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The Wright Brothers: A History From Beginning to End (Biographies of Inventors)

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The Wright Brothers * * *Download for FREE on Kindle Unlimited + Free BONUS Inside!* * * Read On Your Computer, MAC, Smartphone, Kindle Reader, iPad, or Tablet. Wilbur and Orville Wright have gone down in history as pioneers of flight and the inventors of the first airplane. This is the story of how their mechanical interest in printing presses and bicycles led them to The Wright Brothers * * *Download for FREE on Kindle Unlimited + Free BONUS Inside!* * * Read On Your Computer, MAC, Smartphone, Kindle Reader, iPad, or Tablet. Wilbur and Orville Wright have gone down in history as pioneers of flight and the inventors of the first airplane. This is the story of how their mechanical interest in printing presses and bicycles led them towards finding solutions to the conundrum of flight. Find out how their methodological research and innovative ideas set them apart from other inventors, and learn about the newspaper editors and scientists’ reactions to the Wright brothers’ achievement—the slow transformation of skepticism and disbelief to amazement. Inside you will read about... ✓ The House at 7 Hawthorne Street ✓ Flying on Two Wheels ✓ The Dream of Flight ✓ Three Gliders and a Windy Hill ✓ The First Flight ✓ Convincing the Skeptics ✓ The Dawn of a New Era And much more! This is not only the story of the success of two determined brothers from Dayton, but it is the story of a new chapter of history.


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The Wright Brothers * * *Download for FREE on Kindle Unlimited + Free BONUS Inside!* * * Read On Your Computer, MAC, Smartphone, Kindle Reader, iPad, or Tablet. Wilbur and Orville Wright have gone down in history as pioneers of flight and the inventors of the first airplane. This is the story of how their mechanical interest in printing presses and bicycles led them to The Wright Brothers * * *Download for FREE on Kindle Unlimited + Free BONUS Inside!* * * Read On Your Computer, MAC, Smartphone, Kindle Reader, iPad, or Tablet. Wilbur and Orville Wright have gone down in history as pioneers of flight and the inventors of the first airplane. This is the story of how their mechanical interest in printing presses and bicycles led them towards finding solutions to the conundrum of flight. Find out how their methodological research and innovative ideas set them apart from other inventors, and learn about the newspaper editors and scientists’ reactions to the Wright brothers’ achievement—the slow transformation of skepticism and disbelief to amazement. Inside you will read about... ✓ The House at 7 Hawthorne Street ✓ Flying on Two Wheels ✓ The Dream of Flight ✓ Three Gliders and a Windy Hill ✓ The First Flight ✓ Convincing the Skeptics ✓ The Dawn of a New Era And much more! This is not only the story of the success of two determined brothers from Dayton, but it is the story of a new chapter of history.

30 review for The Wright Brothers: A History From Beginning to End (Biographies of Inventors)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dr.J.G.

