Hot Best Seller

The Museum of Lost Art

Availability: Ready to download

True tales of lost art, built around case studies of famous works, their creators, and stories of disappearance and recovery From the bestselling author of The Art of Forgery comes this dynamic narrative that tells the fascinating stories of artworks stolen, looted, or destroyed in war, accidentally demolished or discarded, lost at sea or in natural disasters, or attacked b True tales of lost art, built around case studies of famous works, their creators, and stories of disappearance and recovery From the bestselling author of The Art of Forgery comes this dynamic narrative that tells the fascinating stories of artworks stolen, looted, or destroyed in war, accidentally demolished or discarded, lost at sea or in natural disasters, or attacked by iconoclasts or vandals; works that were intentionally temporal, knowingly destroyed by the artists themselves or their patrons, covered over with paint or plaster, or recycled for their materials. An exciting read that spans the centuries and the continents.


Compare

True tales of lost art, built around case studies of famous works, their creators, and stories of disappearance and recovery From the bestselling author of The Art of Forgery comes this dynamic narrative that tells the fascinating stories of artworks stolen, looted, or destroyed in war, accidentally demolished or discarded, lost at sea or in natural disasters, or attacked b True tales of lost art, built around case studies of famous works, their creators, and stories of disappearance and recovery From the bestselling author of The Art of Forgery comes this dynamic narrative that tells the fascinating stories of artworks stolen, looted, or destroyed in war, accidentally demolished or discarded, lost at sea or in natural disasters, or attacked by iconoclasts or vandals; works that were intentionally temporal, knowingly destroyed by the artists themselves or their patrons, covered over with paint or plaster, or recycled for their materials. An exciting read that spans the centuries and the continents.

30 review for The Museum of Lost Art

  1. 4 out of 5

    Linda Lipko

    This is a wonderful, thoughtful, well-written, and researched book that chronicles some of the lost art of the world. Included is the Colossus of Rhodes, the zodiac water clock at the Old Summer Palace in Beijing, China, the work of art by Alexander Calder titled Bent Propeller, previously destroyed at the bombing of the World Trade Center in New York, NY, paintings stolen from the Isabella Stuart Gardner Museum in Boston, MA, the sacking of Rome in 1527, and the ISIS intentional destruction of This is a wonderful, thoughtful, well-written, and researched book that chronicles some of the lost art of the world. Included is the Colossus of Rhodes, the zodiac water clock at the Old Summer Palace in Beijing, China, the work of art by Alexander Calder titled Bent Propeller, previously destroyed at the bombing of the World Trade Center in New York, NY, paintings stolen from the Isabella Stuart Gardner Museum in Boston, MA, the sacking of Rome in 1527, and the ISIS intentional destruction of the National Museum in Baghdad in 2003. Highly recommended if you are someone who appreciates art.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    The writings of Noah Charney especially in this books can be seen as an interesting overview of art or artifacts that seem to be lost to humanity forever or for a long time. Like the art of forgery before this book it tells such a large amounts of stories that all should be themselves be interesting enough to warrant a complete book on their own. That said probably every bit of history has its own book or larger published paper and probably some or less than easily to read by the average lay per The writings of Noah Charney especially in this books can be seen as an interesting overview of art or artifacts that seem to be lost to humanity forever or for a long time. Like the art of forgery before this book it tells such a large amounts of stories that all should be themselves be interesting enough to warrant a complete book on their own. That said probably every bit of history has its own book or larger published paper and probably some or less than easily to read by the average lay person. In that sense Charney does deliver this popular collection of tales and he does leave it to the reader him/herself if he/she wants to go in-depth with certain subjects as delivered by the writer/presentator. I myself have already read about the monument-men and their role in the recovery of stolen art by the Nazis. In itself the stolen art form WWII does create an interesting chapter and with the families of stolen materials still trying to get it back, I read an article the day after I finished the book about a judicial decision about "stolen" Jewish art. So it is still very much actual today. Anyhow Charney delivers his presentation in the following chapters: Theft - the absolute favorite chapter, who does not love a good heist. War - Interesting how wars always sees people who do know how to get some good stuff accident Iconoclasm & vandalism - learned about a new word and the name ISIS is a very recent billboard for this chapter Acts of God - who are we to discuss with the big guy, anybody remember Pompeii Temporal works - this one was a new one to me Destroyed by his owner - daft buggers Buries & exhumed Lost, or never was? The book and its presentation is clearly fun and lighthearted reading, the illustrations are beautiful and some of the stories were new for me and some were eye-openers. Sure this book is an easy popular presentation of a subject that does call for a certain audience but delivers a story for a much wider audience. If you like visiting musea and artsshows than this book does deliver some extra information and moments of interest. Not very chapter was that interesting for me but I can honestly say that I did learn something new. The book was really enjoyable and a feast to read. It does expand your personal horizon I am sure.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ellen

