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Selected Poetry

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A new collection of Pushkin's great narrative and lyric verse, translated by Antony Wood Pushkin's The Bronze Horseman is the second-most famous poem in Russian literature after his Eugene Onegin, and notoriously difficult to translate. This new translation, described by Robert Chandler as 'truly wonderful', is accompanied here by Pushkin's greatest shorter verses. They ran A new collection of Pushkin's great narrative and lyric verse, translated by Antony Wood Pushkin's The Bronze Horseman is the second-most famous poem in Russian literature after his Eugene Onegin, and notoriously difficult to translate. This new translation, described by Robert Chandler as 'truly wonderful', is accompanied here by Pushkin's greatest shorter verses. They range from lyric poetry to narrative verse, based on traditional Russian stories of enchanted tsars and magical fish. Together, they show the dazzling range and achievement of Russia's greatest poet.


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A new collection of Pushkin's great narrative and lyric verse, translated by Antony Wood Pushkin's The Bronze Horseman is the second-most famous poem in Russian literature after his Eugene Onegin, and notoriously difficult to translate. This new translation, described by Robert Chandler as 'truly wonderful', is accompanied here by Pushkin's greatest shorter verses. They ran A new collection of Pushkin's great narrative and lyric verse, translated by Antony Wood Pushkin's The Bronze Horseman is the second-most famous poem in Russian literature after his Eugene Onegin, and notoriously difficult to translate. This new translation, described by Robert Chandler as 'truly wonderful', is accompanied here by Pushkin's greatest shorter verses. They range from lyric poetry to narrative verse, based on traditional Russian stories of enchanted tsars and magical fish. Together, they show the dazzling range and achievement of Russia's greatest poet.

30 review for Selected Poetry

  1. 4 out of 5

    E. G.

    Chronology Introduction & Notes, by Antony Wood Translating Pushkin Further Reading I. Lyric Poems St Petersburg, 1814-20 --To a Young Beauty who has Taken Snuff (1814) --The Rose (1815) --To Baroness M. A. Delvig (1815) --To Princess V. M. Volkonskaya (1816) --The Singer (1816) --The Window (1816) --Liberty: An Ode (1817) --To Chaadayev (1818) --O. Masson (1819) --A Good Revel (1819) --Renaissance (1819) --You and I (1820) --To Yuryev (1820) Exile, 1820-26 --'The light of day has faded' (1820) --The Nereid (182 Chronology Introduction & Notes, by Antony Wood Translating Pushkin Further Reading I. Lyric Poems St Petersburg, 1814-20 --To a Young Beauty who has Taken Snuff (1814) --The Rose (1815) --To Baroness M. A. Delvig (1815) --To Princess V. M. Volkonskaya (1816) --The Singer (1816) --The Window (1816) --Liberty: An Ode (1817) --To Chaadayev (1818) --O. Masson (1819) --A Good Revel (1819) --Renaissance (1819) --You and I (1820) --To Yuryev (1820) Exile, 1820-26 --'The light of day has faded' (1820) --The Nereid (1820) --'I have outlived desires' (1821) --The Prisoner (1822) --A Songbird (1823) --Night (1823) --'I went alone before the dawn' (1823) --[On Vorontsov] ('Half trade, half grand seigneur') (1824) --'Zephyrs share / The midnight air' (1824) --To *** ('It comes to me again, that moment') (1825) --'Late blooms I find more pleasing' (1825) --Winter Evening (1825) --Prose Writer and Poet (1825) --Mniszek's 'sonnet', from Boris Godunov (1825) --Confession (1826) --The Prophet (1826) Moscow and St Petersburg, 1826-30 --[To my Nanny] ('My dear companion of past times') (1826) --Winter Road (1826) --To I. I. Pushchin (1826) --'Deep in the Siberian mines' (1827) --Arion (1827) --The Angel (1827) --The Poet (1827) --19 October 1827 (1827) --The Talisman (1827) --Recollection (1828) --Thou and You (1828) --'My beauty, sing to me no more' (1828) --Portrait (1828) --The Drowned Man (1828) --The Upas Tree (1828) --'Raven flies to raven' (1828) --The Poet and the Crowd (1828) --A Flower (1828) --'City of splendour, city of poor' (1828) --Signs (1829) --'Once there lived a humble knight' (1829) --'The mists of night enfold the Georgian hills' (1829) --From Hafiz (1829) --'The drums of reveille sound . . .' (1829) --The Monastery on Mount Kazbek (1829) --'Winter. The country' (1829) --Winter Morning (1829) --'I loved you: in my heart, perhaps' (1829) --'I walk the crowded thoroughfare' (1829) --'Inscribe my name? What good--' (1830) --'No, I have lost the taste for stormy pleasure' (1830) --To the Poet (1830) --Madonna (1830) --Demons (1830) --Elegy (1830) --To the Bust of a Conqueror (1830) --Rhyme (1830) --Invocation (1830) --Mary's Song, from A Feast during the Plague (1830) --Master of the Revels' song, from A Feast during the Plague (1830) --'Bound for your distant homeland' (1830) Married Life, 1831-6 --To the Slanderers of Russia (1831) --My Pedigree (1831) --For the Album of Princess Anna Abamelek (1832) --The Beauty (1832) --Autumn (A fragment) (1833) --'It's time, my love, it's time!' (1834) --[from Anacreon:] A fragment (1835) --'. . . I see again / That corner of the earth' (1835) --'The ready power of suffering' (1835) The Stone Island Cycle: --From Pindemonte (1836) --'The desert fathers and unblemished women' (1836) --Imitation of the Italian (1836) --Secular Power (1836) --'When, alone with my thoughts, I leave the city' (1836) --'I have made myself, but not with hands, a monument' (1836) II. Narrative Poems (Poemy) --The Fountain of Bakhchisaray (1823) --The Gypsies (1824) --The Bridegroom (1825) --Count Nulin (1825) --A Little House in Kolomna (1830) --The Bronze Horseman (1833) III. Fairy Tales (Skazki) --The Tale of Tsar Saltan (1831) --The Tale of a Fisherman and a Little Fish (1833) --The Tale of the Dead Princess and the Seven Champions (1833) --The Tale of the Golden Cockerel (1834) Abbreviations Glossary of Metrical Terms Notes Acknowledgements

