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Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women That a Movement Forgot

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Today's feminist movement has a glaring blind spot, and paradoxically, it is women. Mainstream feminists rarely talk about meeting basic needs as a feminist issue, argues Mikki Kendall, but food insecurity, access to quality education, safe neighborhoods, a living wage, and medical care are all feminist issues. All too often, however, the focus is not on basic survival for Today's feminist movement has a glaring blind spot, and paradoxically, it is women. Mainstream feminists rarely talk about meeting basic needs as a feminist issue, argues Mikki Kendall, but food insecurity, access to quality education, safe neighborhoods, a living wage, and medical care are all feminist issues. All too often, however, the focus is not on basic survival for the many, but on increasing privilege for the few. That feminists refuse to prioritize these issues has only exacerbated the age-old problem of both internecine discord and women who rebuff at carrying the title. Moreover, prominent white feminists broadly suffer from their own myopia with regard to how things like race, class, sexual orientation, and ability intersect with gender. How can we stand in solidarity as a movement, Kendall asks, when there is the distinct likelihood that some women are oppressing others?


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Today's feminist movement has a glaring blind spot, and paradoxically, it is women. Mainstream feminists rarely talk about meeting basic needs as a feminist issue, argues Mikki Kendall, but food insecurity, access to quality education, safe neighborhoods, a living wage, and medical care are all feminist issues. All too often, however, the focus is not on basic survival for Today's feminist movement has a glaring blind spot, and paradoxically, it is women. Mainstream feminists rarely talk about meeting basic needs as a feminist issue, argues Mikki Kendall, but food insecurity, access to quality education, safe neighborhoods, a living wage, and medical care are all feminist issues. All too often, however, the focus is not on basic survival for the many, but on increasing privilege for the few. That feminists refuse to prioritize these issues has only exacerbated the age-old problem of both internecine discord and women who rebuff at carrying the title. Moreover, prominent white feminists broadly suffer from their own myopia with regard to how things like race, class, sexual orientation, and ability intersect with gender. How can we stand in solidarity as a movement, Kendall asks, when there is the distinct likelihood that some women are oppressing others?

30 review for Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women That a Movement Forgot

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mina

    FOR YEARS YOUR PRIVILEGE HAS BEEN AN ENEMY TO MY RIGHT! YES YOU. CHECK. YOUR PRIVILEGE! This book is not meant to be pretty or pleasant. It says what it says and it will call you out on your bullshit! I will stress that this is a very important book that covers key issues for black people and black women most importantly because even within our own community we are still at the bottom of the food chain. Its definitely not shocking to me and it's not news that mainstream feminism/feminist iconism FOR YEARS YOUR PRIVILEGE HAS BEEN AN ENEMY TO MY RIGHT! YES YOU. CHECK. YOUR PRIVILEGE! This book is not meant to be pretty or pleasant. It says what it says and it will call you out on your bullshit! I will stress that this is a very important book that covers key issues for black people and black women most importantly because even within our own community we are still at the bottom of the food chain. Its definitely not shocking to me and it's not news that mainstream feminism/feminist iconism will almost always certainly exclude the black woman. In majority (if not all) of third world countries plus not forgetting in the Hood, POC are facing issues such as Homelessness, Poverty, Hunger, BLOODY GUN VIOLENCE & Lack of access to consistent quality education to name just but a few. These are our issues yet if we're are feminists as we so call ourselves left right and center how come I don't here you talk about these issues sis? Where's the solidarity sis?

  2. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

    An engaging essay collection that I would recommend to those who want to learn more about intersectional feminism. Mikki Kendall does a great job of connecting feminism to topics such as the housing crisis, hunger, black women’s maternal health, and more, which often are ignored in a movement that centers cis, heterosexual white women. She dives deep into social issues like gun violence and poverty, thus providing us with a solid understanding of these issues, while always drawing connections to An engaging essay collection that I would recommend to those who want to learn more about intersectional feminism. Mikki Kendall does a great job of connecting feminism to topics such as the housing crisis, hunger, black women’s maternal health, and more, which often are ignored in a movement that centers cis, heterosexual white women. She dives deep into social issues like gun violence and poverty, thus providing us with a solid understanding of these issues, while always drawing connections to how women – especially women of color – are almost always disproportionately affected by social inequities and injustices. She interweaves anecdotes from her personal life that help illustrate the gravity of these issues in a more focused emotional lens, as opposed to solely drawing from systemic analysis or theory and statistics. I’m not sure how much mileage you would get from this collection if you’re already pretty well-versed in intersectional feminism, though I still found the essay an enjoyable read and I’d definitely recommend it to people who think mostly of white women when feminism comes to mind. I noticed a pattern in which some essays would veer off into a more unfocused exploration of many topics by the middle before being wrapped back up into the original thesis by the end, which felt a little clumsy. However, I recognize that so many of these issues intersect and sprawl into one another. Yay for expanding the extent to which feminism also takes into account race, socioeconomic status, and additional vectors of identity.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ariel [She Wants the Diction]

