in the series. The Original and Official Oz Books by L. Frank Baum #1 The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) READ November 26, 2013 – December 1, 2013 My Kid – At first I thought it was crazy, but then it started getting awesome. I remember the movie, but there's a lot of parts that are different. Me – I mean, classic, right? The book pretty much follows the film almost entirely with few exceptions. In hindsight after finishing the entire series, it is worth nothing that it is considerably one of the best books in the series, while many others are of questionable quality. #2 The Marvelous Land of Oz (1904) READ December 1, 2013 – January 9, 2014 My Kid – It was scary... Jack Pumpkinhead and Tip escaped and it was really cool. Me – This is one of the books Return to Oz was based from, The Gump and The Powder of Life coming into play to help Dorothy and Jack Pumpkinhead outwit Mombi. An enjoyable book, quite different than the first book but engineered beautifully with plot and characterization. Enjoyed this one. What was most engaging about this text was Ozma and Tip, and what this book says about gender and youth. I think there is a lot that can be examined about gender at birth and the fluidity of gender as a social construct, witch curse or no. #3 Ozma of Oz (1907) READ January 9, 2014 – February 22, 2014 My Kid – The boat crashes and they have to ride in the box with the chicken... I like TikTok. They saved the Queen. Me – This is the second book that Return to Oz was conceived from and a very engaging book. This one requires more understanding and construction of the Oz Universe including the transformation of several of our characters into ornaments and the outwitting of the Nome King in order to save our friends. This was one of my final favorites before the quality of the books fell, as far as I am concerned. #4 Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz (1908) READ February 22, 2014 – August 12, 2014 My Kid – I kinda forgot this one. There was the vegetable people underground and nothing really happened? Me – Yeah, this one was a bust for me. I think Baum was making some kind of satirical point lost to history... Or maybe the obvious non-referential one, but still, just seemed like the episodic nonsense that didn't have a point most of the time. Keep the beginning, I guess and then skip to the final third, and there's your story. #5 The Road to Oz (1909) READ August 12, 2014 – February 22, 2015 My Kid – The love magnet was pretty awesome, and Dorothy meets the rainbow girl and Shaggy man... I guess I'll leave off there. Me – Another one that I thought was a little redundant and repetitive without much of a point. They get lost, they make it back, there are some weird artifacts that help them... Meh. I did like the new characters, however, who make many more appearances in the future books. Shaggy Man and Polychrome are great. #6 The Emerald City of Oz (1910) READ February 22, 2015 – September 14, 2015 My Kid – The Emerald City was cool and Dorothy was in charge. If I lived there I would sell it all and be rich. There was a war. Me – This one was pretty good until the end, where everything was buttoned up (apologies, button bright) pretty quickly without there being much of a solid reason. The conflicts were all contrived and there were some more ridiculously ridiculous new characters who never showed up again in the series. A great diversion, but with little substance toward the end. #7 The Patchwork Girl of Oz (1913) READ September 14, 2015 – December 22, 2015 My Kid – It was pretty weird how the quilt doll became a patchwork girl and she was really funny. In the end, it didn't matter that they found all the stuff, so it was kinda crazy and funny. Me – This was relatively silly. I enjoyed it, and the Patchwork Girl is a character I can really get behind as a foil to some of the other characters and somewhat mischievous. The plot is ridiculous, but the powder of life and the glass cat are somewhat illuminating elements of this text. Scraps made this a fun one. #8 Tik-Tok of Oz (1914) READ December 22, 2015 – April 2, 2016 My Kid – The whole story of the shaggy man's brother being missing and ugly didn’t make sense, but... there was a war and Tik Tok was rescued. There was a man who was not as evil as the other army general guys. It was weird. Me – This one was primarily about The Shaggy Man and his adventure to resolve a variety of political and interconnected issues happening surrounding everyone's messing around with the Nome King. There is a huge tube that goes through the center of the earth that everything centers on, and Shaggy is trying to get the Nome King to release his brother the whole time. There are a lot of characterization, detail, and plot errors in this that postdate some facts from the earlier books – which is kind of weird – and the intrigue surrounding the plot is somewhat complicating for kids. What I thought was the coolest element was the character of Quox, who passes more than a coincidental resemblance to Catbus from Miyazaki's Totoro. #9 The Scarecrow of Oz (1915) READ April 2, 2016 – September 1, 2016 My Kid – First of all, there's a lot of people getting lost. Second, if I was in Jinxland, I think I would rather be back in oz. Me – This one was interesting as it had little to do with The Scarecrow and was mainly about Button Bright, Cap'n