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Know and Tell: The Art of Narration

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Narration, the art of telling, has been used as a pedagogical tool since ancient times. Over one hundred years ago, Charlotte Mason methodized narration and implemented it in scores of schools in Great Britain. Over the past few decades, educators in the US, mostly in home schools, have followed her guidelines with outstanding results. This book discusses the theory behind Narration, the art of telling, has been used as a pedagogical tool since ancient times. Over one hundred years ago, Charlotte Mason methodized narration and implemented it in scores of schools in Great Britain. Over the past few decades, educators in the US, mostly in home schools, have followed her guidelines with outstanding results. This book discusses the theory behind the use of narration and then walks through the process from beginning to end, to show how simply "telling" is the foundation for higher-level thinking and writing. While narration has grown popular among homeschoolers, it also works well in the classroom. In this book, you will find sample narrations and many resources to help you use narration with your students in any setting. If you've been wanting to try narration, but haven't felt confident enough to rely on an unfamiliar method, this book will give you the tools that you need to make the process easier. People are narrating every day, and this book will show you how to make that natural activity a vital part of education that enhances children's relationship with knowledge and allows them to grow into skilled communicators.


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Narration, the art of telling, has been used as a pedagogical tool since ancient times. Over one hundred years ago, Charlotte Mason methodized narration and implemented it in scores of schools in Great Britain. Over the past few decades, educators in the US, mostly in home schools, have followed her guidelines with outstanding results. This book discusses the theory behind Narration, the art of telling, has been used as a pedagogical tool since ancient times. Over one hundred years ago, Charlotte Mason methodized narration and implemented it in scores of schools in Great Britain. Over the past few decades, educators in the US, mostly in home schools, have followed her guidelines with outstanding results. This book discusses the theory behind the use of narration and then walks through the process from beginning to end, to show how simply "telling" is the foundation for higher-level thinking and writing. While narration has grown popular among homeschoolers, it also works well in the classroom. In this book, you will find sample narrations and many resources to help you use narration with your students in any setting. If you've been wanting to try narration, but haven't felt confident enough to rely on an unfamiliar method, this book will give you the tools that you need to make the process easier. People are narrating every day, and this book will show you how to make that natural activity a vital part of education that enhances children's relationship with knowledge and allows them to grow into skilled communicators.

30 review for Know and Tell: The Art of Narration

  1. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Rollins

    This is the perfect summer read for any teacher or homeschool parent. I am so motivated after reading it that I can hardly wait to get back to our little school and expand on some of the ideas. I especially loved chapters 7,9, and 10! So encouraging and motivating. Even though in some ways I am an old pro at narration, requiring written narrations from my children and students everyday, this book helped me look at it in a refreshing way. I can also concur with the last chapter's details on grown This is the perfect summer read for any teacher or homeschool parent. I am so motivated after reading it that I can hardly wait to get back to our little school and expand on some of the ideas. I especially loved chapters 7,9, and 10! So encouraging and motivating. Even though in some ways I am an old pro at narration, requiring written narrations from my children and students everyday, this book helped me look at it in a refreshing way. I can also concur with the last chapter's details on grown students. My students have not always loved or appreciated written narration but they have all benefitted from it in concrete ways. Across the board they have learned to process and think in ways that easily translated to college and real life. This was a much needed book, for not only the Charlotte Mason community, but for the entire educational platform. Understanding narration can help us understand where our schools are off track. A true Must-Read! But don't be afraid of reading it slowly.

  2. 5 out of 5

    ladydusk

    Super helpful introduction to narration and how it can lead naturally into composition. We've always done narration in one form or another but had gotten stuck in written narration and not transitioning well to more formal writing. Chapter 7 is all about this, and will be a huge help when we start school again in January 2021. Glass includes many samples and some charts, I find the charts especially helpful for my needs and the samples, while a wonderful treasury of narrations for someone gettin Super helpful introduction to narration and how it can lead naturally into composition. We've always done narration in one form or another but had gotten stuck in written narration and not transitioning well to more formal writing. Chapter 7 is all about this, and will be a huge help when we start school again in January 2021. Glass includes many samples and some charts, I find the charts especially helpful for my needs and the samples, while a wonderful treasury of narrations for someone getting started, more distracting to the flow of the narrative for me. I plan to use the "To the student" readings in Morning Time as we begin a journey more deeply into composition and I hope to help, especially my now 10th grader, my students to grow in their ability to think deeply and communicate well regarding the ideas they're grasping hold of. "As teachers and parents, we want to open doors for the children, so that they have every chance to make connections to the things they are learning and to communicate what they know. With a little creativity, we can find ways to make it possible for almost every child to narrate." p 151 All this said, Know and Tell can be a great resource for the educator who wants to use narration in her home or school setting with students of all sorts of capacities. I'm frustrated with myself for not prioritizing reading it as I should have sooner. Highly recommended.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Anne Lawson

