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Superman: Action Comics - The Oz Effect

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After years of build-up, the Man of Steel discovers the identity of the villainous Mr. Oz in SUPERMAN: ACTION COMICS-THE OZ EFFECT, complete with a lenticular motion cover! Shrouded in mystery for years, the puppetmaster known as Mr. Oz has finally shown his hand. His agents have begun to move as the Man of Steel works to stop the chaos they unleash in Metropolis and across After years of build-up, the Man of Steel discovers the identity of the villainous Mr. Oz in SUPERMAN: ACTION COMICS-THE OZ EFFECT, complete with a lenticular motion cover! Shrouded in mystery for years, the puppetmaster known as Mr. Oz has finally shown his hand. His agents have begun to move as the Man of Steel works to stop the chaos they unleash in Metropolis and across the globe. But when Mr. Oz steps from the shadows, his identity rocks the Last Son of Krypton to his core. Who is he? The answer will change Superman forever. A mystery that has weaved through the pages of DC UNIVERSE: REBIRTH, DETECTIVE COMICS, ACTION COMICS and even Geoff Johns' SUPERMAN: THE MEN OF TOMORROW, is finally resolved here in SUPERMAN - ACTION COMICS: THE OZ EFFECT! Written by legendary scribe Dan Jurgens and illustrated by a team of superstar artists led by Ryan Sook and Viktor Bogdonavic, this graphic novel features a lenticular motion cover only available in the first print run! Collects SUPERMAN - ACTION COMICS #985-992.


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After years of build-up, the Man of Steel discovers the identity of the villainous Mr. Oz in SUPERMAN: ACTION COMICS-THE OZ EFFECT, complete with a lenticular motion cover! Shrouded in mystery for years, the puppetmaster known as Mr. Oz has finally shown his hand. His agents have begun to move as the Man of Steel works to stop the chaos they unleash in Metropolis and across After years of build-up, the Man of Steel discovers the identity of the villainous Mr. Oz in SUPERMAN: ACTION COMICS-THE OZ EFFECT, complete with a lenticular motion cover! Shrouded in mystery for years, the puppetmaster known as Mr. Oz has finally shown his hand. His agents have begun to move as the Man of Steel works to stop the chaos they unleash in Metropolis and across the globe. But when Mr. Oz steps from the shadows, his identity rocks the Last Son of Krypton to his core. Who is he? The answer will change Superman forever. A mystery that has weaved through the pages of DC UNIVERSE: REBIRTH, DETECTIVE COMICS, ACTION COMICS and even Geoff Johns' SUPERMAN: THE MEN OF TOMORROW, is finally resolved here in SUPERMAN - ACTION COMICS: THE OZ EFFECT! Written by legendary scribe Dan Jurgens and illustrated by a team of superstar artists led by Ryan Sook and Viktor Bogdonavic, this graphic novel features a lenticular motion cover only available in the first print run! Collects SUPERMAN - ACTION COMICS #985-992.

30 review for Superman: Action Comics - The Oz Effect

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    Oz is revealed but before we get to that there's a teamup between Supes and Lex against the Machinist. Lex's manipulative side is starting to show again which I find disappointing because I'm afraid he'll go back to being a villain. He's more interesting at the moment striving to be a better Superman than Superman. Guillem March provided the art and it's not that great. Everyone looks like their skin is made of silly puddy. I remember when he was the next big thing when he was drawing Gotham Cit Oz is revealed but before we get to that there's a teamup between Supes and Lex against the Machinist. Lex's manipulative side is starting to show again which I find disappointing because I'm afraid he'll go back to being a villain. He's more interesting at the moment striving to be a better Superman than Superman. Guillem March provided the art and it's not that great. Everyone looks like their skin is made of silly puddy. I remember when he was the next big thing when he was drawing Gotham City Sirens. He had a nice clean style with a little Tim Sale thrown in. I'm disappointed in who Oz was. I get it as part of Doomsday Clock but it still feels (view spoiler)[as bad as if they brought Uncle Ben back (hide spoiler)] . I thought his motivations were kind of stupid, especially since he was manipulating all the humans to turn evil and selfish and then saying look how awful humans are. His cult didn't make a lick of sense either. Viktor Bogdanovic steps up for most of the art and knocks it out of the park. I really like his style. Plus a rare issue by Ryan Sook.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Wing Kee