Bill, and Trot. This one is probably the height of the ridiculousness, with little shallow plot item after little shallow plot item heaped upon one another. At the end, The Scarecrow has to (and succeeds) in recapturing Jinxland for Gloria, its rightful ruler, and returns to the Emerald City for a celebration. Eh... #10 Rinkitink in Oz (1916) READ September 1, 2016 – December 1, 2016 My Kid – All these books have someone wicked in them and it's so crazy. I liked the name Kaliko, and the way Dorothy comes to the rescue of everyone being clever solves the problem. What's with all the problems? I feel like there's thousands. Me – This one was pretty good, as it seemed to deviate from the regular universe of Oz and focus on a different set of locations and characters. It had a very Tolkienian feel in terms of plot, structure, and internal political commentary. It felt very different from the others, and most elements in the text had a point and a long-term purpose. I enjoyed this one. #11 The Lost Princess of Oz (1917) READ December 1, 2016 – January 19, 2017 My Kid – First of all, they've gotta be responsible for the diamond pan, and that's why they lost it. They weren't responsible. At the end they searched for the tools and didn't need them and it was useless. Me – Lost Princess was fun. It surrounded the story of Ozma being kidnapped and the Wizard, Button Bright, Trot, and Betsy Bobbin to go rescue her. Everything in this one felt a little random, but it all ties back together in the end. This one was pretty diversionary but not as bad as some of the others. #12 The Tin Woodman of Oz (1918) READ January 19, 2017 – March 13, 2017 My Kid – Woot is a weird name, and everyone was changed to animals and monkeys and none of them matched up. It was all pretty weird because they all had their new needs as animals and it didn't match with what they were. The love story was kinda weird since the girl didn't want the tin woodmen anymore and the fact that they left and it was all for nothing didn't make sense. Me – A lot of randomness in this one as well, but there is a love story at its core as we learn of a twin brother that the Tin Woodman had all along who shares the love of a long lost young lady named Nimee Amee. A lot of diversionary stories, adventures, and one cool twist by the end, and everyone arrives back where they started. Not the best, but entertaining. This one, while random at times, was a quality read. #13 The Magic of Oz (1919) READ March 13, 2017 – April 25, 2017 My Kid – I wish you could transform yourself. Like... What if you wanted to turn yourself into a pea shooter from Plants Vs Zombies? I don't even know how to pronounce the word. I never heard of it, this nonsense word. Me – This one had a funny gimmick in it with a secret word that when spoken could turn anyone into anything. There is a war on, and a secret force is transforming monkeys into superhuman soldiers (and there is a complication that no one in oz can be hurt but what happens when someone is chopped into a hundred living pieces?). This one was enjoyable, but the gimmick is honestly the only thing holding it all together. #14 Glinda of Oz (1920) READ April 25, 2017 – May 23, 2017 My Kid – This one was kinda like a world of them figuring out what is going on with the big glass house-world under-water. The opposite of everything and they couldn't figure out how to get it back to normal, so what was going on with the war the whole time? Then they fix it. Everything is all set. Me – This posthumous volume seemed to be pieced together from notes, as there is a clear difference between the tone of prior volumes and this one. The cadence and structure of the language and story is quite different in parts, and I found it takes itself seriously by comparison. Beautiful art and architecture present this journey, and I have to say, the fact that this was in new hands really shows because there is some wonderful structure that is absent in the other volumes, as well as even reintroductions to the characters when they show up. The end was a little too tidy with another deus ex machina, but the fact that it came from something that was surprising and there all along was different. *BONUS Oz Works by L. Frank Baum, 'the Royal Historian of Oz' The Woggle-Bug Book (1905) READ May 23, 2017 – May 24, 2017 My Kid – Actually, I don't have a review for my kid... See below. Me – This book started cute and had a cute premise. When I began reading it at bedtime, the kid had fallen asleep. I tend to keep reading and save our spot, and then pick it up where he fell asleep the next night. Lucky for me, the terrifyingly racist parlance in this book started after he fell asleep. I read through to the end, with no intention of going back with him tomorrow... It was... shockingly indifferent to complete disregard for everyone. From switching between "Oriental" and "Chinaman" and having a character with a dialect that wasn't just a stereotype but also a stereotype of a racist's impression wasn't nearly as bad as the way Baum used the N-word (and had the character as a monkey's monkey). It was offensive and seemed ridiculously gratuitous for even the time it was published. Not a shining moment for his work at all... But it was pretty cool to learn the Woggle Bug was from Boston, anyway. This one was pretty awful.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Leon