    Well written. *** "“I don’t have any regrets about my part in the invention of the airplane, though no one could deplore more than I do the destruction it has caused.” "—Orville Wright" Not "it has caused", but rather, "it has helped to cause" would be correct to say. After all, men have used knives and fire for massacres of thousands, of millions, as late as 1941-1947; yet these are necessities of every kitchen. It's not a knife or fire that caused the massacres, it's the zealots wielding one and Well written. *** "“I don’t have any regrets about my part in the invention of the airplane, though no one could deplore more than I do the destruction it has caused.” "—Orville Wright" Not "it has caused", but rather, "it has helped to cause" would be correct to say. After all, men have used knives and fire for massacres of thousands, of millions, as late as 1941-1947; yet these are necessities of every kitchen. It's not a knife or fire that caused the massacres, it's the zealots wielding one and nazis the other. *** My early memories are enriched beyond imagination by the history of family as told us by my mother, and her own mother who took care of us while - whenever - my mother was out, whether for her work or, for a short while, finishing her graduate degree in the then new discipline of psychology. She threatened me in jedt in later years, describing how, when she'd return late at night from evening classes and had only the night to prepare for the exams next day, I was hot with fever and she had to relieve her own mother, to take me in her lap, ministering through the night - she'd say, "Now you just wait until you do your graduate work, I'll pull the same stunt on you, see if I don't!" And she did, too! Grandmother's stories had more wonders. One was about her - or was it her own mother, my great-grandmother? - asking her brother, wouldn't it be nice if humans could fly? He'd scoff, she said, saying "you women and your imagination! Is it ever likely?" And humans flew soon enough. That conversation repeated between grandmother and her brother, about movies becoming talkies - and they did. As for flight, we lived close to a major airport, and while we hadn't yet flown, flight paths were over our homes. So flight was matter of course. So it's good reading about Wright brothers and their efforts. **** "As early as 1000 BCE, kites began to swoop through the air in China. In Europe during the late fifteenth century, Leonardo da Vinci worked to develop his famous concepts for flying machines. Less than 300 years later, in 1783, the Montgolfier brothers’ hot air balloon carried a man into the air. Human imagination had always soared skywards, but now the sky began to seem more accessible. As the eighteenth century progressed, movement toward a machine that could raise humans into the heavens in controlled flight began to take off. From the landmark publication of George Cayley’s On Aerial Navigation in 1809 to the successful flight of a manned glider in 1896, human flight started to look like a real possibility at last. "Just after the turn of the century, Orville and Wilbur Wright entered the scene with their celebrated first flight at Kill Devil Hills, disproving a famous scientist who had recently declared powered human flight to be impossible. The flight the Wright brothers made in 1903 was not only monumental because it was powered—using an engine to propel the machine—but also because it was sustained, controlled, and made in a heavier-than-air aircraft. The Wright brothers’ landmark achievement proved that the dream of flight, which many had worked toward and believed in, was possible. *** "But the brothers’ first flight is the middle of their story, not the beginning or the end. Orville and Wilbur spent many years working hard and experimenting before they achieved flight. After 1903, they would go on to make further aeronautical history as they first tried to convince the world of what they had achieved and then continued to take part in the development of flight. ... two imaginative and intelligent yet unassuming boys from Dayton turned their attention from printing and bicycles to building flying machines, and ... they changed the world in the meantime." **** "“We were lucky enough to grow up in a home environment where there was always much encouragement to children to pursue intellectual interests; to investigate whatever aroused curiosity.” "—Orville Wright" *** "In 1878, when Wilbur Wright was eleven and his brother Orville was seven, their father, Milton, returned home from a trip with a surprise for the two boys. As the young children watched in astonishment, the toy their father presented whizzed up toward the ceiling, propelling itself through the air. The toy was a tiny helicopter, made by the French inventor Alphonse Penaud. Though the helicopter soon broke, Wilbur and Orville would long remember this moment as a significant one in their lives—the moment when their thoughts first turned toward the puzzle of flight. *** "For young Wilbur and Orville, their lives were characterized by invention and exploration. They had the support of their family as they pursued various endeavors and interests. Orville came up with many creative schemes, which frequently turned a profit—from putting on a quite successful and well-attended circus with the taxidermy animals of a friend’s father to making and selling kites. Orville was clever and advanced quickly in school, though he was a bit of a troublemaker. Wilbur, four years older, read widely and became an excellent writer. The brothers worked together on some projects, such as making a large lathe—one of the first of their mechanical experiments. "The brothers’ inventiveness did not develop in a void. They came from a family of adventurous individuals. Several of their ancestors were pioneers. Susan, the boys’ mother, was known for her creative ability to adapt any tool at hand to suit her needs. Milton, their father, had moved across the United States to Oregon for two years to teach before returning to Indiana. In 1869, the family, including two-year-old Wilbur and his older brothers Reuchlin and Lorin, moved to Dayton, Ohio. Here, they purchased the house at 7 Hawthorne Street where both Orville and younger sister Katharine were born. Though the family lived in Cedar Rapids and then Richmond, Indiana, from 1878 to 1884, they kept the