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Youngbloods

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IT'S TIME TO COME OUT OF HIDING Frey has spent her life in a family of deceivers, a stand-in for her sister, manipulated at her father's command. Free from them at last, she is finding her own voice -- and using it to question everything her family stood for. Tally was once the most famous rebel in the world. But for over a decade, she's kept to the shadows, allowing her myth IT'S TIME TO COME OUT OF HIDING Frey has spent her life in a family of deceivers, a stand-in for her sister, manipulated at her father's command. Free from them at last, she is finding her own voice -- and using it to question everything her family stood for. Tally was once the most famous rebel in the world. But for over a decade, she's kept to the shadows, allowing her myth to grow even as she receded. Now she sees that the revolution she led has not created a stable world. Freedom, she observes, has a way of destroying things. As the world is propelled further into conflict and conspiracy, Frey and Tally join forces to put a check on the people in power, while still trying to understand their own power and where it belongs. With Youngbloods, master storyteller Scott Westerfeld decisively brings back his most iconic character and merges his Impostors and Uglies series into a breathtaking tale of rivalry, rebellion, and repercussion.


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IT'S TIME TO COME OUT OF HIDING Frey has spent her life in a family of deceivers, a stand-in for her sister, manipulated at her father's command. Free from them at last, she is finding her own voice -- and using it to question everything her family stood for. Tally was once the most famous rebel in the world. But for over a decade, she's kept to the shadows, allowing her myth IT'S TIME TO COME OUT OF HIDING Frey has spent her life in a family of deceivers, a stand-in for her sister, manipulated at her father's command. Free from them at last, she is finding her own voice -- and using it to question everything her family stood for. Tally was once the most famous rebel in the world. But for over a decade, she's kept to the shadows, allowing her myth to grow even as she receded. Now she sees that the revolution she led has not created a stable world. Freedom, she observes, has a way of destroying things. As the world is propelled further into conflict and conspiracy, Frey and Tally join forces to put a check on the people in power, while still trying to understand their own power and where it belongs. With Youngbloods, master storyteller Scott Westerfeld decisively brings back his most iconic character and merges his Impostors and Uglies series into a breathtaking tale of rivalry, rebellion, and repercussion.

30 review for Youngbloods

  1. 4 out of 5

    liz

    this was a good ending to this series. and my 12yo self is satisfied.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Vikingroupie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I wish I had never read this series of books. Perhaps I never knew Tally Youngblood if she is/was who this final book presented her as. The Uglies series made you see Tally's flaws, but you still rooted for her, and you still understood her, and most importantly I wanted to be her friend. This book made Tally seem distant and someone that I would avoid. I have to say that Frai has never really been my favorite, and perhaps I resented her being more the hero than Tally. ***spoiler alert*** I also d I wish I had never read this series of books. Perhaps I never knew Tally Youngblood if she is/was who this final book presented her as. The Uglies series made you see Tally's flaws, but you still rooted for her, and you still understood her, and most importantly I wanted to be her friend. This book made Tally seem distant and someone that I would avoid. I have to say that Frai has never really been my favorite, and perhaps I resented her being more the hero than Tally. ***spoiler alert*** I also disliked the brush-off given to David. Tally mentions him as if he never really mattered, that she was an object she lost along the way and "c'est la vie". This contrasts with the Tally I know as well, and with the David I knew. He went against his whole crew and his mother to defend Tally and his love for her. And now you are telling me that: shrug, they aren't even friends anymore, but that is no big deal. This series, and this final book have somewhat destroyed my Uglies world, and I wish I had never read them to preserve what I knew before. I love Westerfeld, and his world and vocabulary building is pure genius, but he and I definitely had a different vision. I would also like to comment on the Audio book and they narrator Theresa Plummer. I understand the drama that courses through the story, but the narrator voice constantly had the inflection of being stressed, and I had the feeling constantly that she was about to go over a cliff of suspense. After awhile this can become exhausting to listen to. If you loved this book i am happy for you, but Uglies fans beware to possibly have your Uglies world shaken, and you can never go back.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rafaella Litvin