    Great setup for Doomsday Clock SPOILERS! World: The art is great, the colours pop and the splash pages are bright and beautiful. The world building here is fantastic, since Rebirth we've been dealing with Oz and the mystery is revealed but more inportantly for the world building this is a ramp up to Doomsday Clock. The pieces from Action Comics and Superman and The Button allows this to make sense. Sure some will not like the reveal of Oz and it will be against the core of the character but I dis Great setup for Doomsday Clock SPOILERS! World: The art is great, the colours pop and the splash pages are bright and beautiful. The world building here is fantastic, since Rebirth we've been dealing with Oz and the mystery is revealed but more inportantly for the world building this is a ramp up to Doomsday Clock. The pieces from Action Comics and Superman and The Button allows this to make sense. Sure some will not like the reveal of Oz and it will be against the core of the character but I disagree because the world needs this to happen to shake Supes to the point that is needed for Doomsday Clock to happen. Great! Story: The story is well written, topical and paced wonderfully. The reveal of Oz was expected and many had guessed correctly, the use of this character has been a point of argument as some believe that this is a legacy character and hurting the legacy and the core of that character is disrespectful. I agree somewhat but I also agree that this needs to happen. Oz needs to exist for Superman to go through this arc, not just this arc, but the entire arc he's had since Rebirth and leading to the culmination I expect from Doomsday Clock. This is the build up to that. I really loved how this book look head on at the issue of our current world and how hopeless we've become and the put that against the Hopefulness of Superman. It's always been said that he represents the Hope and the beacon for the DC universe and this arc allowed it to be shaken and also allowed for wonderful drama. I like it a lot. Characters: Superman is great, he has an arc and as much as a beacon he is, he also gets to grow, it's great. Oz is great, he's a legacy character yes and he should be treated with respect and should be also the beacon that we of the past have hoped for. However, if you look at the history of this character in comics and also media he has also been a sounding board for Superman to question some things and also paired with the other legacy character you would expect to be his opposite (Pa). I liked how they used Oz, Superman needed this a lot. The rest of the cast was great, giving Clark a larger world and also weight to his decisions. Lois is always the best! I loved this arc, it sets up Doomsday Clock wonderfully and opens the door for great drama to come. Onward to the next book! *read individual issues*

  3. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    THE OZ IDENTITY IS REVEALED! Well...that was okay. I mean I get why. It's to give superman some family moments. To question him. I think having Oz who he is shows how devious, or how fucked up, the man who's pulling the strings is. How he knows how to hurt the man of steel and give him a hell of a tortured mind. Saying that we also get Superman running around the world saving people because that's what he does best. Also first story is Superman working with Lex and it's a different twist on it a THE OZ IDENTITY IS REVEALED! Well...that was okay. I mean I get why. It's to give superman some family moments. To question him. I think having Oz who he is shows how devious, or how fucked up, the man who's pulling the strings is. How he knows how to hurt the man of steel and give him a hell of a tortured mind. Saying that we also get Superman running around the world saving people because that's what he does best. Also first story is Superman working with Lex and it's a different twist on it all. Good: The short little lex story worked well and showed both their true selves which I enjoyed. I also liked some of the Oz reveal, especially with Jon being kind of the open minded individual that the two other Kents were not. I also thought the fights were pretty intense. Bad: The art was a little iffy sometimes, especially in the Oz section. I also thought the dialog was a little on the nose at times and to 90's (come on Dan!) Also the reveal was kind of like 'Oh...." And not all that amazing. This was a solid volume but I just expected more from the great "Oz". I like the future idea of hurting superman emotionally but beyond that this volume wasn't nearly as good as the last one that's for sure.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    The mystery of Mr Oz finally unravels as Superman comes face to face with the master manipulator in this five issue epic that redefines the Rebirth landscape. But first, we get a two-issue story by Rob Williams that puts Lex Luthor back onto the path of villainy as he and Superman are dragged into a war zone and pitted against each other. This one's pretty good, but it feels kind of inevitable. Luthor as a hero hasn't really rung true despite DC trying to make it a thing, but he's been absent fro The mystery of Mr Oz finally unravels as Superman comes face to face with the master manipulator in this five issue epic that redefines the Rebirth landscape. But first, we get a two-issue story by Rob Williams that puts Lex Luthor back onto the path of villainy as he and Superman are dragged into a war zone and pitted against each other. This one's pretty good, but it feels kind of inevitable. Luthor as a hero hasn't really rung true despite DC trying to make it a thing, but he's been absent from the Super-books for quite a while now, so it makes sense to shake him up a bit. The art by Guillem March is a bit off-putting, since he makes everyone look a bit stretched and like they're constantly in pain but I guess that's kind of his thing. The Oz Effect itself does a good job of revealing Mr Oz's role behind the scenes as part of Rebirth, and his ultimate motivation feels like something out of an anime, since it shows a lot of damage in a short space of time for the character. It also allows for a lot more to go on with the DC Universe in general, like A Lonely Place Of Living over in Detective Comics. The art, surprisingly has issues by both Ryan Sook (a huge rarity these days) and Viktor Bogdanovic, on loan from New Super-Man. We also get an aftermath issue that helps Clark come to terms with what's happened to him, as well as resolving to get more answers which leads directly into the next arc too. The Oz Effect's biggest shock is the reveal of who Mr Oz is, but it rolls with it well enough to create a solid storyline that gets a lot of mileage out of the character while opening up a lot of opportunity for more Superman stories as well as elsewhere.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    Only Human. A fight against the machinist. Jurgens continues to do a good job of contrasting Clark and Luther, but this one is a little shallow with the extended Machinist fight, and if it's meant to be the end of the Luthor-as-hero arc, it's a bit underwhelming [3/5]. The Oz Effect. And then we come to "The Oz Effect", which is another of the big storylines that DC has been pushing on since Rebirth. But, if you thought that Mr. Oz was Ozymandias, prepare to be disappointed. Oh, there's another a Only Human. A fight against the machinist. Jurgens continues to do a good job of contrasting Clark and Luther, but this one is a little shallow with the extended Machinist fight, and if it's meant to be the end of the Luthor-as-hero arc, it's a bit underwhelming [3/5]. The Oz Effect. And then we come to "The Oz Effect", which is another of the big storylines that DC has been pushing on since Rebirth. But, if you thought that Mr. Oz was Ozymandias, prepare to be disappointed. Oh, there's another answer that's clever enough, but much like "The Button", this feels mainly like treading water. Or if you prefer, it's turtles all the way down, because there's someone else behind Mr. Oz and ... maybe he's our mystery Watchman? The Watchman plot only feels like it really gets rolling in the last issue, when Superman figures out that there's something wrong with time, a common but unfulfilled trope throughout Rebirth. As for the Mr. Oz plot itself ... it's OK. The identity of Mr. Oz is intriguing, but feels unsustainable. The fact that he hates Earth because it's evil and he's sitting there making it evil is dumb. There's some interesting personality conflicts and some interesting familial conflicts, but the rest of this story feels thin [2+/5].