house in Dayton and were able to return to it. This move back to Dayton impacted Wilbur since he was about to graduate from high school. He did not think the ceremony of graduation was worth the 50-mile trip back to Richmond, and so he never received his diploma. "Around the time the family returned to Dayton, when Orville was 12, his mechanical interests turned to printing. He tried making woodcuts and prints, at first using a tool he made himself, and later tools that were a gift from Wilbur. To make prints, he used his father’s letter-press. As Orville’s interest in printing continued and increased, his family took note. Wilbur and Lorin traded away a boat they had built in exchange for a small printing press. Milton Wright, the boys’ father, bought Orville a collection of type. While Orville had great fun and earned small amounts of money with this little press, printing pages only four and a half inches high, as time went on, he began to want a larger press. Instead of buying a new press, Orville soon built his own. He also spent two summers working with a printing company in Dayton. **** "“Bicycling is the nearest approximation I know to the flight of birds.” "—Louis J. Helle" *** "In 1887, the invention of the safety bicycle, with its equally sized wheels, made the hobby of bicycling more accessible to many than it had been in the days of the dangerous high-wheeled bicycle. Though Orville had previously owned a high-wheeler, now, as bicycling began to take off, he purchased one of the new safety bicycles. Within a few months, Wilbur decided to follow suit. The Wright brothers became avid cyclists, and Orville even began to compete in racing. The brothers also began to develop their skills as bicycle mechanics. In 1892, they started work on a new business venture, opening their first bicycle shop. By spring of 1893, they were open for business. At the shop at 1005 West Third Street, they sold well-known types of bikes, such as Coventry Cross, Envoy, and Halladay-Temple. They also repaired bicycles. "As the business began to enjoy success, they moved the shop to larger quarters. First, they relocated down the street to 1034 West Third Street, and then, in 1895, to 22 South Williams Street, close to the Wright house. There, they began not only to sell and repair bicycles but also to make their own. They became the Wright Cycle Company and created several different designs: the Van Cleve, the less expensive St. Clair, and the budget-friendly Wright Special. The brothers continued to experiment and invent even as their business grew. They came up with their own equipment for welding, as well as designs for brakes and hubs. They even developed a bell system that let them know when they were building bicycles upstairs if a customer just stopped by to use the bicycle pump by the door or needed to be helped. For fun, they also created a tandem bicycle from two old high-wheelers—a dangerous contraption, certainly, but one that they learned to operate together. Besides the brothers, only one friend was able to stay on the perilous tandem high-wheeler. *** "The Wright Cycle Company not only provided Wilbur and Orville with business success and an enjoyable occupation, but it also gave them the chance to discover principles of mechanics that would become more significant to them later, when they began to experiment with flight. The concept of balance was surprisingly similar between riding a bicycle and operating a flying machine. Most previous attempts in the realm of flying had focused on the inherent stability of the flying machine, and creating a machine that would maintain balance on its own. But Wilbur and Orville, observing the way a cyclist interacts with a bicycle to maintain balance, realized that the pilot’s control would be an essential part of how an aircraft operated. Not only this, but the brothers saw that in the same way that riding a bicycle takes practice, operating a flying machine would also take practice. This was a different mindset than other inventors of their day brought to flying experiments. Additionally, the Wright brothers were gaining the practical skills for working with metal and other materials to create precise and lightweight machines—exactly the skills they would need as they moved on to the attempt to build an aircraft." **** "“Invention, it must be humbly admitted, does not consist in creating out of void but out of chaos.” "—Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley" *** "In 1895, as the Wright brothers’ bicycle company took off, their interest in the subject of flight was just beginning to grow as well. They heard of an aeronautical innovator in Germany, Otto Lilienthal. Lilienthal had been working on a series of groundbreaking experiments involving gliders, and would go on to become known as “the father of glider flights.” He went through 18 different designs, making more than 2,000 flights, and also published an important book about aeronautics. Wilbur and Orville began to look for more information about Lilienthal and his gliders and to follow his experiments as best they could from the United States. Their interest only grew during the following year, 1896, when they received news of a tragic accident; one of Lilienthal’s gliders had crashed, and the inventor had been killed. "Orville and Wilbur began to read all they could about flight. Quickly exhausting the relevant materials in the Dayton library, they sent to the Smithsonian for a list of further resources. They received a list of recent works detailing the attempts and advancements made on the problem of flight—books such as Progress in Flying Machines, by Octave Chanute, as well as papers and pamphlets. The brothers began to understand the various experiments made in flight and gliding, especially in the last ten years. Experimenters had been taking a variety of approaches to the problem of stability—how to keep the aircraft balanced in the air. Some, such as Lilienthal and Chanute, had worked on creating machines that not only relied on inherent stability but also on the operator’s ability to shift his weight around to help control the aircraft. *** "As Wilbur and Orville read about the ideas and experiments of the innovators in flight who had come before them, they began to have some of their own ideas. Why, Orville wondered, had no one attempted to use a lateral control to maintain