    3.5 if I'm being super honest, but I'm a goner for this series. The book took a while to pick up, not because it was slow - there are literally no lulls in this book, everyone is constantly running, fighting and hoverboarding all over the place - but the motivations for the Youngbloods to join in on Frey's vengeance plan weren't really convincing me. However, half way thtough it started getting progressively more interesting and infuriating in just the right way. Tally felt real and like a 40yo Sp 3.5 if I'm being super honest, but I'm a goner for this series. The book took a while to pick up, not because it was slow - there are literally no lulls in this book, everyone is constantly running, fighting and hoverboarding all over the place - but the motivations for the Youngbloods to join in on Frey's vengeance plan weren't really convincing me. However, half way thtough it started getting progressively more interesting and infuriating in just the right way. Tally felt real and like a 40yo Special Tally should, I was impressed. All in all, satisfied with this final installment although would not hide my excitement if another spin off series were to be announced...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mitchell

    Huh. I had my doubts with this one. Including whether I remembered enough of the entire series to fully appreciate it. But the author pulled it out in the end, really he always does. Truth and lies. Technology and society. This book, and really the series, has had its clunky moments. But it has always been interesting. It'll be fun to re-read all of Westerfeld some day. Huh. I had my doubts with this one. Including whether I remembered enough of the entire series to fully appreciate it. But the author pulled it out in the end, really he always does. Truth and lies. Technology and society. This book, and really the series, has had its clunky moments. But it has always been interesting. It'll be fun to re-read all of Westerfeld some day.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kate Symons

    Woah- what an amazing ending to such an iconic series. The best part about these books, all of the Uglies/Imposters series, is that there are so many pieces going on and once and constantly changing the plot. So it’s almost impossible to summarize, because plot points are so contingent on previous plot points. Things I didnt like: -There’s no “wow” ending. The last line of the first book, Uglies, has stuck with me for a decade. Literally got it tattooed. The ending of Impostors gives a lovely clo Woah- what an amazing ending to such an iconic series. The best part about these books, all of the Uglies/Imposters series, is that there are so many pieces going on and once and constantly changing the plot. So it’s almost impossible to summarize, because plot points are so contingent on previous plot points. Things I didnt like: -There’s no “wow” ending. The last line of the first book, Uglies, has stuck with me for a decade. Literally got it tattooed. The ending of Impostors gives a lovely closure, like packing the entire series into a box and tying a pretty bow. Compared to the wild cliffhangers of the past, it’s just ok. -The justice system New Shreve settles on. Maybe that’s the foreshadow afterall, but it just doesn’t feel like it was the option they would have chose. -The fact we never learn the name of Tally’s old city; and it’s literally just called that. But picture, absolutely loved it. I cried. (But not in a heart break way; re David and Col). I got goosebumps. I loved the reference to SpagBol, something only a true Uglies fan would catch. And I feel satisfied with the closure.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Marie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I felt like the story just didn't "flawlessly bring the world of Uglies and Imposters together" as it said it would. Uglies came out in 2005, and it existed as a dystopian world formed from 2005 societal order in many ways. It spoke volumes about feminism and the ability of strong women to make hard choices when society was literally offering them, no, forcing them to undergo a surgery that made them exactly what their elders had told them they needed to be since they were young: pretty. The fac I felt like the story just didn't "flawlessly bring the world of Uglies and Imposters together" as it said it would. Uglies came out in 2005, and it existed as a dystopian world formed from 2005 societal order in many ways. It spoke volumes about feminism and the ability of strong women to make hard choices when society was literally offering them, no, forcing them to undergo a surgery that made them exactly what their elders had told them they needed to be since they were young: pretty. The fact that in the original series, Tally and Shay choose to take down the regime, giving up the one thing they have been taught to want for so many years. That was a strong message with some amazing world building in the background. Imposters began on an okay note, but I felt like details were left out in certain places and I while I enjoyed Frey's journey, I felt like the whole thing with Col at the end of book 3 was just... unnecessary. Especially since it was originally supposed to be a trilogy. I get that it set up the whole fourth book, but at least one couple would have been nice without any deaths. I really hated how incredibly volatile Tally was presented as. It's been a long time since I read the original series but even knowing Shay was the level headed one, I felt like there was a better literary solution to destroying all of those. Not to mention, the ones about parents who left messages from secret prisons for their children in the dust, which were stolen, was just like, a forgotten plot point. So was the whole "finding the real kids who had robot copies made of them". Also, why is he trying to be so "woke" about everything? That character who has no gender which just makes the dialogue more confusing, mentioning enbys as if that word even existed when this world was created in the early 2000s. Acknowledging that people can choose to be in between two sexes based on how they dress and act only pushes feminism backwards by defining by contrast, someone who does not dress androgynously as either male or female. Which is ridiculous. It paints a picture of women as being defined by dresses and makeup and long hair and feminine traits. When I wear male sweatpants and shave my head and don't put it on makeup, I'm still a woman. Just as well, a straight man should be able to walk out in a skirt in heels and have no one question he is a straight man. Love whoever you want, but an outfit change doesn't make a difference in our chromosomal makeups and sex based pronouns should be the norm. As a male author, perhaps Scott can't see how taking away the words "she" and "he" in the name of normalizing they/them and the idea of nonbinary, he is feeding into the ideal that anyone deserves the pronoun "she". So much for feminism. Tally and Shay brought hell, and as women I am sure they felt the force of the pretty regime more than men ever could, because sex based oppression is in our history and will undoubtedly find its way into our growing dystopian future. So don't fall for the woke language in the name of trying to validate a movement that pushes feminism backwards in the end. Thanks for coming to my TedTalk, back to the review. I guess I just had too many questions for that to be the last book. What are Rafi's intentions? How old was Tally supposed to be? Are Shay and Tally together now? I don't even remember what happened in specials or Extras so I should stop judging now 😂. They weren't bad, but this final chapter of a book just didn't do it for me.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