    Karen Glass has done it again! This book will undoubtedly become a standard guide and a classic. Homeschoolers who use Charlotte Mason principles will find this book invaluable to their understanding of the power of narration. Karen has made it particularly clear how a student progresses from oral to written narration, essays and finally formal composition. Her instructions are both clear and encouraging. She gives practical examples and advice making it easy to follow and understand, clearing u Karen Glass has done it again! This book will undoubtedly become a standard guide and a classic. Homeschoolers who use Charlotte Mason principles will find this book invaluable to their understanding of the power of narration. Karen has made it particularly clear how a student progresses from oral to written narration, essays and finally formal composition. Her instructions are both clear and encouraging. She gives practical examples and advice making it easy to follow and understand, clearing up the anxiety many homeschooling parents have about "what to do when". Most importantly, Karen is faithful to Charlotte Mason's writings and practice of narration in PNEU schools and homes. She is confident that narration works, and readers will come away with the same confidence. I am encouraged that my children will become successful writers, readers, learners and communicators as they practice daily the art of narration. The book is a must-read for every homeschooling parent. It can also be a valuable resource for teachers in any setting, public or private. I hope every educator will find it, read it, and implement narration in their classrooms. Our children deserve to have a rich feast spread before them, and deserve to be able to use narration as a tool for comprehension and expression.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kim Elder

    This is one of those books I wish I could have had when I started homeschooling my children 20+ years ago. I had heard about narration at some point (thanks Cindy Rollins) and tried to implement it, albeit not very well. We dabbled in and out of it for years and I often did not press through my children's resistance. And then comes this gem of a book. In a clear and encouraging way, Know and Tell explains everything you need to know about narration - the why, the how and the benefit. I am lookin This is one of those books I wish I could have had when I started homeschooling my children 20+ years ago. I had heard about narration at some point (thanks Cindy Rollins) and tried to implement it, albeit not very well. We dabbled in and out of it for years and I often did not press through my children's resistance. And then comes this gem of a book. In a clear and encouraging way, Know and Tell explains everything you need to know about narration - the why, the how and the benefit. I am looking forward to making narration a priority this year. Thank you, Karen Glass!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jessi

    This is my new favorite book on education. I believe the premise in my heart (narration is effective early-stages composition practice) and this helps me believe it in my head. Even better, it is such an encouraging call to assign narration constantly, because the outcome is worth it. It's very hard as an educator to just HOPE that the method your heart loves will work. Know and Tell gives me some reasons for that hope. I am very thankful for Karen Glass's words. This is my new favorite book on education. I believe the premise in my heart (narration is effective early-stages composition practice) and this helps me believe it in my head. Even better, it is such an encouraging call to assign narration constantly, because the outcome is worth it. It's very hard as an educator to just HOPE that the method your heart loves will work. Know and Tell gives me some reasons for that hope. I am very thankful for Karen Glass's words.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lmichelleb