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bettie

    Alexandre Benois's illustration to the poem (1904). a narrative poem written by Alexander Pushkin in 1833 about the equestrian statue of Peter the Great in Saint Petersburg. Widely considered to be Pushkin's most successful narrative poem. -wiki Read here Alexandre Benois's illustration to the poem (1904). a narrative poem written by Alexander Pushkin in 1833 about the equestrian statue of Peter the Great in Saint Petersburg. Widely considered to be Pushkin's most successful narrative poem. -wiki Read here

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mehmet

    Bahçesaray Çeşmesi'ni iki defa bale olarak izleme şansına erişmiştim. Sahnede izlemek bu uzun epik şiiri okumaktan çok daha fazla keyif vermişti. Bir bale ile bir şiiri kıyaslamak doğru değil ama atmosfer açısından Azer Yaran'ın çevirisinden kaynaklı olduğunu tahmin ediyorum, (örn. "Sarmış nasıl bir düşünce usunu?" gibi.) bu şiirin yarattığı atmosfer bence zayıf. Rusçam olmadığından orjinal metne göz atamadım, belki de balesi fazla başarılıdır. Bilemiyorum. Hem balesini izlemiş hem de balenin uya Bahçesaray Çeşmesi'ni iki defa bale olarak izleme şansına erişmiştim. Sahnede izlemek bu uzun epik şiiri okumaktan çok daha fazla keyif vermişti. Bir bale ile bir şiiri kıyaslamak doğru değil ama atmosfer açısından Azer Yaran'ın çevirisinden kaynaklı olduğunu tahmin ediyorum, (örn. "Sarmış nasıl bir düşünce usunu?" gibi.) bu şiirin yarattığı atmosfer bence zayıf. Rusçam olmadığından orjinal metne göz atamadım, belki de balesi fazla başarılıdır. Bilemiyorum. Hem balesini izlemiş hem de balenin uyarlandığı bu şiiri okumuş başkalarının da düşüncelerini merak ederim.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Joselito Honestly and Brilliantly