    The Woggle-Bug Book is not precisely part of the Oz books as it doesn't take place in Oz or really have anything to do with Oz other than the Woggle Bug. Actually, the book is adapted from the musical adaptation of the second Oz book, The Marvelous Land of Oz. Well, loosely adapted. The Woggle Bug is a supporting character in Marvelous Land, but it sounds like much of the plot of the musical is related specifically to the Woggle Bug and his love for a dress, which is what the book is about excep The Woggle-Bug Book is not precisely part of the Oz books as it doesn't take place in Oz or really have anything to do with Oz other than the Woggle Bug. Actually, the book is adapted from the musical adaptation of the second Oz book, The Marvelous Land of Oz. Well, loosely adapted. The Woggle Bug is a supporting character in Marvelous Land, but it sounds like much of the plot of the musical is related specifically to the Woggle Bug and his love for a dress, which is what the book is about except set in New York. Maybe. Some American city, at any rate. So, yes, the book is about how the Woggle Bug falls in love with a dress. He sees it on a department store mannequin and is taken in by its colors, but he can't distinguish it from the person who is wearing it, so the whole plot revolves around him chasing after the various possessors of the dress. And smashing hats. The premise is, in all actuality, entirely amusing. However, the execution is lacking, especially by today's standards, considering that the book is filled with racial caricatures. I'm sure those things were amusing in their time, but it was a time when Blackface was considered a high form of entertainment. Needless to say, by today's standards, the stereotypes are, at the least, insulting. I don't really understand the need to set the book in the real world for any other reason than to include those characters. Baum still felt the need to have the Woggle Bug encounter a bunch of talking animals, so it seems to me the book would have worked just fine in Oz. Except that it was done as a child's picture book, not a novel, so, maybe, they thought the book would work better in a familiar setting. It was more than a century ago, so it's hard to say. It doesn't translate well to modern day, though, because of the racial issues. However, that probably makes the book ripe for a modern interpretation because, as I said, the premise is really very funny and put the Woggle Bug's life in jeopardy on more than one occasion. I wouldn't suggest the original for more than die-hard Oz fans. And, now, for something I've never done before: a review of the specific edition I purchased. I picked up a free edition of The Woggle-Bug Book for my Kindle, and it was definitely an example of getting what you paid for. The person responsible for the adaptation did a piss poor job of it. For one thing, the original book had illustrations; evidently, those illustrations had captions. The captions were included in the narrative text of the book wherever they happened to fall, which was quite jarring. The book is in past tense, but the captions are in present, so you'd suddenly get this present tense summary of the current action of the book. Also, the book, especially toward the end, is full of typos. It was very apparent that not much time or attention was given to making the book presentable. I would certainly not recommend this edition of the book to anyone, even for the low, low price of FREE.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Derek Oberg