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nicola Mansfield

    Fantastic! This moves along the big crossover event happening right now. I can't tell much of the plot as it relies so much on the story so far and I don't want to give anything away. Superman has an epic meeting with a fellow Kryptonian and once this story's disaster is over Supes knows the timeline has been altered and he wants to go back to his birth to find where things went astray. This was a page turner and I loved it.A great read to follow the Superman/Flash volume released earlier this y Fantastic! This moves along the big crossover event happening right now. I can't tell much of the plot as it relies so much on the story so far and I don't want to give anything away. Superman has an epic meeting with a fellow Kryptonian and once this story's disaster is over Supes knows the timeline has been altered and he wants to go back to his birth to find where things went astray. This was a page turner and I loved it.A great read to follow the Superman/Flash volume released earlier this year.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Eli

    Reading in preparation for Doomsday Clock A highlight in this series that's been pretty average for the most part. Sets up a lot of plot for later. I won't be continuing for the reason that this is as far as I've needed to read for Doomsday Clock.

  8. 5 out of 5

    David

    Best yet of the rebirthed Supes but was expecting some sort of ending. Nope, nothing tied up here.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    Basic plot: The mysterious Mr. Oz claims to be Jor El and has been manipulating humanity to show its worst side to Superman, but there is more to this story. I am really starting to see how tightly plotted the Action comics story has been crafted to lead up to the inevitable connection to the doomsday clock event. I am officially impressed ans excited. More than that, though, this volume really taps into the sense of who Superman is -a symbol of hope- and the absolute shitshow that is the world t Basic plot: The mysterious Mr. Oz claims to be Jor El and has been manipulating humanity to show its worst side to Superman, but there is more to this story. I am really starting to see how tightly plotted the Action comics story has been crafted to lead up to the inevitable connection to the doomsday clock event. I am officially impressed ans excited. More than that, though, this volume really taps into the sense of who Superman is -a symbol of hope- and the absolute shitshow that is the world today. We need hope, it is in preciously low supply, and there are so many utterly horrifying events happening daily that the supply of hope dwindles. We need Superman more rhan ever to remind us of who we can be if we strive for better. Truer today than ever before.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Arturo

    I'm not a big fan of this trope they've set up, iv just seen it way too many times. But the explanation behind it all was pretty decent. Seeing as this is just another chapter of a bigger threat coming, I guess it wasn't as bad. Also I'm glad it went in a different direction, I expected Superman to throw a punch as soon as he finds out Mr. Oz's motives and instead we have a morality play and the focus on 'Hope.

