Hot Best Seller

The Reading Cure: How Books Restored My Appetite

Availability: Ready to download

At the age of fourteen, Laura Freeman was diagnosed with anorexia. She had seized the one aspect of her life that she seemed able to control, and struck different foods from her diet one by one until she was starving. But even at her lowest point, the one appetite she never lost was her love of reading. As Laura battled her anorexia, she gradually re-discovered how to enjoy At the age of fourteen, Laura Freeman was diagnosed with anorexia. She had seized the one aspect of her life that she seemed able to control, and struck different foods from her diet one by one until she was starving. But even at her lowest point, the one appetite she never lost was her love of reading. As Laura battled her anorexia, she gradually re-discovered how to enjoy food - and life more broadly - through literature. Plum puddings and pottles of fruit in Dickens gave her courage to try new dishes; the wounded Robert Graves' appreciation of a pair of greengages changed the way she thought about plenty and choice; Virginia Woolf's painterly descriptions of bread, blackberries and biscuits were infinitely tempting. Book by book, meal by meal, Laura developed an appetite and discovered an entire library of reasons to live. The Reading Cure is a beautiful, inspiring account of hunger and happiness, about addiction, obsession and recovery, and about the way literature and food can restore appetite and renew hope.


Compare

At the age of fourteen, Laura Freeman was diagnosed with anorexia. She had seized the one aspect of her life that she seemed able to control, and struck different foods from her diet one by one until she was starving. But even at her lowest point, the one appetite she never lost was her love of reading. As Laura battled her anorexia, she gradually re-discovered how to enjoy At the age of fourteen, Laura Freeman was diagnosed with anorexia. She had seized the one aspect of her life that she seemed able to control, and struck different foods from her diet one by one until she was starving. But even at her lowest point, the one appetite she never lost was her love of reading. As Laura battled her anorexia, she gradually re-discovered how to enjoy food - and life more broadly - through literature. Plum puddings and pottles of fruit in Dickens gave her courage to try new dishes; the wounded Robert Graves' appreciation of a pair of greengages changed the way she thought about plenty and choice; Virginia Woolf's painterly descriptions of bread, blackberries and biscuits were infinitely tempting. Book by book, meal by meal, Laura developed an appetite and discovered an entire library of reasons to live. The Reading Cure is a beautiful, inspiring account of hunger and happiness, about addiction, obsession and recovery, and about the way literature and food can restore appetite and renew hope.

30 review for The Reading Cure: How Books Restored My Appetite

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    A debut memoir with food, medical and literary themes and a bibliotherapy-affirming title – this book ticks a whole lot of boxes for me. The very day I saw it mentioned on Twitter I requested a copy, and it was a warming, cozy read for the dark days of late December. As a teenager, freelance journalist Laura Freeman suffered from anorexia, and ever since she has struggled to regain a healthy relationship with food. This is decidedly not an anorexia memoir; if that’s what you’re looking for, you’ A debut memoir with food, medical and literary themes and a bibliotherapy-affirming title – this book ticks a whole lot of boxes for me. The very day I saw it mentioned on Twitter I requested a copy, and it was a warming, cozy read for the dark days of late December. As a teenager, freelance journalist Laura Freeman suffered from anorexia, and ever since she has struggled to regain a healthy relationship with food. This is decidedly not an anorexia memoir; if that’s what you’re looking for, you’ll want to pick up Nancy Tucker’s grueling but inventive The Time in Between. Instead, it’s about the lifelong joy of reading and how books have helped Freeman in the years that she has been haltingly recovering a joy of eating. If asked to name a favorite food, Freeman writes that it would be porridge – or, if she was really pressed, perhaps her mother’s roast chicken dinner. But it’s been so long since she’s thought of food in terms of pleasure that written accounts of feasting from the likes of M.F.K. Fisher or Parson Woodforde might as well be written in a foreign language. When in 2012 she decided to read the whole of Charles Dickens’s oeuvre in his bicentenary year, she was struck afresh by the delight his characters take in meals. While I was reading Dickens something changed. I didn’t want to be on the outside, looking at pictures, tasting recipes at one remove, seeing the last muffin go to someone else. I began to want to want food. To share it, savour it, to have it without guilt. This nascent desire for a broader and more sumptuous food repertoire fuels the author through her voracious reading: of war writers like Siegfried Sassoon and Robert Graves with their boiled eggs and cocoa; of travel writers Laurie Lee and Patrick Leigh Fermor and their enthusiastic acceptance of whatever food came their way on treks; and of rediscovered favorite children’s books from The Secret Garden through the Harry Potter series with the characters’ greedy appetite for sweets. Other chapters are devoted to Virginia Woolf, whose depression and food issues especially resonate for Freeman; food writers; famous gluttons; and the specific challenge of chocolate, which she can’t yet bring herself to sample because it’s “so tangled up in my mind with ideas of sin, greed and loss of control.” It’s these psychological and emotional aspects of food that Freeman is so good at capturing. She recognizes a tendency to all-or-nothing thinking that makes her prey to clean eating fads and exclusion diets. Today she still works to stifle the voices that tell her she’ll never be well and she doesn’t deserve to eat; she also tries to block out society’s contradictory messages about fat versus thin, healthy versus unhealthy, this diet versus that one. Channeling Dickens, she advises, “Don’t make a Marshalsea prison of rules for yourself – no biscuits at tea, no meat in the week, no pudding, not ever. Don’t trap yourself in lonely habits.” Freeman’s taste in both food and literature seems a trifle old-fashioned, leaning towards jolly ol’ English stuff, but that’s because this is about comfort reading as much as it is about rediscovering comfort eating. Her memoir delicately balances optimism with reality, and encourages us to take another look at the books we love and really notice all those food scenes. Maybe our favorite writers have been teaching us how to eat well all along. Originally published on my blog, Bookish Beck.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Idarah

