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Irresistible Faith: Becoming the Kind of Christian the World Can't Resist

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What if Christians became the best advertisement for Jesus?Jesus said his followers would be a light to the world and a city on a hill--a warmly inviting, neighbor-loving, grace- and truth-filled destination for all. He envisioned his followers as life-giving neighbors, bosses, employees, and friends, the kind of people who return insults with kindness and persecution with What if Christians became the best advertisement for Jesus?Jesus said his followers would be a light to the world and a city on a hill--a warmly inviting, neighbor-loving, grace- and truth-filled destination for all. He envisioned his followers as life-giving neighbors, bosses, employees, and friends, the kind of people who return insults with kindness and persecution with prayers. Rooted in biblical convictions, they would extend love, empathy, and care to one another as well as to those who don't share their beliefs. Over time their movement would become irresistible to every nation, tribe, and tongue. Irresistible Faith is a blueprint for pursuing this vision in our current moment, of redeemed individuals and a renewed community working for a restored world. This is a way of being that gives a tired, cynical world good reason to pause and reconsider Christianity--and to start wishing it was true.


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What if Christians became the best advertisement for Jesus?Jesus said his followers would be a light to the world and a city on a hill--a warmly inviting, neighbor-loving, grace- and truth-filled destination for all. He envisioned his followers as life-giving neighbors, bosses, employees, and friends, the kind of people who return insults with kindness and persecution with What if Christians became the best advertisement for Jesus?Jesus said his followers would be a light to the world and a city on a hill--a warmly inviting, neighbor-loving, grace- and truth-filled destination for all. He envisioned his followers as life-giving neighbors, bosses, employees, and friends, the kind of people who return insults with kindness and persecution with prayers. Rooted in biblical convictions, they would extend love, empathy, and care to one another as well as to those who don't share their beliefs. Over time their movement would become irresistible to every nation, tribe, and tongue. Irresistible Faith is a blueprint for pursuing this vision in our current moment, of redeemed individuals and a renewed community working for a restored world. This is a way of being that gives a tired, cynical world good reason to pause and reconsider Christianity--and to start wishing it was true.

30 review for Irresistible Faith: Becoming the Kind of Christian the World Can't Resist

  1. 4 out of 5

    Wes Van Fleet

    This book may just be the most timely read for the Christian community as a whole. On one hand, Sauls lays out the basics of the Christian Faith. On the other hand, he shows why these basics are so beautiful and irresistible. One of my favorite chapters proposed a vision of leaving things a “little better.” Whether it’s loving our neighbor, laboring well in the workplace, or serving those in the church, we ought to be leaving things a little better off than it was before we were a part of it. I This book may just be the most timely read for the Christian community as a whole. On one hand, Sauls lays out the basics of the Christian Faith. On the other hand, he shows why these basics are so beautiful and irresistible. One of my favorite chapters proposed a vision of leaving things a “little better.” Whether it’s loving our neighbor, laboring well in the workplace, or serving those in the church, we ought to be leaving things a little better off than it was before we were a part of it. I highly recommend this book as a means to refreshing your thirst for Christ, his people, and your neighbor. Sauls has set forth an accessible and necessary deposit to the great treasure of Christian literature.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Michele Morin

    The philosophical underpinnings of Christianity point the way to a community where each one competes to show maximum honor and respect to the others. The Bible describes a rule of life that values individuals as carriers of the image of God and the church gathered as a place to be refueled for maximum impact when scattered. Biblical Christians made the world better wherever and whenever they showed up. If we could pull this off, it seems as if every church in North America would have to launch bu The philosophical underpinnings of Christianity point the way to a community where each one competes to show maximum honor and respect to the others. The Bible describes a rule of life that values individuals as carriers of the image of God and the church gathered as a place to be refueled for maximum impact when scattered. Biblical Christians made the world better wherever and whenever they showed up. If we could pull this off, it seems as if every church in North America would have to launch building or church planting programs to accommodate the masses lined up at their doors. Unfortunately, this is not the case, and in Irresistible Faith: Becoming the Kind of Christian the World Can’t Resist, author and pastor Scott Sauls invites readers to mind the gap between the life of faith described in the Bible and the one that gets practiced here on the ground in the 21st century. With so much at stake, and so much good that could be done, Sauls describes what it means to abide in an “irresistible Christ” (1) and to live in such a way that we do not contradict his teachings at every turn. What Does Irresistible Faith Look Like? With a three-part road map, Irresistible Faith plots a journey back toward lived-out doctrine that is winsome and compelling: 1. Draw close to Christ by taking his righteousness. Think his thoughts after him by immersing our brains in Scripture and allowing God’s Word to shape our understanding of suffering and the objects of our affections. 2. Live in intimate community with other believers in which members speak life-giving words over one another. This transparent living invites mutual correction based in a spirit of loving concern Sauls refers to as “soul surgery.” (79) This is the essence of true gospel living for all of us, for we are “desperately in ruins and graciously redeemed.” (91) Martin Luther said it well: “We are saved by faith alone, but not by a faith that is alone.” (94) 3. Carry all this gloriously generated grace out into the world. Share it with the poor. Broadcast it through our words and our worship, our work and our play, and let the overflow leave transformed lives in its wake. We Can Do Better Than This! We bury the winsomeness of our Savior beneath tactics designed to preserve and heighten our comfort and our control. Fear keeps us inside our fortresses, making decisions based in self-preservation. We can do better than this! Empowered by the Spirit, our lives and our love serve as ambassadors for a faith that “leaves people, places, and things better than they found them.” Simply irresistible! Many thanks to Thomas Nelson for providing a copy of this book to facilitate my review, which, of course, is offered freely and with honesty.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    It's good to see an increase in books like this one - books that are challenging the way we followers of God are presently living, speaking and behaving. I'm continually surprised by how many non-believers and/or non-church goers are sharing how uninspiring and unloving the average person claiming to be a Christian is. It breaks my heart as I realise I am no better. Sauls asks, “What would it look like for Christians, en masse, to start loving and following the whole Jesus and the whole Scripture It's good to see an increase in books like this one - books that are challenging the way we followers of God are presently living, speaking and behaving. I'm continually surprised by how many non-believers and/or non-church goers are sharing how uninspiring and unloving the average person claiming to be a Christian is. It breaks my heart as I realise I am no better. Sauls asks, “What would it look like for Christians, en masse, to start loving and following the whole Jesus and the whole Scripture, the whole time, into the whole world?” It's exciting to contemplate a different world one in which the followers of Jesus truly are a shining light and salty in flavour drawing others to the love of Jesus. Sauls does an excellent job in this well written book to highlight what a vibrant church of Jesus followers would look like and some of the causes for the current malaise. I really liked how he set the book out in 3 sections, 3 chapters in each: 1. Abiding in the Irresistible Christ - it all starts with Jesus. How does one become like Jesus if we're not continually hanging out with Him? 2. Belonging to an Irresistible Community - God is communal in His nature (3-in-one) and being made in His image we must be too. Accordingly, we can only thrive as believers if we commune together. 3. Becoming an Irresistible Christian - this was perhaps my favourite section as it challenged me the most. 3 chapters dealing with practical love for the poor, embracing work as a mission and being motivated to leave the earth a better place. This is a challenging and convicting read and I'd encourage every Christian to read it. I also hope Sauls produces a companion study guide that challenges the reader to execute upon some of the great content in the book. I received a complimentary copy of the book from Nelson Books via NetGalley without any expectation of a positive review.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Clayton Turner