    A relatively new translation by Peter Norman of a poem by the great Russian poet who died young in a duel. Reading it reminded me of the recent devastation wrought upon my country by what was reportedly the strongest typhoon which ever hit land ("Yolanda," international codename: "Haiyan"), the city it destroyed (Tacloban), the great sea surges it created and the various tragic human sufferings it caused. The poem's central character was a guy named Yevgeny and the city was Petrograd (before it b A relatively new translation by Peter Norman of a poem by the great Russian poet who died young in a duel. Reading it reminded me of the recent devastation wrought upon my country by what was reportedly the strongest typhoon which ever hit land ("Yolanda," international codename: "Haiyan"), the city it destroyed (Tacloban), the great sea surges it created and the various tragic human sufferings it caused. The poem's central character was a guy named Yevgeny and the city was Petrograd (before it became St. Petersburg). He was away from his fiancee Perasha when the storm struck and swelled the river Neva-- "All night the Neva Strained towards the sea, against the strom, But could not overcome their raging fury... And no longer could it struggle... By morning above its banks Throngs of people jostled each other, Revelling at the towering of Spray and foam of waters now enraged. But the strength of the winds from the gulf Drove back the blocked Neva and it Turned furious, tempestuous, And plunged the islands into flood, The weather grew more violent still, The Neva swelled up and roared, Bubbling like a cauldron, swirling, And of a sudden, like a frenzied beast, Flung itself upon the city. All fled before it; round about All was of a sudden empty--the waters Flowed into subterranean cellars, The canals surged against the gratings, And Petropolis became afloat, deep Like Triton, plunged waist-high in water. A siege! Attack! Malicious waves, Like thieves, climb through the windows. Boats Ram and smash the glass panes with their poops; Trays under soaking coverings, Broken pieces of huts and beams and roofs, The goods of thrifty traders, The chattels of beggars, pale of face, Bridges torn away by storm, Coffins from the sodden churchyard Float down the streets!" Water and wind can destroy completely. As in Tacloban and the places which crossed Yolanda's path, the survivors' immediate needs were the most basic-- "The people Perceive God's wrath and wait their doom. Alas! All is lost: where will they find Both food and shelter? ..." Then the leader and the relief efforts: "...In that grim year The late Emperor still ruled with glory Over Russia. Onnto the balcony He stepped, both saddened and bemused And spake: 'No Tsar can command The elements of God.' In thought he sat And gazed and gazed with eyes of sorrow At the terrible disaster. Whole squares were turned to lakes, Broad rivers flooded into streets. The palace seemed a forlorn island. The Tsar gave voice and from end to end, By streets both near and far his generals Set off on their perilous journeys, Through raging waters to save the folk, Struck dumb with fear, from drowning, And secure their homes, their houses." Yevgeny survived the catastrophe and immediately went to look for his beloved Parasha (and her widowed mother). But her house was gone-- "A pile of rubble heaped before him; Some buildings abandoned, some torn down, Some houses all awry, some destroyed, Others shifted by the waves; all around Lie scattered bodies, like a battlefield. Quite heedless, tormented to exhaustion, Yevgeny runs headlong to the spot, Where fate awaits him with unknown news, As though enclosed in a sealed letter. And now he runs through the town's outskirts, And here's the gulf, the house is near... But what is this?... He came to a halt, Went back a little and returned. He looks...he walks...he looks again. Here's the spot where their house stood; Here's the willow. The gates were here-- Torn down, it's clear. Where then's the house" To know what happened to Yolanda's many surviving victims is to know Yevgeny's fate in this story-poem written 170 years ago.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Imi

    I listened to this reading on youtube while reading along simultaneously. It's about time I read one of the most influential works in Russian literature! Especially as I visited St. Petersburg myself at the end of last year. This narrative poem is a celebration of the city, which I was expecting, of course, after hearing so much about it, but I was not expecting what happened at the end of this little story! This is very short, but very much worth your time if you want to give it a read, although I listened to this reading on youtube while reading along simultaneously. It's about time I read one of the most influential works in Russian literature! Especially as I visited St. Petersburg myself at the end of last year. This narrative poem is a celebration of the city, which I was expecting, of course, after hearing so much about it, but I was not expecting what happened at the end of this little story! This is very short, but very much worth your time if you want to give it a read, although I'm unsure what would be the best English translation to go for.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Saeed

