30 review for Your Art Will Save Your Life

  1. 5 out of 5

    The Read head

    This book was ok but what I found problematic was that it was far more a book about how to deal with the current trump administration and those who align with it while not getting depressed as an artist (or person). I picked up the book thinking it was about the nuanced issues that all artists face in the contemporary art world (and politics can certainly be one of those issues) but I felt little of this book was explicit advice for artists but just basic tips of emotional intelligence. And not This book was ok but what I found problematic was that it was far more a book about how to deal with the current trump administration and those who align with it while not getting depressed as an artist (or person). I picked up the book thinking it was about the nuanced issues that all artists face in the contemporary art world (and politics can certainly be one of those issues) but I felt little of this book was explicit advice for artists but just basic tips of emotional intelligence. And not even in reference to the art world but just toward the current administration. I truly didn’t learn anything new and am worried that if this book was revolutionary for you you probably need to seek more help than can be found in this book. It really felt like common sense and tips that really would be basic emotional intelligence. Such as: you are allowed to be happy when bad things are happening in the world; If the media is overwhelming have less time with your phone; You can still associate with and even have relationships with people if different ideologies. - really none of this should be groundbreaking.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Julie Ehlers

    Beth Pickens worked for nonprofits for years and then got a master's in counseling psychology, after which she mostly worked as a consultant for arts nonprofits, helping them raise money and figure out how to thrive, particularly in a country that can be weirdly hostile toward the arts. She also worked with artists/writers individually in the same way, counseling them through their insecurities, advising them on how to balance their creative work with all their other responsibilities (not to men Beth Pickens worked for nonprofits for years and then got a master's in counseling psychology, after which she mostly worked as a consultant for arts nonprofits, helping them raise money and figure out how to thrive, particularly in a country that can be weirdly hostile toward the arts. She also worked with artists/writers individually in the same way, counseling them through their insecurities, advising them on how to balance their creative work with all their other responsibilities (not to menti0n earning a living), and helping them with grant applications. Because she didn't have the time to have a lot of individual clients, Pickens often thought of writing a book about these subjects. After Donald Trump was elected, she noticed a lot of strife in her arts communities: about whether their art actually mattered, about whether there would be funding, about whether they, if they were a member of one of the many groups Trump has shown hostility toward, could even still feel safe making art. At that point Pickens decided it was finally time to write her book. Your Art Will Save Your Life is the result. This is a really short book, more an overview than anything else, but it addresses creativity in ways I've never really seen it done before. Mostly, Pickens wants to emphasize that if you have a drive to be creative, you must obey it; it's the only way to ensure that you have a chance at being happy and well, and if you won't do that for yourself you won't be much good to anyone else or the world in general. Beyond that, she talks about balancing art with activism: whether your political beliefs should be a part of your actual creative work—and if not, how you might use your creativity in other ways to help the causes you support. She also talks a lot about practical aspects, like how to get your creative work done if you have many other obligations pulling at you; how you can help other artists and how other artists might be able to help you; and how to apply for grants. I've never really encountered a book that was so practical about all of this—reading it was eye-opening. Pickens admits she's not really a writer, and although the writing was honestly fine, I would describe it as bare-bones, which made this book occasionally a bit tedious to read despite its brevity. Still, if you consider yourself a creative person, and particularly if you're still pretty much an amateur, you'll get a lot out of Your Art Will Save Your Life, and I recommend it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kari

    I loved this book. I read it one sitting, but I know I’ll go back to it again and again. Highly recommend for the creative person who wants to be more productive than they currently are, especially in this political climate!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lizz