    This was a good book, but I had trouble finishing it. The reasons for that, however, are mostly personal. I'm a black feminist, and most of this book is focused on educating white feminists on issues they may not typically consider feminist or associate with the feminist movement - such as housing, food, and education. Kendall makes the argument that all these needs are feminist causes that need addressing, especially in poor communities/hoods where survival is paramount. I agree with almost eve This was a good book, but I had trouble finishing it. The reasons for that, however, are mostly personal. I'm a black feminist, and most of this book is focused on educating white feminists on issues they may not typically consider feminist or associate with the feminist movement - such as housing, food, and education. Kendall makes the argument that all these needs are feminist causes that need addressing, especially in poor communities/hoods where survival is paramount. I agree with almost everything she says, but I also found myself zoning out because I already know the issues and statistics so well, and I wasn't really the target audience for this book. Although the writing was clumsy and repetitive at times, I think this could be a great resource for white women looking to learn how to be better allies, particularly to people of color. I would recommend starting with something classic like Sister Outsider: Essays and Speeches, then following up with this to get a handle on those concepts in the context of modern issues.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Gabby

    Really important thoughtful book on feminism and how women can do a better job at being more inclusive. I think this book is very educational and something everyone should take the time to read, I feel like I learned so much.

  5. 4 out of 5

    emma

    This should be absolutely required reading. For everyone. Rarely in life do you find a work of nonfiction this short and this readable that is also so expansive, so all-encompassing, and so effective. I really don't feel I need to use this review as a space to say anything more than PLEASE READ THIS, but I will explain briefly why this isn't quite 5 stars: This book spends more time and is more explicit in condemning the words of Bernie Sanders supporters than it is of those of Trump supporters or This should be absolutely required reading. For everyone. Rarely in life do you find a work of nonfiction this short and this readable that is also so expansive, so all-encompassing, and so effective. I really don't feel I need to use this review as a space to say anything more than PLEASE READ THIS, but I will explain briefly why this isn't quite 5 stars: This book spends more time and is more explicit in condemning the words of Bernie Sanders supporters than it is of those of Trump supporters or Trump himself. For a thesis that includes universal healthcare, equal access to education (including at the college level), and more democratic socialist platforms as part of its version of feminism, as for many other reasons, I just don't see how that's justifiable. But even with that, this is a stunning book. Bottom line: If you are a person and you are on this planet, read this book. "We rarely talk about basic needs as a feminist issue. Food insecurity and access to quality education, safe neighborhoods, a living wage, and medical care are all feminist issues. Instead of a framework that focuses on helping women get basic needs met, all too often the focus is not on survival but on increasing privilege. For a movement that is meant to represent all women, it often centers on those who already have most of their needs met."

  6. 4 out of 5

    Riley

    "For a movement that is meant to represent all women, it often centers on those who already have most of their needs met." "For a movement that is meant to represent all women, it often centers on those who already have most of their needs met."