    I'm glad this one was just a short story. The Woggle Bug showed up in OZ book #2, and I found him quite amusing. I love that is full name is HM Woggle-Bug, TE (Highly Magnified and Thoroughly Educated). And I thought that the other characters in that book treated him horribly. But as for him holding his own book... Not so much. It's a good reminder of the fact that most "timeless" works are set outside of our reality. Case in point, take an Oz character in a book written in 1904 and stick him in I'm glad this one was just a short story. The Woggle Bug showed up in OZ book #2, and I found him quite amusing. I love that is full name is HM Woggle-Bug, TE (Highly Magnified and Thoroughly Educated). And I thought that the other characters in that book treated him horribly. But as for him holding his own book... Not so much. It's a good reminder of the fact that most "timeless" works are set outside of our reality. Case in point, take an Oz character in a book written in 1904 and stick him in New York. This book is full of terrible racial stereotyping (including the N-word, and some very bad "Chink" jokes) that I'm sure was pretty innocuous for it's time, but pretty damn distasteful today. It’s basically like going back and watching old Looney Tunes or Merry Melodies today. Times change, and for the better.

  9. 5 out of 5

    April

    N ~ it was ok. But, not much to go with the story. It is as the title says...just about the Woggle-Bug. It's not really needed before moving onto Ozma. Bug wants dress. Works to get money. Back to store to purchase dress. Uhoh, lady gets dress first. Is she the wax lady? Can the bug buy her? Hmmm... N ~ it was ok. But, not much to go with the story. It is as the title says...just about the Woggle-Bug. It's not really needed before moving onto Ozma. Bug wants dress. Works to get money. Back to store to purchase dress. Uhoh, lady gets dress first. Is she the wax lady? Can the bug buy her? Hmmm...

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kyle

    This has to be the most uncomfortable I’ve ever been while reading a kids’ story. I mean, holy racism, Batman. I understand that the story is over 110 years old, but the racist overtones were too much. Definitely would never recommend to anyone.

  11. 5 out of 5

    itchy

    ouch

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cosmic Arcata

    Very good. Read it three times. It is not very long but very powerful.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    The Woggle-Bug Book was a sort of comic-book written by L. Frank Baum that brought Oz characters to the US for various adventures. (Warning - the text has been controversial for its use of ethnic stereotypes). The book was written in 1905 and features H.M. (Highly Magnified) Woggle-Bug, a overly large bug from Oz, who visits an unnamed US city. The initials after Mr Woggle-Bug's name, T.E. stand for Thoroughly Educated, although the book says 'You will notice that our insect had a way of using b The Woggle-Bug Book was a sort of comic-book written by L. Frank Baum that brought Oz characters to the US for various adventures. (Warning - the text has been controversial for its use of ethnic stereotypes). The book was written in 1905 and features H.M. (Highly Magnified) Woggle-Bug, a overly large bug from Oz, who visits an unnamed US city. The initials after Mr Woggle-Bug's name, T.E. stand for Thoroughly Educated, although the book says 'You will notice that our insect had a way of using big words to express himself, which leads us to suspect that the school system in Oz is the same they employ in Boston.' (I offer no judgement, just present the facts. Anyway, Mr WB, while wandering down the street in his colorful clothes (he does like bright colors) sees a department store manikin in the most fantastically patterned dress and falls in love; not realizing it's the dress he loves, not the lady. This begins a most amazing adventure with Mr. WB chasing after various women and men, getting stuck in a balloon trip, ending up in the Sahara desert and the African jungle, etc. It's all fun, no dogs were killed during the adventure and it ends happily. Good fun, good entertainment and it kept kids minds on the other Baum, Oz stories, I imagine. (3 stars)

  14. 5 out of 5

    W.

    It starts out as a delightfully fun read, filled with puns and absurdities to an even greater extent than Baum's Oz novels of the time. Unfortunately, around the half way mark, the humour descends into racial stereotypes that were not recognized as problematic within Baum's social circles. While I get the impression he never would go that route were he alive and writing today, he did in 1905, and the world is worse off for it. As a result, what would have been a 5* romp for kids in his era proba It starts out as a delightfully fun read, filled with puns and absurdities to an even greater extent than Baum's Oz novels of the time. Unfortunately, around the half way mark, the humour descends into racial stereotypes that were not recognized as problematic within Baum's social circles. While I get the impression he never would go that route were he alive and writing today, he did in 1905, and the world is worse off for it. As a result, what would have been a 5* romp for kids in his era probably should not be shared with children today until they are mature enough to recognize the troublesome content for what it really is.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I’ve heard about this book since I was a child and read everything I could about the Oz books. I never had a chance to read it until it was available on this Kindle edition I had. And now I know why it was never republished in print. It is awful and incredibly racist. I was reading it to my nine year old and had to change words because the written ones were racial slurs I had no desire to explain to her. There were some amusing and absurd parts of this short book that had her laughing but that d I’ve heard about this book since I was a child and read everything I could about the Oz books. I never had a chance to read it until it was available on this Kindle edition I had. And now I know why it was never republished in print. It is awful and incredibly racist. I was reading it to my nine year old and had to change words because the written ones were racial slurs I had no desire to explain to her. There were some amusing and absurd parts of this short book that had her laughing but that does not make up for its deficiencies.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Fiona Saunders