balance? Instead of focusing on the front and back of the machine, he began to make sketches of an aircraft with sectioned wings that could be adjusted, creating different lift on the two wings to help maintain balance. The aircraft operator would adjust the wing sections with levers. This concept would become one of the primary ideas that led to the Wright brothers’ success. "The brothers recognized that at this point Orville’s idea was not yet anywhere close to usable. Sectioned wings would weaken the structure of the machine far too much. This problem stopped the brothers for several weeks. One day, however, as Wilbur was working in the bicycle shop, he came up with a potential solution. While helping a customer look at an inner tube, Wilbur had been fiddling with the inner tube box. He realized that with the long, narrow box, open at both ends, he could create different angles by bending the two ends while keeping the long lines on the sides of the box rigid. The planes that made up the sides of the box were warped, but still structurally sound. Wilbur and Orville applied this idea to their design for the wings of an aircraft. *** "With a strategy for tackling their biggest problem, the time had, at last, come to conduct some tests. Wilbur built a small model from bamboo that helped to clarify their designs. Then, in late July 1899, the brothers built and tested a kite. The wingspan of the biplane kite was five feet, and they used four cords attached to the wing corners to make the wings adjustable in the way Wilbur and Orville had envisioned. In this way, the operator on the ground could attempt to maintain and restore balance as the kite moved. Wilbur flew the kite at Union Seminary, with an entourage of curious boys who followed along to help him. The method of controlling the biplane kite was a success, and Wilbur and Orville were ready to move on to another level of experiment." **** "“Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.” "—Winston Churchill" *** "In 1900, with their successful kite experiment having proved the potential of their ideas, the two brothers began to lay plans to build a glider large enough to carry a person. Orville and Wilbur thought that if they could attach this glider to a tall crane in an extremely windy place, they would be able to build up the hours of practice needed to pilot an aircraft. "The brothers’ first step was to write to an expert in the field of aeronautical experimentation, Octave Chanute. Wilbur began this correspondence with Chanute, laying out the brothers’ plans and designs and asking for Chanute’s advice. Wilbur and Orville used a table developed by Chanute to calculate the amount of headwind they would need to make the plans for their glider work—15 to 20 miles per hour. The brothers also got in touch with the U.S. Weather Bureau as they began the search for a location with this type of wind. At the top of the list of windiest weather stations sat Chicago, a place where Chanute had made some test flights. However, Wilbur and Orville thought that a location where their experiments would excite less attention would be more suited to their purposes. Their sights turned to the remote North Carolina location of Kitty Hawk, the sixth windiest station on the list. Kitty Hawk would also provide soft sand dunes, ideal for gentle landings. "The Wright brothers next wrote to the Weather Bureau employee at Kitty Hawk, Joseph J. Dosher. In response, they heard not only from Dosher but also from his friend William Tate, who promised them a warm welcome. In September 1900, Wilbur began the long journey to Kitty Hawk. He would first take a train to the Virginia Peninsula, then a steamer to Norfolk. Then the 29-year-old took another train to Elizabeth City, North Carolina. At last, he had to find a boat to take him to the Outer Banks and Kitty Hawk. This proved to be no easy task. After three days of looking, Wilbur found a fishing schooner that would take him. The boat was in terrible condition and had to stop for repairs after encountering a storm. Wilbur finally arrived in Kitty Hawk after nine days of travel, bringing parts of the glider with him. The Tate family welcomed him there, as William Tate had promised, giving him a place to stay and helping him to assemble the glider. *** "Near the end of September, having found someone to watch over the bicycle shop, Orville joined Wilbur at Kitty Hawk. The brothers moved their living quarters to a tent and began almost two weeks of testing of their glider at a site called Kill Devil Hills. Their initial ideas proved problematic. It soon became clear that tying the glider to a crane to practice flying was not functional, and beyond that, something was not working with the design of the glider’s wings. According to the brothers’ calculations, based on tables from Lilienthal, the wings should have developed more lift. "Despite these early disappointments, Wilbur and Orville carried on. They flew the glider as a kite and used the opportunity to make careful measurements. By gathering reams of data, they were able to pinpoint the differences between their observations and the Lilienthal table. They also gave rides to William Tate’s little nephew, allowing them to develop a greater understanding of the additional air resistance a pilot would bring to the aircraft. "After long days of running tests and collecting data, Wilbur and Orville decided to try some glides off a dune. The first day they meant to attempt this, wind speeds rose to 25 miles per hour. The brothers decided to wait. The next day, with the wind blowing at more reasonable speeds, Wilbur was able to make some glides. In mid-October, having used their first experimental glider to its fullest potential, the Wright brothers left it behind and headed back to Dayton. They told Mrs. Tate she could use the fabric from the wings to make dresses. *** ""The brothers’ second glider was larger in an attempt to deal with the lift problems they had encountered in the first glider. They also changed the material for the wing covering and made adjustments to their design. The first glider had weighed about 50 pounds; this second one weighed in at 98. In July 1901, Wilbur and Orville were ready to head to Kitty Hawk and make glider experiments once again. This time, they built a shed to shelter their glider, and their camp became even fuller with ....