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jenna

    The best feminism book I've yet to read I haven't read a lot of books on feminism (14 on my shelf) so perhaps it's too soon to make the assertion this is the best. I can say though, that of the books I have read, this is by far the best. Mikki Kendall is a brilliant writer, eloquent and passionate and intelligent. She points out all the (many) ways traditional feminism is lacking, how it has commonly worked for the needs of middle- and upper-class straight cisgender white women while excluding eve The best feminism book I've yet to read I haven't read a lot of books on feminism (14 on my shelf) so perhaps it's too soon to make the assertion this is the best. I can say though, that of the books I have read, this is by far the best. Mikki Kendall is a brilliant writer, eloquent and passionate and intelligent. She points out all the (many) ways traditional feminism is lacking, how it has commonly worked for the needs of middle- and upper-class straight cisgender white women while excluding everyone else.  When the Women's March first took place in 2017, I was confused why many women of colour did not want to join. But we're all women, I thought. We all are fighting against the patriarchy and standing up against the presidential election of a man who demeans and harms women at every turn. How naive I was.  Over the years I have thought about this a lot and gradually started understanding why many Black and Brown women felt distanced and did not feel like they belonged or that their needs would be addressed. I was only seeing the tip of the iceberg though and Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women That a Movement Forgot really opened my eyes.  Ms. Kendall ardently explains how feminism needs to change in order to work for the needs of all women. She addresses the ways in which feminism tends to exclude and leave behind many women, especially women of color and transwomen, and shows how things like race, sexual orientation, class, and disability come together to create unique challenges and needs for women. She asserts that everything that affects women is a feminist issue and the conversation needs to expand to address issues like: •Affordable housing •Gun violence •Eating disorders among Black girls and women •Access to quality education •Medical care  •Violence against women of color, especially trans women of color •Equal pay (traditional feminism tends to ignore the fact that Black women make even less than white women). These and others are important issues that concern women, especially women of colour, and which need to be addressed and taken seriously.  In case you find yourself bristling and worrying that now white women are going to be left out of the conversation (you won't be), know that, as Ms. Kendall explains, "the reason the concept of intersectionality centers on Black women and justice is that Black women are the least likely to have the kind of class privilege that can grant them access to anything like justice." This book is illuminating. Ms. Kendall shares personal experiences throughout in order to illustrate how important it is that we start including all women in our fight for women.  There is some repetition but that is the only somewhat-complaint I have. Repetition isn't always a bad thing; sometimes we need to hear things over and over before we really "get it".  I highly recommend this book to everyone who calls themself a feminist. We have to start taking an intersectional approach and open our eyes to the unique challenges facing minorities. We need to listen to minority women and take their lead when it comes to finding solutions to their needs. As Mikki Kendall asserts, "the most realistic approach to solidarity is one that assumes that sometimes it simply isn’t your turn to be the focus of the conversation." "Sometimes being a good ally is about opening the door for someone instead of insisting that your voice is the only one that matters." "White feminism is going to have to get comfortable with the idea that until they challenge their racist aunts, parents, cousins, and so on, it is definitely all white women who are responsible." "If feminism’s goal truly is equality for all, that means the future of feminism has to look very different from its past."

  8. 5 out of 5

    Abby

    This was an okay read. I follow Kendall on Twitter and I think that it's a better medium for her than a full-length book on social issues. Although I agree with the vast majority of her political stances and her critique of mainstream feminism for ignoring the needs of women of color, I think she's concocted a bit of a straw man (woman?) in her conception of "white feminism" here. This term is thrown around very loosely throughout the book, almost to the point at which there is little to no dist This was an okay read. I follow Kendall on Twitter and I think that it's a better medium for her than a full-length book on social issues. Although I agree with the vast majority of her political stances and her critique of mainstream feminism for ignoring the needs of women of color, I think she's concocted a bit of a straw man (woman?) in her conception of "white feminism" here. This term is thrown around very loosely throughout the book, almost to the point at which there is little to no distinction between white women in general and white feminists in particular. In general, the tone is very casual and draws more on personal anecdote and history than research, studies or concrete examples outside Kendall's own experiences. I completely agree with all of her points about the importance of creating a feminist movement that centers the needs of the most marginalized women, and that feminism needs to look beyond "equality" in the workplace and political spheres to embrace food justice, prison abolitionism, reproductive justice, and much more. I just wish she had backed up these points with more in-depth research and evidence throughout the text. However, it could be an accessible introductory text for folks who aren't familiar with intersectional feminism.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Bookishrealm

    Do you the know the word intersectionality? Do you know the definition? Because if you don't I need you to read this book and even if you think you know what it means READ THIS BOOK. It's so easy to classify yourself as a feminist BUT does your idea of feminism really address ALL women specifically BLACK women? Last year I was luck enough to receive a copy of Mikki Kendall's graphic novel which I still haven't had the opportunity to read; however, the moment I saw that she was coming out with th Do you the know the word intersectionality? Do you know the definition? Because if you don't I need you to read this book and even if you think you know what it means READ THIS BOOK. It's so easy to classify yourself as a feminist BUT does your idea of feminism really address ALL women specifically BLACK women? Last year I was luck enough to receive a copy of Mikki Kendall's graphic novel which I still haven't had the opportunity to read; however, the moment I saw that she was coming out with this book I knew that it was one that I needed to devour quickly. The information in Hood Feminism doesn't surprise me. You see, I'm a black woman. I know what it's like to watch non-Black individuals declare that they are feminist without truly considering the Black women that they are forgetting. Yet, it was interesting to learn the ways in which certain aspects of feminism directly forget the issues that affect Black women. It was well detailed and made me really think about the ways that a lot of movements have left out the narratives of certain groups. Like a lot of non-fiction books that discuss race, this isn't an easy read. It will make a lot of individuals feel uncomfortable BUT that's the purpose. These are the conversations that need to happen. Race plays a huge part in everything related to the American system, but for some odd reason it's the one conversation that people are scared to have or they hide behind phrases like "we're a post-racial country" or "I'm color blind." These are the tough conversations we need to have in order to move forward. Some of my favorite sections of this book included her discussion on the fetishization of being fierce, education, and (this was the best section) allies, anger, and accomplices. If you're looking for a short, but complex novel that looks at the feminist movement in terms of Black women I would recommend checking out this book.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Krystal