    در مقدمه‌ی کتاب، زندگی و شعر 'الکساندر پوشکین' معرفی می‌شود.ـ سپس متن 'سوارکار مفرغی' با ترجمه‌ی فارسی و زبان اصلی (روسی) آمده است.ـ در ابتدای این اثر، پیوتر با گفتاری به مانند خدا در ابتدای کتاب مقدس، اقدام به بنای پایتخت جدیدی می‌کند: ... این خواست طبیعت است / که از این جا / پنجره‌ای به سوی اروپا بگشاییم / و بر کرانه‌ی دریا / پای بگذاریم / استوار ...ـ روی دیگر سلطه‌ی پیوتر از نظر پوشکین چنین بود که او در حقیقت دلسوز مردم نبود و اگر غضب می‌کرد و یا صرفا تصمیم آنی می‌گرفت، بر استخوان‌ها و خون مر در مقدمه‌ی کتاب، زندگی و شعر 'الکساندر پوشکین' معرفی می‌شود.ـ سپس متن 'سوارکار مفرغی' با ترجمه‌ی فارسی و زبان اصلی (روسی) آمده است.ـ در ابتدای این اثر، پیوتر با گفتاری به مانند خدا در ابتدای کتاب مقدس، اقدام به بنای پایتخت جدیدی می‌کند: ... این خواست طبیعت است / که از این جا / پنجره‌ای به سوی اروپا بگشاییم / و بر کرانه‌ی دریا / پای بگذاریم / استوار ...ـ روی دیگر سلطه‌ی پیوتر از نظر پوشکین چنین بود که او در حقیقت دلسوز مردم نبود و اگر غضب می‌کرد و یا صرفا تصمیم آنی می‌گرفت، بر استخوان‌ها و خون مردم هم که شده می‌ایستاد و آن کار را به انجام می‌رساند. سراسر امپراتوری روسیه از سویی ثروت فرهنگی عظیمی برای بشریت بود و از سوی دیگر حتما با وحشی‌گری، تجاوز، ظلم، نیستی و بی‌حرمتی به انسان همراه بود. انسان، درست مثل ابزاری برای بقا و دوام امپراتوری بود. همه‌ی این‌ها در تصویر پوشکین از پتربورگ و پیوتر گرد هم آمده‌اند و مجسمه‌ی پیوتر مانند روح پتربورگ تصویر می‌شود ...ـ 'انسان کوچک' یک مضمون مهم دیگر در سوارکار مفرغی است که مضمون همیشگی ادبیات روس نیز بوده است

  7. 4 out of 5

    Antonella

    Un piccolo capolavoro pietroburghese. È una gran fortuna che qualcuno abbia deciso di pubblicare questo racconto dato che Puskin non lo pubblicò mai. La critica contenuta in questo libricino era talmente forte che l'autore preferì non divulgarlo. E ancora maggiore fortuna è che qualcuno si sia incaricato di tradurlo e metterlo a disposizione del lettore italiano. Racconto brevissimo, critico e profondo. Molto bello. Inutile analizzare gli intenti e il significato del racconto in quanto sono spieg Un piccolo capolavoro pietroburghese. È una gran fortuna che qualcuno abbia deciso di pubblicare questo racconto dato che Puskin non lo pubblicò mai. La critica contenuta in questo libricino era talmente forte che l'autore preferì non divulgarlo. E ancora maggiore fortuna è che qualcuno si sia incaricato di tradurlo e metterlo a disposizione del lettore italiano. Racconto brevissimo, critico e profondo. Molto bello. Inutile analizzare gli intenti e il significato del racconto in quanto sono spiegati egregiamente nella prefazione del traduttore Gianfranco Lauretano. http://ifyouhaveagardenandalibrary.bl...

  8. 5 out of 5

    Yani

    El Neva había luchado la noche entera contra la tormenta y al final, tras inútiles esfuerzos, comprendió que la lucha era imposible. Qué historia tan bonita y tan poderosa, que dice tanto en tan poco espacio.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Emma L.