  2. 5 out of 5

    Thom Swennes

    The story of the obstinately inventive Wright Brothers is nothing short of fascinating. The brothers’ interests started with printing, advanced to the development of bicycles, and culminated in a rush to the clouds with their fantastic flying machine. With no engineering degrees, or even their high school diplomas, Orville and Wilbur Wright were born entrepreneurs. Building and operating a printing press while still in their teens, the brothers tried their hand in the newspaper business. Althoug The story of the obstinately inventive Wright Brothers is nothing short of fascinating. The brothers’ interests started with printing, advanced to the development of bicycles, and culminated in a rush to the clouds with their fantastic flying machine. With no engineering degrees, or even their high school diplomas, Orville and Wilbur Wright were born entrepreneurs. Building and operating a printing press while still in their teens, the brothers tried their hand in the newspaper business. Although the endeavor booked moderate, if not a sporadic success, a new challenge caught their interest; bicycles. With the invention of the level-wheeled version (replacing the notoriously dangerous big/little wheel combination), the bicycle soon became very popular. They started out selling bikes manufactured by others but soon started experimenting, developing, and producing bicycles of their own. The challenge of flying is much more than sustaining the airtime, the biggest problem is controlling the aircraft once airborne. Thanks to initial experiments conducted in France, the Wright Brothers’ attention soon turned to the sky and the conundrum of control during sustained flight. The brothers worked diligently on this and other problems, but they weren’t reluctant to seek the help or ask advice of others. Wilbur began to correspond with an aeronautical expert, Octave Chanute and learned much about lift and drag. I have often wondered why two boys from Dayton, Ohio would travel all the way to Kitty Hawk, North Carolina to conduct their experiments. This book provided me with a plausible and logical answer. Little did the brothers know what their time, sweat, tears, and blood would mean to the world in a very short time? Like the automobile, the manned flight has to be rated in the top five of human accomplishments. I can’t help but wonder. My father was born a mere ten years after the U. S. military and the populace as a whole, viewed the Wright brothers’ achievements with skepticism. In the span of just two generations, man has not only mastered flight through the clouds but has rocketed into outer space and the planets beyond.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jerry Jares