    The book is a disappointment. I'm a huge Noah Charney fan; I adored "Stealing the Mystic Lamb: The True Story of the World's Most Coveted Masterpiece." That book was thoughtful, complete, detailed. "The Museum of Lost Art" (Phaidon Press Ltd, 2018) is sloppy. Clearly no one looked at the galley because there are problems with spacing as well as sentences where it is evident that editing went on but no one sorted it out at the end. The font choices are bizarre and while the design of the book with The book is a disappointment. I'm a huge Noah Charney fan; I adored "Stealing the Mystic Lamb: The True Story of the World's Most Coveted Masterpiece." That book was thoughtful, complete, detailed. "The Museum of Lost Art" (Phaidon Press Ltd, 2018) is sloppy. Clearly no one looked at the galley because there are problems with spacing as well as sentences where it is evident that editing went on but no one sorted it out at the end. The font choices are bizarre and while the design of the book with colored papers separating each section is attractive, the effect is haphazard. I dunno. Charney ran into some unexpected debts and need fast cash? Charney is capable of weaving a compelling tale but here he jabs at specific works and doesn't bring any of the stories to any kind of conclusion, however literary rather than factual. There wasn't too much material that was unfamiliar to me, as an art historian. So many of the narratives, however, ignore related information. For instance, simply saying that Italian efforts stop because there isn't the money or the governmental will, without mentioning the substantial private efforts in place just shortchanges the reader. It's hard to make a responsible critique of the book as a whole when what I want to do is go through it point by point and complain.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    Truly an excellent read. Much like his 2015 publication (The Art of Forgery), this book is subdivided into categories, in this case, of types of lost art. The distinct division of the book makes it one that is easy to pick up and put down without worrying about losing one’s place in the story. Each chapter tells several anecdotes of lost art which are always entertaining. The historical context and photos that the author provides makes this book accessible to those who do not consider themselves Truly an excellent read. Much like his 2015 publication (The Art of Forgery), this book is subdivided into categories, in this case, of types of lost art. The distinct division of the book makes it one that is easy to pick up and put down without worrying about losing one’s place in the story. Each chapter tells several anecdotes of lost art which are always entertaining. The historical context and photos that the author provides makes this book accessible to those who do not consider themselves art history buffs. Great read overall.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Will Clemmons

    Another oft overlooked part of art history put into story form by a writer (this time Charney) that could have done better in the hands of another. Still fascinating and a recommended read

  6. 5 out of 5

    Susan Ferguson

    Noah Charnet states that all of the art that has been list is more than is curre tly in the world's museums. He looks at art that we know of that has been lost to fire or flood. Some art we know of was destroyed by the buyer or subject. Other art we know of by hearsay, especially renaissance art. Someone was noted to have painted such and such a picture, well described, that has not been seen since. He talks about the looting of artifacts by ISIS and other terrorist groups to obtain money. There Noah Charnet states that all of the art that has been list is more than is curre tly in the world's museums. He looks at art that we know of that has been lost to fire or flood. Some art we know of was destroyed by the buyer or subject. Other art we know of by hearsay, especially renaissance art. Someone was noted to have painted such and such a picture, well described, that has not been seen since. He talks about the looting of artifacts by ISIS and other terrorist groups to obtain money. There is also performance art that was meant to be transient. Stolen art always has a chance of being found again because a piece of art cannot give evidence against the perpetrator (unless it is found in his possession). The author includes pictures of art that has disappeared, some of these are copies of an artwork by students or others. A fascinating look at the disappearance of art and some that has turned up that was thought forever lost. And some art that is only rumored to have existed.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nana