    I knew this book would be helpful, but I didn't fathom quite how practical and encouraging Karen Glass' words would be to me as I evaluate our homeschool after three years of using narration as the key element of our educational philosophy. I feel affirmed in my choice, with my confidence bolstered to tackle the transition to more and more written narrations as well as varied creative narration prompts. Now that I can see the whole process all in one "glance" it is so much easier to stay the cou I knew this book would be helpful, but I didn't fathom quite how practical and encouraging Karen Glass' words would be to me as I evaluate our homeschool after three years of using narration as the key element of our educational philosophy. I feel affirmed in my choice, with my confidence bolstered to tackle the transition to more and more written narrations as well as varied creative narration prompts. Now that I can see the whole process all in one "glance" it is so much easier to stay the course of delaying some language arts skills that are normally tackled earlier in the public school setting, knowing that the goal I have in the end is reachable with narration as the delightful means! Seeing narrations through all the stages, from beginning oral narrations to early written narrations to more polished written narrations all the way to engaging high school essays, turned my hope into more firm confidence as I saw right before my eyes what the work of the mind does when a person is given the skill and gift of ability to narrate. I will be re-reading this for encouragement and practical tips many times over as I continue with my students in our narration journey together.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    If you are educating children, this is a very important book to read. It will revolutionize your teaching. Mrs. Glass skillfully explains what narration is and gives wonderful helps on how to implement it with all ages and educational situations. If you are teaching young children, you might want to read it slowly to absorb it well. You could narrate it. 😊 If you are teaching older children, children with special needs or in classroom situations, you might want to read it a bit quicker. I struggl If you are educating children, this is a very important book to read. It will revolutionize your teaching. Mrs. Glass skillfully explains what narration is and gives wonderful helps on how to implement it with all ages and educational situations. If you are teaching young children, you might want to read it slowly to absorb it well. You could narrate it. 😊 If you are teaching older children, children with special needs or in classroom situations, you might want to read it a bit quicker. I struggled through learning how to facilitate narrations with my oldest children and this really would have been a helpful book for me 20 plus years ago but God is good and narration worked despite my mistakes. It is very much an art and there are rules to follow. We are still narrating and I am still amazed by the results. I read some of the testimonials and sample narrations to my children and it inspired them to continue. Narrations can be hard work and encouragement goes a long way. After reading the examples to them, one daughter now wants to read the book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Renee

    Narration, or the art of telling back, can be the most baffling concept to those new to the Charlotte Mason approach to homeschooling. Glass did an excellent job at explaining what this skill is and how to help out students grow. I would recommend this to those new to the idea but also to the well season homeschoolers, narration is something that we can all practice, from the early school age to those wanting to teach it. My only problem with the book wasn't the content but its structure. I stro Narration, or the art of telling back, can be the most baffling concept to those new to the Charlotte Mason approach to homeschooling. Glass did an excellent job at explaining what this skill is and how to help out students grow. I would recommend this to those new to the idea but also to the well season homeschoolers, narration is something that we can all practice, from the early school age to those wanting to teach it. My only problem with the book wasn't the content but its structure. I strongly disliked having example of narration mix within the chapters of the book, making the reading flow interrupted. I would have preferred having those narration example either before the chapter started or at the end of the chapter, and that is only a personal preference and didn't affect the quality of the content .

  9. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    Excellent book on narration. I will definitely read it again as my boys get older, and progress through the stages.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Karla

    What an invaluable resource for CM educators! You can't read this book just once. I will keep it close by and read specific chapters as needed. What an invaluable resource for CM educators! You can't read this book just once. I will keep it close by and read specific chapters as needed.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jenny Wilson

    Very helpful and inspiring guide to using narration with my children!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Rogers

    This was an excellent read on what narration is and why it is beneficial for education. I started adding in some aspects of narration with my homeschool this last calendar year, and I am excited to incorporate more of it into our lessons. This book helped to provide ideas on how to integrate it into various educational situations (one-on-one vs. larger group/class room narrations), as well as provided practical tips in how to incorporate and grow narrations with the student (oral narrations expa This was an excellent read on what narration is and why it is beneficial for education. I started adding in some aspects of narration with my homeschool this last calendar year, and I am excited to incorporate more of it into our lessons. This book helped to provide ideas on how to integrate it into various educational situations (one-on-one vs. larger group/class room narrations), as well as provided practical tips in how to incorporate and grow narrations with the student (oral narrations expand into oral and written narrations, which finally easily flow into formal compositions). The only reason I gave a 4 rather than a 5 really related to an editing style that left me frustrated several times. Throughout the book there are many samples of narrations , this was helpful, however I really did not like how multiple times these samples were placed in the middle of a paragraph or sentence. Because of this editing it felt a little disjointed at times, or required flipping back and forth on a page. I hope in a later edition, these samples in a chapter are included but the formatting allows for a thought to be completed before the sample is inserted. Other than that minor complaint, this is an excellent book for parents and educations, and particularly for homeschoolers! An excerpt towards the end of the book nicely sums up the book "When you have students narrate daily, you are giving them the opportunity to become artisans with words. They practice the arts of speaking, writing, and communicating, all at the same time, as they assimilate knowledge. The ability to gather your thoughts, order them, and then express them in plain language is a highly prized skill. Whether you are a teacher, a corporate executive, a parent, a mechanic, or a computer programmer is irrelevant. You are a person, and you need to communicate - in speech, in writing, or both. Narration is one of the most effective educational techniques available for developing those skills."

