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The Postnatal Depletion Cure: A Complete Guide to Rebuilding Your Health and Reclaiming Your Energy for Mothers of Newborns, Toddlers, and Young Children

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While postpartum depression has become a recognizable condition, this is the first book to treat root causes of mommy brain, baby blues, and other symptoms that leave mothers feeling exhausted. Any woman who has read What to Expect When You're Expecting needs a copy of The Postnatal Depletion Cure. Filled with trustworthy advice, protocols for successful recovery, and wri While postpartum depression has become a recognizable condition, this is the first book to treat root causes of mommy brain, baby blues, and other symptoms that leave mothers feeling exhausted. Any woman who has read What to Expect When You're Expecting needs a copy of The Postnatal Depletion Cure. Filled with trustworthy advice, protocols for successful recovery, and written by a compassionate expert in women's health, this book is a guide to help any mother restore her energy, replenish her body, and reclaim her sense of self. Most mothers have experienced pain, forgetfulness, indecision, low energy levels, moodiness, or some form of baby brain. And it's no wonder: The process of growing a baby depletes a mother's body in substantial ways--on average, a mother's brain shrinks 5% during pregnancy, and the placenta saps her of essential nutrients that she needs to be healthy and contented. But with postnatal care ending after 6 weeks, most women never learn how to rebuild their strength and care for their bodies after childbirth. As a result, they can suffer from the effects of depletion for many years, without knowing what's wrong as well as getting the support and treatments that they need.


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While postpartum depression has become a recognizable condition, this is the first book to treat root causes of mommy brain, baby blues, and other symptoms that leave mothers feeling exhausted. Any woman who has read What to Expect When You're Expecting needs a copy of The Postnatal Depletion Cure. Filled with trustworthy advice, protocols for successful recovery, and wri While postpartum depression has become a recognizable condition, this is the first book to treat root causes of mommy brain, baby blues, and other symptoms that leave mothers feeling exhausted. Any woman who has read What to Expect When You're Expecting needs a copy of The Postnatal Depletion Cure. Filled with trustworthy advice, protocols for successful recovery, and written by a compassionate expert in women's health, this book is a guide to help any mother restore her energy, replenish her body, and reclaim her sense of self. Most mothers have experienced pain, forgetfulness, indecision, low energy levels, moodiness, or some form of baby brain. And it's no wonder: The process of growing a baby depletes a mother's body in substantial ways--on average, a mother's brain shrinks 5% during pregnancy, and the placenta saps her of essential nutrients that she needs to be healthy and contented. But with postnatal care ending after 6 weeks, most women never learn how to rebuild their strength and care for their bodies after childbirth. As a result, they can suffer from the effects of depletion for many years, without knowing what's wrong as well as getting the support and treatments that they need.

30 review for The Postnatal Depletion Cure: A Complete Guide to Rebuilding Your Health and Reclaiming Your Energy for Mothers of Newborns, Toddlers, and Young Children