    It would give this title 2.5 stars if I could but Goodreads doesn't do half starts. It is short and could have been cut in half as the second half feels a bit tack on. It is interesting to read book written in the past where language politically correct terminology is not a thing. In fact I found when I came across it a bit shocked. Sign of our times I suppose. Though overal an interesting look at what a foreigner or alien makes of the western world. It would give this title 2.5 stars if I could but Goodreads doesn't do half starts. It is short and could have been cut in half as the second half feels a bit tack on. It is interesting to read book written in the past where language politically correct terminology is not a thing. In fact I found when I came across it a bit shocked. Sign of our times I suppose. Though overal an interesting look at what a foreigner or alien makes of the western world.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Will Griffin

    A spin-off from The Marvelous Land of Oz, in which the Woggle-Bug has many random adventures in America while chasing a dress he’s fallen in love with. In terms of structure it’s pretty similar to the mainline Oz series, but it’s not as imaginative or charming, largely because of its horrendous ethnic stereotyping and racist language.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    Audiobook. I do want to start adding T.E. to the end of my name. However, this book was written in 1905 and was meant to stay in 1905, mostly just a pulp fiction set in the world of Oz.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kay Hawkins

    Cute little story. A bit outdated but would make for a great cartoon. Though it isn't labeled as one on here is it still an Oz spin off. Cute little story. A bit outdated but would make for a great cartoon. Though it isn't labeled as one on here is it still an Oz spin off.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Deb

    This book reads series of racist jokes and has very little of the imaginative exploration of the other Oz books I've read so far. This book reads series of racist jokes and has very little of the imaginative exploration of the other Oz books I've read so far.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Paxton Holley

    A short story written around the same time as Marvelous Land of Oz. Showcases the Woggle-Bug character. Pulls Woggle-Bug out of Oz and into America. Weird.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    Has outdated offensive expressions

  23. 5 out of 5

    Zazie

    I didn't like this one as much as the regular stories. I'm in the process of going through the books and this where I'm at. It should not have been written, in my opinion. Just sucked. I didn't like this one as much as the regular stories. I'm in the process of going through the books and this where I'm at. It should not have been written, in my opinion. Just sucked.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Scout Who

    The ethnic slurs and stereotypes are a little jarring for a modern reader, but otherwise it's a humorous little tale. The illustrations are very well done. The ethnic slurs and stereotypes are a little jarring for a modern reader, but otherwise it's a humorous little tale. The illustrations are very well done.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Aliquid A

    Don't bother with this if you are reading the Oz series. It doesn't even vaguely fit in or make sense in relation to the overall story-line. It is a stand-alone story that didn't age well. Don't bother with this if you are reading the Oz series. It doesn't even vaguely fit in or make sense in relation to the overall story-line. It is a stand-alone story that didn't age well.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    This book was absolutely pointless within the Oz series and I really didn’t care for the racist stereotypes.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Brooks

    The Woogle-Bug is weird AF, and this story just solidifies that he has no clue about anything but thinks he does. But also questions arrise, such as HOW did he get out of OZ? WHY is no one trying to kill him with bug spray?

