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The New World: Comics from Mauretania

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Since the mid-1980s, the British cartoonist Chris Reynolds has been assembling a world all his own. On the surface, it seems much like ours: a place of cool afternoon shadows and gently rolling hills, half-empty trains and sleepy downtown streets. But the closer you look, the weirder it gets. After losing a mysterious intergalactic war, Earth is no longer in humanity’s con Since the mid-1980s, the British cartoonist Chris Reynolds has been assembling a world all his own. On the surface, it seems much like ours: a place of cool afternoon shadows and gently rolling hills, half-empty trains and sleepy downtown streets. But the closer you look, the weirder it gets. After losing a mysterious intergalactic war, Earth is no longer in humanity’s control. Blandly friendly aliens lurk on the margins and seem especially interested in the mining industry. The very rules of time and space seem to have shifted: Mysterious figures suddenly appear in childhood photos, family members disappear forever without warning, power outages abound, and certain people gain the power of flight. A helmeted man named Jimmy is somehow causing local businesses to shutter and is being closely watched by the “trendy new police force,” Rational Control. The world is being remade, but in what image? This new collection, selected and designed by the acclaimed cartoonist Seth, includes short stories, a novella, and the full-length graphic novel Mauretania. It is the ideal guide to all the mystery and wonder of one of the most underappreciated cult classics in the history of comics. This NYRC edition is a hardcover with foil stamping, debossing, full-color endpapers, and extra-thick paper, and features new scans of the original artwork.


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Since the mid-1980s, the British cartoonist Chris Reynolds has been assembling a world all his own. On the surface, it seems much like ours: a place of cool afternoon shadows and gently rolling hills, half-empty trains and sleepy downtown streets. But the closer you look, the weirder it gets. After losing a mysterious intergalactic war, Earth is no longer in humanity’s con Since the mid-1980s, the British cartoonist Chris Reynolds has been assembling a world all his own. On the surface, it seems much like ours: a place of cool afternoon shadows and gently rolling hills, half-empty trains and sleepy downtown streets. But the closer you look, the weirder it gets. After losing a mysterious intergalactic war, Earth is no longer in humanity’s control. Blandly friendly aliens lurk on the margins and seem especially interested in the mining industry. The very rules of time and space seem to have shifted: Mysterious figures suddenly appear in childhood photos, family members disappear forever without warning, power outages abound, and certain people gain the power of flight. A helmeted man named Jimmy is somehow causing local businesses to shutter and is being closely watched by the “trendy new police force,” Rational Control. The world is being remade, but in what image? This new collection, selected and designed by the acclaimed cartoonist Seth, includes short stories, a novella, and the full-length graphic novel Mauretania. It is the ideal guide to all the mystery and wonder of one of the most underappreciated cult classics in the history of comics. This NYRC edition is a hardcover with foil stamping, debossing, full-color endpapers, and extra-thick paper, and features new scans of the original artwork.