    "What if the local church became the world's answer to loneliness and isolation, thereby becoming the life-giving alternative to social media-induced isolation and depression, soul stealing habits, noncommittal cohabitations and lonesome barstools? What if, in the spirit of Scripture’s vision for the integration of faith and work, Christians became known as the bosses everyone wants to work for, the colleagues everyone wants to work alongside, and the employees everyone wants to hire? What if, in "What if the local church became the world's answer to loneliness and isolation, thereby becoming the life-giving alternative to social media-induced isolation and depression, soul stealing habits, noncommittal cohabitations and lonesome barstools? What if, in the spirit of Scripture’s vision for the integration of faith and work, Christians became known as the bosses everyone wants to work for, the colleagues everyone wants to work alongside, and the employees everyone wants to hire? What if, in the spirit of Jesus' life and teaching, Christians became widely known not only as the best kind of friends but as the best kind of enemies -- responding to persecution with prayer, to scorn with kindness, to selfishness with generosity, to offense with forgiveness, and to hatefulness with grace and love?" ~ Scott Sauls, Irresistible Faith: Becoming the Kind of Christian the World Can't Resist

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jennie

    Scott Sauls has written a book I would recommend to everyone to read, no matter where you are in you faith. Irresistible Faith ~ Becoming the Kind of Christian the World Can’t Resist, is about what it means to be a Christian, what and how to be in community with others, dealing with our sin, atheism and doubters, loving people like Jesus ~ yes those hard to love ones too, serving and reaching out to others. I know many people that have felt burned by the church/Christians who claim they were fol Scott Sauls has written a book I would recommend to everyone to read, no matter where you are in you faith. Irresistible Faith ~ Becoming the Kind of Christian the World Can’t Resist, is about what it means to be a Christian, what and how to be in community with others, dealing with our sin, atheism and doubters, loving people like Jesus ~ yes those hard to love ones too, serving and reaching out to others. I know many people that have felt burned by the church/Christians who claim they were followers of Christ. I know people that would rather do this faith thing on their own. I know people that struggle in their belief. I also know people that don’t know Jesus Christ. He writes about those things I mention and more in the most encouraging, yet convicting and graceful way, with the truth of Scripture. He shares using his own experiences and stories from the Bible. Scott is a real down to earth person, as he shares his own faults and struggles, you don’t always see many Pastors do that, and I so appreciate it! He doesn’t say now you are a Christian and your life is great now or just go live in freedom, no he gives the Gospel truth we need to know! I so resonate with the many things he shares in the book and want to be more like that Christian he talks about being! I want to see more of them too, because I think when we are living and being obedient to the way Christ teaches, people will want to come see what church is like, the view of what it means to be a Christians will change. Scott asks this very question and it is a good one to ponder on “What would it look like for Christians, en masse, to start loving and following the whole Jesus and the whole Scripture, the whole time, into the whole world?” I don’t know about you, but I have a way to go yet, thankfully Christ is still working on me, breaking me free to live through the freedom Jesus gave us as Christians. Just as Scott reminds me, God has not left me alone to do this! I am thankful to be in a church and part of a small group that shares and lives gospel truth. I haven’t always and it was a struggle. So, I am taking the message of the book to heart, praying, and pondering on it! Here are some of my favorite parts from the book, just a few, because it seems like I have highlights on almost every page. Rather than shinning as a light to the culture, we often become products of the culture. The world thirsts for a different kind of neighbor – not the kind who deny their fellow man, take up their comforts, and follow their dreams – but the kind who deny themselves, take up their crosses, and follow Jesus in His mission of loving a weary world to life. Until Jesus returns, we will continue to fall short of the glory for which we have been created. Encouragement comes knowing that even the greatest heroes of faith were flawed and broken – wrecked, weary, restless, and sometiems tortured sinners – even when they were at their very best. Even though we will never fully attian it in this life, we must continue to strive with all the energy Christ supplies toward the perfect for which we were made – recognizing that even the striving is a gift given to us by Him. God loves us to the degree that we are in Christ. A slow rate of change need not lead to self loathing, because even when sin abounds for the Christian, the grace of God super-abounds. People don’t reject the Bible because it contradicts itself; they reject the Bible because it contradicts them. Following Jesus and following Scripture are inseperable endeavors. The Bible, as opposed to our feelings, opinions, experiences, and wishes begins to have the final say about things that are true, beautiful, and praiseworthy. We creatures are not meant to censor out our Creator’s words; His words are meant to censor us. When we plug our soul into any power source besides Jesus and expect it to give us life, it will steal life from us instead. If our souls look toward Jesus, our relationships with other persons, places, and things will become healthier. For many people, the pursuit of happiness is built on something that is not true, on a promise made by some Jesus-substitute/counterfeit- god. And if you take away someone’s counterfeit god, if you take away a person’s functional lord and savior, if you take away a person’s precious – whether it be a wealth, romance, career, healthy, friendship or fame – you take away that person’s functional sources of meaning and joy. Jesus plus nothing equals everything. It is far better to be known and loved than it is to be followed, tweeted, and applauded. For God has made us for community, not for isolation, for interdependence, not for autonomy; for relational warmth and receptivity, not for relational coldness and distance. When we neglect either encouragement or correction in our life together, we invite unhealthy, distorted realities to rule. God sometimes calls us to inflict on one another – always as with a scalpel and never as with a sword – can sometimes create further relational strain. And yet, because God’s thoughts and ways are highter than ours, we must remain confident that God is at work. As important as it is for Christians to represent Jesus well to a watching world, Christians’ failure to do so is no good reason to dismass the Man Himself. Being poor is no more a sign of God’s unhappiness than being rich is an indication of his favor. Material wealth is niether moral nor immoral – although the means of acquiring wealth is – and neither poverty nor riches is a sign of God’s blessing nor a sign of God’s curse.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    I enjoy reading Sauls and this work does not disappoint. It is a call back to the basics of Christianity: gospel-centrality, loving community, and incarnational mission and ministry. Lots of great quotes and cultural exegesis, all written with a pastor's heart.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Kilby Vannette