    3.5 stars, rounded up for GR. I don’t review favorite authors but I have lots of thoughts on this to come.

  8. 4 out of 5

    rafia ✿

    ✶ cries. screams. hyperventilates. this cover????? after the last reveals I didn't know how much better it could get but honestly Aykut Aydoğdu actually never disappoints. this is going to be such a ride yall...I'm not ready, tbh! but can't wait to have my heart shattered to pieces multiple times :,) so excited (starts sobbing in TALLY is coming back to me) ✶ ✶ cries. screams. hyperventilates. this cover????? after the last reveals I didn't know how much better it could get but honestly Aykut Aydoğdu actually never disappoints. this is going to be such a ride yall...I'm not ready, tbh! but can't wait to have my heart shattered to pieces multiple times :,) so excited (starts sobbing in TALLY is coming back to me) ✶

  9. 5 out of 5

    Hannah⚡️

    I really don’t have enough words for how good Youngbloods, and this whole series, was. The Uglies series was one of my favorite series in junior high and high school…I can’t even count how often I reread the original series when I was younger. And this new quartet of books definitely didn’t disappoint as a sequel series. I loved all the callbacks to the original series in this book-obviously the presence of Tally and Shay, but also things like the roller coaster where the original Smoke camp was I really don’t have enough words for how good Youngbloods, and this whole series, was. The Uglies series was one of my favorite series in junior high and high school…I can’t even count how often I reread the original series when I was younger. And this new quartet of books definitely didn’t disappoint as a sequel series. I loved all the callbacks to the original series in this book-obviously the presence of Tally and Shay, but also things like the roller coaster where the original Smoke camp was, mentioning the Extras space station. I thought this series was a very good exploration of Tally’s line in the original series “freedom has a way of destroying things.” I love that this new post-mind rain world had almost as many problems as the world of Uglies. I loved the slow buildup in the first 3 books and then rapid pivot in this book of Diego becoming the villain. I loved the conflict and different perspectives coming from the Youngbloods who grew up during the Pretty regime, the rebels like Yandre and X, and Frey and their conflicting opinions of what needed to be done to save the world from the AI and Diego. And how sometimes in situations like this, there just isn’t a “good” or ideal option. I also found it interesting how there are so many cities named in this series-Shreve, Diego, Paz, Victoria, SeaTac-and yet Shay and Tally’s home city still remains nameless. Anyway I thought this new quartet of books was a really strong sequel series, and now I want to go reread all 4 Uglies books now.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa

    Not sure if I got closure or if there will be more to this series. I’m gonna be a snob about this book because law of recency here…. As I said in my update, the use of an Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) in this book is incorrect. While not much is known about EMPs because there is no precedent in modern day warfare or usage, there is still a lot of literature on how EMPs would be used and employed. What the author described was a nuclear weapon. Not that it wasn’t good, because he did get all effects Not sure if I got closure or if there will be more to this series. I’m gonna be a snob about this book because law of recency here…. As I said in my update, the use of an Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) in this book is incorrect. While not much is known about EMPs because there is no precedent in modern day warfare or usage, there is still a lot of literature on how EMPs would be used and employed. What the author described was a nuclear weapon. Not that it wasn’t good, because he did get all effects correct- blast, shock, thermal, etc…. The problem is that he called it an EMP. A EMP is designed to be used at a high altitude (as written by Samuel Gladstone), and yes it is theorized that it will take out communications if used this way. However, there would be no blast effects because of how high the burst is. So having an EMP-esque bomb would not produce the same effects as a nuclear bomb. I digress. Still a 3⭐️ read as we got more of the story and how it connects with the Pretties, Uglies, Specials series which I thought was pretty ingenious. Again, I’m confused on if we got closure, if this was the last book, or if there is more coming bc it was not wrapped up in a finalized sort of way. I didn’t get answers to questions or maybe I did and I was just too incensed about the misuse of an EMP (but that’s my problem lol) I still can’t get over a character death and it made me lose a lot of interest in the book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    CJ

    "Freedom has a way of destroying things." Sure does, Tally. Frey joins Tally's crew, and we finally get to see what Tally is like as an adult. (And Shay, too. The characterization of Shay was actually amazing, was one of my favorite parts.) She has a surprising perspective on Rafi's actions at the end of the previous book, giving Frey some needed context. After the Fall of Shreve, Frey and co. are discovering more of the dead dictator's secrets, many of them utterly chilling. The stuff with the ki "Freedom has a way of destroying things." Sure does, Tally. Frey joins Tally's crew, and we finally get to see what Tally is like as an adult. (And Shay, too. The characterization of Shay was actually amazing, was one of my favorite parts.) She has a surprising perspective on Rafi's actions at the end of the previous book, giving Frey some needed context. After the Fall of Shreve, Frey and co. are discovering more of the dead dictator's secrets, many of them utterly chilling. The stuff with the kids, ugh. Also really liked Frey and X's continued dynamic. Theirs is a complicated relationship with a lot of baggage, but ultimately it's a loving one, almost sibling-like. This book is all about hard decisions. Impossible decisions. And chaos.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Pat

    A wild exciting ride that was hard to put down.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Renata

    I think Scott Westerfeld is so so good at understanding technology's impact on culture and it's thrilling!! I loved seeing what Tally and Shay had become! I did have to read a wiki to remember what Frey and Rafi's whole deal was but that's on me! I think Scott Westerfeld is so so good at understanding technology's impact on culture and it's thrilling!! I loved seeing what Tally and Shay had become! I did have to read a wiki to remember what Frey and Rafi's whole deal was but that's on me!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Destiny Warne

    This was a fun look into a post-Pretties world, and I love the theme that you can solve one problem but open the door to other ones. I enjoyed the issues they faced in the story, and it was a fun read, but definitely not my favorite book in this series.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Steve Alcorn