30 review for The New World: Comics from Mauretania

  1. 5 out of 5

    Derek Royal

    Phenomenal! One the one hand, I'm ashamed that I didn't know about Reynolds's Mauretania comics before this year. At the same time, this has been a wonderful discovery, something that may be even more impactful given my previous ignorance. What initially drew me to this title -- outside of the fact that it's published by New York Review Comics, who always puts out great material -- is the fact that Seth did the design of this collection. The book definitely has the Seth "stamp," and his note at Phenomenal! One the one hand, I'm ashamed that I didn't know about Reynolds's Mauretania comics before this year. At the same time, this has been a wonderful discovery, something that may be even more impactful given my previous ignorance. What initially drew me to this title -- outside of the fact that it's published by New York Review Comics, who always puts out great material -- is the fact that Seth did the design of this collection. The book definitely has the Seth "stamp," and his note at the end, albeit brief, in many ways sums up my own experiences in reading The New World. These stories -- and with some, "story" may not even be the best way to describe them -- are almost all enigmatic, drifting unanchored in a narrative sense and unfolding in what could be described as a dreamscape experience. Trying to figure out rationally these stories is futile, and it's not how you should approach these comics. The mystery lies at the heart of what's going on, so one should just assume and accept the ambiguity and head-scratching, and let these unknowns just consume you. The enigma is what draws me, despite my constant questioning. One of the highlights of this year, so far.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. This was nothing like anything I’ve ever read before. Released in bits and pieces since the mid-1980s, Chris Reynolds has been teasing readers with fragments of a world that seemed to continuously attempt to come full circle yet also remain fragmented and indecipherable. The cartoonist delivers a truly surreal story that often puts a strange individual with a helmet at the heart of it and successfully draws up a world that seems real at first gl You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. This was nothing like anything I’ve ever read before. Released in bits and pieces since the mid-1980s, Chris Reynolds has been teasing readers with fragments of a world that seemed to continuously attempt to come full circle yet also remain fragmented and indecipherable. The cartoonist delivers a truly surreal story that often puts a strange individual with a helmet at the heart of it and successfully draws up a world that seems real at first glance but quickly shows its dream-like facet in the most calm and controlled way possible. Expect the black and white artwork to suck you into a parallel world that is stripped down to dichotomies and ideals, and the dialogue and direction to conjure a billion questions within you that will unfortunately never find answers in the long run. Seth, a cartoonist himself, edited this volume and scoured the archives to put together all the artwork that Chris Reynolds ever shared with the world. A lot of the stories are actually short stories that sometimes don’t even exceed a page with nine panels, and often don’t ever show any signs of continuity between each other. Each story also strives for uniform panel size that are sometimes free of dialogue, making it easy to blow through the volume (clueless, most of the time). The main attraction in this collection is however the graphic novel Mauretania that occupies half of the volume and is strategically placed at the end (last half) of the volume. Readers who pick up this edition will thus find themselves in front of a bunch of stories that are extremely difficult to understand, but never meant to be. Just when you think Mauretania will clear up the air and give you exactly what you seek, you’ll find yourself mesmerized by its surreal and puzzling story, and succumb to its spellbinding vision. I would normally try and tell you what the whole graphic novel is about, but I believe The New World actually doesn’t want anyone to be able to achieve such a feat. In fact, Mauretania alludes to a whole rivalry between the unconscious and the rational. You can try as much as you’d like to try and connect the dots. You can try and enjoy the hunt for answers throughout this adventure. You can try and convince yourself that things seem to start to make sense. But I can assure you that by the end of it all, the only feeling you’ll have is a sense of loss. A feeling that gravity isn’t there to ground you anymore and that the artwork is starting to pull you into a dream where life is a mystery that you just can’t solve. There’s no lying that this was far different from any typical collection of artwork. It will not please anyone who seek instant gratification. It doesn’t lay out the plans to the whole project and tell you everything that you want to know. Opposite to linear, this is a fragmented tale with recurrent characters and a mysterious world that strives to put forward mankind’s short-sightedness, search for purpose, blindness to detail, tendency to isolation and loneliness, and especially individual and corporate paranoia. As you can see, there’s a huge array of themes hidden within the black and white art, but what you’ll go home with after going through this collection of comics will be personal and probably very different from what anyone else with go understand from it all. The New World: Comics from Mauretania is, I believe, a mysterious story that is simply meant to remain a mystery forever. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/ ________________________ Completely surreal and sometimes truly mesmerizing for its way of stripping everything down to dichotomy and ideals. Had to get around to the main story, Mauretania, to understand that this mysterious story was meant to stay a mystery forever. P.S. Full review to come soon. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  3. 5 out of 5

    Peter Landau

    Some of the things I like best I hated at first. They were too new or radically different from what I expected, I guess, until realizing I didn’t know what I wanted. I didn’t hate THE NEW WORLD: COMICS FROM MAURETANIA by Chris Reynolds when I opened up the handsome tome collecting his work from the 1980s and on, but I didn’t love it. The work was dense in every way: the panels were thick black bands, the artwork dark patterns of brushwork and the stories were weirdly normal. But that rigid facad Some of the things I like best I hated at first. They were too new or radically different from what I expected, I guess, until realizing I didn’t know what I wanted. I didn’t hate THE NEW WORLD: COMICS FROM MAURETANIA by Chris Reynolds when I opened up the handsome tome collecting his work from the 1980s and on, but I didn’t love it. The work was dense in every way: the panels were thick black bands, the artwork dark patterns of brushwork and the stories were weirdly normal. But that rigid facade is not as uninviting as it first looks. There’s talk of wars and flying cars, secret police and other unseen menaces. Plots arise and fall with the regularity of the tide, and like an ocean there’s a deep mystery beneath the seemingly calm ebb and flow of storylines. I got sucked in. The tales, some short others longer, have their details almost scrubbed to a dull hardness and yet they resonate an emotional core that attracted me like a visitor on vacation in a foreign land I never wanted to leave. Sorry. Reynolds makes me swoon poetically, maybe because his work is so evocative not necessarily of a time and place (and least not one I personally know, but he is English and perhaps those who grew up where and when he did feel some nostalgic pull to his art) as much as a mood. And I’m a moody guy. Guess what? I love this book!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Stewart Tame