    This book was a little more intense/serious than I had expected it to be. That's not a knock, it just didn't end up being quite what I thought, nor exactly what I needed. I think the advice it contained is useful to a lot of folks, but it was a lot more than I needed and not all of it was relevant to my circumstances. That being said, there were some nuggets that I particularly appreciated and want to take to heart, like "fun is not optional and joy is not a luxury - this is an actual anti-burno This book was a little more intense/serious than I had expected it to be. That's not a knock, it just didn't end up being quite what I thought, nor exactly what I needed. I think the advice it contained is useful to a lot of folks, but it was a lot more than I needed and not all of it was relevant to my circumstances. That being said, there were some nuggets that I particularly appreciated and want to take to heart, like "fun is not optional and joy is not a luxury - this is an actual anti-burnout strategy" and "your fear is much bigger than the task at hand." Even reminding myself that my art has intrinsic value, to me and to others, even when I don't share it, is empowering, as well as the notion that artists of any medium *have* to create, that it is part of us and that failing to create is to deny part of ourselves, and that even with the state of the world as it is, making time to create things is valuable and worthy. So yeah, not all the advice worked for me, but I appreciated what I got out of it. And I dusted off my latest novel draft for the first time in five months so I think it worked. :)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I went to one of the Making Art During Fascism events that started this book and I'm so happy it is finally here for me to read and reread and do all the exercises in and generally love. It is vital to be reminded that making art is necessary to the maker and the larger world. Buy a copy for every artist you love. I went to one of the Making Art During Fascism events that started this book and I'm so happy it is finally here for me to read and reread and do all the exercises in and generally love. It is vital to be reminded that making art is necessary to the maker and the larger world. Buy a copy for every artist you love.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

    I had higher expectatons from this book but I think it was just not for me. Overall it had some great ideas and it was a new persective for me.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Johanna E. H.

    I think the quote on the cover says it best: "A slim, necessary revelation." (Maggie Nelson) This book was specifically written for surviving the Trump administration, which thankfully is coming to an end tomorrow, but it will sadly still be relevant. Pickens refers to her book in the final chapter "a framework for maintaining your practice regardless of the political climate." Pickens is not an artist herself, but rather a consultant/counselor for artists, which I found to be a very unique and he I think the quote on the cover says it best: "A slim, necessary revelation." (Maggie Nelson) This book was specifically written for surviving the Trump administration, which thankfully is coming to an end tomorrow, but it will sadly still be relevant. Pickens refers to her book in the final chapter "a framework for maintaining your practice regardless of the political climate." Pickens is not an artist herself, but rather a consultant/counselor for artists, which I found to be a very unique and helpful perspective. She makes a living counseling artists in their practice, mental health, and future. The book talks about the balance between art and activism, how important it is to keep making art no matter what's going on in the world, and provides lists and exercises to keep going as an adult human who depends on their creative practice. I took pages of notes while reading and am so excited to use the book's tips to further my practice! This is worthwhile for artists of any medium or career stage.

  8. 5 out of 5

    zac carter

    this is a short, energizing read that digs into the vitality of artists consistently creating. pickens provides great examples of ways to connect with art and creative process at various mental states, including at very low capacity, and i felt like i really needed to hear that. pickens’ point of view placed itself in a sweet spot between self-compassion and firm accountability for putting or not putting time into your craft. one thing — the book was released midway through tr*mp’s term in office this is a short, energizing read that digs into the vitality of artists consistently creating. pickens provides great examples of ways to connect with art and creative process at various mental states, including at very low capacity, and i felt like i really needed to hear that. pickens’ point of view placed itself in a sweet spot between self-compassion and firm accountability for putting or not putting time into your craft. one thing — the book was released midway through tr*mp’s term in office, so pickens speaks directly to coping with the emotional impact of that time. (honestly though, isn’t that weight and dread still here?)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin Kunkel