    This is the third of Charney’s ‘pop art history’ books that I’ve read and while it’s a good and interesting topic and has lots of intriguing stories within it, it suffers from the same issue as his previous The Art of Forgery. Namely, never diving that deep into most of the stories he tells here. So you get a great primer on many fascinating stories of lost, destroyed, stolen etc works of art throughout history, but you are left wanting more. But that’s probably the art historian in me, a more l This is the third of Charney’s ‘pop art history’ books that I’ve read and while it’s a good and interesting topic and has lots of intriguing stories within it, it suffers from the same issue as his previous The Art of Forgery. Namely, never diving that deep into most of the stories he tells here. So you get a great primer on many fascinating stories of lost, destroyed, stolen etc works of art throughout history, but you are left wanting more. But that’s probably the art historian in me, a more lay reader would probably be fine with this level of detail; hence four stars. Charney is a poetic and evocative writer and I’m glad he is still continuing this pop art history track with this book even if it is a little shallow.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    Noah Charney’s The Museum of Lost Art is a heavily researched yet entertaining meditation upon the many ways works of art can suffer destruction and go missing (and sometimes be found again). The book is divided into chapters that discuss the various misfortunes that over many centuries have befallen works of art: some caused by man (War, Theft, Iconoclasm & Vandalism), others caused by nature (Accident, Acts of God). Within each chapter, Charney briefly describes specific cases of deliberate an Noah Charney’s The Museum of Lost Art is a heavily researched yet entertaining meditation upon the many ways works of art can suffer destruction and go missing (and sometimes be found again). The book is divided into chapters that discuss the various misfortunes that over many centuries have befallen works of art: some caused by man (War, Theft, Iconoclasm & Vandalism), others caused by nature (Accident, Acts of God). Within each chapter, Charney briefly describes specific cases of deliberate and accidental destruction and loss. Charney’s thesis in this book is that our understanding of the history of art is slanted because of missing links in the chain. Predictably enough, scholars have allowed their conclusions to be swayed by the works that are available to be examined, when sometimes a reasonable case can be made that, where an artist’s reputation or a specific artistic practice is concerned, a work (or works) that no longer exists has had far more impact, but its influence is downplayed or disregarded because it no longer exists or has been lost. The story of lost art is, of course, a fascinating one. Most of us have heard stories on the news of important works being stolen from galleries, or unexpectedly recovered in some fortuitous manner. For example, in 1994, brazenly and in broad daylight, Edvard Munch’s The Scream was stolen from the National Art Museum in Oslo. But hundreds of years earlier, nobody had thought of securing valuable works of art in an institutional setting. Art was owned by royalty or wealthy patrons, and iconic works hung in private parlours and dining rooms with little thought being given to security. Works were routinely lost to theft and fire, or sunk at sea, or looted by invading armies. More tragic yet are works that have been lost or destroyed because of murderous prejudice or a clash of ideologies (ie, Nazi Germany and ISIS). Charney also discusses works that were lost in ancient times and have since been restored through the efforts of archeologists, works deliberately destroyed by the artist who created them, and temporal works, created with the intention that they would not last. The Museum of Lost Art is persuasive and succeeds in engaging the reader in its alternative view of art history. It is also lavishly and beautifully produced and illustrated. It is unfortunate therefore that the text is marred by an astounding number of typographical errors.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

    This is a lovely and fascinating book that attempts to detail the centuries of great art that has been lost to theft, iconoclasm, disasters both natural and man-made, intentional destruction by artists, and the ravages of time. For art lovers especially, this is a bittersweet read; I found myself wishing for a time-traveling Delorean so I could tackle Michelangelo and stop him from burning drawings he deemed imperfect (although I suppose that was his prerogative). I think Charney does an admirab This is a lovely and fascinating book that attempts to detail the centuries of great art that has been lost to theft, iconoclasm, disasters both natural and man-made, intentional destruction by artists, and the ravages of time. For art lovers especially, this is a bittersweet read; I found myself wishing for a time-traveling Delorean so I could tackle Michelangelo and stop him from burning drawings he deemed imperfect (although I suppose that was his prerogative). I think Charney does an admirable job bringing lost art (temporarily) back to life, although he acknowledges that his summary is just the tip of the metaphorical iceberg. Unfortunately the editing is a bit sloppy at times, but I can forgive that in light of the beautiful printed images that are typical of Phaidon publishing. I enjoyed the varied anecdotes and summaries of moments in history that accompanied the description of lost art (i.e. learning about Adam Worth, "the most moral of criminals" and the inspiration for Arthur Conan Doyle's character of Moriarty, the monks of the Alcazar who risked their lives to save a Velazquez masterpiece, the dramatic and at times hilarious history of the first mass-produced pornography in the 16th century).