    This seems to be the conclusion of the latest trilogy, and it wraps up in a satisfying way.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Phoebe Cowdell

    I loved the Uglies world when I was a teenager so I always love diving back into the same world. Saying that I’m not sure I would recommend this spin off series on its own. It’s very much all action and not so much depth. But if you, like me, loved the world of Tally Youngblood, this series is an easy and nice read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ana

    A solid return to form by Westerfeld. Sure, there are lots of little issues I could nitpick. But I'm still giving this a five star rating just because I'm so pleased to see Westerfeld's writing finally picking up again. After slogging through the beginning of this series with its boring muddle of "does Col like the fake me or the real me?" it's nice to get some excitement again. Westerfeld's at his best when he's exploring the consequences of tech and describing angsty outcasts going on missions, A solid return to form by Westerfeld. Sure, there are lots of little issues I could nitpick. But I'm still giving this a five star rating just because I'm so pleased to see Westerfeld's writing finally picking up again. After slogging through the beginning of this series with its boring muddle of "does Col like the fake me or the real me?" it's nice to get some excitement again. Westerfeld's at his best when he's exploring the consequences of tech and describing angsty outcasts going on missions, and that's what this book is all about. Nonstop energy, high-tech action, strong friendships, and some interesting philosophical questions all put this finale back on the level of the original series. It's not perfect, but it does an excellent job of being a YA dystopian novel.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ciera

    Petition for a third quartet series a la Cassandra Clare. If she can keep writing those incestuous Shadowhunter novels that center on the same four families, surely Westerfeld can continue to let us live here in this expansive future and keep following our lord and savior Tally Youngblood through the wilds no?

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ilana

    It’s been a minute since we’ve been with this series but it’s so easy to slip back into the series. Getting back into the world of Tally and Frey really leads us down an exciting path, and throughout this fourth book, we don’t know who to trust. The journey here is one to watch how Frey tries to get over the loss of Col, the one person that she loved, knowing that it was her twin sister who murdered him. Frey doesn’t know who to trust since she knows that her sister isn’t loyal and is moral missi It’s been a minute since we’ve been with this series but it’s so easy to slip back into the series. Getting back into the world of Tally and Frey really leads us down an exciting path, and throughout this fourth book, we don’t know who to trust. The journey here is one to watch how Frey tries to get over the loss of Col, the one person that she loved, knowing that it was her twin sister who murdered him. Frey doesn’t know who to trust since she knows that her sister isn’t loyal and is moral missing, so she has to tread carefully. We get to watch the relationships grow with the Youngbloods and all the other cliques that were once part of the city – especially now that laws and dust aren’t a thing, an everyone’s got the chance to reinvent themselves. It’s a reliance on some of those old ‘friends’ that gets us through some of the trials in this storyline. We see a ‘come to terms’ between Boss X and Frey and the realization that they are more similar than they thought, but have the same scars to get through life which make things harder. These similarities make it that much harder to predict what the future will hold with them since the dynamic is tough. There’s a quest to uncover an destroy the old dust files that Frey/Rafi’s father had saved – knowing that there’s a lot there that the AI of other nations can use against them. Part of the issue of course is that they are radioactive so it’s harder to get to, and once they discover the hiding place, they learn that they’re not the only ones on this same quest. just for different motives. Rarfi has made a trade, a deal with another nation without thinking through the repercussions and that means that we’re on the backfoot throughout the quest to save the world.and then when we realize that she perhaps made deals with multiple people, well that means that we have even more to worry about. Even within the Youngbloods we see that there’s a power struggle on who’s making the right choices for them and for mankind that we don’t know who’s going to be on the right side of things. There’s strife, stress, fear, angst….everything with the exception of romance since that’s been killed. But…all in all a great next chapter in their journey and in this series