  1. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    I don't know how I stumbled across this book, but I'm glad that I did. It helped me understand a lot of what I had experienced in the years after my two children were born and come to peace with a lot of it as well. Now, when my youngest is 2 1/2 years old, I am learning how important nutrition is during pregnancy and postpartum. I wish I would have known sooner! A lot of the information was helpful for understanding what has happened to my body because of pregnancy, but I got bogged down in the I don't know how I stumbled across this book, but I'm glad that I did. It helped me understand a lot of what I had experienced in the years after my two children were born and come to peace with a lot of it as well. Now, when my youngest is 2 1/2 years old, I am learning how important nutrition is during pregnancy and postpartum. I wish I would have known sooner! A lot of the information was helpful for understanding what has happened to my body because of pregnancy, but I got bogged down in the chapters where he described each vitamin and supplement dosages in detail. Much of the advice was not practical unless a mother has a nanny and personal chef, in which case why would her depletion be critical in the first place? But, this is a useful book to read in order to learn about self-care postpartum and to give a mom ideas on where to go from there once armed with this knowledge.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I love the concept of this book and think it is wonderful that it is being addressed. This book addresses the depletion women face after giving birth, especially in American society that doesn't give them any time to recover but expects them to get back to doing it all almost immediately after giving birth. The author provides many helpful holistic suggestions for women to care for themselves. The author included case studies of women with their specific diagnoses and treatment plans, which I fo I love the concept of this book and think it is wonderful that it is being addressed. This book addresses the depletion women face after giving birth, especially in American society that doesn't give them any time to recover but expects them to get back to doing it all almost immediately after giving birth. The author provides many helpful holistic suggestions for women to care for themselves. The author included case studies of women with their specific diagnoses and treatment plans, which I found to be too specific to be helpful. I was also concerned that the author included self-tests for vitamin and mineral deficiencies and then specific dosage amounts for self-treatment. Though he did say to consult with your doctor, this specific information encourages readers to skip over a doctor consultation and self-treat, which can be dangerous depending on the supplement and other medications/supplements one is taking. I received an ARC from NetGalley.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    With the caveat that Oscar Serrallach is a doctor of *functional* medicine which is very different from an MD, and therefore this book was prone to woo, I really liked quite a bit of it! I think our society has unreasonable expectations on mothers in general, and especially new mothers. I liked that this book encouraged new moms to care for themselves, not worry about bouncing back but move their bodies to regain some health and strength, eat nourishing foods, practice good sleep hygiene, etc. I With the caveat that Oscar Serrallach is a doctor of *functional* medicine which is very different from an MD, and therefore this book was prone to woo, I really liked quite a bit of it! I think our society has unreasonable expectations on mothers in general, and especially new mothers. I liked that this book encouraged new moms to care for themselves, not worry about bouncing back but move their bodies to regain some health and strength, eat nourishing foods, practice good sleep hygiene, etc. I skimmed over the section on supplementation, figuring I could probably just continue taking my prenatal vitamins and it would be effective and much less expensive than whatever goop is hawking in her online shop. The section on food had a few annoying mentions of tOxInS but also included a lot of quick and healthy meal ideas. The chapter on exercise was something I wish I'd read about a year ago when I was newly postpartum. All in all, I thought this book was a great way to turn the focus back into healing and supporting the mother, rather than devoting 95% of her energy to the baby and giving herself the leftovers.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    I couldn't get through this. I couldn't get past the fact that it was written by a man. I don't know how we've come to a place where we look to men for advice on how to heal our bodies...postpartum bodies of all things. When will we women reclaim our powers of healing, of intuition, of wisdom around the biology that is uniquely ours? The advice is general at best. And the author's voice comes from a very, very distant place. I couldn't get through this. I couldn't get past the fact that it was written by a man. I don't know how we've come to a place where we look to men for advice on how to heal our bodies...postpartum bodies of all things. When will we women reclaim our powers of healing, of intuition, of wisdom around the biology that is uniquely ours? The advice is general at best. And the author's voice comes from a very, very distant place.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ingrid

    Definitely some good info here. I was pleasantly surprised to find that judging by his 'tests' I wouldn't seem to be super depleted (still want to get some bloodwork done to make sure, of course!) Still, three pregnancies in three years has taken its toll and the fact that breastfeeding won't end for probably another two years... I do know that my body needs some care. While Dr. Serralllach makes it clear that we need to rethink the way we treat postpartum mothers, I found his suggestions only m Definitely some good info here. I was pleasantly surprised to find that judging by his 'tests' I wouldn't seem to be super depleted (still want to get some bloodwork done to make sure, of course!) Still, three pregnancies in three years has taken its toll and the fact that breastfeeding won't end for probably another two years... I do know that my body needs some care. While Dr. Serralllach makes it clear that we need to rethink the way we treat postpartum mothers, I found his suggestions only mildly helpful. Many of us simply can't afford to buy several, high quality supplements. And then his suggested eating plan... I mean, I know that I certainly don't have the time to make roasted lamb shank and macademia nut sauce! I'm juggling three kids! I would have liked solutions that feel attainable for the average, stressed out mother instead of wealthy/middle classed moms. I finished reading feeling inspired to take care of myself, but also defeated because the book didn't give me any true help in doing so (except maybe a few suggestions for supplements and some exercises that had already been suggested by my pelvic floor physiotherapist.)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Fiona