    A very useful, smart and moving little book. Definitely going to buy and recommend to artists in my life!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Pickens works as a therapist, an artist, a grant writer, and an activist. This slim volume was written in the wake of Trump's 2016 election as a way for her to focus her energies on supporting artists in an era of political turmoil. Consequently, this will appeal to those who take a counter cultural approach to the role of the artist. Well, maybe not. Her advise is helpful for all types of artists, but those who are beholden to Trump might bristle at the book's occasional negative comments about Pickens works as a therapist, an artist, a grant writer, and an activist. This slim volume was written in the wake of Trump's 2016 election as a way for her to focus her energies on supporting artists in an era of political turmoil. Consequently, this will appeal to those who take a counter cultural approach to the role of the artist. Well, maybe not. Her advise is helpful for all types of artists, but those who are beholden to Trump might bristle at the book's occasional negative comments about the 45th president. I enjoyed Picken's book for the way it balances ideals and pragmatics. As a grant writer for artists and a therapists for artists, she very much understands the roadblocks that artist must clear in order to produce art. I am tempted to type in much of the 130 page book, but that would be ridiculous. Just get your hands on a copy. But here are a few morsels to whet your appetite: * Artist need to secure for themselves "an ongoing art practice, a community of working artists, and lots of varied art consumption" (p. 53). * Artists need to combat negative self-talk that self-sabotages through criticism and fear. She suggests listening to the inner dialogue, question these statements, and then address them through taking contrary action. "It is crucial that your meta-observation process results in an action that runs contrary to the mean inner voice" (p. 80). * Artists often cower beneath the unrealistic ideal of perfectionism. They either don't start a project, abandon a project, or refuse to show / publish a project because it isn't "perfect." Pickens counters: "Perfection simply does not exist as long as we are in our human brains, which do not cease analyzing, creating, wondering, and comparing. In a sense, everything is already perfect and nothing is ever perfect" (p. 83). * Pickens' next two points--comparing and generosity--are related. She cautions artists against comparing the best exterior life with their own worse interior life, of course the results will be discouraging. She asks artists to support each other with a generous spirit rather than comparing and competing with each other. She has observed hundreds of artists, and the ones who are the happiest are the ones who can cheer for other artists instead of being competitive, critical, or jealous of others. * The second half of the books is filled with concrete suggestions for how to apply for grants, how to transition from a BFA/MFA into being a working artist, and how to respond productively to the political atmosphere. The sections about limiting consumption of news stories hit home for me. I spend entirely too much time worrying about the state of the world when I could be acting (even in small ways) to better the world. She concludes with a little two page blessing and positive visualization for her readers / artists entitled "My Wish for You." She has a big heart and a lot of practical tips. It's worth the evening I spent sitting with this book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    I wanted to like this book (the hosts of Call Your Girlfriend raved about it) but it fell super short. Kinda disjointed in what the actually message of the book is. A bit stuck in it’s time (2016-2018ish) too. Felt basic and I didn’t find anything revelatory or super interesting. Bunch of white feminist-y moments too. I saw what she was trying to do, but wish it had stuck with something and not be a hodge podge.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Marianne Mullen

    This book wasn't what I expected. It is a unique blend of artist self-help, motivation, kick in the ass combined with catalyzing social activism and political engagement. I really enjoyed it for both aspects! This book wasn't what I expected. It is a unique blend of artist self-help, motivation, kick in the ass combined with catalyzing social activism and political engagement. I really enjoyed it for both aspects!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Andee Marley

    I read this in bed on a Sunday morning in about an hour. It's about the importance of creating art in the time of Trump and why it is worthwhile and important to keep creating. Pickens is very knowledgeable and has the background to prove it. Loved hearing her voice. I read this in bed on a Sunday morning in about an hour. It's about the importance of creating art in the time of Trump and why it is worthwhile and important to keep creating. Pickens is very knowledgeable and has the background to prove it. Loved hearing her voice.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Franchescanado

    Some solid advice on squelching artistic anxieties and guilt, delivered with a direct approach. 2018 already feels like a lifetime ago, and this book focuses on Leftist cultural anxiety. I remember that anxiety, for sure, but it's center stage here, and it feels antiquated compared to the advice evergreen on getting grants, or finding and getting involved in communities. Some solid advice on squelching artistic anxieties and guilt, delivered with a direct approach. 2018 already feels like a lifetime ago, and this book focuses on Leftist cultural anxiety. I remember that anxiety, for sure, but it's center stage here, and it feels antiquated compared to the advice evergreen on getting grants, or finding and getting involved in communities.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ashur

    Very timely; since there are useful exercises in it that I will complete slowly, I'm considering picking up a copy of my own. Very timely; since there are useful exercises in it that I will complete slowly, I'm considering picking up a copy of my own.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kris Patrick

    I thought my sister Andee was being silly when she wrote that this book is about making art in the era of Trump. No, really. It is a book about making art in the era of Trump.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    Ohh, I just noticed this comes recommended by Maggie Nelson! There’s too much trump election drama but the rest is really good and helpful.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Candace Berger

    This book is a great introduction to anyone looking to get their creative life on the right path, and for anyone doubting their creative life in the current political climate. It’s brief (I was able to read it in less than a day), but it is full of ideas on how to recondition your thoughts and practices. The author calls this her love note to artists, and it is just that. It is an encouraging read.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Britt