    An intelligent, insightful read. It made me more aware of my own ignorance as a white female living in Australia - so many of these things I hadn't even considered - and it made me feel a little ashamed, to be honest. That being said, the point of this book is not to shame, but to educate. She talks about issues that feminism supposedly tackles and then describes how badly feminism is missing the mark when it comes to women of colour. Apparently racism is more powerful than misogyny. I'm very voca An intelligent, insightful read. It made me more aware of my own ignorance as a white female living in Australia - so many of these things I hadn't even considered - and it made me feel a little ashamed, to be honest. That being said, the point of this book is not to shame, but to educate. She talks about issues that feminism supposedly tackles and then describes how badly feminism is missing the mark when it comes to women of colour. Apparently racism is more powerful than misogyny. I'm very vocal when it comes to women standing up for women, particularly when it comes to sexual violence, so when I encountered this particular quote regarding rape culture, I was horrified: When you can't count on solidarity for women in danger, when bystander intervention isn't a solution because white female bystanders may feel that a Black woman's plight doesn't deserve their attention because race has a more powerful effect than gender, then we aren't really battling rape culture. The scariest part was that, as disgusting as the idea of that is to me, I had to take the time and make sure I wouldn't be someone who stood back. I want to make sure that I don't have any of these subconscious racist notions myself. (I do feel confident that I would help someone in trouble, no matter the colour of their skin. I truly hope so.) That's such a big part of why this book was so powerful to me. Because so many of these things I hadn't even considered, because my white privilege has kept me safe. I have a home, a family I can rely on, a steady job, and an income that allows me basic needs as well as some things I want. I'm not afraid to walk around the neighbourhood, or hang out in parks, and if I'm really in trouble I'm confident that law enforcement will help. I'm not afraid of being incarcerated for making a mistake, and no one has ever implied that I will be unfit to raise children when the time comes. All of these things I have taken for granted, and if you have too I encourage you to read this book. This book is begging for accomplices - not just allies. It's not enough to send thoughts and prayers. It's not enough to 'hope things work out'. This book asks us to stop putting the responsibility on the marginalised groups to stand up for themselves and make our own efforts to change how they're treated. They need allies in positions of power to be moved by their plight - to understand that supporting women of colour won't cost them their white privilege - and then actually make changes for the better. They need action from those of us who have had the fortune to be born white. I've honestly never felt so powerless. I wish I was in a position to do more. But wishes aren't enough, either, so in the absence of that I intend to educate myself as best I can, and this book was a great introduction. It covers a lot of important subjects in a calm, rational and educated manner. There's even a little humour, and the author uses anecdotes from her own life to help demonstrate the issues. My only complaint really is that it was too intelligent for me - I could have used a glossary because there are so many terms in here that I'd never heard of before. However that does also highlight once again how naive I was before I picked up this book. If you're looking to educate yourself on real issues that Black women face, this is a really good starting point because it covers things so comprehensively. Some of it is quite heavy reading, and you may need a dictionary on hand for some of the terms, but it's well worth the time. I'm grateful to find books like this that can help me learn, and grow, and further understand the struggles of others.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Olivia (Stories For Coffee)

    Everyone needs to read/listen to this book. Everyone.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Brandice

    Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women White Feminists Forgot is a much needed check for white women who claim to be feminist. ”Instead of a framework that focuses on helping women get basic needs met, all too often the focus is not on survival but on increasing privilege. For a movement that is meant to represent all women, it often centers on those who already have most of their needs met.” It’s more than having a seat at the table or being paid the same as your male colleagues — Basic needs like Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women White Feminists Forgot is a much needed check for white women who claim to be feminist. ”Instead of a framework that focuses on helping women get basic needs met, all too often the focus is not on survival but on increasing privilege. For a movement that is meant to represent all women, it often centers on those who already have most of their needs met.” It’s more than having a seat at the table or being paid the same as your male colleagues — Basic needs like access to quality education, medical and reproductive rights, and safe housing are just some of the major issues often absent from discussions about feminism. In Hood Feminism Mikki Kendall explores why each of these tenets is critical to feminism and how they have often been ignored or minimized in the discussion, yet have large impacts on marginalized communities. While I have long considered myself to be a supporter of feminist ideas and an advocate for equal playing fields, this book was a welcome reality check — My idea of feminism is too narrow and my perspective demands expansion. The most powerful chapter is the closing one about white women as allies and why we should instead be accomplices: ”Accomplice feminists would actively and directly challenge white supremacist people, policies, institutions, and cultural norms. They would know they do not need to have the same stake in the fight to work with marginalized communities. They would put aside their egos and their need to be centered in our struggles in favor of following our instructions, because they would internalize the reality that their privilege doesn’t make them experts on our oppression. This style of feminism would be performative, would not pay lip service to equality while sustaining and supporting those who actively work against it. Becoming an accomplice feminist is not simply semantic. Accomplices do not just talk about bigotry; they do something about it.” Read it — Share it — Change your definition of feminism and Act on it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    This book was great! It's my goal to read more non-fiction in 2021 and I'm so happy I started with this one. My favorite section was the one about education (I'm a teacher, so that hit close to home). I definitely recommend picking this up! It took me awhile to get through because the information is less narrative and more packed with information, but taking it in slowly is allowed me to think more about the content while I was reading it, which I enjoyed. The author is not afraid to be blunt an This book was great! It's my goal to read more non-fiction in 2021 and I'm so happy I started with this one. My favorite section was the one about education (I'm a teacher, so that hit close to home). I definitely recommend picking this up! It took me awhile to get through because the information is less narrative and more packed with information, but taking it in slowly is allowed me to think more about the content while I was reading it, which I enjoyed. The author is not afraid to be blunt and face the hard truth about women of color and how feminists aren't actually promoting the equality and opportunity for all women.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Books with Brittany

    Please, I urge you. Read this book.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lily Herman

    In a world of #girlboss bullshit and emphasis on if we have enough female CEOs running problematic Fortune 500 companies, Mikki Kendall's Hood Feminism is a beacon of light with a simple message: If your feminism isn't actively centering and loudly fighting for the most marginalized people in our society first and foremost, that feminism is incredibly privileged, white, and performative. I can only speak for my own identities, so if you're a white woman who considers yourself a feminist, do yours In a world of #girlboss bullshit and emphasis on if we have enough female CEOs running problematic Fortune 500 companies, Mikki Kendall's Hood Feminism is a beacon of light with a simple message: If your feminism isn't actively centering and loudly fighting for the most marginalized people in our society first and foremost, that feminism is incredibly privileged, white, and performative. I can only speak for my own identities, so if you're a white woman who considers yourself a feminist, do yourself a favor and allow this book to completely flatten you and re-arrange everything you thought you knew about how you conceptualize your fight for equality. Honestly, consider Hood Feminism required reading in my opinion.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Aoife - Bookish_Babbling

    Sometimes being a good ally is about opening the door for someone instead of insisting that your voice is the only one that matters. ... Sometimes solidarity is just that simple; step up, reach back and keep pushing forward. This book has given me a heck of a lot to think about. Breaking feminism down to its barebones and highlighting how it impacts so much more than women in the workplace. I am inordinately privileged to have grown up where hunger, housing and gun violence have not impacted my lif Sometimes being a good ally is about opening the door for someone instead of insisting that your voice is the only one that matters. ... Sometimes solidarity is just that simple; step up, reach back and keep pushing forward. This book has given me a heck of a lot to think about. Breaking feminism down to its barebones and highlighting how it impacts so much more than women in the workplace. I am inordinately privileged to have grown up where hunger, housing and gun violence have not impacted my life and have had my eyes blown open to how much more should be done & not ignored/brushed aside till later. Highly recommend! It might be uncomfortable at times - but if I've learned anything from 2020 so far it's to keep on pushing and the more uncomfortable something might be to hear doesn't mean it is not worth listening to, working to better understand and re-examine my perception of the world vs the one we all share. Privilege not only blinds you to oppression it blinds you to your own ignorance even when you notice the oppression. I listened to the audio version which was narrated by the author herself and cannot recommend this highly enough. Everyone should be angry about injustice, not just those experiencing it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    ✨ jami ✨