    It’s a great idea for a book but it is written for a certain type of cis, white, heterosexual, privileged mother and I am sick of this type of language in health books. Do better 🤮 Alarm bells should have rang at “functional doctor for GOOP” and “Byron Bay-based” and the fact a male is writing a postnatal book 🤣 All the bits about libido and complex superfood recipes made me roll my eyes several times. The good bits were the actual bits about macro and micro nutrient depletion and a list of tests It’s a great idea for a book but it is written for a certain type of cis, white, heterosexual, privileged mother and I am sick of this type of language in health books. Do better 🤮 Alarm bells should have rang at “functional doctor for GOOP” and “Byron Bay-based” and the fact a male is writing a postnatal book 🤣 All the bits about libido and complex superfood recipes made me roll my eyes several times. The good bits were the actual bits about macro and micro nutrient depletion and a list of tests to take to your doctor. Considering how appalling postnatal care in most countries, this would be handy information to have as you wade through the swamp that is female healthcare. There is a big focus on restorative yoga and Pilates which is excellent. Slow is best. Rest is healing. Good stuff.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Diana

    I had a hard time reading a book about post natal issues from a man who’s never experienced it but I sympathized with him wanting to help his wife and the countless mom’s he’s treated. This is a book that goes beyond self care, with a list of reasons why a mom may be depleted but also recommends getting checked by a doctor. There is a list of the blood tests to take to a doctor instead of blindly going in, which I found incredibly helpful. There’s so much information online and hearing sound byt I had a hard time reading a book about post natal issues from a man who’s never experienced it but I sympathized with him wanting to help his wife and the countless mom’s he’s treated. This is a book that goes beyond self care, with a list of reasons why a mom may be depleted but also recommends getting checked by a doctor. There is a list of the blood tests to take to a doctor instead of blindly going in, which I found incredibly helpful. There’s so much information online and hearing sound bytes on Instagram and Pinterest about caring for yourself is not enough. This was helpful and something I’ll be going back to read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    Interesting book about the toll that having kids takes a woman's body. I was unaware of most of these supplements and vitamins, but I've been taking the recommended ones for 4 weeks and I do notice an increase in energy and decrease of brain fog. There are also suggested routines for sleep, exercise, and self-care. Interesting book about the toll that having kids takes a woman's body. I was unaware of most of these supplements and vitamins, but I've been taking the recommended ones for 4 weeks and I do notice an increase in energy and decrease of brain fog. There are also suggested routines for sleep, exercise, and self-care.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    Really appreciated this book. There isn't a lot of books written on this topic so it was helpful to read after having my first baby. His suggestions and stories of his patients were really helpful and practical. I felt especially thankful reading his last two chapters - it was very kind, gracious, and loving and it was the exact encouragement I needed to read as a new mom. Really appreciated this book. There isn't a lot of books written on this topic so it was helpful to read after having my first baby. His suggestions and stories of his patients were really helpful and practical. I felt especially thankful reading his last two chapters - it was very kind, gracious, and loving and it was the exact encouragement I needed to read as a new mom.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bronwyn

    I think that there is always something that the reader can learn from a book like this. Even if you don’t feel that you suffer from postnatal depletion there are plenty of interesting topics covered in this book. Whether it’s for the tips on rebuilding energy or sleep, or the gentle encouragement the author gives throughout the book to take care of yourself as a mother, it is worth a read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    I already feel depleted, and while I suspect there was good information in here, it just made me tired. So I didn't get very far. I already feel depleted, and while I suspect there was good information in here, it just made me tired. So I didn't get very far.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Janelle F