    Creating in a world that is literally burning is indescribably hard, especially when you’re neurodivergent, queer, and a woman. This book understands, and is like a realistic but hopeful pep talk with a friend who is also struggling but keeping it together. It helped me to remember that I do have a responsibility to my art, and that I do need to connect with other creative people.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Jeanette

    Got this solely based on the title and had no idea it would be so political. My politics are in pretty close alignment with hers, so I didn’t mind too much (even though I’m kinda over politics right now); but I’m sad less people will probably read it as a result. The author is a therapist and this book is basically therapy for creatives. I really enjoyed every part pertaining to creating art and being an artist. I found the book so helpful that I’ll be buying a physical copy now that I’ve finish Got this solely based on the title and had no idea it would be so political. My politics are in pretty close alignment with hers, so I didn’t mind too much (even though I’m kinda over politics right now); but I’m sad less people will probably read it as a result. The author is a therapist and this book is basically therapy for creatives. I really enjoyed every part pertaining to creating art and being an artist. I found the book so helpful that I’ll be buying a physical copy now that I’ve finished the audible version. The author offers such a great mental adjustment for creatives, and so many great actionable steps, that it’s the kind of book I can see myself keeping close at hand and and revisiting often.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Guldenbrein

    This was wonderful, in a way, but also felt like it was written for Artists with a capital 'A'. I'm actively trying to develop an art practice, but I'm still not super comfortable with the identity of artist, since I didn't go to art school and it's not my goal for it to be my main source of income. Or any source of income, really. Also, the way Pickens writes about what makes an artist, namely, someone who processes the events around them through a creative practice, and someone who needs to cr This was wonderful, in a way, but also felt like it was written for Artists with a capital 'A'. I'm actively trying to develop an art practice, but I'm still not super comfortable with the identity of artist, since I didn't go to art school and it's not my goal for it to be my main source of income. Or any source of income, really. Also, the way Pickens writes about what makes an artist, namely, someone who processes the events around them through a creative practice, and someone who needs to create to live...I just didn't feel like those applied to me, and so this book felt like it was written for "real" artists, where I'm just someone who really likes to sew and loved art classes in high school. I'd still recommend it to many, though, as it's a petite book that only takes a day or two to read, and does have some nice encouragement to continue creating even when it feels like art doesn't matter when the world and politics are so effed up. That was nice.

  22. 5 out of 5

    yipeng

    This book was written in response to the 2016 election in the aftermath of Trump’s presidency. It wasn’t what I expected the book to be after listening to Beth Pickens’ podcast, Mind Your Practice. The advice is more tailored to dealing with Trump’s presidency than being an artist. I found some tips to helpful but most of it is skippable in light of what’s currently happening (the COVID-19 pandemic and the US elections in the coming days). I would recommend skipping this book and listening to Mi This book was written in response to the 2016 election in the aftermath of Trump’s presidency. It wasn’t what I expected the book to be after listening to Beth Pickens’ podcast, Mind Your Practice. The advice is more tailored to dealing with Trump’s presidency than being an artist. I found some tips to helpful but most of it is skippable in light of what’s currently happening (the COVID-19 pandemic and the US elections in the coming days). I would recommend skipping this book and listening to Mind Your Practice instead.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    A bit disjointed. The beginning and end focused very heavily on the 2016 election outcomes and felt like a general pep talk for activism. The middle, though, seemed like the practical minutiae of being an artist/writer that the author already had sitting on her hard drive. Different people will probably find different sections the most useful, but I enjoyed the middle advice the most.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Katrina Sark