  11. 5 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    Who in their right mind thought that it would be a good idea to make Jor-El be the bad guy!? I could use some extremely strong and long words here, but it'd just make me look like an unhinged Superman fan. That being said, why on Earth would you destroy the character and the mythos in such a sloppy and pathetic manner? I normally despise retcons, but this needs to be retconned out of existence as quickly as possible.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    I passed on "The Oz Effect" when it first ran in ACTION COMICS back in 2017. The whole "Rebirth" thing intrigued me, but some of the stuff like the Flash/Batman crossover "The Button", just left me cold and bordering on disinterest. When I saw the identity reveal as to the story arc's antagonist, I felt frustrated and disappointing, feeling like "#Facepalm Didn't we do something like this already?!". Since re-discovering my love of Superman (my earliest recollections of the character were one of I passed on "The Oz Effect" when it first ran in ACTION COMICS back in 2017. The whole "Rebirth" thing intrigued me, but some of the stuff like the Flash/Batman crossover "The Button", just left me cold and bordering on disinterest. When I saw the identity reveal as to the story arc's antagonist, I felt frustrated and disappointing, feeling like "#Facepalm Didn't we do something like this already?!". Since re-discovering my love of Superman (my earliest recollections of the character were one of love and admiration, because he was just so darned GOOD, y'know?) during Bendis taking the reins, I figured reading this book would aid me in what was to come. Catching it on a recent Comixology sale for the Big 'S' was the icing on the cake! The first story in book, the two-issue story "Only Human", written by Rob Williams, was just meh. It felt like "paint by number", as far as the plot was concerned. Nothing in it made me go, "Whoa! Holy crapola, that was fab!" Nope. The only reason it was included was due to the inclusion, and overall influence, of Mr. Oz on the story. Outside of that, I saw no reason to include it, other than DC wanted to add more pages (good, bad, or otherwise) for the money spent on purchasing it! Now, the art by Guillem March was another story altogether. I felt he did a great job of capturing the heroic aspects to Superman, as well as the "human" side, achieving a perfect balance. I also thought the way he drew Lois Lane was also perfect, making her appear to be smart, because, well, she is, right? 'Nuff said. Thank you. Guillem, for helping to make this a 3-Star review instead of just a 2-Star one! As far as the remainder of the book, which WAS "The Oz Effect, I thought it was fair. Not terrible by any means, but certainly not the kind of Dan Jurgens' helmed story. I felt the dialogue involving Clark and Jon, as well as with Lois, was good, as was the way he handled Perry White. But the reveal for Mr. Oz (no Spoilers, promise!) was just a bit underwhelming! The character who he really has been done before. Sometimes good, sometimes not so good. This round, I was just like "Hmmm.. Ok, didn't see it coming, but at the same time.." I think a lot of people, myself included, were hoping it would be WATCHMEN's Ozmandyias. *womp* *womp* Nope. And that, dear readers, is the only kinda-sorta Spoiler in this review! What really made it work for me, as well as aiding that push for the 3-Star review, was the backstory. Even though his name (not gonna say it, but we all know the blue fellow in question) is not mentioned, it is clear who is behind all of this. The fact that he brought this person into the present, tweaking the grand scheme of Everything? Whew! That's heavy! And definitely interest enough for me to stay onboard with Supes, especially with care Bendis is exhibiting with the character as well as the book's main cast. This was my first time with Viktor Bogdanovic's art style. Quite good, I'd say. He really does a great job at capturing character's emotions, really drawing you into what is going on in that particular panel. Definitely someone I will be looking out for going forward. So, final verdict, do I recommend this? Yeah, because there's a lot of little bits that owe to the bigger story involving him. However, don't expect to have your mind blown or anything, because it really ain't gonna do that. But, it's good enough to read. And that, dear readers, is all I have to say about it! I will be curious to finally read Geoff Johns' DOOMSDAY CLOCK (hopefully, it will conclude in my lifetime!) as I feel a lot more will make sense.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Going into this book, I had some reservations. I’d already heard (because avoiding spoilers in comic books is nearly impossible), who Mr. Oz is. And a big part of me was like.... What? That goes against basic Superman mythos! Because that character (I’m going to avoid spoilers) is supposed to be dead! That’s one of the constants in the Superman story: truth, justice, the American way... and that. (Again, really trying to avoid spoilers here). But the further I got into the story... the more I co Going into this book, I had some reservations. I’d already heard (because avoiding spoilers in comic books is nearly impossible), who Mr. Oz is. And a big part of me was like.... What? That goes against basic Superman mythos! Because that character (I’m going to avoid spoilers) is supposed to be dead! That’s one of the constants in the Superman story: truth, justice, the American way... and that. (Again, really trying to avoid spoilers here). But the further I got into the story... the more I couldn’t help but think how utterly ingenious and earth-shattering it was. What if Superman hadn’t been taken in by the best of humanity? What if he had been taken in by the worst? And does humanity--which is still just as violent now as during any other point in history--really deserve the symbol of good that is Superman? The moments with Jon and Lois interacting with this aforementioned spoiler-y character were also interesting--and Superman interacting with him was obviously gripping: the combination of both love and doubt, of both hope and suspicion. Those moments in particular were palpable on the page. I also liked that this story ended with a cliff-hanger--both with the plot and with the theme. Superman is doubting his place in the universe, as well as humanity itself. He wants to believe in hope. He wants to believe in good. And, as Superman, he’s doing everything he can to keep all of that alive. But there is one page in particular that really punches the reader in the gut: Superman is on the Daily Planet roof. Lois and Jon are behind him. And he’s hunched over, listening to all of the pain, suffering, and hate going on in the world. I mean... wow. Just let all of that sink in. Humanity is giving too much anguish for even Superman to handle. He has his family supportively behind him... but he also (because of the danger Mr. Oz told him is coming) has to wonder if putting faith in humanity means putting his family in danger. It’s a powerful image that I’m sure I could analyze in a million other ways, but those were the messages that spoke most strongly to me. All in all, this is just a compelling story that takes a what-if and plants it into the canon in such a way that leaves the reader guessing and yearning for more. I’m very excited to see what’s going to happen next.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    I've yet to have a more swings-and-roundabouts, highs-then-lows read from DC, and that's saying something. The two-parter to start made me seriously worried – Lois being all Ms Exposition, Miss Recap and Lovey-Dovey-Wastaspace, Lex being, er, Lex – but it was actually pretty good, snappy and intelligent where that word has clearly been a dirty one with these publishers of late. But then we get the heinous problem that is DC Politics. After the Big Reveal, we see that this particular bad, which we I've yet to have a more swings-and-roundabouts, highs-then-lows read from DC, and that's saying something. The two-parter to start made me seriously worried – Lois being all Ms Exposition, Miss Recap and Lovey-Dovey-Wastaspace, Lex being, er, Lex – but it was actually pretty good, snappy and intelligent where that word has clearly been a dirty one with these publishers of late. But then we get the heinous problem that is DC Politics. After the Big Reveal, we see that this particular bad, which we so want to love as a character, saw some dodgy Islamist warlords and so on and based his whole back-story on those. Oh. Dear. We're supposed to accept your argument as valid on that flimsy basis? That easiest representation of evil drives this whole event story? You couldn't have found something more edgy, more interesting and more compelling than Islam as motivation for a Jewish-borne, Christ-like Ubermensch to be up against? It gets worse before it gets better. They use the word "pabulum" to try and claim that intelligence back (oh, the irony). They make Lois look like she's a he in transition. And they give us that Big Reveal a second time in case we missed it an issue or two ago. And then they bring in Superbrat. But, you know what? Come the end enough has been set up for the BIG EVENT that the Big Reveal (and the Big Reveal Repeated) started to set in motion that I was actually on board for finding out where we were going. So, some utter, utter frustration, too much pabulum, and yet some gumption to get the hooks in tight for future books. It all amounts to something like three and a half stars.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Norman Cook