    Mysterious and enigmatic. There's a quiet surrealism to these stories. It's not loud and obvious, but subtle and quiet. Things almost make sense. One is left with the sense that, if only there were a couple more clues, everything would fall into place. It feels like a bizarre combination of the comics work of Seth and the short stories of J.G. Ballard, maybe a touch of Blue Velvet era David Lynch as well. Although the stories feel meandering and plotless, I enjoyed the head space this put me into Mysterious and enigmatic. There's a quiet surrealism to these stories. It's not loud and obvious, but subtle and quiet. Things almost make sense. One is left with the sense that, if only there were a couple more clues, everything would fall into place. It feels like a bizarre combination of the comics work of Seth and the short stories of J.G. Ballard, maybe a touch of Blue Velvet era David Lynch as well. Although the stories feel meandering and plotless, I enjoyed the head space this put me into. Recommended!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Dylan Horrocks

    If I could give this 10 stars, I totally would.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nate D

    Late in this work, there's a stretch of several wordless pages where two characters follow a telephone cord through an empty landscape. Like most plot points here, this one cuts off unexpectedly into nothing, but it was this spare narration-free passage where I was most able to feel the mysterious, haunted sensation that others seem to get from these comics. Otherwise, these stories, like the blocky, murky linework, just felt a little too vague and half-formed, the images often overwhelmed by na Late in this work, there's a stretch of several wordless pages where two characters follow a telephone cord through an empty landscape. Like most plot points here, this one cuts off unexpectedly into nothing, but it was this spare narration-free passage where I was most able to feel the mysterious, haunted sensation that others seem to get from these comics. Otherwise, these stories, like the blocky, murky linework, just felt a little too vague and half-formed, the images often overwhelmed by narration within the frame, even as that narration ultimately unravels as well. All of this -- these deteriorating, disappearing stories for a ambiguously deteriorated world -- may well be the point, but so far it eludes me...