    *** I guess that this review is pretty much spoiler-free *** Rating: 🌟🌟🌟 (3/5 stars). I had to read this narrative poem for one of my university elective courses called Russian & Eastern European Literature: The Classics; one of the easiest courses I have ever taken in my life. I did wish we actually read some of the great classics like Anna Karenina, War and Peace, or Crime and Punishment instead of fragments and short stories written by those famous authors. I still have an interest in reading *** I guess that this review is pretty much spoiler-free *** Rating: 🌟🌟🌟 (3/5 stars). I had to read this narrative poem for one of my university elective courses called Russian & Eastern European Literature: The Classics; one of the easiest courses I have ever taken in my life. I did wish we actually read some of the great classics like Anna Karenina, War and Peace, or Crime and Punishment instead of fragments and short stories written by those famous authors. I still have an interest in reading those books eventually so I am slowly collecting them whenever I find them in a thrift store, aka the place where I get most of my classics from. Haha, I myself am surprised that I read once again something else for school and that it even was a long-ass poem narrative poem. It is even more surprising that I actually quite liked it and that I was able to understand most of what the poem was saying or at least tried to tell. It´s quite a dramatic, grim/dark, gloomy read where a flood happens that kills people but also where statues from the founding father of Sint Petersburg came alive and haunted our poor narrator. He definitely got so much shit he did not deserve and he never got a happily ever after (quite the opposite of it). Very dramatic, very much inspired by religion and the sublime, so it was also interesting to analyze this poem and write a short little essay on it. I also liked how the poem started off by telling us the readers how Petersburg came to be. In all honesty, I had no clue how Petersburg came to be and how it became the great city that it is now so it was interesting to learn about its origins through this poem. I also did not know that the city´s location is very close to a huge river? lake? ocean? (Neva) and that it had been plagued by numerous floods. Haha, I thought we the Dutch people only had issues and that many natural disasters of cities being flooded, but I cause we´re just basic bitches after all. Now I have the song the Neva flows from Anastasia the Musical stuck in my head, hahaha. It would have made more sense if the song was My Petersburg (another Musical Anastasia song) but nope my brain apparently dislikes logic. I don´t have much else to say about this poem, besides that it was a nice read and one of the rare old poems that I actually like.

  10. 4 out of 5

    GONZA

    I've always thought that it doesn't make much sense to read the poems of some poets unless they are in their original language, and after reading the translator's foreword to this Puskin's collection in English, my idea has only been confirmed. Apart from that, I have only read the actual poems, leaving aside the ballads and short stories in lyrical form, and they are certainly beautiful, but the predominant feeling remains the regret of not having learned Russian. Ho sempre pensato che non avess I've always thought that it doesn't make much sense to read the poems of some poets unless they are in their original language, and after reading the translator's foreword to this Puskin's collection in English, my idea has only been confirmed. Apart from that, I have only read the actual poems, leaving aside the ballads and short stories in lyrical form, and they are certainly beautiful, but the predominant feeling remains the regret of not having learned Russian. Ho sempre pensato che non avesse molto senso leggere le poesie di alcuni poeti se non in lingua originale, e dopo aver letto la premessa del traduttore a questa raccolta in inglese di Puskin la mia idea non si é che confermata. A parte questo, ho letto soltanto le poesie vere e proprie, lasciando perdere le ballate e i racconti in forma di lirica e sicuramente sono bellissime, ma il sentimento predominante resta il dispiacere di non conoscere il russo.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Elena

    Molto bello! Non posso valutare se e quanto sia fedele all'originale perché non conosco il russo, ma posso dire che la lettura è stata molto bella, scorrevole ed evocativa. Mi è piaciuto particolarmente come Puskin ha descritto la Nevà, paragonandola a dei briganti e ad altre persone. Molto bellabella! Ammetto che ho voluto leggerlo spinta dalla curiosità che mi è venuta leggendo Il cavaliere d'inverno di Paullina Simons, ma ora ho anche un altro motivo per apprezzare questo bellissimo componime Molto bello! Non posso valutare se e quanto sia fedele all'originale perché non conosco il russo, ma posso dire che la lettura è stata molto bella, scorrevole ed evocativa. Mi è piaciuto particolarmente come Puskin ha descritto la Nevà, paragonandola a dei briganti e ad altre persone. Molto bellabella! Ammetto che ho voluto leggerlo spinta dalla curiosità che mi è venuta leggendo Il cavaliere d'inverno di Paullina Simons, ma ora ho anche un altro motivo per apprezzare questo bellissimo componimento dedicato al fondatore di San Pietroburgo!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Elder

    Good to finally read Pushkin, the poet of my people, but what this did to me more than anything else is make me grieve that I couldn’t read it in the original language. I’ve never wanted to learn Russian more.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kaveh Rezaie

    شعر. البته شاید به ترجمه که می آید همان روسی نشود ولی همه سعی و تلاش شده است که بهترین باشد. مقدمه خیلی خوبی بر احوالات پوشکین دارد. تصویرهای رنگی زیبایی هم متناسب باهر قطعه در کنار هر قطعه هست.