    "For fifteen years before taking Bevis off the shelf, I had been hungry. Sometimes acutely so, sometimes less, but always going to bed each night empty and cold. For two of those fifteen years, I had been starving." This was a delicious read! Laura Freeman takes us into her confidence, and shows how crippling anorexia was for her, and the years thereafter when she was recovering. A voracious reader from a young age, she read herself well with classics like Dickens, memoirists of WWI, and Virg "For fifteen years before taking Bevis off the shelf, I had been hungry. Sometimes acutely so, sometimes less, but always going to bed each night empty and cold. For two of those fifteen years, I had been starving." This was a delicious read! Laura Freeman takes us into her confidence, and shows how crippling anorexia was for her, and the years thereafter when she was recovering. A voracious reader from a young age, she read herself well with classics like Dickens, memoirists of WWI, and Virginia Woolf's fictitious meals and diary entries. I've never made it through a Dickens novel; I've attempted David Copperfield and Oliver Twist at various stages of my life, and all unsuccessfully. Freeman went through all of his works in one year, looking for solace, comfort and appetite in the meals he wrote about and the characters that ate with such gusto. She even goes back to reading children's classics that feature healthy relationships with food like The Wind in the Willows and Swallows and Amazons. Honestly, most of the books mentioned were books I haven't read yet. My To-Be-Read pile grew by a foot, and I can't wait to dive into them! The authors I'm most excited to read are food writers M.F.K. Fisher and Elizabeth David (authors I'm familiar with already). Unknown authors to me were travel writers like Patrick Leigh Fermor and Laurie Lee's autobiographical books about his walking travels after leaving Britain. "Paddy's happy, effortless eating is perfected in Mani: Travels in the Southern Peloponnese. At Kalamata in midsummer, with his girlfriend Joan and friend Xan Fielding, Paddy sits down to dinner above the quayside flagstones that throw back the heat like a casserole with the lid off. They step fully dressed into the sea and carry their table a few yards out, then three chairs. They sit up to their waists in cool water: The waiter, arriving a moment later, gazed with surprise at the empty space on the quay; then, observing us with a quickly-masked flicker of pleasure, he stepped unhesitatingly into the sea, advanced waist deep with a butler's gravity, and, saying nothing more than 'Dinner-time', placed our meal before us—three beautifully grilled kephali, piping hot, and with their golden brown scales sparkling. To enjoy their marine flavour to the utmost, we dipped each by its tail for a second into the sea at our elbows." Now that is mindful eating! I'm determined to work my way through all of Fermor's books! Not to be outdone, Woolf gets her own chapter! It was one of the most insightful and moving ones in the book. I've yet to read any Woolf, but she moved me so much! "While Woolf has been the most extraordinary consolation—and no other writer has so helped me make sense of my own mind, nor offered such a rubric for how I might mend it—she is also a writer who frightens me. For long periods she succeeded in reigning in and stabling her galloping horses, tied them, kept them in hay. For years, she managed it. And this from her 1935 diary, January, when she was fifty-two: 'I wish I could find some way of composing my mind—It's absurd to let it be ravaged by scenes...On the contrary, it is better to pull on my galoshes & go through the gale to lunch off scrambled eggs & sausages.' That is the remedy to: 'I can't fight any longer.' That is what I hold tight from Virginia Woolf. Galoshes. Courage. On." I'm sitting in a hotel pub in Ireland looking over notes and pages from this book while a feast is laid before me as I write this review. Plenty of local people chatting each other up. It's great. I can't help but think of how much more I appreciate it after this book. It's a fab one. Get your hands on a copy!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    At the young age of fourteen, Laura Freeman was diagnosed with anorexia. Where everyone saw a really thin girl with almost transparent skin, she saw something utterly different in the reflection in the mirror. It was the culmination of months of avoiding certain foods, before almost stopping eating completely until she reached the point where she was starving to death. While she let very little pass her lips in the form of nourishment, she still devoured books, and it was literature that was to At the young age of fourteen, Laura Freeman was diagnosed with anorexia. Where everyone saw a really thin girl with almost transparent skin, she saw something utterly different in the reflection in the mirror. It was the culmination of months of avoiding certain foods, before almost stopping eating completely until she reached the point where she was starving to death. While she let very little pass her lips in the form of nourishment, she still devoured books, and it was literature that was to hold the key to her recovery. The road to recovery for an anorexic is long and fraught and it was no different for Laura, but where others just had the mental battle, she had the extra support from the books she was reading. In between the covers of Dickens, Sassoon, Woolf, Lee and Leigh Fermor, she would discover how they were able to consume vast plates full of roast beef, bowls of soup and exotic sounding breads without a care in the world. She reads of soldiers who treasure the moment of a scalding hot cup of tea after an intense battle in World War One. In fact, what she discovered was that these authors loved food; they reveled in the taste of what they were eating and sharing the moment with others. These passages in the books, slowly gave her the confidence to rediscover food for the pleasure of eating it rather than purely as a fuel. Even though her mind had driven her to the point of abhorring food, one thing that she never lost was her love of reading. Most people do not realise just how debilitating anorexia is and there is some painful moments in here as she recalls the lowest points of her illness. But there are the moments too, where she is sustained by her mother's love, an invitation from a friend that arrived at just the right moment. I have read a fair number of the books that Laura talks about in here and whilst the eating and celebration of life between friends and strangers is a key part of them, it is not something that particularly stood out for me, until now. Just reading the descriptions quoted in the book made me very hungry! However, it did for Laura and this list of childhood favourites and other classics has played a crucial role in her accepting that food is not something to avoid and can be enjoyed.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    This memoir is at once lovely and disturbing. Freeman writes with unwavering honesty about her illness, and in doing so, gives a real insight into what it is like when your mind is not your own. Such a narrative has the potential to be immensely bleak; overwhelming. This instead, is balanced. It is as much a story of a lengthy battle against an unrelenting illness, as it is a love letter to books and reading. It is a reminder that when the world fails us, when our minds fail us, there is always This memoir is at once lovely and disturbing. Freeman writes with unwavering honesty about her illness, and in doing so, gives a real insight into what it is like when your mind is not your own. Such a narrative has the potential to be immensely bleak; overwhelming. This instead, is balanced. It is as much a story of a lengthy battle against an unrelenting illness, as it is a love letter to books and reading. It is a reminder that when the world fails us, when our minds fail us, there is always solace and healing to be found in books.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lauralai