  13. 5 out of 5

    Eva B.

    I wish this book had been written a quarter of a century when I first started homeschooling. My sporadic efforts at having my offspring narrate were not successful, because I did not understand how effective narration could be as an educational tool, and I was too easily discouraged by the results which were not what I expected. Karen Glass writes why to narrate and how to narrate and encourages the reader to be consistent in expecting students to narrate and to take the long view when assessing I wish this book had been written a quarter of a century when I first started homeschooling. My sporadic efforts at having my offspring narrate were not successful, because I did not understand how effective narration could be as an educational tool, and I was too easily discouraged by the results which were not what I expected. Karen Glass writes why to narrate and how to narrate and encourages the reader to be consistent in expecting students to narrate and to take the long view when assessing its effects. Among her topics she covers narration with young students, older students who are new to narration, when to move from oral narration to written narration and how to segue from written narrations to more formal writing. Excellent book!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Barker

    I highly recommend this book for any home schooling parent or teacher. Even those not following the Charlotte Mason tradition will be able to glean so much information from this book. Although CM and narration do go hand-in-hand, this method can be utilized in any educational setting and in every day life. The information is accessible to any reader and will walk you through how to be successful with narration in any setting.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Meghan Armstrong

    Another extremely helpful, open-hearted book from Karen Glass. I’m particularly appreciative of how this primer on using narration as a primary tool of education is so practical. It includes a detailed scope and sequence for developing the skill of narration (aka communication skills) from age 6 to graduation. I’ve already personally experienced the pure magic of narration, but I believe this book could really win over skeptics. Thank you, Karen, for your tireless work in this field!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Schultz

    Helpful and thorough on an important part of education. Makes the claim “the greatest thing a human soul ever does in this world is to see something and tell what it saw in a plain way.”