  7. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Curran

    The people of Mauritania seem to forever be returning to places where they once lived, only to find them empty, their friends missing, their old homes in ruins. The world – drawn using more black than white – is much like our own, but there has been an invasion, and cars are technically capable of flight. But strangely, these comics aren't about the future. They are about a futile longing for the past. Or at least I think they are. In their intricacy and their unashamed obliqueness, they resemble The people of Mauritania seem to forever be returning to places where they once lived, only to find them empty, their friends missing, their old homes in ruins. The world – drawn using more black than white – is much like our own, but there has been an invasion, and cars are technically capable of flight. But strangely, these comics aren't about the future. They are about a futile longing for the past. Or at least I think they are. In their intricacy and their unashamed obliqueness, they resemble outsider art. This feels like a highly personal project: a pen and ink geographical expression of the author's subconscious: what J.G. Ballard would call 'inner space'. The stories (two longer pieces and a selection of shorts) often look like they might move towards narrative sense but then veer off in unexpected directions, refusing to connect the threads. A team of detectives showing up doesn’t mean any mysteries will be solved. Then there's the central figure, the face in the sci-fi helmet on the cover, Monitor. But is that Monitor, or is it Jimmy? And if it is Jimmy, then where is Monitor? And is Monitor a stand in for the author? I don't know. Better to sink into the melancholic atmosphere and take what you can find.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    090519: yup. my kind of graphic...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    (A version of this review was published, in German, in the Swiss comics journal STRAPAZIN.) On travels to the United Kingdom in the 1980’s I discovered the vibrant world of British small-press comics, and one title that greatly intrigued me was MAURETANIA COMICS, written and drawn by Chris Reynolds. The comics were starkly beautiful, black-and-white and drawn with what looked like a rollerball pen. The pages contained almost-deserted landscapes (both urban and rural), sterile office building inte (A version of this review was published, in German, in the Swiss comics journal STRAPAZIN.) On travels to the United Kingdom in the 1980’s I discovered the vibrant world of British small-press comics, and one title that greatly intrigued me was MAURETANIA COMICS, written and drawn by Chris Reynolds. The comics were starkly beautiful, black-and-white and drawn with what looked like a rollerball pen. The pages contained almost-deserted landscapes (both urban and rural), sterile office building interiors, and a not sad though not exactly happy cast of characters, including one who always wore a peculiar helmet. The narrative was difficult to follow, however, in part because I was only able to find issues 4-9, 11, and 12. I always assumed that one day I’d complete the series and it would all make sense on a read-through, but with New York Review Comics’ publication of THE NEW WORLD: COMICS FROM MAURETANIA I now realize how misguided I was. This gorgeous hardcover, designed by Seth, collects “Mauretania” stories including a graphic novel, a novella, and a dozen-and-a-half short stories. Having read the book through three times now, I can happily say it makes no sense at all. Or, rather, it makes complete sense, though not in any traditional narrative terms. More than anything else, the comics of Chris Reynolds depict a state of mind, one deeply disquieted but somehow also hopeful. The stories are set in a “new world” sometime in the near future, after Earth has been invaded by aliens—though the aliens are barely shown, and they don’t seem to have much interest in our planet other than its coal mines. The setting is a time of wars (distant), depopulation (at least in the locales we are shown), religious proselytization (though not particularly forceful), and corporate intrigue (mostly unintelligible)—and in the midst of all that, we encounter a small group of people who are more or less just trying to go about living normal lives. The MAURITANIA comics are almost impossible to describe, but I can’t recommend them highly enough—nor can Seth, who has been singing Reynolds’s praises for more than a decade. If you like TWIN PEAKS, THE PRISONER, the works of Samuel Beckett or Stansilaw Lem, and/or the drawings of Raymond Pettibon, there is definitely something here for you. I expect to re-read THE NEW WORLD often, seeking to piece together some meaning that I’m sure will continue to elude me, and that elusiveness is part of the work’s beauty and appeal.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mateen Mahboubi

    A wild ride of sparse mysterious stories in a dark and chunky art style. I enjoyed some of the more straightforward storytelling better but even the more obscure stuff was enjoyable. Enjoy the journey despite knowing that you may never get to the destination.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Comics Alternative

    http://comicsalternative.com/episode-... http://comicsalternative.com/episode-...

  12. 4 out of 5

    Scribe

    Got this from the library after being interested in the idea of exploring worlds through surreal narratives. In a moment of synchronicity, this was one of the first 'quick selection' books on view as I walked in through the library door. The book itself is large, hard, shiny and seductive. The stories inside have a gorgeous, dreamy sense of being. Hints and implications are everything, mysteries are being explored, but the stories feel like they carry on in the gaps between and after the panels t Got this from the library after being interested in the idea of exploring worlds through surreal narratives. In a moment of synchronicity, this was one of the first 'quick selection' books on view as I walked in through the library door. The book itself is large, hard, shiny and seductive. The stories inside have a gorgeous, dreamy sense of being. Hints and implications are everything, mysteries are being explored, but the stories feel like they carry on in the gaps between and after the panels themselves. Where does Monitor go? What's the significance of this, that, the other? A book I can imagine coming back to repeatedly.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Shawn Conner