    ‘Anorexia tells you that you cannot eat, that you do not deserve, that you may not have or hope for. It tells you that you are worthless. It’s a way of thinking that is hard to break.’ In ‘The Reading Cure’ Laura tells us the story of her long ongoing battle with anorexia and how getting back into reading the works of Dickens, Woolf, Rowling and more inspired her to find a love, joy, want and passion for food. This book hit home. I’ve dealt with anorexia for three years now and never have I had ‘Anorexia tells you that you cannot eat, that you do not deserve, that you may not have or hope for. It tells you that you are worthless. It’s a way of thinking that is hard to break.’ In ‘The Reading Cure’ Laura tells us the story of her long ongoing battle with anorexia and how getting back into reading the works of Dickens, Woolf, Rowling and more inspired her to find a love, joy, want and passion for food. This book hit home. I’ve dealt with anorexia for three years now and never have I had someone understand my thoughts so clearly as Laura Freeman does. The restriction, the lack of energy, the jealousy, the torment of the voices in your head. I want to thank her for making me feel less alone. I am now at a much healthier place, mentally and physically. I only had one problem with this book which I feel the need to explain. Eating plant-based is the only thing that has kept me alive after slowly recovering from anorexia. In Freeman’s world, chicken, butter and ‘real’ milk are good and lentils, hummus, avocados and other foods considered ‘healthy’ are bad. I am not depriving myself by not eating roast beef and cheese toasties. I eat a wide variety of foods and they are all, if I do say so myself, bloody delicious. ‘This isn’t food. This is freakery.’ Eating healthy alternatives and trying to avoid meat and dairy is not absurd. Trying to boost your immune system and overall health by eating clean foods isn’t dramatic and a plant-based diet does not have to be strict and depriving. These comments which were dropped relentlessly throughout the book came across as a bit ignorant to me. These constant insults didn’t ruin my reading experience, they just pissed me off and felt unnecessary in order to get her points across. It’s clear to me that Laura Freeman had extremely well meaning intentions with this book, and overall I really enjoyed it and related to it a lot - let’s just say I cried more than once!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Felicity

    I picked this up on a whim in Waterstones Piccadilly and am so glad I did. I love books about books if they are well written and this book made me aware of the numerous feasts in literature. Laura Freeman started to suffer from anorexia at the age of 13 and at the age of 30 she can't quite manage to try chocolate as she is worried she will lose all control and not stop eating. I found her story about her illness interesting as instead of a book about the initial diagnosis and that difficult time, I picked this up on a whim in Waterstones Piccadilly and am so glad I did. I love books about books if they are well written and this book made me aware of the numerous feasts in literature. Laura Freeman started to suffer from anorexia at the age of 13 and at the age of 30 she can't quite manage to try chocolate as she is worried she will lose all control and not stop eating. I found her story about her illness interesting as instead of a book about the initial diagnosis and that difficult time, you have a book which focuses on her recovery over a long period of time. Freeman was very honest about how she heard voices and how she still can't eat like normal people. She has always been an avid reader and literature helped her get over a lot of food fears. Oddly after I bought the book I found out a student has been diagnosed with anorexia! Freeman has educated me further about anorexia and has inspired to read Virginia Woolf and many other writers I had never heard of. A well crafted and interesting book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    At the age of fourteen, Laura Freeman was diagnosed with anorexia. The Only joy in her life is her love of books when she is bedridden we meet the authors whom help her get through this difficult time and help her look at food in a new way. This was a very moving read and the author shared every up hill battle she had when it came to eating and how to this day it still a fight she faces. I loved how Virginia Woolf own struggles with food came up and how the author found a kindred soul in Virginia, At the age of fourteen, Laura Freeman was diagnosed with anorexia. The Only joy in her life is her love of books when she is bedridden we meet the authors whom help her get through this difficult time and help her look at food in a new way. This was a very moving read and the author shared every up hill battle she had when it came to eating and how to this day it still a fight she faces. I loved how Virginia Woolf own struggles with food came up and how the author found a kindred soul in Virginia, I would like to read Virginia Woolf letters. I have read some of Charlies Dickson books but love the idea of take a year to read them all. This was a book for anyone whom has struggles in life to show them that you can get through it in time and you will have good days and bad but keep pushing forward and hopeful one day you will find some happiness again.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Beth Bonini

    “What I have found in reading isn’t a dictionary of foodstuffs - A is for apple amber, B is for beautiful soup, C is for cheese on toast - but a whole library of reasons to eat, share, live, to want to be well.” Laura Freeman is a self-confessed ‘glutton’ for books, and she makes an eloquent case for the ways in which reading - and specific writers - have taught her to eat enough to not just live, but take pleasure in living. Having starved herself through most of her adolescence - and having spe “What I have found in reading isn’t a dictionary of foodstuffs - A is for apple amber, B is for beautiful soup, C is for cheese on toast - but a whole library of reasons to eat, share, live, to want to be well.” Laura Freeman is a self-confessed ‘glutton’ for books, and she makes an eloquent case for the ways in which reading - and specific writers - have taught her to eat enough to not just live, but take pleasure in living. Having starved herself through most of her adolescence - and having spent at least one year of that time bed-bound - Freeman’s grip on life was shaky in the extreme. Books became a way of connecting to a sane world, a joyous world, at the very least a different world. First of all, books were a way of escaping from her own dangerous mind; later, they became a potent form of ‘deprogramming’ the dangerous messages that anorexia had carved into her psyche. As she read her way through all of Dickens, through the World War I poets and memoirists, through food writers like M.F.K. Fisher and Elizabeth David, through travel writers like Laurie Lee and Patrick Leigh Fermor, through Virginia Woolf, through beloved childhood classics, through Harry Potter, Freeman began to reconnect the idea of food with pleasure, with health, with strength, with energy, with kindness and generosity, with recovery from illness. Gradually, mostly tentatively, but sometimes with ‘zest’, she began to eat enough to enjoy life again. I’ve always believed that reading is solace, escape, mental stimulation and emotional succour - and Freeman’s joy in words, and her own great talent for deploying them, make a pleasure out of reading what is at times quite painful. Although Freeman is definitely more comfortable with feelings couched in metaphors, and cravings and greediness at a literary remove, she manages moments of piercing honesty about the self-flagellating mental tortures of anorexia. She describes the irrational, starved mind as both a gibbering ‘Jabberwock’ and a smashed library. If you have never experienced an eating disorder, and cannot understand why someone who is starving ‘just won’t eat’, then perhaps you will glean some insight into this torturous, self-punishing state of mind. If you have suffered from anorexia, or have been a first-hand witness at that battle, then this book may stir up moments of intense recognition and emotional discomfort. In the Epilogue, particularly, my throat kept catching with choked-back tears. I think it is partly because one senses how strong a grip the disease still has on Laura Freeman, for all that she will now (occasionally) permit herself eggs or butter or a small ice cream. Her struggle is so present and ongoing, despite the great distance she has travelled in her recovery. At the very least, this memoir will probably make you want to wallow in a great many books. 4.5 stars ”Reading has also given me spells to say under my breath, charms against Jabberwock voices. Galoshes. Courage. Good supper. Strong Tea. Learning something. Learn how the world works and what wags it. On.”