    One of the most compelling things to me about Christianity is a view of the gospel that is restorative. My childhood theology viewed the gospel more as a 'get-out-of-hell-free-card' that had much less to do with the here and now. So why bother making the world a better place? The perspective shift that Scott outlines and invites us to imagine is truly irresistible. What if Christians did love people, places, and things back to life? (pg. 161) What if we embraced our "universal Christian job desc One of the most compelling things to me about Christianity is a view of the gospel that is restorative. My childhood theology viewed the gospel more as a 'get-out-of-hell-free-card' that had much less to do with the here and now. So why bother making the world a better place? The perspective shift that Scott outlines and invites us to imagine is truly irresistible. What if Christians did love people, places, and things back to life? (pg. 161) What if we embraced our "universal Christian job description--to use our time, energy, imagination, and resources to leave God's world better than we found it?" (pg. 149) What if we followed Jesus' example of working "for our rescue, restoration, and renewal?" (pg. 141) To see death move in reverse, shattered creation healed, brokenness restored, and everything sad come untrue. That's precisely the sort of mission mission I'd want to join. Sign me up.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Conrade Yap

    The Christian Church is in the midst of challenging times. In fact, the way that the world view the Church has not changed a lot. The Church and Christians remain quite a rejected bunch of people in many societies. One of the reasons is what author Scott Sauls say: "the people of Jesus often have not represented him well." Many of us know that Christianity is about Christ. Yet, there are many who are disappointed with the behaviour of Christians, which in turn leads them to reject Christianity a The Christian Church is in the midst of challenging times. In fact, the way that the world view the Church has not changed a lot. The Church and Christians remain quite a rejected bunch of people in many societies. One of the reasons is what author Scott Sauls say: "the people of Jesus often have not represented him well." Many of us know that Christianity is about Christ. Yet, there are many who are disappointed with the behaviour of Christians, which in turn leads them to reject Christianity altogether. This is a pity but also a common reality. Mahatma Gandhi once commented about Christians: "I like your Christ, but I do not like your Christians. Your Christians are so unlike your Christ." He is not the only one who says things like that. Many non-believers are aghast at the way some Christians are politicizing religion; having hypocritical behaviour; and doing things that are perceived as "holier-than-thou" attitudes. Such cultural climates, rightly or wrongly, are what believers have to go through these days. Safe to say, if believers were to practice according to the teachings of Jesus, they might be seen in a better light. Having said that, historically, believers no matter how pious or charitable they had been, criticisms have never subsided. Even Jesus Himself had been persecuted. This is unavoidable. What author Scott Sauls has proposed is a good posture of resilience and optimistic response. Society nowadays, rightly or wrongly, discredits the entire Christian population, albeit unfairly. One should not generalize the entire Christian faith on the basis of a section of Christians. Yet that happens a lot. The challenge before us is this: How do we move from this state to becoming a community where people would find us and our faith irresistible? Three things: 1) Abide in Christ; 2) Belong to an irresistible community; and finally, 3) becoming an irresistible Christian. Sauls makes several pertinent observations. The problem with the negative image about Christians is both external and internal. Externally, it is because the behaviour of Christians do not reflect enough of Christlikeness. Internally, it is due to Christians' flawed understanding of Christianity. He embarks on a positive journey to remind us of the great achievements of old. In spite of opposition, Christians have started hospitals, universities, contributed positively to the arts and the charities; etc. They have helped society to flourish at that time and we ought to continue our witness in our present times. At the same time, we are urged to avoid adopting any "holier-than-thou" behaviour or to politicize our beliefs. We should do our part to shape culture. In Part One, Sauls begins with Christ. No matter how impossible it is, any optimism must stem from abiding in Christ. That means recognizing that Christ accepts us as we are. He makes a good observation, that even when Jesus felt forsaken when He was at the cross, we are given much grace that even in the midst of struggle, we could even question God: "My God, why haven't You forsaken me?" That is a comforting thought. At the end of the day, it is all about God loving us and we living for approval by God. Having said that, Sauls takes us through the journey of struggling to read the Bible. Many struggle with boredom, confusion, and lack of focus. That is why we need to depend on the Holy Spirit to help us get our heads straight. The journey to savouring Christ needs divine guidance, more than mere human perseverance. Part Two brings us to the effects of abiding in Christ. A community is about relationship. Without the foundation on Christ, Christian community loses its meaning and identity. Sauls shares several examples about the need as well as the impact of a transparent, kind, intimate, and compassionate community. In our world, it is common to be showered with thousands of praises, but all it takes is one criticism and we can get shaken. An irresistible community will not only cultivate an atmosphere of safety, it helps us be ourselves. Not only that, we help one another grow beyond our negativity in a beneficial way. That said, we also need courage to stand up for what we believe in, rather than to shirk back at the first signs of opposition. Even when we admit we are a mess, that does not mean we should quit altogether. After all, the gospel is for hypocrites from all walks of life! As long as we learn and respond humbly, there is no preventing us from reaching out. An irresistible community also embraces hope and helps one another to do the same. Part Three puts all the discussion we have so far into action, especially about personal testimonies to becoming an "irresistible Christian." First, learn to treasure the marginalized, especially the poor. They are often ignored. Once we have learned to deny ourselves, identifying with the poor becomes much easier. We are not self-accomplished individuals. We are nothing without God. With God, they believe that God's blessings are to be shared, not hoarded. This attitude of sharing and caring are practical steps toward blessing our neighbours. The work we do should not just be making money or to make ends meet. It is a mission for Christ. Once we have this as the reason for work, going to work need not be purposeless or monotonous. As new creation people, we ought to seek to leave this world a better place than before. Sauls exhorts us to cultivate and live out a "love-driven, life-giving" community, even when such communities are increasingly a minority in many parts of the world. My Thoughts First, I thank the author for reminding us once again that there is hope and excitement in the proclamation of the gospel in words as well as in deeds. Faith without works is dead. Work without faith is meaningless. We have many reasons to be optimistic and hopeful. Sauls has given many reasons for such hope throughout the book. Some of the ideas would take sometime to sink in, especially the part about "being ok with not being ok." As people have said, the longest journey is from the head to the heart. The gospel reminds us that we need to abide in Christ and to let Christ abide in us. For without Christ, we can do nothing. Hopefully, readers will get a good sense of this truth as they read this book. It is easy to plunge into the more "practical" part of the book, but I would advise against that. Every work and activity needs a firm foundation. With patience, we would get there. Second, don't for one imagine that there will be no resistance. There are obvious limits to any forms of optimism. I am sure the author writes this book with the best of intentions and the highest of hopes. Unfortunately, it may be too idealistic to think that practicing all the good we could automatically result in being "irresistible" to the world of opinions. Jesus has said clearly that those who follow Him will be persecuted. Scriptures are full of reminders to believers not to be discouraged when the world reject us. Christians are not of this world, though they are in the world. In other words, in spite of the optimism that Sauls puts into the book with regard to becoming the people the world cannot resist, I think the opposite is more true. The more we be like Christ, the greater the rejection rates. It is an unfair world, so we should not deceive ourselves into thinking that we can change the world's thinking. Finally, a reminder that our objective in the Christian life is not about becoming "irresistible" in itself. This is a byproduct of something bigger: Christlikeness. We are called to Christ and this means called to holiness. We can try to become as attractive as possible to the world, but that again is a red herring, a futile exercise in itself. What really matters is how we love God and love people. This is a lifelong journey of perseverance in our pursuit of God. For Jesus has reminded us that blessed are those who seek after God's righteousness, for they shall be filled. This is a promise that we can take heart in. Don't give up on the tasks before us. Don't give in to discouragement surrounding us. Don't give away the hopes we have in Jesus. Stay Scott Sauls is senior pastor of Christ Presbyterian Church in Nashville, Tennessee. He was formerly a lead and teaching pastor at New York City's Redeemer Presbyterian Church. He also teaches homiletics at Covenant Theological Seminary. Rating: 4 stars of 5. conrade This book has been provided courtesy of Nelson Books and NetGalley without requiring a positive review. All opinions offered above are mine unless otherwise stated or implied.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bill Pence