    What I appreciate most about Chris Reynolds' Mauretania stories is their sense of timelessness. As Seth notes in "Designer notes" at book's end, Reynolds' work has aged well, better than that of many of his fellow comics creators who also came of age in the '90s (the stories in this volume are from 1985 and later). Reynolds isn't caught up in trying to capture any kind of zeitgeist. Or, if he is, he does so accidentally and indirectly. This is heavy Twilight Zone-ish stuff that takes place in a What I appreciate most about Chris Reynolds' Mauretania stories is their sense of timelessness. As Seth notes in "Designer notes" at book's end, Reynolds' work has aged well, better than that of many of his fellow comics creators who also came of age in the '90s (the stories in this volume are from 1985 and later). Reynolds isn't caught up in trying to capture any kind of zeitgeist. Or, if he is, he does so accidentally and indirectly. This is heavy Twilight Zone-ish stuff that takes place in a post-alien invasion Earth (or is it?) that's sort of like ours, or one that is just similar enough to be dream-like in its familiarity. There isn't a lot at stake emotionally in these stories but the world that Reynolds, a British graphic novelist, creates is one that fans of David Lynch (for starters) will enjoy visiting.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    Tip: The foreword by Ed Park has spoilers. Read the stories first.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Hawpe

    This beautiful new collection of Welsh comics artist Chris Reynolds' very difficult to find work is a revelation: lovely, strange, subtle and poetic stories with light touches of surrealism and scifi. Think Jim Jarmusch films, Chris Ware's mundane-meets-fantastic style (Reynolds might be an influence?), Twin Peaks, Samuel Beckett... but this stuff is truly unique, like a dream made of white paper and black ink. This beautiful new collection of Welsh comics artist Chris Reynolds' very difficult to find work is a revelation: lovely, strange, subtle and poetic stories with light touches of surrealism and scifi. Think Jim Jarmusch films, Chris Ware's mundane-meets-fantastic style (Reynolds might be an influence?), Twin Peaks, Samuel Beckett... but this stuff is truly unique, like a dream made of white paper and black ink.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mitchell

    ...I don't get it. ...I don't get it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Timothy

    Sometimes you read something and marvel at how the author expressed a thought you’ve never been able to put into words. Reading this collection, I felt like Chris Reynolds was pulling out and examining pieces of my psyche of which I’ve never been more than fleetingly conscious. It was a moving, thrilling, sometimes frightening experience. This registers not as a celebration of nostalgia but as an exploration of the strangeness of memory, reconciling it both with the experience of the real world a Sometimes you read something and marvel at how the author expressed a thought you’ve never been able to put into words. Reading this collection, I felt like Chris Reynolds was pulling out and examining pieces of my psyche of which I’ve never been more than fleetingly conscious. It was a moving, thrilling, sometimes frightening experience. This registers not as a celebration of nostalgia but as an exploration of the strangeness of memory, reconciling it both with the experience of the real world after the passage of time and with the impossible logic of dreams. Characters return to old homes to find them strange and empty; old friends resent each other's reappearances in changed lives; temporary reprieves from death are granted. There is religious iconography that refuses to settle into an allegorical framework. Glimpses of the lazily hidden security apparatus of a surveillance state resist description as dystopian. No one has a real job or complete personality; they move through largely empty cities and landscapes trying to make sense of a world that rejects simple cause and effect. The simple, almost childish prose eventually begins to feel natural, allowing you to focus on the unbelievably assured and effective drawing. The writing is surreal, but not in a way that blows your mind up front. Instead it lingers and gets under your skin, leaving you shaken after reading. I was reminded of long summer mornings of adolescence, of travels in Eastern Europe, of classic point-and-click computer games. Your mileage may vary, but this was exactly what I was looking for.

  18. 4 out of 5

    cardulelia carduelis

    This was another one of those 'I know nothing about this but it's on offer' purchases. As such, I was unprepared for the nostalgia I'd feel for the landscapes (they're Welsh, but they could easily be from the North East of England), not to mention the poignant, dark atmosphere of the comics themselves. There's something very, British about the entire collection - but again, that's likely due to the countryside rather than the content as having looked back through there's not too much to suggest This was another one of those 'I know nothing about this but it's on offer' purchases. As such, I was unprepared for the nostalgia I'd feel for the landscapes (they're Welsh, but they could easily be from the North East of England), not to mention the poignant, dark atmosphere of the comics themselves. There's something very, British about the entire collection - but again, that's likely due to the countryside rather than the content as having looked back through there's not too much to suggest this is set in Britain, possibly apart from the trains? So it's less of a single story and more like a collection of eery, well-written vignettes. The 'impossibly thick black lines', as says the collection's editor, adds to the detatchment and for frames that are filled with black they feel strangely empty. I wasn't quite as fond of the longer-format comic as I was of the short stories, perhaps because it felt less odd? Perhaps because I didn't care for the protagonist? Perhaps because it featured less of the rolling hills and barren moorland? I think the real strength of these comics is how water-tight the narration is. There is quite a lot of movement from one frame to the next but it feels as though you're in capable hands. Really enjoyed this collection and will be seeking out Reynold's back catalogue.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Duncan