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sophy H

    3.5 stars What I liked about this book, as the author herself points out, is that usually stories of eating disorder "survivors" end when the individual "recovers" from their "struggle period"; whereas here, the whole of the story concentrates on the ongoing after-struggle and the tools used to cope then. I use inverted commas above entirely unpretentiously, as survivor, recovery and struggle can't ever really encompass what those with eating disorders experience, and its never that cut and dried 3.5 stars What I liked about this book, as the author herself points out, is that usually stories of eating disorder "survivors" end when the individual "recovers" from their "struggle period"; whereas here, the whole of the story concentrates on the ongoing after-struggle and the tools used to cope then. I use inverted commas above entirely unpretentiously, as survivor, recovery and struggle can't ever really encompass what those with eating disorders experience, and its never that cut and dried. I like the way Laura describes how every meal and every experience with food will always be a grapple of some sort, but the books she has read, the pages she has immersed herself in, and characters she has met upon the many pages have strengthened her resolve somewhat in the scuffle. Her writing is not astounding or groundbreaking, more homely and truthful. Some phrases which stood out for me were:- "..........there is redemption in reading." (so true) (about her mum) "....She wanted only for me to have enough energy to read books, go to school, .... to have friends, .....to visit galleries, to sketch, to walk in the park, travel abroad, to have a life worth living." "I may bankrupt myself, the shelves may buckle, but I could never be sated, never be too fat, full, gorged with books." (hear hear) Whatever the ailment, reading is always the cure.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mahala

    I cried so much reading this book. I have never had anorexia, but I have lived with this blistering loneliness, the isolation that comes with knowing your problems are eating you alive and yet don’t seem worth treating or even talking about. I’ve known the feeling of not having earned my existence, of denying myself sleep or the next meal unless I met whatever task I’d set for myself. Laura is so graphic in her deprivations, of simmering a chicken sliver in drops of stock, nibbling cereal bars i I cried so much reading this book. I have never had anorexia, but I have lived with this blistering loneliness, the isolation that comes with knowing your problems are eating you alive and yet don’t seem worth treating or even talking about. I’ve known the feeling of not having earned my existence, of denying myself sleep or the next meal unless I met whatever task I’d set for myself. Laura is so graphic in her deprivations, of simmering a chicken sliver in drops of stock, nibbling cereal bars in Italy etc, but what hits the reader like a punch to the gut is the shrinking of her heart as she starves herself, her yammering ‘Jabberwock’ that steals our breath. The flip side is the food she finally grants herself and the way she relives the books that inspire her appetite. Roast per Dickens, butter via Mary Fisher, the potatoes of wartime poets - they draw her out of her cave. The children’s book section was my favourite - I read the Secret Garden’s classic line ‘How does tha’ like thysel’?’ and my heart leapt. This book looks quiet and literary, another biography about a writer’s life in books. Don’t let that fool you. This book is a RIDE.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kaisha

    An excellent memoir on illness, reading and food. I was expecting to “like” this book as it is about food and books (big fans of those, I am) what I didn’t expect was to “love” this book. What a thoughtful, honest and talented writer Laura Freeman is.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Thelastwordreview

    Laura Freeman is a freelance writer and has written for magazines and newspapers such as The Spectator, Standpoint, The Times, TLS, and Slightly Foxed to name but a few. Laura has recently released her first book and what a read this really turned out to be. Not hard to see why I have always enjoyed reading Laura’s writing. The Reading Cure: How Books Restored my Appetite is a memoir. Laura at the age of fourteen was diagnosed anorexia and his is her story, a journey of how books and reading hel Laura Freeman is a freelance writer and has written for magazines and newspapers such as The Spectator, Standpoint, The Times, TLS, and Slightly Foxed to name but a few. Laura has recently released her first book and what a read this really turned out to be. Not hard to see why I have always enjoyed reading Laura’s writing. The Reading Cure: How Books Restored my Appetite is a memoir. Laura at the age of fourteen was diagnosed anorexia and his is her story, a journey of how books and reading helped her on her road to recovery. I know at first hand as a family member suffered from anorexia for many years with little or no help apart from the love of her family around her. For Laura Freeman like all who have suffered from anorexia, they come to loathe themselves and will avoid eating and any situations that will involve food. For more than fifteen years Freeman has been a recovering from this dreadful illness. There was one part of Freeman’s life that she continued to enjoy and that was her love of literature and through reading she discovered food and learned to start enjoying food through the pages of her favourite books. The journey to recovery is never an easy journey to take and not always a successful one as she writes in her memoir. After spells in hospital and various treatment programmes she read Siegfried Sassoon’s Memoirs of a Fox Hunting Man and this tells of him devouring boiled eggs and cocoa. So this was the beginning of the road to recovery for Laura Freeman. Then she progressed onto Dickens and we all know of how well food is talked of in Dicken’s novels. From here she clearly could see that there was a better life to be had. Freeman writes just beautifully and it is inspiring. She openly talks of her younger life and how her anorexia started and the chaos that her life became, her descriptions of food are just bountiful that you can almost taste the fare on offer. Freeman’s joy of literature and reading is there to be enjoyed and to rejoice at. The optimism of how she copes on her journey is just breathtaking. This is her story of hunger and also obsession, there is happiness here to. The Reading Cure is a brave account of her recovery. Books and reading can cure. Here is the proof if it was ever needed moving and evocative. Delighted to recommend The Reading Cure by Laura Freeman. 272 Pages.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    Did not finish. Very boring and fails to make connection between how the books actually made the impact to her life which would expand her "cure" to other people more effectively if that was the goal of writing such a book. Did not finish. Very boring and fails to make connection between how the books actually made the impact to her life which would expand her "cure" to other people more effectively if that was the goal of writing such a book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Owen Townend