  17. 4 out of 5

    Osama

    Children who are taken for long walks every day develop stamina and endurance for hiking. Children who are taken to the pool regularly become swimmers. Children who spend every week playing baseball learn the skills of playing ball; and children who narrate consistently become thinkers and writers. Regular, consistent practice is all that is necessary-no special training is needed, and no tricks or shortcuts will take its place. I chose this book to shrug off the scientific mood my mind entered, Children who are taken for long walks every day develop stamina and endurance for hiking. Children who are taken to the pool regularly become swimmers. Children who spend every week playing baseball learn the skills of playing ball; and children who narrate consistently become thinkers and writers. Regular, consistent practice is all that is necessary-no special training is needed, and no tricks or shortcuts will take its place. I chose this book to shrug off the scientific mood my mind entered, and hermetically seal itself to pickle. And because this book is about language and upbringing, which I happen to have an interest in, with few other reasons. The book, though brief, talks in depth about narration and its uses, benefits, and superiority over the traditional school teaching methods. The book is primarily for teaching kids of 6 to 12 years the art of narration, and learning and developing through it. There are many samples which shows how impressive kids can narrate (oral or written) when placed in the right encouraging environment. That is the majority of the book. The rest is complimentary subjects regarding the same main issue; narration. There are sections for starting to write. Other for special needs kids, and kids who start later than six years old. There are tips for doing this in classrooms, though the majority is written with the underlying assumption that homeschool is happening. The book is progressively logical; starting from what narration is at the beginning of the book and reaching to how to write five-paragraphs essays by the end of the book. It is very practical. Almost too practical for my use. This is what the book is about: To make an art of narration, we begin with children's natural interest and ability to tell about something. We accustom them to tell accurately, consecutively, and fully. In due time, we encourage them to write their narrations. They begin by learning to write the same thing they would have said in an oral narration, and when that becomes natural, we teach them to take what they have written and shape it into familiar forms of writing, such as essays. For those who are interested in writing, like myself, mostly you’ll be bored many pages in which the topics is about writing and how it is done. The information, though perfectly true, for a person who write is sleep-inducingly obvious. To use the words of the book: It is full of truisms (8_8). In attempting to show the surprisingly (to myself) unique and important benefits of narrating, the author threw so much shade at traditional schooling placing them in a celestial umbra. This just highlight the problems which we should try to eradicate. Still she never said anything that was not true. They are all sadly true, and obvious. Quotes The historical seven liberal arts (grammar, logic, rhetoric, arithmetic, geometry, music, and astronomy) were called "arts" and not "sciences" for a reason. In the ancient world, a "science" represented a body of knowledge to be acquired. An art is not a body of knowledge; it is something to be practiced. An art is something that you do. This is why even in contemporary usage we speak of "practicing" law or "practicing" medicine. It is necessary to acquire some knowledge in order to be a lawyer or a doctor, of course, but when knowing is expressed by doing , it becomes an art. Synthetic thinking, at its foundation, is the development of a personal relationship with the material being learned, so that the pupil achieves a level of familiarity with it that allows at least the potential for connecting what she is learning to things she has learned before or might learn in the future. Those connections are real for her only if she perceives them for herself, and the process of narration encourages this integrated, synthetic thinking as almost no other educational practice does. I found this document simplifying the synthetic vs analytical thinkingwith a quick Google search. In fact, writing, thinking, and even learning itself are all part of one process. As we articulate our thoughts, either aloud or in writing, we are at the same time sifting, classifying, selecting, and ordering. We are thinking. Narrating, either by speaking or writing, goes hand in hand with both thinking and learning. Shade-Throwing If we recall that narration is, at its heart, a relationship-building activity, it will be easier to appreciate how beneficial it can be for older children. Often, traditional institutional school methods have dampened, damaged, or even destroyed the natural love of learning that bright-eyed little ones begin with. It is not the purpose of this work to criticize traditional methods, but it is sadly all too common to find that, as children grow older, they lose their love of learning. The hungry mind of a bright, eager pupil is rarely satisfied with the meager sustenance offered by a bland textbook or a watered-down summary. If he truly wants to learn, he will look elsewhere and read books of his own choosing. Unfortunately, many children are forced to ingest too many "dry oatmeal" school lessons, and their love for learning withers. When learning ceases to be a joy, entertainment steps in to fill the void. Television, films, video games, and other time-consuming activities are available to entertain a passive mind, but they do not feed a growing mind. The usual practice of questioning, in which a child is expected to produce an isolated piece of information, does not encourage synthetic thinking. Narration, on the other hand, requires a child to think about all of the material and produce the relevant details in relation one to another. What the narrator tells has to make sense. Knowledge that is not easily measured and tested is often ignored in modern schools.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Danielle Z