    I read this book prior to having my first baby, to get some info on a topic I have heard a lot about. This book is divided into 4 parts, not all were useful for me. Part 1 is a rather alarmist depiction of the depleted mother. It’s not the worst offender in alarmist literature for new moms (there’s some really terrible stuff out there) but i didn’t find it informative or reassuring, so I recommend skimming or skipping. Part 2 was on repletion of nutrients: I found some of the sections helpful, h I read this book prior to having my first baby, to get some info on a topic I have heard a lot about. This book is divided into 4 parts, not all were useful for me. Part 1 is a rather alarmist depiction of the depleted mother. It’s not the worst offender in alarmist literature for new moms (there’s some really terrible stuff out there) but i didn’t find it informative or reassuring, so I recommend skimming or skipping. Part 2 was on repletion of nutrients: I found some of the sections helpful, how nutrients can affect mood especially. The sections on magnesium, iron, and zinc were especially good, and I liked the idea of IV therapy to boost these soon after birth. Easy! (Although expensive, but so are babies). He also speaks briefly and not very in-depth about acupuncture sessions to help balance - I was intrigued but will have to do my own research to find a practitioner obviously. Part 3 was diet and exercise. Somewhat useful though his “superfoods” (a term I’m not fond of) include chocolate, garlic, and cruciferous vegetables - and no mention of the fact that these might affect a breastfeeding baby’s digestion. The exercise section was nice with lots of movements described (though not pictured). Part 4 of the book was all emotional well-being. I thought this part of the book was particularly weak and unnecessary in a book that should be about nutrient depletion and diet. It felt like page filler to me, and the advice wasn’t anything novel: meditate, practice self-love, get sleep, blah blah. Overall: a couple good tidbits, but I’m glad I got it from the library and didn’t pay for it because the nutrient depletion and nutrition aspect of the book only comprises 80/260 pages, less than 1/3rd.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kiah McFarlane

    This book has some really great information. I’m six months postpartum; I’ve been getting acupuncture for over two years now, I knew about ‘the golden month’ practices of various cultures, eat a well balanced diet and practice yoga so I felt I had all things covered (plus I have a good sleeper). But this book did give me even more to consider and reflect on which I enjoyed, there are a few concepts which I will be looking into further. I did however have a few issues with this book, firstly, it’ This book has some really great information. I’m six months postpartum; I’ve been getting acupuncture for over two years now, I knew about ‘the golden month’ practices of various cultures, eat a well balanced diet and practice yoga so I felt I had all things covered (plus I have a good sleeper). But this book did give me even more to consider and reflect on which I enjoyed, there are a few concepts which I will be looking into further. I did however have a few issues with this book, firstly, it’s written by a man. I’m sorry but I just can’t relate to this coming from a man who has never and will never experience pregnancy and childbirth, I don’t care how good of a doctor you are. Plus some of the phrases are eye twitchingly irritating, like ‘my mums always say..’. Secondly, there are quizzes to self diagnose along with specific dosage information, and while he does say to see a healthcare professional, this is making it so easy for women to try and self diagnose and supplement. Thirdly I disagree with probably half his dietary advice. Overall though this book does have some good info, specially around exercise, meditation, recovery, breathing, eating real foods and making the most of your sleep.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Marilia