  14. 5 out of 5

    June

    This is an excellent selection of Pushkin's lyric poetry, translated by Anthony Wood. He strives to replicate meter and rhyme in addition to capturing the sense of Pushkin's often-complex verse. Here is his rendering of the final verse of Ode to Liberty, the 1817 poem that got Pushkin exiled: Learn then, rulers of the world: No dungeon, no reward, No piety, no punishment Can be your faithful guard. But if you are the first to bow Before the trusted Law, The People’s peace and liberty Will keep your thro This is an excellent selection of Pushkin's lyric poetry, translated by Anthony Wood. He strives to replicate meter and rhyme in addition to capturing the sense of Pushkin's often-complex verse. Here is his rendering of the final verse of Ode to Liberty, the 1817 poem that got Pushkin exiled: Learn then, rulers of the world: No dungeon, no reward, No piety, no punishment Can be your faithful guard. But if you are the first to bow Before the trusted Law, The People’s peace and liberty Will keep your throne secure. And the original: И днесь учитесь, о цари: Ни наказанья, ни награды, Ни кров темниц, ни алтари Не верные для вас ограды. Склонитесь первые главой Под сень надежную Закона, И станут вечной стражей трона Народов вольность и покой. The edition also includes a helpful chronology of Pushkin's life that would be very useful in the classroom. There are also notes and explanations to help even non-Russophile readers understand more background. Thank you to the publishers and NetGalley for a digital ARC for the purpose of an unbiased review.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ian

    Today I am trying something a little different by reviewing a short story/ poem in prose. Poetry often doesn't translate as well across the language barrier as novels do. One reason for this is because wordplay and double meanings are harder to translate than character development and themes. This poem however is exceptionally good in any language. It is a brilliant portrayal of the individual vs. the state. I could go on about this piece, but today I think I will end this review short and simpl Today I am trying something a little different by reviewing a short story/ poem in prose. Poetry often doesn't translate as well across the language barrier as novels do. One reason for this is because wordplay and double meanings are harder to translate than character development and themes. This poem however is exceptionally good in any language. It is a brilliant portrayal of the individual vs. the state. I could go on about this piece, but today I think I will end this review short and simply recommend you read it!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bahman Bahman

    ….دوستت می دارم آن گاه که طلوعی شتابان سر می رسد و پیش از آنکه ظلام شب به تمامی آسمان های زرین را پوشانده باشد جای طلوع پیشین را می گیرد و شب نیم ساعتی پیش نمی پابد هوای ماسیده و سرمای بی رحم زمستانت را دوست می دارم تَکِ سورتمه در امتداد نوای عریض را دوست می دارم آنگاه که رخسار دوشیزگان از گل های سرخ درخشانتر است

  17. 4 out of 5

    Miguel Duarte

    A parte central desta colectânea, o Cavaleiro de Bronze, é de tal forma incrível que não pode ser atribuída outra nota, mesmo não estando os poemas seguintes todos ao mesmo nível.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Javier Muñoz