    Self-Inventory p.46 – Our jobs, educational experiences, and financial lives all intersect with the other parts of ourselves, including our social identities and internal characteristics. These different parts of ourselves are inextricably linked. I am constantly amazed at the different stories artists share. Their stories are filled with themes of immigration, war, global economic shifts, social progress, political climates, family fractures, prison, white flight, migrations, risk, failure, and Self-Inventory p.46 – Our jobs, educational experiences, and financial lives all intersect with the other parts of ourselves, including our social identities and internal characteristics. These different parts of ourselves are inextricably linked. I am constantly amazed at the different stories artists share. Their stories are filled with themes of immigration, war, global economic shifts, social progress, political climates, family fractures, prison, white flight, migrations, risk, failure, and resilience. The Artist’s Three Basic Needs p.54 – In my estimation, artists need to be active creatively in order to be alive, processing the world and other people. I find that artists who have been away from creative engagement for a long period of time frequently describe feeling depressed, agitated, anxious, disconnected, and empty. Making art is an essential form of self-care in their lives. If my clients tell me they haven’t made anything in a while, the first thing we do is get them making work without putting pressure on what that work is. You, as an artist, have to continue making art using the time, space, and resources you can access now – not later, not someday. Pro Tips p.123 – How to Stay Active and Engaged While Maintaining Your Practice and Well-Being: • Don’t normalize this political climate • Do not keep your phone in your bedroom. Need an alarm? Alarm clocks are inexpensive. Avoid starting your day with “the scroll.” • Make art. Be in a community of active artists. Take in new art. • Remember that you are in your life, the only one you have. You get to make it meaningful and well lived each day, regardless of the political climate. People make community and beauty in the most treacherous and fascist climates. • Think of resistance and activism as a new hobby or one that you are devoting more time to now • You know that friend who you meet at the gym, who helps you get there? Your gym buddy. You can have an activism buddy, too. Do your action, activism, and volunteering with someone if you prefer. • Ask organizers and organizations what they need; you don’t have to guess or try to figure it out. • Being of service is a strong antidote to depression.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Luke Southard

    I don’t read very many descriptions of books - I just kind of go with what sounds interesting and, when I saw this title, I thought “hey, I like art! Maybe this will be fun!” It wasn’t fun. But it WAS completely necessary. A lot of my recent issues were addressed within the first few pages and yesterday’s concern of whether or not it’s moral to be able to have fun in today’s “moral upside-down,” as Tom Fuerst describes it was addressed specifically. The catalyst was the executive order banning al I don’t read very many descriptions of books - I just kind of go with what sounds interesting and, when I saw this title, I thought “hey, I like art! Maybe this will be fun!” It wasn’t fun. But it WAS completely necessary. A lot of my recent issues were addressed within the first few pages and yesterday’s concern of whether or not it’s moral to be able to have fun in today’s “moral upside-down,” as Tom Fuerst describes it was addressed specifically. The catalyst was the executive order banning all Muslims from coming to the US and a lady was at dinner having a good time when she laughed and suddenly felt awash in guilt. Also, it isn’t so much an art book or even a book about how pursuing your own art enriches your own life. It is solidly a book written by an angry artist as a reaction to the 2016 election and instructions on how artists can avoid depression, burnout, and moral quagmires and get through to the next administration. Dramatic? I’m inclined to say yes because I like to think that administrations (of all sorts, not just presidential) act more like lines in which one operates and that’s all, but I am not a female or gay so I don’t want to discount the opinions and feelings of people who have had wildly different lives than I have. Regardless, there was a lot of good stuff in here and it felt like it was exactly what I needed yesterday.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lara Mamea

    I wanted to like this book. Didn’t expect to read so much about politics, but I hated the Trump administration as much as anyone. However, I couldn’t ignore the fact that the author’s perspective seemed to fit the stereotypical white liberal. At times it felt like she was pandering, or perhaps underestimating her audience. She includes short anecdotes where she bestows preachy psychology lessons upon her friends (i.e. she told one that Obama is not their dad and Trump not their stepfather). Pick I wanted to like this book. Didn’t expect to read so much about politics, but I hated the Trump administration as much as anyone. However, I couldn’t ignore the fact that the author’s perspective seemed to fit the stereotypical white liberal. At times it felt like she was pandering, or perhaps underestimating her audience. She includes short anecdotes where she bestows preachy psychology lessons upon her friends (i.e. she told one that Obama is not their dad and Trump not their stepfather). Pickens then tells the reader how said friend is always impressed with these profound and insightful statements, like the one mentioned above, rather than letting the reader decide if her statements are deep on their own. The book sounds like a regurgitated shortened version of “The War of Art”. She includes a questionnaire to get to know yourself and advice on how to not waste time with mindless activities and how to minimize distractions so you can focus on creating. (Maybe start by skipping this book) There’s some bits of encouragement too if you can sift through the rest. It’s fine if you want to be spoon fed recycled “inspirational” Tumblr quotes with the occasional curse word to mix things up. I rarely leave reviews but this book was disappointing and unoriginal. My fault for judging it by its cover though.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Maggie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book almost lost me in the beginning because it’s so time sensitive (the writer talks about her clients/her feelings and their anxiety during the (then) incoming Trump administration) granted- I had a lot of these feelings too but I thought the book was going to continue to springboard off of that period in time. Honestly I may not of enjoyed the beginning because (like she said of her clients and herself, they were traumatised/disturbed by this event/time period - and reading/reflecting on This book almost lost me in the beginning because it’s so time sensitive (the writer talks about her clients/her feelings and their anxiety during the (then) incoming Trump administration) granted- I had a lot of these feelings too but I thought the book was going to continue to springboard off of that period in time. Honestly I may not of enjoyed the beginning because (like she said of her clients and herself, they were traumatised/disturbed by this event/time period - and reading/reflecting on this book, I was I was too. But!!! The book is great. It asks good strong questions that I genuinely had to stop and ponder and has a both a holistic and practical approach- as she says she’s very good at what she does and it shows. This book is short, accessible and smart and helpful to both self taught and ‘educated’ artists/art creatives. This book gives great advice on schooling, finance, money management harnessing and maintaining creativity,praxis mindfulness ,funding and self care (plus a bit more) but most importantly the take away from the book is to keep going no matter how small - very glad I picked up this book. If you can get past the Trump stuff (no matter your stance)It’s a good read - Hope you guys enjoy it too 🖤