    In a society that expects all mums to be so careful and nurture their children they forget to care about the mums health and their energy. It’s not about postnatal depression because that’s already part of the health care in some country to recognise this once you had your baby but it’s also important and if not taken into seriously can lead to depression and a motherhood and parenting not so enjoyable. I totally recommend the book to all parents or parents-to-be because it explains what will ha In a society that expects all mums to be so careful and nurture their children they forget to care about the mums health and their energy. It’s not about postnatal depression because that’s already part of the health care in some country to recognise this once you had your baby but it’s also important and if not taken into seriously can lead to depression and a motherhood and parenting not so enjoyable. I totally recommend the book to all parents or parents-to-be because it explains what will happen to your body while pregnant and after. The vitamins needed to keep healthy and back on your feet after your baby is born. all the feelings that are normal to have during your baby’s early years and this book helps in how to cope with all of this new fase, like sleepless nights, the house cores, breastfeeding and giving attention to your other child in same cases and don’t forget about daddy who needs to understand what’s going on fwith you and how to help you in the best way and the attention he needs from you as well, overall it can be daunting and you will feel overwhelmed most of the times and that’s way I think this book it’s a reveal. For all parents definitely.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Right after my sister-in-law had a baby, she told me she was slightly worried that this time she might get postpartum depression. She asked me if I had ever experienced that, and I said no, but I was just so exhausted, constantly, for years. When I got home, I went to the library, and saw this book and knew I had to read it. As I read it, I cried, because it explained my experience so fully...from brain fog, to inability to make decisions, to exhaustion, to increased anxiety (which had never rea Right after my sister-in-law had a baby, she told me she was slightly worried that this time she might get postpartum depression. She asked me if I had ever experienced that, and I said no, but I was just so exhausted, constantly, for years. When I got home, I went to the library, and saw this book and knew I had to read it. As I read it, I cried, because it explained my experience so fully...from brain fog, to inability to make decisions, to exhaustion, to increased anxiety (which had never really been an issue before). He explains how the baby/stress/sleep deprivation/breastfeeding can leach vital minerals, vitamins, and fatty acids from the mother's reserves, leaving her depleted. The ideas for rebuilding are good, but could be better/more specific. Overall, the idea that this issue is being addressed is amazing and ground-breaking. I wish I would have read this book before I had kids, so I could have prevented some of the depletion and enjoyed the early years of my kids' lives more.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kellie

    I started this book about a week after having baby. My husband and I already have a 3 year old. I was feeling very down with a big case of the “baby blues.” I can’t give this book enough praise for giving me hope that I can do it and I’m not alone! I’m not a very “clean eater,” but am excited to incorporate some of the advice from Dr. Serrallach in my family! I would recommend this for every parent, no matter the age of your kids! I feel there’s truly something for everyone.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Marci Miller

    As a mom of 7 I’ve experienced nearly everything described in this book at one time or another, and this ought to be on every mother’s book shelf. While many parts of this book are slightly clinical it serves to help inform a mother and so she can help direct her caregivers in getting the care she needs to restore after a birth and during the several years after a child is born. More than anything it helps a woman own and manage her own restoration and healing.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Carey Thrasher

    A comprehensive, holistic guide to replenishing your body after birth - whether you gave birth last week or last decade! Symptom charts, medical test suggestions, meal plans, exercise routines, sleep tips...this book has helped me identify the gaps in my health since having my second baby and has greatly contributed to my self-healing from postpartum anxiety. I want to give a copy to every mom I know!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Cherie

    I was not impressed. I was a bit taken aback when I realized the author was a man, and while it is more useful than I thought it would be, not for me. He is a doctor and talks about the medical reasons many women are extremely depleted post-baby, and I liked that he recommends alternative therapies and medicines, but he does have a bit too much of a doctor hat on, and the anecdotes are a bit much. I don't have postnatal depletion necessarily, but thought this might be useful/of interest. I was not impressed. I was a bit taken aback when I realized the author was a man, and while it is more useful than I thought it would be, not for me. He is a doctor and talks about the medical reasons many women are extremely depleted post-baby, and I liked that he recommends alternative therapies and medicines, but he does have a bit too much of a doctor hat on, and the anecdotes are a bit much. I don't have postnatal depletion necessarily, but thought this might be useful/of interest.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    After a super strong start with nutritional information that had me up-in-arms yelling: yes! (in my head), my interest tapered off once the author got to the chapter on sleep and incorporating yoga. Past that and I really struggled to finish. That said, the nutrition/supplement information is enough for me to recommend this to my friends, and I did, but take the rest with a grain of salt. Or just don’t finish it 🤷‍♀️