  10. 4 out of 5

    PoligirlReads

    This book has a funky format, and even funkier editing, but it's a great read. What an interesting concept for a book! It's almost a dangerous thought experiment, in that it's a recipe for losing hours of time just thinking about what treasures might be hoarded somewhere, or what might pop up on Antiques Roadshow. Because he's all about quantity, and because this book would otherwise be 2,000+ pages, Charney only gives an overview of the missing pieces of art and their artists. It's actually quit This book has a funky format, and even funkier editing, but it's a great read. What an interesting concept for a book! It's almost a dangerous thought experiment, in that it's a recipe for losing hours of time just thinking about what treasures might be hoarded somewhere, or what might pop up on Antiques Roadshow. Because he's all about quantity, and because this book would otherwise be 2,000+ pages, Charney only gives an overview of the missing pieces of art and their artists. It's actually quite nice, but it means that I've made all sorts of notes to myself about other topics I'd like to read, like Worth and his Pinkerton counterpart. He raises an interesting question about art that it is only presumed to be lost. The idea that stories about lost art can get lost or augmented in the oral tradition is a convincing one. It didn't happen in time, but it would've been interesting to get Charney's take on Banksy's shredded art prank. I would've liked footnotes rather than endnotes, but it doesn't distract too much. Overall, a nice read and I'd like to read more by this author.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tara Redd

    At points, the book seems kind of like a laundry list of interesting anecdotes about lost art. Some of the stories are great, like Michaelangelo's sprezzatura, but the way the book is organized makes it seem fragmented. I think this strategy of museum-like organization in text is hard to pull off. And it's weird because it doesn't seem like a paper museum--a book for browsing--it's sort of trying for both and ending with none. Basically it reminded me that I want to read Vasari. I think the book At points, the book seems kind of like a laundry list of interesting anecdotes about lost art. Some of the stories are great, like Michaelangelo's sprezzatura, but the way the book is organized makes it seem fragmented. I think this strategy of museum-like organization in text is hard to pull off. And it's weird because it doesn't seem like a paper museum--a book for browsing--it's sort of trying for both and ending with none. Basically it reminded me that I want to read Vasari. I think the book I was hoping for would be titled, "An Alternative Art History Through Lost Art" because the idea of counteracting bias towards the accessible and surviving works is really interesting, I'm just not sure how exactly you would pull that off.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Shane

    "The Museum of Lost Art" provides some good information about notable works that have been lost (or, as one chapter asserts, maybe never existed at all) from various culprits: war, theft, natural disasters, destroyed on purpose, etc... This organization scheme was pretty solid. Charney does have an over-abundance of typos and grammatical errors, which greatly distracts and lessens the quality of the work. Also, I thought Charney tries overly hard to make it read more like a novel; ironically I wo "The Museum of Lost Art" provides some good information about notable works that have been lost (or, as one chapter asserts, maybe never existed at all) from various culprits: war, theft, natural disasters, destroyed on purpose, etc... This organization scheme was pretty solid. Charney does have an over-abundance of typos and grammatical errors, which greatly distracts and lessens the quality of the work. Also, I thought Charney tries overly hard to make it read more like a novel; ironically I would almost say this idea would have worked better as a coffee table book, in which each lost artwork is given it's own page in a more easy-to-read format. Still, if one has an interest in art history and art that has disappeared, this book has enough to recommend it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Despite exhibiting a few stark editing and proofreading flaws (especially surprising in a book with the evident publishing budget of this one) The Museum of Lost Art ended up being quite an engrossing read, beautifully designed and presented. The survey of lost art is grouped into the categories: 'theft', 'war', 'accident', 'iconoclasm and vandalism', 'acts of God', 'temporal works', 'destroyed by owner', 'buried and exhumed', and 'lost or never was?' Aside from the intrigue, the book also provide Despite exhibiting a few stark editing and proofreading flaws (especially surprising in a book with the evident publishing budget of this one) The Museum of Lost Art ended up being quite an engrossing read, beautifully designed and presented. The survey of lost art is grouped into the categories: 'theft', 'war', 'accident', 'iconoclasm and vandalism', 'acts of God', 'temporal works', 'destroyed by owner', 'buried and exhumed', and 'lost or never was?' Aside from the intrigue, the book also provides insights about the value and significance of art to humanity and culture - telling us something about humans as art-making (and art hording, destroying and losing) creatures.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Monica