    This is an easy-to-read explanation of two brothers and their quest for flying.  They were creative and always looking for a project that would be worthwhile and make money.  Their early endeavors were with printing and then bicycles.  Because they not only sold but also repaired bicycles, they soon became proficient enough to create their own line of bicycles. While they were learning principles of mechanics, they started to experiment with flight.  It is important to note that famous people had This is an easy-to-read explanation of two brothers and their quest for flying.  They were creative and always looking for a project that would be worthwhile and make money.  Their early endeavors were with printing and then bicycles.  Because they not only sold but also repaired bicycles, they soon became proficient enough to create their own line of bicycles. While they were learning principles of mechanics, they started to experiment with flight.  It is important to note that famous people had been saying for years that human flight was not possible.  However, these two men were fascinated by the elements that were important to bring about flight.  As they conquered one, another problem arose.  Their bicycle business offered the two men the time and money to learn new things about flying machines. This is the fascinating story of how two brothers worked hard to prove something they thought was possible.  They were ignored for a long time and then others tried to infringe on their patents. The brothers spent years in court over lawsuits. The stress and typhoid fever eventually killed Wilbur, at the age of 45.  These two men invented, built, and flew the first successful airplane -- and changed the world.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Patsy

    Two young brothers ages 7 and 11, Wilber and Orville Wright used their curiosity, intelligence and imagination from printing presses, bicycles and airplanes to better the world. From these experiences they learned success and rejections from scientists and newspapers. The brothers could see how their inventions would help the world and persevered throughout their life time. They saw the great benefits of their planes during World War II and around the world. I was amazed when Orville died of a h Two young brothers ages 7 and 11, Wilber and Orville Wright used their curiosity, intelligence and imagination from printing presses, bicycles and airplanes to better the world. From these experiences they learned success and rejections from scientists and newspapers. The brothers could see how their inventions would help the world and persevered throughout their life time. They saw the great benefits of their planes during World War II and around the world. I was amazed when Orville died of a heart attack in 1948. This is an outstanding history of the Wright Brothers and their flying experiences. I enjoyed the history from beginning in the end.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nestor o miller

    Up up away In regards of the Wright brothers reading there is a insightful information of aviation history that this incredible invention was really in many ways great triumph for humanity but also brought challenges to the Wright brothers. The book gives a inspirational insight of their hard work and courage of the Wright brother its easy to understand their up and downs as aviation was getting off the ground. It’s historical read!!

  6. 4 out of 5

    William O. Robertson

    Excellent short read on the development of the airplane by the Wright Brothers. I am very familiar with the development of their aircraft so I was on the lookout for anything I could read that was not factual. I appreciate the detail that was given in how the brothers had to keep proving the worth of the airplane by convincing the U.S. Government of its importance, which did take time for our government to finally recognized. This is one of the best in the series of “hourly histories.”