  21. 4 out of 5

    Morgan Evans

    Where to start? I totally missed the "Goop Press"on the cover until I was almost finished reading. This book was written by a man, the first chapter was interesting but then the rest of the book was just general advice about taking vitamins, eating obscure healthy food that I'm not would be easily accessible to most people, getting more sleep and exercise, general advice. I think you could definitely skip this read but 5 stars for clever title and first chapter. Where to start? I totally missed the "Goop Press"on the cover until I was almost finished reading. This book was written by a man, the first chapter was interesting but then the rest of the book was just general advice about taking vitamins, eating obscure healthy food that I'm not would be easily accessible to most people, getting more sleep and exercise, general advice. I think you could definitely skip this read but 5 stars for clever title and first chapter.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I love the concept and wish the mainstream US doctors would get on board with helping women bounce back from pregnancy and breastfeeding. Some parts had some excellent advice, some were a little over the top for me, but I’ve made some changes as a result of reading this book that I hope will help me feel closer to normal soon.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mimi McLemore

    This book is an amazing resource for new moms, Particularly those of us who feel like no matter what we do we are drowning. Everything that you described is work myself and Brent have experience in childbirth. It’s great to hear that this has a name now and that there is steps that you can take to alleviate that sense of loss and anxiety.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Joanna

    The nutritional explanations and suggestions here are smart, and it's comforting to know improving your health starts there. But if you're already into nutrient-dense eating, you probably won't gain a lot of new insight here. (There are chapters with safe post-natal exercises and good recommendations for better sleep hygiene but the food portion is the largest.) The nutritional explanations and suggestions here are smart, and it's comforting to know improving your health starts there. But if you're already into nutrient-dense eating, you probably won't gain a lot of new insight here. (There are chapters with safe post-natal exercises and good recommendations for better sleep hygiene but the food portion is the largest.)

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Every mother of a newborn or young child who has felt "not quite herself" since giving birth, read this! You may finish it and have further question, but the knowledge and wisdom imparted will help you identify and articulate how you're feeling and communicate clearly with your healthcare provider which is a step in the right direction. 👏👏👏 Every mother of a newborn or young child who has felt "not quite herself" since giving birth, read this! You may finish it and have further question, but the knowledge and wisdom imparted will help you identify and articulate how you're feeling and communicate clearly with your healthcare provider which is a step in the right direction. 👏👏👏

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    As a postpartum physical therapist, this book contains information I want all new and expecting moms to know. The fourth trimester is a critical time that does not receive enough attention. This book provides specific practical advice and is written in a way that is approachable to women and their health care providers alike.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kim Duffy

    I was pleasantly surprised by some parts of this book and totally put off by others. It had more cultural context and reflections on traditional cultures than I expected and enjoyed. There were a couple of parts where we go too far into the weeds particularly around testing for micronutrients that I could have done without.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lexi

    Some good information that is great for psychoeducation. Living in the U.S. though would require a huge cultural shift in terms of policies and Care and without that, would make a lot of the suggestions difficult to implement. I think this book is a great start to that conversation though!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I was really excited to read this one and started it in September, right after giving birth to my second son. I could really relate to the feelings the author described about feeling depleted in motherhood, and also enjoyed his descriptions of the way new mothers are treated in other cultures and countries immediately after giving birth. It made me realize that things are quite backwards here in the US, and I wish that doctors and other people who are around new moms could read those parts. That I was really excited to read this one and started it in September, right after giving birth to my second son. I could really relate to the feelings the author described about feeling depleted in motherhood, and also enjoyed his descriptions of the way new mothers are treated in other cultures and countries immediately after giving birth. It made me realize that things are quite backwards here in the US, and I wish that doctors and other people who are around new moms could read those parts. That said, I struggled a lot with the rest of the book. I thought it was far too clinical for the average reader, and contained a lot of things that perhaps only medical professionals could understand. It was way too specific with various vitamins, minerals, etc. and read a lot like a textbook. In one word, it was boring. I think that doctors, particularly OBs, could REALLY benefit from the information in this book, but that it's too dry and complicated for most everyone else who might be reading it.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Kase-Janowski

    Ughhhh. I wish I had read this book when I got pregnant. Some of it may feel a little bit like woo, but I think there’s a lot of common sense here, that a layperson wouldn’t know unless you were a doctor. I

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