    Pushkin es un genio, fuera de la lectura que se pueda haber entre lineas es un poema increíble, hasta aprendi un poco sobre Rusia; ahora solo quiero subirme a un avión e ir a San Petersburgo y ver a Pedro el Grande!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    Reading this in Russian and also in English (a really vile translation), and piecing together the sense of it, while mostly digging what it sounds like in Russian--that riding four beat line (Nicholson Baker was soooo right about that)--There's a lovely set of videos on Youtube of an actor reciting The Bronze Horseman out loud, I recommend listening to it and reading along in English, something better than the one I've got--I've heard the DM Thomas translation is very good. The one on the intern Reading this in Russian and also in English (a really vile translation), and piecing together the sense of it, while mostly digging what it sounds like in Russian--that riding four beat line (Nicholson Baker was soooo right about that)--There's a lovely set of videos on Youtube of an actor reciting The Bronze Horseman out loud, I recommend listening to it and reading along in English, something better than the one I've got--I've heard the DM Thomas translation is very good. The one on the internet barely sounds like English. But for the SOUND--check it out: "Медный всадник" (читает И.Смоктуновский) - 1 часть It says "Mednie vsadnik" (Bronze Horseman, read by I. Smoktunovsky, part 1) It's read a little sensitively, avoiding the singsongy 4 beat line, which I stress when I read it aloud because I love that stuff and can't get enough of it. Bronze Horseman is the ultimate Petersburg tale-in-verse. Very short (12 pages), it starts with a celebration of the city and all the things the poet loves about it, and then moves to the hero of the tale, a poor working zhlub named Evgeny (a joke, in that the hero of Puskhin's greatest work is Eugene too, Eugene Onegin. (He even jokes about it in the prologue, how the hero's name is one with which the poet is very friendly.) It's about the great flood of of 1824, and the founder of Petersburg, Peter I, comes to life in the storm, or rather, his great brazen statue by Falconet, which overlooks the Neva River, and pursues the poor defenseless Evgeny to the death. (oops, spoiler.) Pushkin is the Russian Shakespeare, he could do everything, poetry, prose, novels in verse. This little excursion just reemphasizes the man's genius.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Svetlana

    I loved this story, even thou it was a very short read. It made me really sad in the end, and the feeling has stuck with me all day, but then again that is the thing I love about Pushkin. He can write three lines that have more emotional value then a book of a thousand pages written by someone else. The way he describes the surroundings and nature is an other thing I admire. It's at the same time simple easy to understand, but also very picturesque. I find his description of the scene after the I loved this story, even thou it was a very short read. It made me really sad in the end, and the feeling has stuck with me all day, but then again that is the thing I love about Pushkin. He can write three lines that have more emotional value then a book of a thousand pages written by someone else. The way he describes the surroundings and nature is an other thing I admire. It's at the same time simple easy to understand, but also very picturesque. I find his description of the scene after the Neva retreated really interesting, and I can't get it out of my head. Oh and an other interesting thing, here we find out what happens to Eugene. Love the story and Love Pushkin, that's all I have to say.

  21. 4 out of 5

    BDT

    A Pushkin classic, he leaves the reader questioning who to support. The Horseman (Emperor Peter), who modernized Russia and made Petrograd/St. Petersburg a reality? Or Yevgeny, who suffers from the storm and flooding of the Neva, loses his love interest, and is haunted by an animated Bronze Horseman in a sick and delirious state? There is an argument for both, but neither argument is fulfilling. That's what makes Pushkin a genius - you can interpret his work a hundred ways and always find new thi A Pushkin classic, he leaves the reader questioning who to support. The Horseman (Emperor Peter), who modernized Russia and made Petrograd/St. Petersburg a reality? Or Yevgeny, who suffers from the storm and flooding of the Neva, loses his love interest, and is haunted by an animated Bronze Horseman in a sick and delirious state? There is an argument for both, but neither argument is fulfilling. That's what makes Pushkin a genius - you can interpret his work a hundred ways and always find new things to discuss.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sasha

    A classic narrative about man attempting to tame nature, and nature eventually taking back the reigns. This is a poignant, sad, and triumphant poem showing the strength of human will and the human spirit, while also showing our extreme vulnerabilities. The Neva is such a player in this story and the land which was essentially a bog prior to all the construction is as well. The ominous overtones are a staple of both Russian lit and of that time period.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Anastasia

    4.25/5 *Read for class. That was unexpectedly sad. I've heard about the poem, of course, but never read it. So I had no idea what it was really about (I'm ashamed). And it took me by surprise how much I liked it. 4.25/5 *Read for class. That was unexpectedly sad. I've heard about the poem, of course, but never read it. So I had no idea what it was really about (I'm ashamed). And it took me by surprise how much I liked it.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    Reading Pushkin has been on my to-do list for ages, and this was an easy entry of a translation with helpful, relevant, historical explanations.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Frans Kempe

    I usually don´t like poetry but this short small piece of poetry i really enjoyed. About a man and a flood and grief.