  7. 5 out of 5

    Supinder Kaur

    Amazing Gift to Mankind A good brief book. Amazing history created by these two brothers. A gift to humankind. This teaches me that never loose belief in oneself inspite what world says because they can't read your imagination. Amazing Gift to Mankind A good brief book. Amazing history created by these two brothers. A gift to humankind. This teaches me that never loose belief in oneself inspite what world says because they can't read your imagination.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Terri

    I learned a lot from this short one hour summary about the Wright Brothers, specifically I learned about their many experiments, their data collection, details about their attempts and failures. I feel that this book is one of the better One Hour Histories I have read. Well worth the read.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Leon Olivier, Jr

    Nice and concise. Well written and concise history of the development of the airplane. Enjoyed the description of how the Wright Bros used both the scientist method and perseverance to develop their aircraft

  10. 5 out of 5

    WILLIAM SHISLER

    Much too short I was hoping to read something new but this book was disappointing as it was a very short book with information that I could have found on wickipeda but a least it was accurate.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mike Briley

    A nice summary of their lives and their contribution to the conquest of the air. It quite nicely places their invention in the context of the time. I hadn't realised how their first flight was totally ignored as something of no interest! A nice summary of their lives and their contribution to the conquest of the air. It quite nicely places their invention in the context of the time. I hadn't realised how their first flight was totally ignored as something of no interest!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Guy

    Now here is an educational read! I knew the Wright Brothers flew--end of story. Come to find out that, yes, they did fly, but it was not a "one time effort", nor were they alone in making flight something more than an act. For a quick read, this is very enlightening and I thank you for it. Now here is an educational read! I knew the Wright Brothers flew--end of story. Come to find out that, yes, they did fly, but it was not a "one time effort", nor were they alone in making flight something more than an act. For a quick read, this is very enlightening and I thank you for it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    alexander burrus

    From bikes to planes I like reading about the struggle to d and the struggle to get attention from governments and backing. It is cool to see high school graduates changing the world without college.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Elaine

    This is a short overview of the history of the Wright Brothers. If you're looking for something to read in an hour or so this works. However, I consider David McCullough's book on the Wright Brothers excellent. This is a short overview of the history of the Wright Brothers. If you're looking for something to read in an hour or so this works. However, I consider David McCullough's book on the Wright Brothers excellent.

  15. 4 out of 5

    James Orr

    Nicely done Well worth the time to enjoy this short synopsis of the Wright Brothers and their work. If you enjoy planes or flight this should wet your appetite for further reading.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    Kitty Hawk, Kill Devil Hills This is such an interesting story. I was also interested in it because I have been to the Wright Brothers museum in Kitty Hawk. I love the Outer Banks.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sandra Burns

    Good, short read. Summarization of what the Wright brothers did, to invent the first airplane. Lots of trial and error. However, they prevailed in the end.

  18. 5 out of 5

    pradip kumar deka

    During the time of experimentation why there was no explosion As now a days once accident certainly there is catastrophe. Book is good.

  19. 5 out of 5

    L Jerome Krovetz

    Goood Interesting account of the started. If aviation the attention to, details was particular iNterestinng. Book was very well p ppppp

  20. 5 out of 5

    David

    Weight brothers A great story of the American ingenuity and the desire and compassion to take an idea and make it reality. What a leap forward for mankind!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    Fascinating Facts With flight so everyday now, it's important to remember what they had to go through. Worth the short time it will take you to read this. Fascinating Facts With flight so everyday now, it's important to remember what they had to go through. Worth the short time it will take you to read this.

  22. 4 out of 5

    John Schilling

    True story of American enginuity. Good read,short and easy to read.Love reading these books.Anyone has to admit the Wright's determination to continue in spite of so many obsticles. True story of American enginuity. Good read,short and easy to read.Love reading these books.Anyone has to admit the Wright's determination to continue in spite of so many obsticles.

  23. 4 out of 5

    George Polansky

    A good read. Important to pay attention to the problems the brothers had trying to get a hearing for their accomplishments.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Anant R. Shastri

  25. 4 out of 5

    Wayne Owen Lay

  26. 4 out of 5

    John Matthews

  27. 4 out of 5

    MR K KITTO

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kiffin E Gilbert Jr

  29. 5 out of 5

    JOHN W PARKER

  30. 5 out of 5

    robert keehn

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