    This is pastor Scott Sauls’ fourth book. I always find his books challenging and quite helpful. Irresistible Faith is no exception. The “Foreword” is written by Bob Goff. He writes that the book is an invitation for us to return to the most authentic version of our faith. It’s also an invitation to join, or create, an authentic community of people trying to go somewhere beautiful with their faith. He states that Scott has given us some beautiful reminders about what each of us needs and about th This is pastor Scott Sauls’ fourth book. I always find his books challenging and quite helpful. Irresistible Faith is no exception. The “Foreword” is written by Bob Goff. He writes that the book is an invitation for us to return to the most authentic version of our faith. It’s also an invitation to join, or create, an authentic community of people trying to go somewhere beautiful with their faith. He states that Scott has given us some beautiful reminders about what each of us needs and about the Someone we can trust to go with. Sauls tells us that these days the word “Christian” seems to evoke as many negative reactions as it does positive ones. He asks how it was that we ended up alienating the world around us from Christ, rather than attracting it to Christ? He tells us that at times our lives are perceived as being more lackluster than compelling, more contentious than kind, more self-centered than servant-like, more fickle than faithful, more materialistic than generous, more proud than humble. Instead of shining as a light to the culture, we often become products of the culture. He tells us that as those whom Christ has called the light of the world, the salt of the earth, and a city on a hill, we still have a long way to go. He tells us that the world thirsts for the kind of neighbors who deny themselves, take up their crosses, and follow Jesus in his mission of loving a weary world to life. The world also thirsts for a new vision for being human, for pursuing and entering friendship, and for leaving things better than we found them. Looking back at the church depicted in the book of Acts, he asks what it would look like for Christians to be reignited in this kind of faith for our time? What would it look like for us to become those who live most beautifully, love most deeply, and serve most faithfully in the places where we live, work, and play? What would it look like for Christians to become an irresistible force again, even among their nonbelieving friends, colleagues, and neighbors? He tells us that well-formed followers of Christ can’t help but become positive contributors to the places they live, work, and play. This book is an attempt to nudge readers in that direction, away from worldliness and toward a world that thirsts for a hope that only Christ can provide. The first part of the book is designed to help the reader draw closer to Christ, our ultimate source of nourishment and light. The second part explores how living in community with other believers is an essential component to this endeavor. The final section encourages the reader to take the grace we have received from Christ and from each other into the world in a way that uplifts the poor, integrates faith and work, and leaves the world better than we found it. As in his previous three books, Sauls is vulnerable and honest in his writing, telling us that he sometimes feels like he is more part of the problem than he is a part of the solution. He tells us that the first step in our journey becoming like Jesus is acknowledging how unlike Jesus we are and knowing that he loves us just the same. While we are simultaneously sinners and saints, in Christ we are identified solely as the latter. The process of growing into the forgiveness, perfect righteousness, love, and character of Jesus is precisely that—a process. I appreciated his statement that when Christ invites us to come to him as we are, he doesn’t intend for us to stay as we are. The closer we grow to Jesus, the less dominated by sin we will be. And the less we are dominated by sin, the more like Jesus we will become. He writes about Scripture, telling us that fulfilling our calling to love and enjoy God with everything we are and to love our neighbor as ourselves—that is, becoming irresistible—stands or falls on whether or not we become people of the Book. He states that a sure sign that we have been filled with the Holy Spirit is the presence of a new affection and thirst for Scripture, and that the Bible in all of its parts is a reliable roadmap for trusting, following, and becoming like Him. He tells us that when our lives are united to Christ through faith, we have the assurance that our best days are always ahead of us and never behind us. He addresses a number of topics in this helpful book, including our work (that chapter was worth the price of the book for me), serving the poor, idols (our functional lord and savior), possessions, kindness and encouraging words over criticism and judging others and the resurrection. Throughout the book he offers helpful illustrations as well as quotes from theologians, pastors and authors that he appreciates, such as C.S. Lewis, Tim Keller, Jonathan Edwards, Dorothy Sayers and John Bunyan. The book ends with an appendix including “A Prayer for Irresistible Faith” which gives in summary form the many themes of the book. I highlighted many passages in the book. Here are 10 of my favorite quotes: • On the cross, Jesus took the punishment that our sins deserve, thereby moving our judgment day from the future to the past. • When our lives are united to Christ through faith, we have the assurance that our best days are always ahead of us and never behind us. • Everything minus Jesus equals nothing, and Jesus plus nothing equals everything. • What if all it took for us to become the “light of the world” and the “salt of the earth” and the “city on a hill” to our friends, neighbors, and colleagues was to choose kindness over criticism toward one another, giving the benefit of the doubt over assuming the worst in one another, building each other up instead of tearing each other down. • While Jesus invites us to come as we are, he does not want us to stay as we are. • This is the good news—that in Jesus, God has forgiven all shame and guilt from sins past, present, and future. No one is beyond the forgiveness and grace that Jesus offers and accomplishes with his own death and resurrection. • Jesus did not come to make bad people good or good people better, but to bring dead people to life. • Blessed are those who recognize that in having everything without Jesus, they have nothing, and in having Jesus and nothing else, they have everything. • Work, all productive activity apart from rest and play, contributes to our fulfillment as God’s image-bearers. It is one of the primary ways we have been invited by God to participate in his mission to redeem, restore, and develop the world. • All Christians are called as Christ’s ambassadors into the places where they live, work, play, and worship, with the glorious purpose of leaving people, places, and things better than they found them. This is the universal Christian job description.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