  26. 5 out of 5

    ollywally

    *read for russian literature class*

  27. 4 out of 5

    James

    I've read it in Russian and English. Its really good, but I lived in St. Petersburg and know most of the locations he is describing, so my point of view is skewed. I've read it in Russian and English. Its really good, but I lived in St. Petersburg and know most of the locations he is describing, so my point of view is skewed.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Bruce

    Before I read The Bronze Horseman, I had formed some vague conceptions about its themes: the debate about Peter the Great and the wonders and dangers of the city he built. Now that I've read it, along with Michael Basker's excellent introduction and notes, I see how marvelously complex it is. Pushkin completed this in less than a month (while working on several other poems) at his family estate in Boldino. In fact he dashed off the whole second part (222 lines!) in only two nights, finishing it a Before I read The Bronze Horseman, I had formed some vague conceptions about its themes: the debate about Peter the Great and the wonders and dangers of the city he built. Now that I've read it, along with Michael Basker's excellent introduction and notes, I see how marvelously complex it is. Pushkin completed this in less than a month (while working on several other poems) at his family estate in Boldino. In fact he dashed off the whole second part (222 lines!) in only two nights, finishing it at 5:05 a.m. on November 1, 1833 (he must have burned lots of candles). The central story takes place during the great Petersburg flood of 1824. Evgenii, a low-level bureaucrat, who loses his love to the waves, comes face to face with the bronze statue of Peter the Great, whom he blames for his calamity. The statue awakes (or so it seems to Evgenii) and begins to chase him down... In some ways, Basker argues, the poem can be reduced to a triangular opposition between Peter the Great, Evgenii, and the forces of nature. But this is complicated in several ways; for example, Peter the Great is alternately a heroic, terrifying, noble, and destructive figure. The poem switches stylistically from a formal ode, to a realistic narrative, to a fantastic vision, and the use of rhyme, enjambment, and alliteration is similarly complex. Here is one of the best passages, filled with alliteration:И, озарен луною бледной, Простерши руку в вышине, За ним несется Всадник Медный На звонко-скачущем коне; И во всю ночь безумец бедный, Куда стопы ни обращал, За ним повсюду Всадник Медный С тяжелым топотом скакал.John Dewey's translation (1998), though it lacks the sound effects of the original, captures some of the frightfulness of the horse's charge:For after him, with arm extended, The Bronze Colossus on its steed Charged at the gallop and offended The moonlit calm with its stampede. And then, no matter where he wended His way, he found that all night through – Poor, hapless wretch – he was attended By bronze hooves beating their tattoo.

  29. 4 out of 5

    MD

    Хорошая поэма и также отличный образ конфликта между творением великого человека и силой природой. Этот конфликт решает судьбу нашего бедного героя, Евгений. По-моему, лучше читать по-русский, но я знаю что большинство моих знакомых не может. Поэтому, я советую вам читать в каком угодно языке вы можете. A good narrative poem and also an excellent image of conflict between a great man's creation and the strength of nature. This conflict determines the fate of our hero, Evgenii. (I'm being a bit s Хорошая поэма и также отличный образ конфликта между творением великого человека и силой природой. Этот конфликт решает судьбу нашего бедного героя, Евгений. По-моему, лучше читать по-русский, но я знаю что большинство моих знакомых не может. Поэтому, я советую вам читать в каком угодно языке вы можете. A good narrative poem and also an excellent image of conflict between a great man's creation and the strength of nature. This conflict determines the fate of our hero, Evgenii. (I'm being a bit simplistic). In my opinion, it is better to read in Russian, but I know that the majority of my friends do not. Therefore I recommend you read in whichever language you can.

  30. 5 out of 5

    veronica quattrocchio | memorie.di.un.sognatore

    Lo stile di Puškin è ineguagliabile, di una modernità strabiliante. È capace di avvolgerti con la sua ritmicità e trasportarti nel vivo delle scene con una tale poetica precisione che sembra di esser lì durante l’alluvione. Consigliatissimo se si vuole evadere dalla realtà per esplorare un mondo unico: quello della penna cardine del romanticismo russo.

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