    One of the biggest issues with mainstream feminist writing has been the way the idea of what constitutes a feminist issue is framed. We rarely talk about basic needs as a feminist issue. Food insecurity and access to quality education, safe neighborhoods, a living wage, and medical care are all feminist issues. Instead of a framework that focuses on helping women get basic needs met, all too often the focus is not on survival but on increasing privilege. For a movement that is meant to repres One of the biggest issues with mainstream feminist writing has been the way the idea of what constitutes a feminist issue is framed. We rarely talk about basic needs as a feminist issue. Food insecurity and access to quality education, safe neighborhoods, a living wage, and medical care are all feminist issues. Instead of a framework that focuses on helping women get basic needs met, all too often the focus is not on survival but on increasing privilege. For a movement that is meant to represent all women, it often centers on those who already have most of their needs met. Hood Feminism by Mikki Kendall is an essay collection addressing a different feminist topic per chapter, which at points also doubles as Kendall's memoir. The collection tries to analyse modern feminism and construct a new framework through which to various feminist issues should be perceived. Using intersectional feminism as the theoretical framework, this book looks at how issues often deemed to be 'non-feminist' are intimately tied with the ideals of the movement and looks at how feminism and feminists have routinely failed certain women who do not fit within pre-selected categories, especially Black women and trans women. Overall I thought the breadth of this collection was impressive. Kendall had a lot to say about many issues and made many points which I think are very important. The way she explored so many different issues in a relatively small book was impressive. At times I did think some points would wander or stray and get lost, and then get clumsily tied together at the end. But overall, it was well written with a host of excellent information and arguments. I appreciated the statistics and research included and also the references. I also thought Kendall's inclusion of personal anecdotes broke up the book a little making it easier to read and more accessible. For me, a major issue was just that parts of this were very centred on American issues, which felt unrelatable. I felt almost like this was intended solely for American audiences at points. Sometimes it meant sections had no impact on me since the specifically American policies or situations did not apply. That said, there is plenty still that translated globally and I wouldn't say don't pick this up if you're American. But I would say, definitely pick it up if you are because I think there will be a lot in here for you. Overall, this is a well written and extensive essay collection that covers a range of topics with clarity and depth. Kendall's take on feminism and intersectional feminism is important and I'm glad I read this. *Thankyou to the publisher for providing me a copy for review

  18. 4 out of 5

    BookOfCinz

    What I do have is a deep desire to move the conversation about solidarity and the feminist movement in a direction that recognizes that an intersectional approach to feminism is key to improving relationships between communities of women, so that some measure of true solidarity can happen. Erasure is not equality, least of all in a movement that draws much of its strength from the claim that it represents over half of the world’s population. Listen Mikki Kendall did not come to play with y'all What I do have is a deep desire to move the conversation about solidarity and the feminist movement in a direction that recognizes that an intersectional approach to feminism is key to improving relationships between communities of women, so that some measure of true solidarity can happen. Erasure is not equality, least of all in a movement that draws much of its strength from the claim that it represents over half of the world’s population. Listen Mikki Kendall did not come to play with y'all in this book, she addresses every single area that the movement forgot and I was here for it. I learned SOOOOO much reading this book and what having a holistic approach to feminism looks like. It needs to be truly firm on every issue that affects women. A must read for anyone who is interested in being a better person and a better feminist. Well written and well researched.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Alice Lippart

    Educational and eye-opening.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Candie

    This is a good book but I thought I was going to like it more than I did. I agree with a lot of the ideas and concepts in this book and found it very interesting and eye opening to learn about feminism and so many issues from a different point of view than my own. I did not however, like the writing style of this book. I found it to be very repetitive, unorganized and often went completely off topic. It brought up a lot of issues to consider and look into but it was mostly all based on her opini This is a good book but I thought I was going to like it more than I did. I agree with a lot of the ideas and concepts in this book and found it very interesting and eye opening to learn about feminism and so many issues from a different point of view than my own. I did not however, like the writing style of this book. I found it to be very repetitive, unorganized and often went completely off topic. It brought up a lot of issues to consider and look into but it was mostly all based on her opinion and experiences and I feel like there was not a lot of statistics or research put into this book. Although her lived experiences are extremely valid, I feel like more organization and research would have led to a more informative reading experience with more effective arguments. I don't know of a lot of books personally that cover feminism through the eyes of marginalized women so for that reason alone I would still recommend this book, but more as a starting point of topics to educate yourself on than because it is such an informative and well written book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mia C