    I know very little about anorexia so the prospect of learning through the medium of literature seemed very attractive to me. That being said I only really benefited from Freeman's personal experiences as this is more of a memoir than a formal guide to the disease (by the author's own testament). She has managed to make reading a ballast through the tougher days of her condition: something for her to aspire to. She reads about Dickensian meals with great relish and feels a strong affinity with Vir I know very little about anorexia so the prospect of learning through the medium of literature seemed very attractive to me. That being said I only really benefited from Freeman's personal experiences as this is more of a memoir than a formal guide to the disease (by the author's own testament). She has managed to make reading a ballast through the tougher days of her condition: something for her to aspire to. She reads about Dickensian meals with great relish and feels a strong affinity with Virginia Woolf's thoughts on depression. Indeed Freeman's taste in literature appears to be mostly classic in nature. Most of the authors and titles featured have, of course, stood the test of time and can certainly be heartening but I still came away feeling that this all was a very cultured middle-class approach to treating anorexia and therefore potentially isolating to those with the disease that have not had the same opportunities as Freeman. While she is honest about controversial aspects of the disease and goes into some detail about her own support network, I did find myself wanting to know more about her daily experiences. Discussions of food in literature may have initially been the main draw for me but I soon craved to know more about her relationships and memorable incidents where she triumphed over the voice in her head telling her not to eat. By the last page, I felt like I only knew so much about Freeman's struggle and admired her enough to want to know much more. As such I am loathe to recommend The Reading Cure to those seeking to learn about anorexia. In fact I believe this would be a much more rewarding read for those who have started formal treatment and are looking for extra support. Also, if you are hungry for chapter essays on the delicious dishes of English Literature past, this might prove a book to devour.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rachana Hegde

    This book is a tremendous gift. There was something deeply satisfying about sitting down to read this with hot cups of oat milk and dark chocolate or with a dinner of warm pasta drowned in Parmesan cheese and white sauce. It was the reference to the Edge Chronicles and the harvests from the Deepwoods that finally brought on a wave of nostalgia. I had read that series years ago craving earth apples and delberries. I was obsessed with the escape it gave me as a kid. It's hard to explain what this This book is a tremendous gift. There was something deeply satisfying about sitting down to read this with hot cups of oat milk and dark chocolate or with a dinner of warm pasta drowned in Parmesan cheese and white sauce. It was the reference to the Edge Chronicles and the harvests from the Deepwoods that finally brought on a wave of nostalgia. I had read that series years ago craving earth apples and delberries. I was obsessed with the escape it gave me as a kid. It's hard to explain what this book means to me – how much it hurt to read this and how grateful I am to know I'm not alone in what I've experienced. And there are so many beautiful, wonderful quotes in here – quotes that gave me courage to face my own demons: 'This is what Mum had tried to tell me. That eating would allow me to pursue the things I loved.' 'She wanted only for me to have enough energy to read books, go to school, then to university, to have friends...to sketch, to walk in the park, travel abroad, to have a life worth living.' 'When I read, when I walk, when I am taken out of myself I am quiet, my mind is steady.'

  16. 4 out of 5

    Joanne Watson

    An utterly incredible book for so many reasons - the strength and bravery of the author to write such an honest book, the power of mother love, the insightful description of living with anorexia (evidence that the person best placed to understand their mental illness is indeed the individual themselves) and the power of books to teach and heal. This book had me in tears at Laura's despair and saying 'well done' to her when she defeated her Jabberwock in an internal battle and allowed herself to An utterly incredible book for so many reasons - the strength and bravery of the author to write such an honest book, the power of mother love, the insightful description of living with anorexia (evidence that the person best placed to understand their mental illness is indeed the individual themselves) and the power of books to teach and heal. This book had me in tears at Laura's despair and saying 'well done' to her when she defeated her Jabberwock in an internal battle and allowed herself to eat something previously forbidden. Such an amazing book and an ode to the wonderfulness of food.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nik

    Eating disorders are hard to explain to people. This book does a pretty good job of describing the hell that is experiencing it and the ongoing, slow process of "recovery" - not really a road, more like trying to find your way through a forest. And learning to love eating again is often the hardest part. This isn't a hold-your-hands #blessed sort of a book. This is an honest book. Although it does come off as a bit pretentious sometimes, the narrator is self-aware enough to understand her own fai Eating disorders are hard to explain to people. This book does a pretty good job of describing the hell that is experiencing it and the ongoing, slow process of "recovery" - not really a road, more like trying to find your way through a forest. And learning to love eating again is often the hardest part. This isn't a hold-your-hands #blessed sort of a book. This is an honest book. Although it does come off as a bit pretentious sometimes, the narrator is self-aware enough to understand her own failings and the impact her eating disorder has on her family, especially her mother.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    'The Reading Cure: How Books Restored My Appetite' is a memoir written by Laura Freeman. Given that this is a book that explains how the author helped overcome an eating disorder by reading about food, initially I found the title concerning. Declaring anything a ‘cure’ has a couple of unfortunate associations: it makes it sound like a self-help manual, or some bit of nineteenth-century quackery (‘water cures’, etc). I was worried that the book would try to end by pressing its method on the reade 'The Reading Cure: How Books Restored My Appetite' is a memoir written by Laura Freeman. Given that this is a book that explains how the author helped overcome an eating disorder by reading about food, initially I found the title concerning. Declaring anything a ‘cure’ has a couple of unfortunate associations: it makes it sound like a self-help manual, or some bit of nineteenth-century quackery (‘water cures’, etc). I was worried that the book would try to end by pressing its method on the reader. The media is flooded with cheap self-care solutions as a substitute for real treatment of mental health problems, and too often this becomes a way of transferring responsibility onto the shoulders of the sufferer. For young people today, breathing exercises and dietary hygiene are sometimes talked about as if they were a substitute for decent working conditions or access to healthcare. Happily, this book does nothing of the kind. In spite of the title, it never actually suggests that one could ‘cure’ anorexia via mouth-watering descriptions of food. Instead, it provides an appreciative survey of food in literature with reflections as to how the books mentioned became a part of the author’s life. Though reading did help with Freeman’s anorexia, there’s no attempt to turn this into a system, or to look at it through the lens of psychology or psychotherapy — and for that I was grateful. It makes no great claims. It is simply a considered expression of what worked for the author. Dickens is perhaps the keystone here. All the others matter, but it is to him the author returns again and again. There are two aspects to this: the lush, plentiful, homely descriptions of food and drink in his novels; but also the scenes of penury, both accidental and deliberate. Early on, Freeman is especially repulsed by those characters (so common in Dickens) who indulge themselves while deliberately depriving others. An important realisation comes when she realises that anorexia has a way of turning herself into one of those mean-spirited souls, with that same selfishness both created by and inflicted upon herself. How much better to be one of the good and the kind — the eaters, the sharers. There’s a brisk streak of Britishness — mostly Englishness — that runs through this book. From Dickens to the poets of the First World War through to Laurie Lee and Patrick Leigh Fermor, most of the writers cited are part of a fairly familiar old school Eng Lit canon. Their names exude a certain sort of small-c conservative establishment quality. There’s nothing here to scare the horses. Rabelais is mentioned only because the author finds him repulsive. Virginia Woolf is the closest we get to modernism, and even then Freeman is initially only preoccupied with her diaries and letters; the novels come later. She admits to a certain tendency towards male voices in her writing, with a few notable exceptions (like the great American food writer MFK Fisher). For the most part there is a great deal of manly men eating manly food. ‘Niminy-piminy’ — a contemptuous descriptor for a certain effeminate primness — is frequently invoked, with a certain self-consciousness, as the antithesis of everything good here. But if the book has a good deal to say about the gendered implications of its taste in food, it has little to say about the question of class. A couple of observations are offered: that it is often the poorest characters in Dickens who are also the most generous; and that so many of the writers she quotes weren’t cooks themselves, but had their meals cooked for them. Not much is made of either of these aspects. Eating as a necessary daily act is barely present here; eating anything is always special, always rarified. There is no sense of food as anything else. There’s a part of me which thinks perhaps this is always how we ought to think about food. But it seems irresponsible to forget that for many people, cooking is work first; and if we think about cooking as only the means to a delightful end, that might lead us towards thinking the work doesn’t deserve to be recognised as such. Cooking is only a small part of the pleasurable dynamic of eating in this book — it’s there, but it isn’t the main course (so to speak). If the book has a thesis you could summarise it as follows: that the generous eating of wholesome foods is a good in itself, but it’s best considered as a preparation for work to come. Eating not just for the experience of eating, but eating as a means of fortification, consolidation, restoration, before embarking on some noble labour. There is something disquieting in this. It isn’t so much that I disagree — my own feelings about it are more or less the same, up to and including a certain contempt for the ‘clean eating’ movement — but it is difficult to shake the sense of a conservative work ethic looming behind it all. If you want to work, you must eat, and vice-versa; gluttony as a relation of laziness is to be deplored. What if one person can’t work as hard as another – do they not get to eat as much? It’s an intense way of characterising food which seems like an evolution of those thoughts which prompted the original disorder: that every bite must in some sense have its final justification. But perhaps this is the only way to live with such thoughts. If you can’t get rid of them, you might as well turn them into something with which it is possible to live.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ginny