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dani-ellie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Libby Audio: I assume that this is the last book since Westerfeld likes to keep the endings a little open-ended (but would definitely read like four more books if they're coming lol). Don't get me wrong, it wraps up. But in a way that doesn't answer every single question raised and doesn't show us the happily ever after. It's how Specials ended, with the world technically saved but more broken than before. Honestly, I'm surprised high school me didn't read a ton of Uglies fanfiction back in the Libby Audio: I assume that this is the last book since Westerfeld likes to keep the endings a little open-ended (but would definitely read like four more books if they're coming lol). Don't get me wrong, it wraps up. But in a way that doesn't answer every single question raised and doesn't show us the happily ever after. It's how Specials ended, with the world technically saved but more broken than before. Honestly, I'm surprised high school me didn't read a ton of Uglies fanfiction back in the day because I had sooooo many unanswered what-if questions. This series leaves just about as many. Okay, first of all. Tally and Shay are back! (And then leave at the end, boo). I know it's Frey's story, but the OGs come back and she joins their crew. *internal squeal* They're the same as ever, only now sort of Middle Pretties instead of Uglies/Pretties. They're as Special as ever. And so is their entire crew of Youngbloods. There are some more semi-familiar faces, but no David. Wtf Westerfeld. Tally gives some lame line about the wilderness and everything being too much for him in the end and only Tally's crew being cut out for it. Read: his whiney normal humanself was too weak to handle the hard choices. I used to really admire him, but after rereading the series recently as an adult, he was a gaslighting Mama's boy. But, I feel like he was such a part of the Uglies series, it feels weird without him. More full circle that it's Shay by Tally's side, though, keeping her in check...mostly. The similarities between Tally/Frey and Shay/Frey are a bit much at times. Though, there is a clever line near the end that spells it out that Frey is actually Shay when it comes to her sister Rafia. Always there to keep her from going over the deep end. (Which Shay also doesn't do when there's talk of a bomb...because she's the "loyal" one). Frey betrays her friends to side with Tally AND THEN betrays Tally to try and save the world herself. Such a Tally move. 🤣 I get that they're Specials, but they would definitely all be dead by the end of this book. Read by Therese Plumber. #booksin22

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ricky

    I...guess that this fourth and final novel of Westerfeld's second cycle of the Uglies world is taking things full circle back to the original? After all, it gets its name from original protagonist Tally, who makes a return as the leader of an ongoing rebel faction roping Frey into the mission to eliminate the last vestiges of the old families...or something like that. One thing I thought was sad about the first book of this new series was how thin the world building was, and I feel like that thi I...guess that this fourth and final novel of Westerfeld's second cycle of the Uglies world is taking things full circle back to the original? After all, it gets its name from original protagonist Tally, who makes a return as the leader of an ongoing rebel faction roping Frey into the mission to eliminate the last vestiges of the old families...or something like that. One thing I thought was sad about the first book of this new series was how thin the world building was, and I feel like that thinness, even if it was somewhat corrected in the intervening novels, kinda makes this finale fall flat a bit. Granted, it's every bit as action-packed as one can expect from Westerfeld, but it still feels like...what even is going on most of the time? Especially in the end, which is surprisingly open and yet loaded with Mind Screw almost to the very last page. Well, to this finale, I now say ave atque vale, though I honestly wouldn't be surprised if Westerfeld decided to do a third series in this same world. Hopefully one with more engaging characters and world-building next time. And please God, no more Tally, not after this one...

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ky

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Another amazing book by Scott Westerfeld. Youngbloods felt as if returning to your childhood home, filled with nostalgia and love. Many old characters are mentioned or show up in this book, more than the last three. Having loved the uglies series since the originals came out, this one was everything I needed. Seeing how Shay and Tally grew up, and what they were to each other meant everything to me. And the parallels between then and Frey/Rafia. I will never stop singing my praises for how amazin Another amazing book by Scott Westerfeld. Youngbloods felt as if returning to your childhood home, filled with nostalgia and love. Many old characters are mentioned or show up in this book, more than the last three. Having loved the uglies series since the originals came out, this one was everything I needed. Seeing how Shay and Tally grew up, and what they were to each other meant everything to me. And the parallels between then and Frey/Rafia. I will never stop singing my praises for how amazing this series is and always will be. I'll read whatever Scott releases in this world, because I feel like there's so many stories that can be told. I grew up with Tally as my main favourite, and I love as an adult reading how someone else in a story can show who she becomes. Tally and Frey will always hold a special place in my heart. And as the world changes, I always remember their words..."freedom has a way of destroying things."