    "Only Human" by Rob Williams with art by Gullem March in issues #985-986 pits Superman against the Machinist. The Machinist uses stolen tech from Lexcorp which prompts Lex to get involved, but in doing so seems to revert back to his villainous ways. Mr. Oz makes an appearance at the end, showing that much of this has been due to his manipulations, possibly the only really interesting revelation of this two-parter. "The Oz Effect" by Dan Jurgens with art by Viktor Bogdanovic (Ryan Sook in issue #9 "Only Human" by Rob Williams with art by Gullem March in issues #985-986 pits Superman against the Machinist. The Machinist uses stolen tech from Lexcorp which prompts Lex to get involved, but in doing so seems to revert back to his villainous ways. Mr. Oz makes an appearance at the end, showing that much of this has been due to his manipulations, possibly the only really interesting revelation of this two-parter. "The Oz Effect" by Dan Jurgens with art by Viktor Bogdanovic (Ryan Sook in issue #988) in issues #987-991 finally reveals who Mr. Oz is. Mr. Oz's motivation seems a bit simplistic, and there really isn't a conclusive finale. Like the Batman/Flash crossover, "The Button," this seems to be setting up more questions than providing answers. For at the end, we learn that Mr. Oz is himself being manipulated by some unknown entity. Not a bad story (the art is especially nice) considering Mr. Oz is not who most people thought he was (and is, in fact, probably one of the last characters you would expect), but at some point I'd like some closure. The epilog from issue #992, "Aftereffects," by Dan Jurgens and Rob Williams with art by Will Conrad, shows Superman contemplating his encounter with Mr. Oz and what it means to his world. He begins to realize that the timestream has been altered and sets out to do something about it. This is definitely a transition issue. The best part, though, was when Batman suddenly appears in Superman's Fortress of Solitude without Superman being aware he is there. Superman says, "I didn't hear the Batplane approaching," to which Batman replies, "No... ...you didn't," with no other explanation. That Batman is such a card!

  16. 5 out of 5

    SSShafiq

    Overall 3 stars; an enjoyable book which I understand leads a longer arc. This could have been a 4 star book as I enjoyed the story but I hated the art. Everyone looked like they had taking steroids and were over-buffed. Take a look at the Superman on the cover which looks like he has extra muscles and imagine reading that for the entire book. I still have a residual headache, which is unfortunate. Now it’s ok to not have exact continuity when drawing these characters but please - some continuit Overall 3 stars; an enjoyable book which I understand leads a longer arc. This could have been a 4 star book as I enjoyed the story but I hated the art. Everyone looked like they had taking steroids and were over-buffed. Take a look at the Superman on the cover which looks like he has extra muscles and imagine reading that for the entire book. I still have a residual headache, which is unfortunate. Now it’s ok to not have exact continuity when drawing these characters but please - some continuity would be appreciated. In the end, the last comic had better art from Will Conrad, so I gave the book a final at 3 stars. The last book set-up with Bruce turning up, and Supes visiting Green Lantern Corp HQ was nice. The revelation of Mr. Oz and the set up for the next arc were generally interesting though I wish we slowed down the action just a little. Supes spent too much screaming like Goku in panels for me not to giggle. All that screaming - LUTHOR! MACHINIST! All the art with his eyes red and shining, I almost expected him to go Super Saiyan. I wish they had been more focus on the pathos than the action but I acknowledge this is a personal taste. Some random observations: (view spoiler)[ -- Jor-el looks much older than his wife with the beard. Cradle snatcher much! -- Baby Ka-el, not so cute looking here -- So basically Oz brainwashes the humans and then blames them. I guess that is one way of proving us evil?? -- Superman decides to go back in time - when is time travel a good idea? Haven’t you learnt anything Supes. Bad Superman! (hide spoiler)]