    In full disclosure, I have known Scott Sauls since the late 1990's and have been a friend, student, and fan of his career ever since. I know his voice, his theological background, some of his loves, some of his strengths, and some of his weaknesses. We have a relationship. Scott's writing voice is very much like he is sitting with you and having a conversation. The book is a very easy read and one that I found myself forcing a break to put it down and think, process, and pray. Scott is writing fr In full disclosure, I have known Scott Sauls since the late 1990's and have been a friend, student, and fan of his career ever since. I know his voice, his theological background, some of his loves, some of his strengths, and some of his weaknesses. We have a relationship. Scott's writing voice is very much like he is sitting with you and having a conversation. The book is a very easy read and one that I found myself forcing a break to put it down and think, process, and pray. Scott is writing from his experiences and his teaching voice. In short, he has lived, breathed and taught this world view/view of the Church and writes from a very authentic place. The organization of this book is important. Scott does a good job of laying out the foundation of the Gospel and pointing us to the what causes this good news of faith to be the engine of our lives. Books of this type could digress into a checklist of things to check off and implement and this offering steers clear of that. Scott directs us to the only source from which our strength comes and the reminder is sweet food. The natural outgrowth of an invigorated awakening by Jesus' resurrection and infilling of the Spirit into our lives is community which encompasses part two of the book. Scott illustrates that true community is authentic, open, and often messy. This is a message we need to hear. Lastly, the outward reaching and living irresistibly through lives of faith is addressed in the final section. This faith is something that makes a difference and is ultimately what causes us to love others such that we will live outwardly with joy, love, and long suffering. I felt that this last section of the book could have been developed even more and had a larger percentage of the material. I believe the actual audience for this book is the church-ed and more specifically the fundamentalist audience that overemphasizes scripture relative to tradition and reason. I like where Scott was moving with the book toward an even more social aspect of the Gospel. I wish he would have continued on that trajectory. We need that in the Church and this book begins us on that path. When viewing a work of art I think that the major importance is how it informs your heart and mind and causes them to ask questions, awaken with awe and wonder, and grow. This book is one that can and should be returned to multiple times over extended periods. Live with the Scriptures, the stories, and ultimately the heart of Jesus that is pointed to in these pages. You very well may be energized and your faith become a bit more irresistible.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Josh Cuthbertson

    It's the gospel all over again...and who DOESN'T need to hear it all over again. If you're familiar with Scott's other books or are a regular reader of his blog you'll find this book very familiar. Scott has a gift for reminding us the same truth in a way that never gets old. Irresistible Faith is an easy read that's full of Biblical references, stories, and examples from saints gone before us. You'll be encouraged by what you read. My main take-aways were as follows... 1. You're NOT o.k....and t It's the gospel all over again...and who DOESN'T need to hear it all over again. If you're familiar with Scott's other books or are a regular reader of his blog you'll find this book very familiar. Scott has a gift for reminding us the same truth in a way that never gets old. Irresistible Faith is an easy read that's full of Biblical references, stories, and examples from saints gone before us. You'll be encouraged by what you read. My main take-aways were as follows... 1. You're NOT o.k....and that's o.k. (no one is) 2. In Christ, you're FORGIVEN (and that's good news) 3. Life is all about growing in that knowledge of WHOSE you are and what's ahead (One day you'll finally being O.K., PERFECTED) 4. In the meantime, keep doing what you're doing (loving your neighbors, being excellent in your work, serving the poor, leaving the world a better place than you found it) and trusting in Christ, not in yourself. And if we do this, together with other believers, the world will take notice and want what we have. I'll leave you with this quote from the book, “When our lives are united to Christ through faith, we have the assurance that our best days are always ahead of us and never behind us, that every Christian’s long-term “worst-case scenario” is resurrection and everlasting life, that our struggles represent a single paragraph in a single chapter in the middle of a story whose last chapter is a joy-filled, sorrow-free everlasting life, and we know this because the Bible tell us so.” And that's the gospel...HOPE is only found in Christ and his promises.

  12. 5 out of 5

    David

    What does Biblical Christianity look like? What if followers of Christ lived the type of faith that would attract the world, rather than repelling it? Scott Sauls has written a very practical book about faith that is lived in daily life. He begins with faith as a personal matter. We must "be okay with not being okay." Faith in Christ requires an understanding that we don't have it all together, but trust in Christ to make it "okay" in the end. The second section involves life in the community of What does Biblical Christianity look like? What if followers of Christ lived the type of faith that would attract the world, rather than repelling it? Scott Sauls has written a very practical book about faith that is lived in daily life. He begins with faith as a personal matter. We must "be okay with not being okay." Faith in Christ requires an understanding that we don't have it all together, but trust in Christ to make it "okay" in the end. The second section involves life in the community of faith. in the chapter entitled "Performing Soul Surgery on One Another" Sauls reminds us why we must confront each other in love. Isn't that hypocrisy? Sauls notes that what qualifies you or me to steer anyone from a path of sin to a path of wholeness is not that we have our acts together. If that were so, we would all be disqualified. Rather, it is in treating others as fellow sinners who are on a journey beside us that we have a duty to help our fellow traveler deal with the speck in his eye. Finally, Sauls puts Irresistible Faith into perspective in how we live daily. We must treasure and help the poor, rather than blaming and ignoring them. We should see our work as a mission, rather than a job that has no relationship to our faith. Finally, our task is to leave the world a little bit better by the way we live. Thanks to the publisher for providing an advance reader copy in exchange for an honest review.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jan Shaffer

    “What if, in the spirit of the early church, Christians once again began to enjoy the favor of all the people – not because of how like the world they have become…, but because of how unlike the world they have become through their lives of love and good deeds?” Scott Sauls reminds us of Christ’s vision of His church as the light of the world, the salt of the earth, a city on a hill. Then, from a posture of humility and a determined faithfulness to Jesus’ call to “speak the truth in love,” he ca “What if, in the spirit of the early church, Christians once again began to enjoy the favor of all the people – not because of how like the world they have become…, but because of how unlike the world they have become through their lives of love and good deeds?” Scott Sauls reminds us of Christ’s vision of His church as the light of the world, the salt of the earth, a city on a hill. Then, from a posture of humility and a determined faithfulness to Jesus’ call to “speak the truth in love,” he calls us out for the long way we have to go if we’re to live into that vision: “Rather than shining as a light to the culture, we have often become products of the culture.” “We have let ourselves become imbalanced, lopsided, and unfocused (much like the rigid, holier-than-thou Pharisees and the materialistic, secular Sadducees of the New Testament).” The solution? “To regain our footing, we need to begin following the whole Jesus and the whole Scripture, into the whole world, the whole time.” The three sections of the book – “Abiding in the Irresistible Christ,” “Belonging to an Irresistible Community,” and “Becoming an Irresistible Christian” – lay out our path. As the author assures his readers, Jesus is with us every step of the way. This is a very accessible book, filled with grace and love and hope. It will be helpful to the new Christian as well as those of us who may know a lot about the Bible but still have room to put a lot more of it into practice.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ben Flaming