  23. 5 out of 5

    Taylor Johnson

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I feel like every book in this series has: 1- left me so satisfied with the return of the Uglies world 2- left me slightly unable to keep track of all of the characters and happenings 3- baffled me at how well it ties all the pieces together After finishing the book, I’m still trying to comprehend what all just happened. The AI imposters of Frey, Rafia, their dad, Col, and the doctor. I’m working through who was behind everything that happened and how things ended up the way they did. But, in the en I feel like every book in this series has: 1- left me so satisfied with the return of the Uglies world 2- left me slightly unable to keep track of all of the characters and happenings 3- baffled me at how well it ties all the pieces together After finishing the book, I’m still trying to comprehend what all just happened. The AI imposters of Frey, Rafia, their dad, Col, and the doctor. I’m working through who was behind everything that happened and how things ended up the way they did. But, in the end, I think I’m happy to see Tally back in hiding, and Frey and Rafia back together in Shreve. I wish there would’ve been a little more information about the future of Shreve - especially dealing with crime and the possibility for reinstating some sort of dust. I, of course, also want to know what ends up happening to Diego.

  24. 4 out of 5

    April Helms

    Wow. My only negative reaction is that this was the last book. Still, the story wraps up well (although there are some ways I can see how another series could be started). The start of this book was strongly hinted at in the previous novel: Frey has joined Tally Youngblood's crew of rebels, who call themselves the Youngbloods. Obviously it was great to see Tally and Shay again, and I liked the parallels drawn between Tally and Frey. I'll try not to get into too many spoilers, but Frey discovers Wow. My only negative reaction is that this was the last book. Still, the story wraps up well (although there are some ways I can see how another series could be started). The start of this book was strongly hinted at in the previous novel: Frey has joined Tally Youngblood's crew of rebels, who call themselves the Youngbloods. Obviously it was great to see Tally and Shay again, and I liked the parallels drawn between Tally and Frey. I'll try not to get into too many spoilers, but Frey discovers that her father's ambitions were more sinister and far-reaching than she, or anyone, could have dreamed after they stumble across a group of kidnapped children. The ending really puts the protagonists in a Catch-22, with no easy way out. I do hope Westerfeld revisits this world. I just love the characters, the nuanced stories, the conflicts, and the creative technologies.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Braiding

    This book is fucking brutal. Tally at ~40 is not who any of us imagined her to be, and yet, it makes sense. Frey's growing awareness of who Tally has become mirrors the reader's reactions; Frey has always been our avatar, wearing a multitude of faces and struggling to understand the complexities of her world, as each new revelation rewrites what we know about everything. The anticipation and horror of the last act, constantly battling to believe that they wouldn't go there (the author? the charac This book is fucking brutal. Tally at ~40 is not who any of us imagined her to be, and yet, it makes sense. Frey's growing awareness of who Tally has become mirrors the reader's reactions; Frey has always been our avatar, wearing a multitude of faces and struggling to understand the complexities of her world, as each new revelation rewrites what we know about everything. The anticipation and horror of the last act, constantly battling to believe that they wouldn't go there (the author? the characters?), it just fucking hurts. Like the original Specials, with their angelic and cruel beauty, this book will rip your heart out and eat it, and you'll be grateful that you got to witness its perfection.