    First, if you've never heard the word intersectionality or have little to no understanding about how race intersects with other forms of identity, this would be fine to read, though I could recommend better material on the subject. If you already have an understanding about these topics, this book may be so obvious it will be very tedious to get through. Second, in terms of the writing, another critical review noted that the editors "failed" this author and while that seems harsh, there were man First, if you've never heard the word intersectionality or have little to no understanding about how race intersects with other forms of identity, this would be fine to read, though I could recommend better material on the subject. If you already have an understanding about these topics, this book may be so obvious it will be very tedious to get through. Second, in terms of the writing, another critical review noted that the editors "failed" this author and while that seems harsh, there were many points in the book that I found myself thinking the same exact thing. Third, there are no "notes" from "the women" that a movement forgot, as the title promises. Just one long note from one woman.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Christy

    4 stars This is a book that I think is important for all women to read. Definitely thought provoking and eye-opening. I enjoyed listening to the audiobook. It talked a lot about the groups left behind in feminism and the parts of it that aren’t recognized as they should be. I’m glad I picked this one up! Audio book source: Libby (borrow) Story Rating: 4 stars Narrators: Mikki Kendall Narration Rating: 4 stars Genre: Non-fiction Length: 6 hours and 57 minutes

  23. 5 out of 5

    Bethany

    Hood Feminism unpacks the problems with a mainstream feminism that centers white women while excluding or even harming many women of color and women who are not middle class or wealthy. Issue by issue, it paints a picture of what true intersectional feminism might look like, focusing on serious concerns that have a serious impact on women and children. From gun violence and a more comprehensive approach to reproductive justice, to food and housing security and the ways that racism and white femi Hood Feminism unpacks the problems with a mainstream feminism that centers white women while excluding or even harming many women of color and women who are not middle class or wealthy. Issue by issue, it paints a picture of what true intersectional feminism might look like, focusing on serious concerns that have a serious impact on women and children. From gun violence and a more comprehensive approach to reproductive justice, to food and housing security and the ways that racism and white feminism can intersect in very harmful ways, Kendall calls attention to the very real issues that have nothing to do with whether someone can more easily become a CEO. This is a book everyone should probably read and take to heart. This is the brand of feminism, centered on racial and social justice, that I feel strongly about. And you will probably learn a lot, as the author includes data and statistics while carefully structuring her arguments. This is an important book from a thinker we should be paying attention to. Now I just want more practical steps for action.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ivonne Rovira

    Mikki Henderson does a good job of pointing out how often “feminism” means more rights for upper-middle-class working women who need nannies, while forgotten African-American women, lesbians, transgendered women and working-class women of all races. Issues that are definitely feminist ones — housing, living wages, food security and more — are thought of as labor issues when we should instead operate from a mindset of intersectionality. I enjoyed Hood Feminism, but I didn’t find it as inspiring as Mikki Henderson does a good job of pointing out how often “feminism” means more rights for upper-middle-class working women who need nannies, while forgotten African-American women, lesbians, transgendered women and working-class women of all races. Issues that are definitely feminist ones — housing, living wages, food security and more — are thought of as labor issues when we should instead operate from a mindset of intersectionality. I enjoyed Hood Feminism, but I didn’t find it as inspiring as either Ijeoma Olou’s So You Want to Talk About Race, Roxane Gay’s Bad Feminist or Baratunde Thurston’s How to Be Black. In the interest of full disclosure, I received this book from NetGalley, Penguin Group and Viking in exchange for an honest review.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Reads Ravenously

    I really enjoyed listening to this book. I feel a lot of "feminists" need to listen to or read this book because it points out all the people modern day feminism leaves out. Very informative and made me think about my own perspective on things. I started to wonder how I would react if I was the "white woman" in these situations and I hope I come out on the side of ally. All white women need to work on being better allies, myself included. I really enjoyed listening to this book. I feel a lot of "feminists" need to listen to or read this book because it points out all the people modern day feminism leaves out. Very informative and made me think about my own perspective on things. I started to wonder how I would react if I was the "white woman" in these situations and I hope I come out on the side of ally. All white women need to work on being better allies, myself included.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Madalyn (Novel Ink)

    I think this is necessary reading for anyone who considers themself a feminist.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Olivia