    What I love about Scott and his writing is that he asks the tough questions and challenges us to think through our positions, opinions, beliefs and our way of doing things - that's convicting but never arrogant. With confident humility, he simply asks the "what ifs" to see if we can find a better way - instead of being quite irresistible to the world, having a faith that becomes irresistible, first to us as the Church, and then to those around us. I love this quote that he deems our necessary star What I love about Scott and his writing is that he asks the tough questions and challenges us to think through our positions, opinions, beliefs and our way of doing things - that's convicting but never arrogant. With confident humility, he simply asks the "what ifs" to see if we can find a better way - instead of being quite irresistible to the world, having a faith that becomes irresistible, first to us as the Church, and then to those around us. I love this quote that he deems our necessary starting point... "The beginning of blessedness—and the beginning of real change that will cause the world to notice the light in us—is not the realization that we are okay, but the realization that we are not okay. It is not in becoming convinced that we are superior to everyone else, but in recognizing that we are no better than anyone else. It is not in believing that we are strong and capable and competent, but in accepting that we are frail and incapable and weak, while also being fearfully and wonderfully made (Ps. 139:14). It is not in thinking that God expects us to be awesome and prettied-up and all put together, but in gaining confidence that God has first and foremost, in Christ, caused us to be forgiven, loved, faithful, and free. It is from this humble place—and only from this place—that we have any chance of growing into the virtues of Christ. It is only when we can cry out, 'God, be merciful to me, a sinner!' that we are sent home justified, blameless in his sight, and confident in his love (Luke 18:9–14)."

  15. 4 out of 5

    Chad Ellenburg

    As I read through Irresistible Faith I was reminded of Jeremiah 6:16 to “stand by the road, and look, and ask for the ancient paths, where the good way is; and walk in it.” Scott calls us to the simple, yet deep path of following Jesus and the Way is still the way. I loved the focus on Jesus and His Word. One of his early quotes spoke of our need for “the whole Jesus, the whole Scripture into the whole world, the whole time.” His voice rings true with the consistent and faithful message of Chris As I read through Irresistible Faith I was reminded of Jeremiah 6:16 to “stand by the road, and look, and ask for the ancient paths, where the good way is; and walk in it.” Scott calls us to the simple, yet deep path of following Jesus and the Way is still the way. I loved the focus on Jesus and His Word. One of his early quotes spoke of our need for “the whole Jesus, the whole Scripture into the whole world, the whole time.” His voice rings true with the consistent and faithful message of Christianity throughout the millennia - our ability to become irresistible “stands and falls on whether or not we become people of the Book.” The words of Jesus came through each chapter: loving His Word and finding comfort in “the Bible tells us so,” humbling ourselves as we accept criticism and confront others with grace and truth, loving and serving our enemies rather than calling them out, becoming a people who walk with a limp in our dependence on Jesus, sacrificially loving the poor and cast-aways, engaging the deep thinkers of the world with the depth of a faith that is grounded in the work of Jesus, and so many others. I was challenged and convicted in many ways. You will find your own heart and mind challenged and probably come away with a few things knocked loose that will nudge you toward the irresistible Jesus and His Gospel.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kevin L. Law

    Another excellent book from Scott Sauls. True to the historical gospel message of the unbelievable grace of God as demonstrated through the life and death of his Son, Jesus Christ. My only quibble is the title, which feels a little bit like a bait and switch, given the content. Consider this passage from Chapter 6. "But what if the failure of Christians actually turns out to be the best argument for Christianity? What if the failure of Christians, in the end, is the thing that makes the Christian Another excellent book from Scott Sauls. True to the historical gospel message of the unbelievable grace of God as demonstrated through the life and death of his Son, Jesus Christ. My only quibble is the title, which feels a little bit like a bait and switch, given the content. Consider this passage from Chapter 6. "But what if the failure of Christians actually turns out to be the best argument for Christianity? What if the failure of Christians, in the end, is the thing that makes the Christian movement irresistible to billions of souls all over the world? The resurrection story represents the inauguration of a new world order, one in which a new community forms based not on how well God’s people follow his ways but on how fully God forgives them of their failure and inability to do so." This I suspect veers from what many (most?) Christians would be expecting from this work based on the subtitle. You know, another dose of Do More, Try Harder for God. But I'm actually very pleased with this semi-subversive way he delivers this message. You may or may not connect with Scott's message, but there's plenty of truth here to chew on. And like your vegetables, it's all good for you.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Okay I’ll admit I was so ready not to like this book because I started reading it in the midst of the current (but really more “enduring” than “current”) national climate of racial injustice. Another conservative white male Christian about to tell me what I need to do to be a better Christian? No thanks. Alas, it was the book chosen for my book club, so I decided to check my attitude at the door and understand that God can and does speak through whomever he’d like to. And I’m so glad I did. The m Okay I’ll admit I was so ready not to like this book because I started reading it in the midst of the current (but really more “enduring” than “current”) national climate of racial injustice. Another conservative white male Christian about to tell me what I need to do to be a better Christian? No thanks. Alas, it was the book chosen for my book club, so I decided to check my attitude at the door and understand that God can and does speak through whomever he’d like to. And I’m so glad I did. The message of nearly every chapter of this book was convicting and so relevant to my everyday experience. It was that double-edged sword, piercing straight through my heart, calling me to repent of all the ways I’ve gone on living for, protecting/preserving, and building up myself and my comfort...and how counterproductive, self-defeating, and counter-missional (is that a word?) that all is, anyway. If you don’t want to be challenged, don’t read this book. Though I hope you give it a chance and prayerfully enter into it with the openness to see how God can touch and heal your deepest wounds in order for you to share that with others who so desperately need it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Scott McFaddin