    "If you know yourself to be subject to irrational glooms and torments, if your mind cannot be trusted to be even and sensible, it is critical, it is life-saving to find some ruse, some sympathetic medicine to keep you going. When I read, when I walk, when I am taken out of myself I am quiet, my mind is steady. When I am walking, when I am reading, I do not feel that I am mad." This book is gorgeous. I devoured it in a couple of sittings. I found so much to relate to in Laura Freeman's 'The Readin "If you know yourself to be subject to irrational glooms and torments, if your mind cannot be trusted to be even and sensible, it is critical, it is life-saving to find some ruse, some sympathetic medicine to keep you going. When I read, when I walk, when I am taken out of myself I am quiet, my mind is steady. When I am walking, when I am reading, I do not feel that I am mad." This book is gorgeous. I devoured it in a couple of sittings. I found so much to relate to in Laura Freeman's 'The Reading Cure', books have definitely helped me to stay sane over the years. A voracious reader, Freeman takes us through her recovery from anorexia by chronicling the books that she's read, from 14 up to the age of 30- noting in particular the glorious descriptions of food that reignited a curiosity and desire to eat. Books in Freeman's case were quite literally life-saving. We are taken through books such as 'The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe', 'Alice in Wonderland', the Harry Potter series, 'Charlie and the Chocolate Factory' T.H.White's 'The One and Future King', the works of Charles Dickens and Virginia Woolf, as examples. I found myself writing down a list of classics I need to get around to reading. Although the focus here is on how books helped Freeman recover from anorexia, I believe this could be applied to any mental health issue. 'Cure' is a dangerous word to use though, as recovery will always be an ongoing process with other factors involved. Freeman says herself, she is still unable to touch chocolate no matter how many books with a chocolate theme she reads. Highly recommend to bibliophiles, and anyone with an interest in mental health issues or looking to understand anorexia nervosa. "If you remember the words of only one person in this book, let it be Merlyn (from T. H. White's 'The One and Future King'). Learn something. It is the best medicine. It is the only thing that never fails... anything that takes you out of yourself. That is the real magic."

  20. 5 out of 5

    Margaret Martin

    Well written and completely absorbing - unexpected that a detailed pre-occupation with food accompanied unwillingness to eat it. Perhaps another punishment inflicted by the self hate of a disordered brain puritanically rejecting food. The huge range of literacy references was almost overwhelming presenting food as a source of sensory comfort, hope and connection or alternatively the absence of such. Predictable that women feature prominently, although not exclusively, as the providers of this com Well written and completely absorbing - unexpected that a detailed pre-occupation with food accompanied unwillingness to eat it. Perhaps another punishment inflicted by the self hate of a disordered brain puritanically rejecting food. The huge range of literacy references was almost overwhelming presenting food as a source of sensory comfort, hope and connection or alternatively the absence of such. Predictable that women feature prominently, although not exclusively, as the providers of this comfort. Interesting too that the gradual restoration of appetite is linked not so much to factual description of food and its nutritional value but to the emotional references. Processed food, now so widely available, the images of which bombard us incessantly, contributes little to this triggering of the imagination. Perhaps the emotional disconnect with manufactured food contributes to the problem. The references in the book to gluts of home grown produce and the determined effort to make best use of it all - jams, jellies, pies - chimes with the joy of eating our own harvest. The reading cure, evident in the content of the book combined with descriptions of walking, particularly around London, provides threads of hope for the reader that the condition is eventually, with considerable effort, under the writer's control. A brave, personal account that hints of tragic consequences but is written with a lightness of touch that leaves the reader hopeful, safe and inspired to read a lot more books. Given the problems of mental health in western culture, I think this book speaks to a far wider audience than just those experiencing anorexia. Anybody interested in people and books will undoubtedly enjoy this one.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    I have only a layman's (or laywoman's) knowledge of anorexia so this book was an eye-opener into how severe a mental illness it can be. It seemed to me that the author was completely obsessed with food and that seeking out the descriptions of food and eating in the books she read was part of this obsession. For most of us, such descriptions are an incidental and often swiftly forgotten part of the novels we read, although one certainly goes to Elizabeth David for her accounts and recipes of deli I have only a layman's (or laywoman's) knowledge of anorexia so this book was an eye-opener into how severe a mental illness it can be. It seemed to me that the author was completely obsessed with food and that seeking out the descriptions of food and eating in the books she read was part of this obsession. For most of us, such descriptions are an incidental and often swiftly forgotten part of the novels we read, although one certainly goes to Elizabeth David for her accounts and recipes of delicious dishes. I was intrigued to see the very different approach of Freeman. Fortunately the descriptions in the books she reads serve to rouse her curiousity and thereby, very gradually, her appetite as she experiments with some of the dishes or is provoked to reflect on the actual desirability of food and the mistreatment involved in willfully starving oneself. The 'cure' was of some benefit to Freeman, although the potential for regression seems to remain imminent. I am doubtful how efficacious it would be for others less interested in literature. Another book I would suggest to anyone else thinking of following such a cure is Isabel Allende's 'Aphrodite, A memoir of the senses' subtitled 'the love of food and the food of love', which is replete with wonderful accounts of the author's experiences with all types of food. Comments such as: "Like poetry, baking is a rather melancholy vocation, whose primary requirement is free time for the soul. The poet and the baker are brothers in the essential task of nourishing the world," are liable to inspire one to knead dough!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jennie Pease