    This would be the second book that I would say every homeschool mom needs to read. First Teaching from Rest and then Know and Tell. I taught writing for seven years and I think this really answers why kids can not write or speak well. If you're a teacher in ANY capacity, read this book! This would be the second book that I would say every homeschool mom needs to read. First Teaching from Rest and then Know and Tell. I taught writing for seven years and I think this really answers why kids can not write or speak well. If you're a teacher in ANY capacity, read this book!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Narration is something we do every day without even noticing— we tell each other stories about our days, books were reading, or the goofy thing our pets did. Narration builds communication skills, both written and oral, and it encourages students to know the material in a fuller sense. Glass argues for this skill to be more intentionally practiced in the classroom setting in any subject area. Based on what I read, I plan to be more intentional about implementing narration into my lessons. Based o Narration is something we do every day without even noticing— we tell each other stories about our days, books were reading, or the goofy thing our pets did. Narration builds communication skills, both written and oral, and it encourages students to know the material in a fuller sense. Glass argues for this skill to be more intentionally practiced in the classroom setting in any subject area. Based on what I read, I plan to be more intentional about implementing narration into my lessons. Based on her definition of narration, I have already been encouraging my students to do it to a certain extent. Narration goes along perfectly with John Milton Gregory’s Law of Review, and we do that all the time! I do think that the layout of the book was a little weird; Glass provided “scores of” examples of narrations with zero context, and they were more or less just strewn throughout the book. They interrupted sentences and did not add anything to the flow of the writing. Frankly, I stopped reading them about a chapter into the book. Also, I understand that narration is not exactly an educational method that has a lot of formal research to support it, but it seems like Glass relied on the same three or four sources to back her argument for narration. For a book this length, I would have liked to see more formal research done, but again, I understand that that may be a big ask. I am eager to implement narration into my class, and I am thankful that at the early primary level, narration ought to be oral. So often writing is the kids’ least favorite thing because it pushes them to focus for long amounts of time. I am glad that there are more developmentally appropriate ways to encourage narration. I feel challenged to make narration more interactive, creative, and enjoyable for the students. It is a skill that has a lot of benefits, and I’m eager to grow in the skill myself.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    This book makes a good case for the value of narration, defined as "telling" about something. For example, in the context of my literature class, I would ask students to tell me about the assigned reading. In math class, a student might be asked to tell about the process of working out a specific problem. After a field trip, students might be asked to tell about what they saw. If students in my literature class know that they will be asked to share about what they have read, they will pay greate This book makes a good case for the value of narration, defined as "telling" about something. For example, in the context of my literature class, I would ask students to tell me about the assigned reading. In math class, a student might be asked to tell about the process of working out a specific problem. After a field trip, students might be asked to tell about what they saw. If students in my literature class know that they will be asked to share about what they have read, they will pay greater attention as they read. Unlike a conventional reading quiz with right or wrong answers, students will have the satisfaction of sharing what they have gotten out of the readings. It will be a chance for them to show what they know, rather than what they don't know. Any gaps in their knowledge can be supplemented with other students' narrations. Every student has a unique perspective and will narrate differently--and that is good thing, because students should be developing their own voices. The book shows that narration is a flexible and powerful tool. Glass presents good ideas about creative ways to narrate by acting out scenes or drawing pictures. There are also helpful guidelines for turning narrations into more formal papers, like the five-paragraph essay. One thing I did not like was how many of the student examples interrupted the flow of the book's arguments (many of the right-hand pages had these examples). It would have been less distracting to put all of the student examples in the appendix. Also, it would help to have more context about the student examples, like what the prompt was for each of them. That would help us teachers have a better sense of good questions to ask.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    An excellent, accessible book about narration -- the act of telling back what you remember after reading or listening. This book explains how being able to synthesize information from a young age will set you up for success because you essentially become a natural teacher. If more schools adopted this mindset and method versus grades we would see a different generation of thinkers. If you are neurodiverse or a family member is, this will encourage you. She specifically mentions ADHD, autism, and An excellent, accessible book about narration -- the act of telling back what you remember after reading or listening. This book explains how being able to synthesize information from a young age will set you up for success because you essentially become a natural teacher. If more schools adopted this mindset and method versus grades we would see a different generation of thinkers. If you are neurodiverse or a family member is, this will encourage you. She specifically mentions ADHD, autism, and dyslexia. This is a book for parents and educators. Will be buying copies to distribute.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    A perfect blend of the philosophical and practical. I love the emphasis on narration as a relationship-builder, and it has given me both the confidence and a plan to make narration the foundation of building my children’s writing skills.

  23. 5 out of 5

    feastingwithlight

    Excellent read. I particularly liked the last half of the book where Glass shows you the transition from Oral Narration to composition. I finished the book encouraged and aware of the process moving forward with my students.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Philippa

    The new ‘go to’ for narration! A must-read if you are incorporating narration as part of your teaching method.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Julie Mabus

    A very informative book on the value and process of narration. I can see myself referring back to this book as we continue with our journey with a CM education.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Amber Jimerson

    I highly recommend this not only for homeschoolers who are familiar with Charlotte Mason’s methods, but anyone in the teaching field. Karen Glass does an excellent job of not only explaining why narration should be the foundation of a child’s education but also providing practical advice and encouraging real-life examples from students.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lynn Joshua

    Excellent! Highly recommended! I would have given 5 stars, except the inclusion of SO many examples of narration was distracting.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    This book is a must-buy for my homeschool shelf. Looking forward to reading other books by Karen Glass.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Veronica

    A must for every educator and homeschool parent.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Excellent book on the homeschool practice of narration or telling back what you’ve heard. It amazes me how such this simple act can facilitate so much growth and learning. I skipped a few chapters that weren’t relevant to my current situation, but the rest of the information was invaluable. The chapters on beginning narration had so much great information and answered so many questions I had. I’m thankful to have read this at the beginning of our homeschool journey.

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