    I love Noah Charney's approachable yet informed style of writing. He writes on the most interesting topics, too, and I like how this book explores different aspects of how art can be "lost." My only minor complaint is that I first was thrown off with the flow of the book, since each section in the book begins and ends with the same story/object. But it made sense as I continued to read and I loved learning more about this topic. Charney even explores little-known history regarding famous works o I love Noah Charney's approachable yet informed style of writing. He writes on the most interesting topics, too, and I like how this book explores different aspects of how art can be "lost." My only minor complaint is that I first was thrown off with the flow of the book, since each section in the book begins and ends with the same story/object. But it made sense as I continued to read and I loved learning more about this topic. Charney even explores little-known history regarding famous works of art, like Masaccio's "Holy Trinity."

  15. 5 out of 5

    Paige

    This book was a quick read and didn't stay on any one topic of ways to be lost or a particular artwork for too long. By doing so the author kept it short and to the point where your mind does not wander off. I have always loved art, particularly "classic" art, and am not overly keen on abstract work. This drizzling of information about a variety of art pieces, styles, and artists was very satisfactory. Especially considering I have never read a book about art before. This book was a quick read and didn't stay on any one topic of ways to be lost or a particular artwork for too long. By doing so the author kept it short and to the point where your mind does not wander off. I have always loved art, particularly "classic" art, and am not overly keen on abstract work. This drizzling of information about a variety of art pieces, styles, and artists was very satisfactory. Especially considering I have never read a book about art before.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Steve Willey

    Very interesting book. THE LOST ART OF THE WORLD IS MORE THAN ALL THE ART IN ALL THE WORLDS MUSEUMS!!! How crazy is that. The book is segregated in categories by how the art was lost. It is a bit academic but very interesting history. I am sad that I will never get see many of the artworks described in the book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kayla Tornello

    I loved all the pictures and information about works of art that have been lost over the years from various causes. This includes many works that have been lost and found again later. The descriptions give enough information to be informative without bogging down on too much detail. This book has a side effect of inspiring trips to art museums.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Catherine

    An interesting if light read. Has some well known and obscure losses, and then included buildings like The gardens of Babylon, but not faberge eggs. I would describe this as a coffee table read not an academic resource, but I still enjoyed it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Renee

    Interesting stories and beautiful pictures. Some sections were easier to follow than others, but most of the individual stories about art pieces quite good. The main detractor was that for a published book there are a lot (>20) of typos, which sometimes impeded the flow of reading through a story.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Hillary Wilkerson

    Such an interesting concept. Unfortunately, the haphazard organization, sloppy writing, and lack of editing make for a rather tedious read. I wish this book had spent a bit more time in editing before it was published.

  21. 4 out of 5

    William Hogan

    Excellent recap of art history and interesting stories that sometimes reads like fiction. Covers lost art from ancient history up to the current use of ISIS for gathering money from relics then destroying what is too big to sell.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Fletcher

    this was a great book with some of the best reproductions i've ever seen, but gets one star taken off for editing (or lack thereof). this was a great book with some of the best reproductions i've ever seen, but gets one star taken off for editing (or lack thereof).

  23. 5 out of 5

    K

    Excellent book, very informative!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Pan Ellington

    bland, lifeless text. interesting subject matter, tho.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Steve Dock

    And almost random collection of anecdotes regarding Western art throughout the past millennium. And easy read with some interesting chapters .

  26. 4 out of 5

    Cora Johnston

    I really enjoyed this book. Noah Charney did a great job talking about different lost pieces in art. It wasn’t overly academic, would highly recommend if you’re interested in the subject matter.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sherry

    quite an interesting take on missing (and sometimes found) artworks thru the ages. A lot of history and descriptions. Very well written and keeps one reading!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Susan Tryforos

    I enjoyed this book immensely, although it could have used a more careful editor.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa Mdez

    I absolutely loved this book, quite interesting and easy to read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Laurie

    Fun and fascinating read.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.