    To me these stories read as if film director Michealangelo Antonioni had story boarded a British kid's tv show from the 1970's. I'm not saying these were infantile, some of the Brit kids show were pretty sophisticated. Nothing makes any sense but one finds oneself okay w/that, not frustrated at the outcome. I was frustrated though at their not being anymore. At 300 or so pages the book almost seems a little light. To me these stories read as if film director Michealangelo Antonioni had story boarded a British kid's tv show from the 1970's. I'm not saying these were infantile, some of the Brit kids show were pretty sophisticated. Nothing makes any sense but one finds oneself okay w/that, not frustrated at the outcome. I was frustrated though at their not being anymore. At 300 or so pages the book almost seems a little light.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Shtwaan

    A great example of "less is more". Quietly disturbing stuff, with a peculiar sense of now, though created decades ago. It presents a world that exists in suspension, without recognizable patterns of causality and purpose, and consumed by an unnamed catastrophy which everybody seems to ignore, as if in a trance. The simultaneous lulling and menacing qualities makes this the narrative equivalent of Boards of Canada's music. Beautiful as an object, too. A great example of "less is more". Quietly disturbing stuff, with a peculiar sense of now, though created decades ago. It presents a world that exists in suspension, without recognizable patterns of causality and purpose, and consumed by an unnamed catastrophy which everybody seems to ignore, as if in a trance. The simultaneous lulling and menacing qualities makes this the narrative equivalent of Boards of Canada's music. Beautiful as an object, too.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dylan

    One of the most wondrous, melancholy, and haunting works I've come across—somehow Reynolds has captured an air of nostalgia on an almost societal level, and the bewildering feeling of people, communities, and whole nations changing over time, leaving behind whole customs and rituals and the detritus of ordinary life. It's hard to describe the effect these stories have, but they're absolutely sui generis—I read this a year ago and I can't stop thinking about it. One of the most wondrous, melancholy, and haunting works I've come across—somehow Reynolds has captured an air of nostalgia on an almost societal level, and the bewildering feeling of people, communities, and whole nations changing over time, leaving behind whole customs and rituals and the detritus of ordinary life. It's hard to describe the effect these stories have, but they're absolutely sui generis—I read this a year ago and I can't stop thinking about it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rowena

    ~4.5 Quietly weird narratives and/or meandering threads ending in droll scenarios. It's darkly charming in a way that's hard to pin down, thanks to the confluence of familiar yet alienish settings, mysterious and largely unexplained characters, atmospheric art bound by thick black strokes, and correspondingly eerie lettering. ~4.5 Quietly weird narratives and/or meandering threads ending in droll scenarios. It's darkly charming in a way that's hard to pin down, thanks to the confluence of familiar yet alienish settings, mysterious and largely unexplained characters, atmospheric art bound by thick black strokes, and correspondingly eerie lettering.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    Strange, unsettling, mysterious, quiet, steeped in loneliness, this should be a depressing collection but Reynolds has a self professed mission to spread hope. It’s in there, a little. But the comics still loosen the gravity holding down every day life - like reading Sebald or Murakami, the world is never the same once you put this book down. Recommended.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Matthew R

    Once again perfect score for personal reasons. This book has so much in it that appeals to the core of my being it really almost cheats its way to a perfect score. Surrealism, sci-fi, philosophy, tension all blend together to make a tome of comics that scratches a particular itch for me. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

  25. 4 out of 5

    Maria Aquinoppoiuuyutt

    0

  26. 4 out of 5

    Moon Captain

    So sparse and cozy

  27. 5 out of 5

    Six

    creepy, distinctive graphics.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    The New York Review of Comics edition is beautiful and these are some enigmatic and fascinating tales. The art is dark and wonderful and the stories are bizarre yet familiar.

  29. 4 out of 5

    David Rickert

    Poorly drawn comics with no storytelling sense.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Damian Knight

    got bored of this graphic novel

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