    *Contains very mild spoilers It seems strange to say I really enjoyed a book that so strongly features anorexia, but this book is primarily about a love of books and how this has provided a framework upon which Laura Freeman has built/is building her recovery. I escaped an unhappy childhood and utterly miserable teen years by reading voraciously, so Freeman's love of books resonated with me. Thankfully I have never suffered with anorexia, but as someone who loves food, eating and books about food *Contains very mild spoilers It seems strange to say I really enjoyed a book that so strongly features anorexia, but this book is primarily about a love of books and how this has provided a framework upon which Laura Freeman has built/is building her recovery. I escaped an unhappy childhood and utterly miserable teen years by reading voraciously, so Freeman's love of books resonated with me. Thankfully I have never suffered with anorexia, but as someone who loves food, eating and books about food, I shared her vicarious and voluptuous enjoyment of food writing. I was willing her on as she would tentatively try an omelette or homemade soup that some book (frequently by Elizabeth David) had discussed. I found her thought on Dickens' writing about food in his novels eye opening. She saw that the Pumblechooks, the Wackford Squeers, the Ralph Nickelbys of Dickens' novels, "bullies and misanthropes" all, were inflicting on others the punishment she was wreaking on her own body. Conversely, Mr Pickwick, Mr Micawber, Peggotty and others give her an initial glimpse of the comfort and joy and even more the companionship and conviviality of food and of sharing it. This is the first step on the long and difficult road of recovery. I say 'Road of recovery' rather than 'to recovery' because it is still very much a work in progress and Freeman may always struggle to some extent with eating and feelings of shame, unworthiness etc. A very moving, yet uplifting and enjoyable book. If you love books too, be prepared to have your wishlists/to-be-read piles to expand exponentially!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Violet Raven

    I'm giving this 5 stars because although I found it particularly difficult in places, it is unique look at long term Anorexia, from an adult perspective, with very little focus on the development of the illness or on treatment and much more on the redevelopment of the self after long illness. This is not a perspective found in any other book I've read thus far. For me it was the only time I've truly been able to connect with the writer on the subject because she can express what it is to have li I'm giving this 5 stars because although I found it particularly difficult in places, it is unique look at long term Anorexia, from an adult perspective, with very little focus on the development of the illness or on treatment and much more on the redevelopment of the self after long illness. This is not a perspective found in any other book I've read thus far. For me it was the only time I've truly been able to connect with the writer on the subject because she can express what it is to have lived half a lifetime with an eating disorder, outwith the context of family or treatment centers, into the half life of 'better' but not 'well'. Be warned, however, it talks about food (in the context of all the books the author read) A LOT. If you are not yet in recovery, or in an early stage this might be overwhelming. As a book about books it's interesting and says much about the completionist nature of an anorexic mind, there is much hope and colour contained within it, and the author's writing style is both engaging and refreshing. Recommended with caution, dependent on your state of wellness and openness to reading many varied and potentially triggering descriptions of foodstuffs alongside the book quotes and introspection.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ana Costa

    Searching for a Natural cure for any form of herpes, contact Dr Okoh  Herbal Home for roots and herbs, he has the remedy for anxiety and depression or Any type of Infection. Contact email him ([email protected]) or you wish to WhatsApp him +2348159907568 ,then thank me laterHow i got cure from herpes virus. I was diagnosed of herpes virus in 2015 and I have tried all I can to get cured but all to no avail, until i saw a post in a health forum about a herbalist man who prepare herbal me Searching for a Natural cure for any form of herpes, contact Dr Okoh  Herbal Home for roots and herbs, he has the remedy for anxiety and depression or Any type of Infection. Contact email him ([email protected]) or you wish to WhatsApp him +2348159907568 ,then thank me laterHow i got cure from herpes virus. I was diagnosed of herpes virus in 2015 and I have tried all I can to get cured but all to no avail, until i saw a post in a health forum about a herbalist man who prepare herbal medication to cure all kind of diseases including herpes virus, at first i doubted if it was real but decided to give it a try, when i contact this herbalist via his email and he prepared a herpes herbal cure and sent it to me via DHL courier shipping company , when i received this herbal cure, he gave me step and instructions on how to apply it, after taking it as instructed, i was totally cured of this deadly disease within 14days of usage, I am now free from the deadly disease called herpes, all thanks to Dr OKOH  for saving my life. Contact this great herbalist via his email:([email protected]) phone number call him or whatsapp : + 2348159907568You can also visit his  website at http://drokohcuringherpes.wixsite.com... 