  26. 5 out of 5

    marlagemica

    I was disappointed. The author is better than this. I really thought that this book will be great and fantastic, but no. The other series was the best. Though still like this one. This book was just talking about what happen after all the series. I still hate Rafi and I hate that Frey forgave after all that. I hate Rafi that she took everything away from Frey. I was really mad at Diego (the AI) but I like Paz. There was some boring chapter that I didn't like at all. But I still like all the othe I was disappointed. The author is better than this. I really thought that this book will be great and fantastic, but no. The other series was the best. Though still like this one. This book was just talking about what happen after all the series. I still hate Rafi and I hate that Frey forgave after all that. I hate Rafi that she took everything away from Frey. I was really mad at Diego (the AI) but I like Paz. There was some boring chapter that I didn't like at all. But I still like all the other characters like Tally and Frey . I didn't expect that she'll like Shay more than Tally. I really can't say anything since it's going to be Spoilers/ 8.5/10

  27. 5 out of 5

    Katherine Current

    This transported me back to being a teenager and reading the Uglies series obsessively. Sometimes, I feel like Westerfeld is a million times more smart than I am, so I can’t quite put together the dots. Maybe that’s weird for a YA book, but it doesn’t bother me, it just makes me think. Uglies dealt with one societal issue. Youngbloods deals with an entirely different one that feels more pertinent to today, while providing us a window into some of our favorite characters. I’d probably give this 3 This transported me back to being a teenager and reading the Uglies series obsessively. Sometimes, I feel like Westerfeld is a million times more smart than I am, so I can’t quite put together the dots. Maybe that’s weird for a YA book, but it doesn’t bother me, it just makes me think. Uglies dealt with one societal issue. Youngbloods deals with an entirely different one that feels more pertinent to today, while providing us a window into some of our favorite characters. I’d probably give this 3.5 stars. I came away with some questions and theories, but since this is the end of the series I guess they’ll remain with no answers.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Dhaivyd Hilgendorf

    The Smoke Lives! I could (and will) keep reading books from the world of the Uglies as long as Scott Westerfeld keeps writing them! They are always full of action, clever futuristic tech ideas, interpersonal emotional drama, questioning of contemporary practices and some coming-of-age component. In this book, we get to see the main protagonist from the Uglies (Tally) meet up with Frey, the heroine of the Imposters. Not all of the interactions are as copacetic as one might think. Read it for your The Smoke Lives! I could (and will) keep reading books from the world of the Uglies as long as Scott Westerfeld keeps writing them! They are always full of action, clever futuristic tech ideas, interpersonal emotional drama, questioning of contemporary practices and some coming-of-age component. In this book, we get to see the main protagonist from the Uglies (Tally) meet up with Frey, the heroine of the Imposters. Not all of the interactions are as copacetic as one might think. Read it for yourself to find out how they mesh! Middle school and up.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lorelei🤍

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Sooo Tally and Frey in the same book???!?? I absolutely loved this book. However, I am slightly upset that Tally didn’t talk about her loss of Zane as he was my favorite character from the ugly series but oh well. I honestly still haven’t forgiven Rafia for killing Col but I’m glad Frey did by the end. I also thought while reading the beginning of the imposter series that Tally was dead. So, reading that Tally was back was definitely an unexpected plot twist. Loved this book and it was a great e Sooo Tally and Frey in the same book???!?? I absolutely loved this book. However, I am slightly upset that Tally didn’t talk about her loss of Zane as he was my favorite character from the ugly series but oh well. I honestly still haven’t forgiven Rafia for killing Col but I’m glad Frey did by the end. I also thought while reading the beginning of the imposter series that Tally was dead. So, reading that Tally was back was definitely an unexpected plot twist. Loved this book and it was a great ending to this beautiful series. Can’t wait for the movie!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Elsie Birnbaum

    In many ways this book feels a lot smaller than its predecessors, partly because there are no new characters or places but Frey gets to shine in this smaller perspective. Its interesting seeing Tally and the others from Uglies through her eyes. I understand the need for a message of revolutions being messy but the central conflict felt poorly developed from my perspective which made the ending unsatisfying. That said the book had me totally hooked from start to finish.

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