  28. 5 out of 5

    Patty

    The author is not herself an artist, but she has found art necessary to her survival. Besides being an art lover, she works with artists as a therapist, consultant and grant writer, and she has particular concern for those struggling on the margins of society. In this little book are lots of things that artists need to hear often but in fact rarely - or sometimes never - do hear: that your work is important, that making it is legitimately necessary for you and also that it is needed by the world The author is not herself an artist, but she has found art necessary to her survival. Besides being an art lover, she works with artists as a therapist, consultant and grant writer, and she has particular concern for those struggling on the margins of society. In this little book are lots of things that artists need to hear often but in fact rarely - or sometimes never - do hear: that your work is important, that making it is legitimately necessary for you and also that it is needed by the world. Yes, even/especially in these times and in this political climate. She understands the ways artists beat themselves up and the fears we have in common. It's not in-depth, but it's helpful, heartfelt, and validating. (And sometimes funny.) I'm going to give it to all of my friends and family, artists and otherwise.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tess Malone

    This is a great inspiration and kick in the pants for how and why to keep making art even as the world is crumbling. Pickens provides the emotional tools to give yourself this permission and practical suggestions of how to combine activism and art (or not). The most helpful section is a series of questions she has you ask about how the situation you were raised in affects how you view your practice, work, and goals. It really illuminated some of the pressures I put on myself and gave me new nuan This is a great inspiration and kick in the pants for how and why to keep making art even as the world is crumbling. Pickens provides the emotional tools to give yourself this permission and practical suggestions of how to combine activism and art (or not). The most helpful section is a series of questions she has you ask about how the situation you were raised in affects how you view your practice, work, and goals. It really illuminated some of the pressures I put on myself and gave me new nuance on how to approach them. I have a feeling I will be returning to this book every so often when I need a pep talk or some basic advice. One note: this isn’t a book with a lot of specifics on how the art world works (there is some basic advice on why you should still apply for a grant or retreat), but nothing that will get you into a specific program.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sofia Chang

    A short guide on how to be an artist in today's political climate. Very practical and very informative- Pickens addresses many concepts about creativity that I've never really thought about before. Pickens states that artists need certain things in order to combat burnout- to be creating consistently, and to have a community of other artists to be able to be inspired by. She talks about how important grant writing is, and how we as artists are often so scared. Our mental framework is messed up- A short guide on how to be an artist in today's political climate. Very practical and very informative- Pickens addresses many concepts about creativity that I've never really thought about before. Pickens states that artists need certain things in order to combat burnout- to be creating consistently, and to have a community of other artists to be able to be inspired by. She talks about how important grant writing is, and how we as artists are often so scared. Our mental framework is messed up- we often believe we can't apply for anything because there are "real" artists out there, or that our project isn't finished because it isn't perfect. But in truth, if you make art you are an artist, and you deserve just as much recognition as everyone else. I wish this book were longer-I'm interested in Pickens' practice as a sort of consultant/therapist, and more of her thoughts on the subject.

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