  17. 4 out of 5

    Adam Fisher

    Fast paced and incredible story-telling, The Oz Effect does one thing: reveal who Mr. Oz really is, and it's a little shocking! SPOILERS... Mr. Oz has been manipulating events in the DCU ever since the Rebirth event. Turns out, he is actually Jor-El, returned to life, having been pulled away from the destruction of Krypton during the explosion. (Comic rumor followers can assume the the force controlling Oz is, in fact, Doctor Mahattan) Put through torture and a very painful recovery, Oz has been w Fast paced and incredible story-telling, The Oz Effect does one thing: reveal who Mr. Oz really is, and it's a little shocking! SPOILERS... Mr. Oz has been manipulating events in the DCU ever since the Rebirth event. Turns out, he is actually Jor-El, returned to life, having been pulled away from the destruction of Krypton during the explosion. (Comic rumor followers can assume the the force controlling Oz is, in fact, Doctor Mahattan) Put through torture and a very painful recovery, Oz has been watching Clark and his family for sometime, and has one goal: Convince Superman to abandon humanity, which will never get any better due to their reliance on violence and hatred, and take him to a utopia world. Something huge is coming....universe destroying... Clark is very skeptical, which continues when he finds out that Oz is responsible for caused worldwide chaos, but comes to accept him as father, right as he is getting taken away by "an unknown force". In his curiousity, he goes to the Watchtower and uses Flash's cosmic treadmill to travel back in time to the end of Krypton. Right after he leaves, Booster Gold shows up, trying to stop him, as he will strongly affect the future. Will Clark get his answers? Was that really Jor-El? What problem is he causing? Who is coming? What else will happen as we speed towards issue #1000? Recommend. Superman's stuff has been good for a few years now.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Scott Lee

    Doesn't stand up as well after the excellent fourth volume. The first collected arc--a Clark/Lex fight/team-up arc--has nothing to do with everything the book advertises itself as with its title and cover. It was okay. Underwhelming if you ask me. But the whole Lex thing is just a bit....I don't know. The reveal of Mr. Oz's identity had no impact for me as I ended up reading Batman: Detective Comics: A Lonely Place of Living first so I already knew who Oz is. That said, it feels like the only wa Doesn't stand up as well after the excellent fourth volume. The first collected arc--a Clark/Lex fight/team-up arc--has nothing to do with everything the book advertises itself as with its title and cover. It was okay. Underwhelming if you ask me. But the whole Lex thing is just a bit....I don't know. The reveal of Mr. Oz's identity had no impact for me as I ended up reading Batman: Detective Comics: A Lonely Place of Living first so I already knew who Oz is. That said, it feels like the only way it could work without being gimmicky is if its a part of the whole mystery Watchman messing with time thing that has been alluded to throughout Rebirth. Like it has to be a product of Rebirth itself and the DC/Watchmen crossover/clash they've been building to. I would be disappointed with it otherwise. (view spoiler)[It feels like no one's death is sacred anymore. Honestly, other than Uncle Ben and Batman's parents is there anyone we haven't brought back as a legitimate in-continuity return in either major main-stream comics universe? I'm kind of sick of it. (hide spoiler)] That said if it is a product of the whole Rebirth Universe was changed messed with thing, what a wonderful way for the big bad behind it all to get at Superman. If Mr. Oz is a weapon someone else created and pointed at Clark it's absolutely brilliant. So it's a bit hard to judge from the middle-point we're at now.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Spaghettiman

    Wow! I've been reading a fast-track order for Doomsday Clock, and while Rebirth, the Button, and Reborn had bits that were confusing (but still fun reads overall) since I"m not really caught up on DC, The Oz Effect works as not only an incredible standalone, but as a great way to set up Doomsday clock and what it's doing. Essentially, the story is a fairly self-contained morality play. The best Villians are always the ones that think they're doing the right thing, and I think the best evil plans Wow! I've been reading a fast-track order for Doomsday Clock, and while Rebirth, the Button, and Reborn had bits that were confusing (but still fun reads overall) since I"m not really caught up on DC, The Oz Effect works as not only an incredible standalone, but as a great way to set up Doomsday clock and what it's doing. Essentially, the story is a fairly self-contained morality play. The best Villians are always the ones that think they're doing the right thing, and I think the best evil plans are the ones that really confront the hero's ideology and their sense of self. Mr. Oz is a fantastic villain that makes Superman really question what he's doing (and the reveal of who he was was very surprising, I was expecting someone else). In addition, there's some very interesting moments between Superman and a seemingly reformed Lex Luthor (I'm not sure the context for this, but I'm interested in reading about it) that brings out what's so great about each character. The Oz Effect has piqued my interest for not only Doomsday Clock, but getting into modern DC in general. I really want to read the rest of Rebirth Superman and make sense of it all now. A great standalone book and a great entryway for new fans.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Joe Whitfield

    Two things stand out in The Oz Effect. Firstly, DC certainly know how to build a story. This secret began way back in the New 52 era. It has festered in the background for years and it is tied in so beautifully the pay-off is incredible. Secondly, the social commentary that accompanies the main revelation is on point. The book takes a not-so subtle look at the world today. Political instability, immigration worries and abuse scandals. It’s all in there like a slap to the face. Comics have always Two things stand out in The Oz Effect. Firstly, DC certainly know how to build a story. This secret began way back in the New 52 era. It has festered in the background for years and it is tied in so beautifully the pay-off is incredible. Secondly, the social commentary that accompanies the main revelation is on point. The book takes a not-so subtle look at the world today. Political instability, immigration worries and abuse scandals. It’s all in there like a slap to the face. Comics have always been about taking real world problems and encouraging people to make a change. With today’s climate being so volatile, it’s important to remember that we’re all trying to survive on a tiny rock hurtling through space. By showing us humanities dark side, we can work towards the light. This is more powerful than finding out who the man behind the hood is. I’ve never been much of a Superman fan, but this collection of Action Comics has changed my mind. It doesn’t matter if you’ve read the build up to the Oz Effect or not. This book is for anyone. Full review can be found - https://wp.me/p9941G-2E