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kristiana Carrington

    I picked this book up at the library because I like books and food, but not knowing anything about it. I found Laura’s Explanation of how anorexia felt for her very insightful. I also enjoyed her journey of learning to enjoy eating rather than doing it merely to survive. The quotes from various books talking about food add a delightful element to the book. It made me think about how as a country we often reduce food down to calories and what’s bad and good for us rather than enjoying the pleasure I picked this book up at the library because I like books and food, but not knowing anything about it. I found Laura’s Explanation of how anorexia felt for her very insightful. I also enjoyed her journey of learning to enjoy eating rather than doing it merely to survive. The quotes from various books talking about food add a delightful element to the book. It made me think about how as a country we often reduce food down to calories and what’s bad and good for us rather than enjoying the pleasure of eating. My favourite quote is the section where she explains Merlin’s remedy for being sad, “Better that they should say feed your mind. Learn something, read something, see something new: a painting, a church, a bird, a rose garden, a park, a monument, a castle mate white with swans and hidden perch, a muse of hooded merlins, an elephant with ivory tusk and a palanquin on his back. Bhelle your thoughts with the world and what wags it. Plant roses so that thistles may not grow. Be as curious as you were as a child, as curious as the wart, helping himself to Meryln’s breakfast and gasping: oh I love the mustard pot! Where ever did you get it? “

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Bentley

    I am fully aware of the restorative power of good books. I once spent nearly six months bed bound and reading my way through my bookshelf. At the time of reading The Reading Cure I am on a 12 week Coronavirus lockdown and I am consuming books at a rapid pace. So whenever I see books that extol the healing power of reading I will always be drawn to them. What I found with The Reading Cure is a memoir that his heartbreakingly beautiful and a writer – Laura Freeman – who talks about books with such I am fully aware of the restorative power of good books. I once spent nearly six months bed bound and reading my way through my bookshelf. At the time of reading The Reading Cure I am on a 12 week Coronavirus lockdown and I am consuming books at a rapid pace. So whenever I see books that extol the healing power of reading I will always be drawn to them. What I found with The Reading Cure is a memoir that his heartbreakingly beautiful and a writer – Laura Freeman – who talks about books with such passion that I count help but feel compelled to read more about her.  If I am honest, I didn’t know who Laura Freeman was before reading her book but what I found was a vulnerable girl who was fighting a daily battle but also a girl that was winning. It may not seem that she has massive scream from the roof top victories but the victories that she had were very uplifting to read about. After reading The Reading Cure I know I will be paying a lot more attention to the food featured in books. The Reading Cure – How Books Restored My Appetiteby Laura Freeman is available now.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Isabella

    Freeman's story of anorexia is tragic and a little frightening, but to be able to fall in love with food all over again through her eyes was an absolute pleasure. Her book provides a fascinating catalogue of foods throughout a range of literature. Reading about so many other books felt at once nostalgic and adventurous, making me pause constantly to scribble down the title of another book to read later. The food talked about within the book is fabulously warm: exceptional British stodge, foreign Freeman's story of anorexia is tragic and a little frightening, but to be able to fall in love with food all over again through her eyes was an absolute pleasure. Her book provides a fascinating catalogue of foods throughout a range of literature. Reading about so many other books felt at once nostalgic and adventurous, making me pause constantly to scribble down the title of another book to read later. The food talked about within the book is fabulously warm: exceptional British stodge, foreign flairs of taste, playful delicacies, and all manner of comfort. I loved her perspective on why descriptions of certain foods in certain literature spoke to her so deeply: the fuelling power of boiled eggs, the pleasure of a welcome-home meal, the beguile of adventurous eating. This book is a lovely read, and a heartening message to help a lover of food resist the toxic effects of diet culture.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jemima

    This book is a beautifully written masterpiece! The pleasure that Laura takes in books and reading is evident, and delightful because any bookworm can relate to her story - at least of having an appetite for literature. As someone who knew nothing of anorexia, it has also challenged my perceptions of the illness, but I feel it is handled very well here. It neither swamps the book depressingly nor is it forgotten. My favourite part of The Reading Cure was the sumptuous descriptions advocating lon This book is a beautifully written masterpiece! The pleasure that Laura takes in books and reading is evident, and delightful because any bookworm can relate to her story - at least of having an appetite for literature. As someone who knew nothing of anorexia, it has also challenged my perceptions of the illness, but I feel it is handled very well here. It neither swamps the book depressingly nor is it forgotten. My favourite part of The Reading Cure was the sumptuous descriptions advocating long, brisk walks followed by good tea and food and reading by the fire. All the food descriptions stoked my own appetite and Laura’s journey was galvanising to read! I would recommend this book to anyone and everyone! Especially teenagers, and teenage girls in particular. There is a message in this book that I want all my friends to read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lynda

    "I want to write about the solace of reading, and through reading, putting my mind's shelves in order. About restoring my [mind's] library, one book at a time." p14. Laura Freeman is a journalist, and her writing flows easily and directly. She gives insight into her condition of anorexia nervosa, which erupted during her teenage years and waged a terrible war within her chaotic mind. Her long journey to better health (though still not 100%) came about because reading gave her both an escape from "I want to write about the solace of reading, and through reading, putting my mind's shelves in order. About restoring my [mind's] library, one book at a time." p14. Laura Freeman is a journalist, and her writing flows easily and directly. She gives insight into her condition of anorexia nervosa, which erupted during her teenage years and waged a terrible war within her chaotic mind. Her long journey to better health (though still not 100%) came about because reading gave her both an escape from the physical trauma and fatigue of her everyday life, and an insight into the human condition - that she was worthy of regarding herself in a whole better light. The love of family and friends, and the constancy of books and their resonance with her, has enabled Laura to tell a remarkable story of healing and hope.

  30. 4 out of 5

    James

    I can't imagine this was easy to write, and the introductory chapters on the disorder itself were a proper education, much more enlightening than the more lazy elements of the media which point out thin people on magazines. But I could not get into the parts when the literary works were introduced. Partly she read classics, which I generally find less interesting, but mostly because there was too much listing what she'd read about. There was a lot of food, which was fair enough and related to he I can't imagine this was easy to write, and the introductory chapters on the disorder itself were a proper education, much more enlightening than the more lazy elements of the media which point out thin people on magazines. But I could not get into the parts when the literary works were introduced. Partly she read classics, which I generally find less interesting, but mostly because there was too much listing what she'd read about. There was a lot of food, which was fair enough and related to her anorexia, but there were just too many lists and I found it a bit dry. There is a part of me that feels guilty given the subject matter, but I wasn't motivated to get past the first third when it felt like this style was going to be kept for the rest of the journey.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.