    "There's nothing feminist about having so many resources at your fingertips and choosing to be ignorant. Nothing enlightening or empowering in deciding intent trumps impact. Especially when the consequences are not going to be experienced by you." I think this book drives home the point that if your brand of feminism isn't intersectional.... you can keep it. Leave it in 2020/the trash while we all blissfully go to 2021/progress LOL. I think this reads as an accessible and near introductory book "There's nothing feminist about having so many resources at your fingertips and choosing to be ignorant. Nothing enlightening or empowering in deciding intent trumps impact. Especially when the consequences are not going to be experienced by you." I think this book drives home the point that if your brand of feminism isn't intersectional.... you can keep it. Leave it in 2020/the trash while we all blissfully go to 2021/progress LOL. I think this reads as an accessible and near introductory book on intersectionality in feminism and continuously calling out the problems of mainstream and white feminism. What I enjoyed about this book is that Mikki Kendall does a great job of being able to put eloquent words to experiences and thoughts that I am intimately familiar with as a Black woman in America. And then she added in a number of topics that I honestly sometimes forget, or didn't really think to include in this particular conversation like eating disorders, housing, etc. **sidenote: I read a review that listed a con of this being that it is incredibly American-centric, and I had not considered that. I agree. While many ideas are universal, the context is pretty much entirely focused in America.*** With that, sometimes it seemed a little stretched thin. She covers a large number of topics and occasionally I wished she would dive in deeper in some sections. I also am a fan of nonfiction books that are loaded with research and references- I don't mind, and even appreciate that. I found this book not exactly lacking in research, but just not as much as I wanted. Or that the occasional stats and evidence she would use were often the more commonly known. I listened to this on audio and think she did great narrating her own book :) And afterwards, I took the time to sit down and write down all the bookmarked quotes, because there were many!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Michaela

    ---- Disclosure: I received this book for free from Goodreads. ---- Dnf p. 140. Well, someone has to give the 1st unpopular 1-star review. *sigh.* I guess that'll be me, then. Will have to come back & review when I can more clearly articulate what is so wrong with this. Obviously I don't recommend it. If you've a science background, or any familiarity with recent social history (esp. w/ a legal bent) the problems here will become obvious in the reading without your even having to look into the ---- Disclosure: I received this book for free from Goodreads. ---- Dnf p. 140. Well, someone has to give the 1st unpopular 1-star review. *sigh.* I guess that'll be me, then. Will have to come back & review when I can more clearly articulate what is so wrong with this. Obviously I don't recommend it. If you've a science background, or any familiarity with recent social history (esp. w/ a legal bent) the problems here will become obvious in the reading without your even having to look into the misuse of the provided references. So many problems. I'll have to pare it down to focus on just the most glaring so that I can manage a succinct review. For now, I'll say that I regret having given time over to this. It could have been good, but the editors failed the author, & the author failed the work. Like I said, don't bother. Better stuff is already out there that addresses this subject. Again, I'll try to provide a more complete review after I've had enough space for my brain to re-focus. Right now it's all anger clouds & WTF grumblings when I try to think about what all made me stop reading.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Alexa

    Thank you Penguin Group and Netgalley for the advance copy of this book, which will be released 2/25/20. This book is important. It’s not always pleasant. It calls you on your shit. But more people should read it. It serves as a reminder that feminist issues include things like food insecurity, access to quality education, a living wage, and medical care. The book discusses how gun violence, mental health, education, and poverty are all feminist issues and frames them as racial and socio-economi Thank you Penguin Group and Netgalley for the advance copy of this book, which will be released 2/25/20. This book is important. It’s not always pleasant. It calls you on your shit. But more people should read it. It serves as a reminder that feminist issues include things like food insecurity, access to quality education, a living wage, and medical care. The book discusses how gun violence, mental health, education, and poverty are all feminist issues and frames them as racial and socio-economic issues we all need to care about as well. The author shares her perspective and experiences, demonstrating how white women/feminists and their (our) privilege inhibit true intersectional feminism and solidarity.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jaime

    Truly a refreshing voice in Black feminism. Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women That a Movement Forgot by Mikki Kendall (@vikingbooks #partner) is a collection of essays where she takes aim at the legitimacy of the modern feminist movement arguing that it has chronically failed to address the needs of all but a few women.⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ She draws on her own experiences with hunger, eating disorder, violence, hyper sexualization along with commentary that makes all of the essays so strong. My favorite essays Truly a refreshing voice in Black feminism. Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women That a Movement Forgot by Mikki Kendall (@vikingbooks #partner) is a collection of essays where she takes aim at the legitimacy of the modern feminist movement arguing that it has chronically failed to address the needs of all but a few women.⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ She draws on her own experiences with hunger, eating disorder, violence, hyper sexualization along with commentary that makes all of the essays so strong. My favorite essays were #OfFastTailedGirls and Freedom, It’s Raining Patriarchy, and Pretty for a... Truly though all of the essays are strong. A great debut and a strong anti-racist collection of essays. https://www.instagram.com/p/B--D2zYgc...

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