  21. 4 out of 5

    Clay Bartel

    I just love this book. Of course if you haven't read savage dawn, the final days of superman, dc universe rebirth, action comic 1-4 rebirth, superman reborn, etc etc then this book will likely have no impact on you. Before I buy any superman book I dig deep into the research and figure out which books are needed to grasp the story being told. While I first started as a child and the death of superman were some of the first books I ever read, I've only really been collecting since about 30 years I just love this book. Of course if you haven't read savage dawn, the final days of superman, dc universe rebirth, action comic 1-4 rebirth, superman reborn, etc etc then this book will likely have no impact on you. Before I buy any superman book I dig deep into the research and figure out which books are needed to grasp the story being told. While I first started as a child and the death of superman were some of the first books I ever read, I've only really been collecting since about 30 years old and now have gone strong for 3 years, mostly superman books and I'm loving piecing together his enormous history. I've got 60ish books simply on the Blue superman transformed storyline for example, hated by many but easily one of my favourite runs ever. Well Oz Effect like many big events books needs the reader to either have read all the surrounding material or at least wanna start working backwards and figuring out what is going on. Anyways I love Superman comics and while some story lines do fall flat this one is one of my favourites. Look forward to rereading once I get the soon to be released tpb doomsday clock.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Galbreath

    The strength of this comic lies in its ability to eloquently address its themes through the conflict between Kal-el and Oz. At first, "The Oz Effect" seems like it's content to check off all the Superman boxes, but the plot improves significantly once Oz himself shows up. It loses points for having an inconsistent version of Superman that comes off as immature or naive at times, and a narrative that falls back on common "Superman as a perfect god figure" cliches to the point of self-parody. I ha The strength of this comic lies in its ability to eloquently address its themes through the conflict between Kal-el and Oz. At first, "The Oz Effect" seems like it's content to check off all the Superman boxes, but the plot improves significantly once Oz himself shows up. It loses points for having an inconsistent version of Superman that comes off as immature or naive at times, and a narrative that falls back on common "Superman as a perfect god figure" cliches to the point of self-parody. I have mixed feelings about this comic's version of Lex Luthor. While I haven't read all the comics this ties into, I feel his presence added little to the story. "The Oz Effect" is a solid enough graphic novel, but it could have been extraordinary if it had a bit more meat on its story's bones and a little less reliance on Superman cliches. Still, the art is consistently well done, the dialogue is compelling and the story moves at a brisk pace. Recommended for Superman fans, but may alienate newbies to the Man of Steel.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    Fantastic episode that will surely add to the history of Supes (until DC retcon it - naturally) for years to come. While a tad preachy at times, Jurgens gets the 'Earth doesn't deserve Superman' message across well, and the manipulation of Jon by 'Oz' is a timely metaphor for the media and politics at the current time. Art here is outstanding, particularly the multi-panel montages, and colour is used to great affect. My only niggle is the last issue feels a little 'throw-it-all-in' with the appea Fantastic episode that will surely add to the history of Supes (until DC retcon it - naturally) for years to come. While a tad preachy at times, Jurgens gets the 'Earth doesn't deserve Superman' message across well, and the manipulation of Jon by 'Oz' is a timely metaphor for the media and politics at the current time. Art here is outstanding, particularly the multi-panel montages, and colour is used to great affect. My only niggle is the last issue feels a little 'throw-it-all-in' with the appearance of fellow League members. Where they had previously been mentioned as dealing with the various incidents around the world, they feel a little superfluous here - almost as if Jurgens was handed down a reminder from DC about a recently tanking movie. Only Green Lantern really needs to be featured here as it he drives the plot. This ends on a cool cliffhanger, giving the next Action Comics release a 75% chance of being purchased.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bram Ryckaert

    Ever since the start of Rebirth the identity of Oz was the big thing for the Superman comics, and I'm a bit disappointed in how it turned out. Not because of his identity, but more because of the lackluster story. This is how most of the exchanges play out: "Humanity is doomed, come with me and leave this planet behind! "No, humans good! Must save" "No, humans bad! Must come with me!" "Yes, I am X, can you believe it?" "I can't believe you're X!" "But it's true, I am X" Jurgens lets the wheels spin in Ever since the start of Rebirth the identity of Oz was the big thing for the Superman comics, and I'm a bit disappointed in how it turned out. Not because of his identity, but more because of the lackluster story. This is how most of the exchanges play out: "Humanity is doomed, come with me and leave this planet behind! "No, humans good! Must save" "No, humans bad! Must come with me!" "Yes, I am X, can you believe it?" "I can't believe you're X!" "But it's true, I am X" Jurgens lets the wheels spin in these issues and only the last pages of the conclusion have some okay character moments. There's one page that shows how Supes is starting to doubt his mission and that's pretty powerful, but most of the dialogue or fights with Oz are nothing special. I wasn't a fan of the artist either.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Aidanmark30