    This entry by author Scott Sauls is a great reminder of what we are called to as Christians. While "Irresistible Faith" doesn't grab and shake you like his previous, and more affecting books, "Jesus Outside the Lines" and "Befriend", this is still a good read to keep our heads right and focused for what a Christian witness means in today's cultural and political environment. I appreciate Scott's reminder that God has used, and continues to use broken people to achieve his mission, after all we C This entry by author Scott Sauls is a great reminder of what we are called to as Christians. While "Irresistible Faith" doesn't grab and shake you like his previous, and more affecting books, "Jesus Outside the Lines" and "Befriend", this is still a good read to keep our heads right and focused for what a Christian witness means in today's cultural and political environment. I appreciate Scott's reminder that God has used, and continues to use broken people to achieve his mission, after all we Christians are broken and in need of Healer just like everyone. Irresistible Faith includes personal examples of his own shortcomings and failings and words well as a mirror to us to examine our own areas where we need to learn some humility and perhaps even ask for forgiveness (or give it to others). The books ends with a series of "What if..." questions and this is great way to wrap up and give us a vision of what the world can look like "if" we are known more for our love and actions rather than our theology and words.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Wesley

    "Irresistible Faith" is both an inspiring as well as challenging call to the church to once again be the kind of community Luke describes in Acts 2 "having favour with all the people" and to whom God was daily adding to their number. This has nothing to do with attracting people to us, but to the Christ *in* us as we live lives more and more consistent with the character of Jesus. I love Saul's emphasis on beginning with our own abiding in Jesus; rooting us in the only place our power lies. But "Irresistible Faith" is both an inspiring as well as challenging call to the church to once again be the kind of community Luke describes in Acts 2 "having favour with all the people" and to whom God was daily adding to their number. This has nothing to do with attracting people to us, but to the Christ *in* us as we live lives more and more consistent with the character of Jesus. I love Saul's emphasis on beginning with our own abiding in Jesus; rooting us in the only place our power lies. But then, calling us to join in community with other like-minded disciples in a way that challenges current cultural narratives of Christianity and reverses Gandhi's well known quote about loving the Christ of Christianity but not the Christians. We have deserved a lot of that critique many times and Saul's book is a powerful call to acknowledge where that is true of us and then seek, with the Spirit's help, to live in such a way that makes such critiques no longer valid. Highly recommended read!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Bible Gateway

    Jesus envisioned his followers would be hard to resist: a wildly diverse yet compellingly unified multitude of strangers that would penetrate the world with love. They would lead the world in acts of love and justice and be the most life-giving bosses, employees, neighbors, and friends. They’d also be the best enemies, returning insults with kindness and persecution with prayers. They’d stay true to their biblical convictions while loving, listening to, and serving those who don’t share their co Jesus envisioned his followers would be hard to resist: a wildly diverse yet compellingly unified multitude of strangers that would penetrate the world with love. They would lead the world in acts of love and justice and be the most life-giving bosses, employees, neighbors, and friends. They’d also be the best enemies, returning insults with kindness and persecution with prayers. They’d stay true to their biblical convictions while loving, listening to, and serving those who don’t share their convictions. Over time this Jesus movement would become irresistible to people from every nation, tribe, and tongue. How does Christianity stack up to Jesus’ expectations? Bible Gateway interviewed Scott Sauls about his book, Irresistible Faith: Becoming the Kind of Christian the World Can’t Resist. Check out the interview here: https://www.biblegateway.com/blog/201...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Knouse

    Irresistible Faith comes at just the right time. As a youth minister I very commonly see apathetic, content with where they're at Christians, living life by a compartmentalized means where God takes up but one compartment, not affecting the whole of their lives (I find myself here at times as well). Scott Sauls has also noticed this, and has provided an inspiring work, pressing us on towards the goal of an irresistible faith. This book is convicting, reassuring, and encouraging. I felt as if God Irresistible Faith comes at just the right time. As a youth minister I very commonly see apathetic, content with where they're at Christians, living life by a compartmentalized means where God takes up but one compartment, not affecting the whole of their lives (I find myself here at times as well). Scott Sauls has also noticed this, and has provided an inspiring work, pressing us on towards the goal of an irresistible faith. This book is convicting, reassuring, and encouraging. I felt as if God was speaking directly to me through the words that Scott has written. I highly recommend this book to those who feel as if their faith has dried up in a sense. I also recommend it to those who have doubts about who God is and what Christianity is. Heck, I recommend this book to anyone and everyone, it's incredible. I hope you take the time to read it and soak in it.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Curtis Taylor

    Irresistible Faith reminds us that growing in God’s grace is a balance in all of life. It’s a reminder of “... while Jesus invites us to come as we are, he does not want us to stay as we are.*” Scott writes about the struggle in our real vs. perceived standing with God; the balance in the way we live our life in various relationships and communities; and the balance in our walk, our actions we show the entire world. Irresistible Faith serves to remind us that the sanctified life for the follower Irresistible Faith reminds us that growing in God’s grace is a balance in all of life. It’s a reminder of “... while Jesus invites us to come as we are, he does not want us to stay as we are.*” Scott writes about the struggle in our real vs. perceived standing with God; the balance in the way we live our life in various relationships and communities; and the balance in our walk, our actions we show the entire world. Irresistible Faith serves to remind us that the sanctified life for the follower of Christ is not characterized by an elevator or escalator. The life of a follower of Christ is more like a staircase built by God, differently, for each follower. The staircase is characterized by fine steps made of gold as well as broken, ragged and missing steps where the Holy Spirit, through intervention or guidance, makes sure the follower gets to the top.

  23. 5 out of 5

    J.L. Martin

    I would definitely recommend the book. The nine chapters are broken into three parts: Abiding in the Irresistible Christ, Belonging to an Irresistible Community and Becoming an Irresistible Christian. One of my favorite things about the book is the flow from abiding with Christ to community to world. Too often Christian books focus on one of those three and in the process we miss the connection and importance of all three. Also, one of the things that Scott Sauls does so well is show how a “conser I would definitely recommend the book. The nine chapters are broken into three parts: Abiding in the Irresistible Christ, Belonging to an Irresistible Community and Becoming an Irresistible Christian. One of my favorite things about the book is the flow from abiding with Christ to community to world. Too often Christian books focus on one of those three and in the process we miss the connection and importance of all three. Also, one of the things that Scott Sauls does so well is show how a “conservative” understanding of Scripture leads to a “liberal” way of loving others. He did this in Jesus Outside the Lines and this book reinforces that again. In this day and age, we need more unity and I believe Scott’s book will help us experience it. I plan to use this book in an adult class I teach at church. Go and pick up the book today!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Scott Sauls has become a favorite voice of mine to read. I especially enjoyed his book, Befriended, so at the opportunity to read Irresistible Faith, I jumped. His voice and this book are very timely in my opinion. The basics of the Christian faith are important and Scott clearly lays those out here in his book, but not only does he want the reader to understand they are important, he wants the reader to understand they are important because it was what made the Gospel contagious and allowed it Scott Sauls has become a favorite voice of mine to read. I especially enjoyed his book, Befriended, so at the opportunity to read Irresistible Faith, I jumped. His voice and this book are very timely in my opinion. The basics of the Christian faith are important and Scott clearly lays those out here in his book, but not only does he want the reader to understand they are important, he wants the reader to understand they are important because it was what made the Gospel contagious and allowed it to spread in the early church. When Christians are restorative, rather than judgmental, they point people to Jesus. This invites people to a relationship not religion. This book is honest, authentic and the writing is from a place of authenticity, which I can appreciate. Overall, I highly enjoyed this book and know that you will too.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ronja