  28. 5 out of 5

    Prashant

    A couple of days back I read 'The wonderful Wizard of Oz' and was pretty intrigued after reading the introduction to the book. The book is good, no doubt about that and I gave the deserved 4 stars to it but even after completing the book the facts pertaining to Baum kept on haunting me. Here was an author who gave the world one of the most talked about book and characters and he is claimed to be writing just for the profits. That's what is cited the reason that he wrote about 12 sequels to the f A couple of days back I read 'The wonderful Wizard of Oz' and was pretty intrigued after reading the introduction to the book. The book is good, no doubt about that and I gave the deserved 4 stars to it but even after completing the book the facts pertaining to Baum kept on haunting me. Here was an author who gave the world one of the most talked about book and characters and he is claimed to be writing just for the profits. That's what is cited the reason that he wrote about 12 sequels to the first Oz book and even started The Oz Film Manufacturing Company to milch the cow. He allegedly died a painful death after he was no longer able to leverage the Oz brand and his company got busted. Well, what can we say, artists are intriguing and Baum not withstanding his motives gave an unforgettable story to the world.I give him credit for that. So what took me to this story? Actually, I was just reading through some reviews here at GR and stumbled on one review of this book. Freshly scarred by 'The Oz' I decided to give it a try. Luckily many Baum books are available on the Gutenberg project for free. You can download this book from here http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/21914 This was a small book and the Woggle-Bug in this book was introduced by Frank Baum in his second book 'Marvelous Land of Oz' in 1904. The book is hardly 40 pages and in-between the author gave glimpses of the Hans Anderson like expertise. The Woggle-Bug on an expedition far from the city of Oz falls in love with a fabric print. He pursues the fabric indigently and have to face many different people as the fabric changes hands like a hot potato. The racial remarks and stereotypes could have put Frank in the ostracized chamber in the late 19th century but in those times he got away with it rather cleanly. It makes no sense to make a book out of this story which loses its mark rather widely in terms of teachings as well as novelty. It didn't hurt me much because it was short and I got it for free. I am definitely glad for that !

  29. 5 out of 5

    Katie Lambrix

    Genre: Classic Children's Summary Blurb(s): The Woggle-Bug has a series of misadventures trying to possess a dress made from cloth of the bright colors he so dearly loves. (Goodreads) The Woggle-Bug Book features the broad ethnic humor that was accepted and popular in its era, and which Baum employed in various works.[6] The Woggle-Bug, who favors flashy clothes with bright colors (he dresses in "gorgeous reds and yellows and blues and greens" and carries a pink handkerchief), falls in love with a gau Genre: Classic Children's Summary Blurb(s): The Woggle-Bug has a series of misadventures trying to possess a dress made from cloth of the bright colors he so dearly loves. (Goodreads) The Woggle-Bug Book features the broad ethnic humor that was accepted and popular in its era, and which Baum employed in various works.[6] The Woggle-Bug, who favors flashy clothes with bright colors (he dresses in "gorgeous reds and yellows and blues and greens" and carries a pink handkerchief), falls in love with a gaudy "Wagnerian plaid" dress that he sees on a mannequin in a department store window. Being a woggle bug, he has trouble differentiating between the dress and its wearers, wax or human. The dress is on sale for $7.93 ("GREATLY REDUCED" reads the tag). The Bug works for two days as a ditchdigger (he earns double pay since he digs with four hands) for money to buy the dress. He arrives too late, though; the dress has been sold, and makes its way through the second-hand market. The Bug pursues his love through the town, ineptly courting the women (Irish, Swedish, and African-American, plus one Chinese man) who have the dress in turn. His pursuit eventually leads to an accidental balloon flight to Africa. There, menacing Arabs want to kill the Woggle-Bug, but he convinces them that his death would bring bad luck. In the jungle he falls in with the talking animals that are the hallmark of Baum's imaginative world. In the end, the Bug makes his way back to the city, with a necktie made from the dress's loud fabric. (Wikipedia) Interesting Quotes: --- Other Thoughts: Interesting as a cultural comparison over time, but otherwise nothing special.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chris Fellows

    This very short incidental fragment of the Oziverse is a work I would doubtless never have encountered without the wonders of e-book technology, yay technology. The humour relies largely on the funny behaviour of the various sorts of peculiar furriners one might find inhabited a seething American metropolis of the early years of last century; but the most peculiar furriner of all is of course H. M. Woggle-Bug, T. E., of whom too much is never enough. The Woggle-Bug is well known for his addictio This very short incidental fragment of the Oziverse is a work I would doubtless never have encountered without the wonders of e-book technology, yay technology. The humour relies largely on the funny behaviour of the various sorts of peculiar furriners one might find inhabited a seething American metropolis of the early years of last century; but the most peculiar furriner of all is of course H. M. Woggle-Bug, T. E., of whom too much is never enough. The Woggle-Bug is well known for his addiction to puns, and in the course of this book he is served in kind in a most spectacular fashion: "Presently they came to a tall hedge surrounding the Inner Jungle, and without this hedge stood a patrol of brown bears who wore red soldier caps and carried gold-plated muskets in their hands. 'We call this the bearier,' said Miss Chim, pointing to the soldiers, 'because they oblige all strangers to paws.'" Tish-boom! So you can't so you weren't warned.

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