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book was okay. There were some plot twists and exciting parts. I read this book to learn more about the guy in the green hood or MR.OZ. This book is about MR.OZ trying to show Superman that earth doesn't deserve a saviour. He makes people choose between evil and good. Evil is winning this time. MR.OZ believes earth faith is sealed. When MR.OZ revealed himself as JOR-EL (Superman's father), I was hoping to see lots of fighting and action. No zero action was done between Jor-el and Superman! This book was okay. There were some plot twists and exciting parts. I read this book to learn more about the guy in the green hood or MR.OZ. This book is about MR.OZ trying to show Superman that earth doesn't deserve a saviour. He makes people choose between evil and good. Evil is winning this time. MR.OZ believes earth faith is sealed. When MR.OZ revealed himself as JOR-EL (Superman's father), I was hoping to see lots of fighting and action. No zero action was done between Jor-el and Superman! ” I am reading Superman: Action Comics for its action”- George Zakka. The ending was kind of cool. It ends with Superman going back in time to Krypton when his father died. Than booster shot comes and is like WAIT! I guess it makes me a tad bit existed for Superman Action Comics: Vol 5 Boster Shot. I don't want to get my hopes too high. Overall okay book. I give it a 3.5/10.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Terry Mcginnis

    For me, this is the second to last graphic novel that I had to read with regard to Superman. I'm not his biggest fan (I do love Earth One, though), but made a list for the road to Doomsday Clock, and the road to Rebirth and unfortunately they include Superman titles. This volume comes after the Reborn story and shows Superman's father (yep, you read that correctly) return in a big way! Much, much better than the Superman stuff I've read lately (see my other reviews). Dan Jurgens is apparently th For me, this is the second to last graphic novel that I had to read with regard to Superman. I'm not his biggest fan (I do love Earth One, though), but made a list for the road to Doomsday Clock, and the road to Rebirth and unfortunately they include Superman titles. This volume comes after the Reborn story and shows Superman's father (yep, you read that correctly) return in a big way! Much, much better than the Superman stuff I've read lately (see my other reviews). Dan Jurgens is apparently the man when it comes to the Man of Steel. Great writing, okay art, and a solid story about the return of Jor-El. Superman fans will love this, casual fans may want to skip unless you're doing the same thing I'm doing in preparation of Doomsday Clock or to see what led to Rebirth.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Adam Graham

    This book collects Issue 985-992 of Action Comics. First up is the two-part story, "Only Human" written by guest writer Rob Williams finds terrorists using chips from Lex Luthor to encourage mayhem and Civil War. Superman suspects Luthor has gone back to his old ways, but Luthor denies knowledge and the two team up to sort things out. This is a nice look at the Lex-Superman relationship and leads into the main arch. Issue 986-991 makes up the proper Oz Effect story where Oz is revealed and his ag This book collects Issue 985-992 of Action Comics. First up is the two-part story, "Only Human" written by guest writer Rob Williams finds terrorists using chips from Lex Luthor to encourage mayhem and Civil War. Superman suspects Luthor has gone back to his old ways, but Luthor denies knowledge and the two team up to sort things out. This is a nice look at the Lex-Superman relationship and leads into the main arch. Issue 986-991 makes up the proper Oz Effect story where Oz is revealed and his agenda is to convince Superman that humanity can't be saved and to take care of himself and his family. This is a good emotional arc that gets to the core of Superman is. I think Jon is a bit flat here, but otherwise it's a strong arc that sets up Doomsday Clock. Issue 992 has Superman working in after-math of the main story, leading to a fateful decision to take an extreme step that will set up the next story arc. Overall, some decent comics with an interesting answer to the question of Mr. Oz, although it's all a tease for what is to come.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ming

    You know how in comic books they like to have the big bad go, "Muahahaha all the problems you've been having are my doing"? Well, that's all well and good, and is sometimes effective, but not when their individual deeds make no sense whatsoever. Like imprisoning a bunch of Superman's villains to show him how screwed up humanity is -- how does that compute? And don't even get me started about Tim Drake (who's not even in this book but was taken anyway in the Bat-books). And then it turns out the You know how in comic books they like to have the big bad go, "Muahahaha all the problems you've been having are my doing"? Well, that's all well and good, and is sometimes effective, but not when their individual deeds make no sense whatsoever. Like imprisoning a bunch of Superman's villains to show him how screwed up humanity is -- how does that compute? And don't even get me started about Tim Drake (who's not even in this book but was taken anyway in the Bat-books). And then it turns out the big bad is manipulated by an even bigger bad? Yawn.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Trey

    Far too long for the amount of action covered in this story. We finally learn who Mr. Oz is, and he tries to convince Superman that the humans of Earth will always choose evil over good, that they are not deserving of his presence, and that Earth is doomed anyway, so he better abandon the planet. If you know anything about Superman, that's not going to work on him, so the amount of time spent treading water is inordinate. I received a preview copy of this book from NetGalley.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Garrett

    I have only been half-assedly participating in DC's Rebirth/Doomsday Clock/Here Comes Dr. Fuckin' Manhattan EVENT, so there's probably some emotional impact from the reveal of this I missed out on, but I enjoyed reading Jurgens back on Superman, and overall, thought this, while not particularly special in any way, was a pretty solid Superman comic, and touched on real world concerns and events while providing ample character-building space.

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