    What if Christians became the best advertisement for Jesus? That is the idea behind Scott Saul’s book, Irresistible Faith. Jesus said His followers would be a light to the world and a city on a hill — a warmly inviting, neighbor-loving, grace- and truth-filled destination for all. Irresistible Faith is a blueprint for pursuing this vision in our current day and age. It holds ideas what we can do as individuals and communities, to pursue to vision and apply it to our lives. Irresistible Faith cons What if Christians became the best advertisement for Jesus? That is the idea behind Scott Saul’s book, Irresistible Faith. Jesus said His followers would be a light to the world and a city on a hill — a warmly inviting, neighbor-loving, grace- and truth-filled destination for all. Irresistible Faith is a blueprint for pursuing this vision in our current day and age. It holds ideas what we can do as individuals and communities, to pursue to vision and apply it to our lives. Irresistible Faith consists of three parts: abiding in the irresistible Christ., belonging to an irresistible community, and becoming an irresistible Christian. All these are based on biblical convictions and Scripture. I found that this book is a great reminder for all Christians. We are supposed be a light to the world. However, that does not mean that we need to become “relatable” to the world. These two get mixed up fairly easily, which is why I think Irresistible Faith is a good read for us all. I have to say, though, that Irresistible Faith didn’t really speak that much to me. Not because it didn’t have good content, no, not at all. I really liked the content of this book. I liked all the calls to action, that were clearly drawn from the Bible. Really, this book went through important topics and Scott Sauls covered them in a good way. But in this season of life, this was not a book that spoke to me.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Vicki Gatchell

    In Irresisitible Faith, Scott Sauls lights a path for us from genuine, committed faith through personal transformation, to community, and outward to the world around us. Our trust in God's transformative work in our own lives readies us to bring the hope that the world needs to hear. Sauls writes: "According to the One who created, and sustains, and intends to renew the world, the answer to the world's woes includes ordinary men, women, and children who have been awakened to their place in the S In Irresisitible Faith, Scott Sauls lights a path for us from genuine, committed faith through personal transformation, to community, and outward to the world around us. Our trust in God's transformative work in our own lives readies us to bring the hope that the world needs to hear. Sauls writes: "According to the One who created, and sustains, and intends to renew the world, the answer to the world's woes includes ordinary men, women, and children who have been awakened to their place in the Story of an extraordinary God." True to his previous works, Saul's writing is honest, insightful, and challenging. I highly recommend this book to ignite the church, believing that God still uses people of genuine faith to change the world.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    I am often frustrated and discouraged by the “Church” as it exist currently, so much so I often question why I still show up and participate. This book shows a way forward, a way to the genuine, restorative, kind faith that is at the heart of Christianity. A faith that draws people, and is life changing, and truly irresistible! This is how I think our faith in action should look. I will encourage you to read this book before you give up on the church, and incorporate some of this principles into I am often frustrated and discouraged by the “Church” as it exist currently, so much so I often question why I still show up and participate. This book shows a way forward, a way to the genuine, restorative, kind faith that is at the heart of Christianity. A faith that draws people, and is life changing, and truly irresistible! This is how I think our faith in action should look. I will encourage you to read this book before you give up on the church, and incorporate some of this principles into your life. This is the church I long for, the body of believers I want to be a part of and hope it will lead to transformative change in the North American church. ( I received an ARC copy of this book for free in order to provide an unbiased review).

  28. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    "What if all it took for us to become the 'light of the world' and the 'salt of the earth' and the 'city on a hill' to our friends, neighbors, and colleagues was to choose kindness over criticism toward one another, giving the benefit of the doubt over assuming the worst in one another, building each other up instead of tearing each other down. What kind of difference—if we committed ourselves to this—do you think it would make?" These words from Scott's new book challenge readers as we begin th "What if all it took for us to become the 'light of the world' and the 'salt of the earth' and the 'city on a hill' to our friends, neighbors, and colleagues was to choose kindness over criticism toward one another, giving the benefit of the doubt over assuming the worst in one another, building each other up instead of tearing each other down. What kind of difference—if we committed ourselves to this—do you think it would make?" These words from Scott's new book challenge readers as we begin the new year. May we each resolve to be a difference maker! Sauls' Irresistible Faith is both instructive and inspirational as it gently purposes to polish (light), season (salt), and fortify (city) so that we irresistibly reflect "the Story of an extraordinary God."

  29. 4 out of 5

    Luis Saldana

    I received an advance copy of Irresistible Faith as part of the Launch team, and this was truly a gift for me. The book is very timely for Christians today. We seem to be wandering in the desert of contemporary culture and this book presents us with a "way out". It reminds us of the core of Christianity and how Christianity grew organically in connecting person to person. Our faith externally needs to be a true representation of our internal faith so that our faith becomes irresistible to those I received an advance copy of Irresistible Faith as part of the Launch team, and this was truly a gift for me. The book is very timely for Christians today. We seem to be wandering in the desert of contemporary culture and this book presents us with a "way out". It reminds us of the core of Christianity and how Christianity grew organically in connecting person to person. Our faith externally needs to be a true representation of our internal faith so that our faith becomes irresistible to those we interact with and connect with every day. This book presents you with a thoughtful read that helps to bring you back to those basic principles, and away from false gospels that tempt us and lure us away from the true Gospel. Read this book and come back to Irresistible Faith.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    I was first introduced to Scott's writing through his blog. What has kept me reading Scott's blog is what is helpful in this book: he is rooted in the Gospel of Jesus and responds by working out his faith by interacting with difficult people, not avoiding awkward circumstances, and genuinely caring about the world in which we live. There is nothing earth shatteringly new in this book, but it's a helpful read to remind us (especially those of us who may be comfortable in our american churches and I was first introduced to Scott's writing through his blog. What has kept me reading Scott's blog is what is helpful in this book: he is rooted in the Gospel of Jesus and responds by working out his faith by interacting with difficult people, not avoiding awkward circumstances, and genuinely caring about the world in which we live. There is nothing earth shatteringly new in this book, but it's a helpful read to remind us (especially those of us who may be comfortable in our american churches and american traditions of Christianity) how GREAT the Good News of Jesus is and how our faith can influence how we work, spend money, and interact with others. I was both encouraged and challenged.

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