Hot Best Seller

Proyecto Amanda: Invisible

Availability: Ready to download

Callie, Hal y Nia son tres chicos que, accidentalmente, se encuentran en el despacho del director del instituto; aparentemente,no tienen nada en común... solo que conocen a una chica que se llama Amanda. Pero,se dan cuenta de que lo poco que saben de su vida es totalmente falso. ¿Quién es Amanda? ¿Qué relación la une con los tres chicos? Una novela de misterio que no dejar Callie, Hal y Nia son tres chicos que, accidentalmente, se encuentran en el despacho del director del instituto; aparentemente,no tienen nada en común... solo que conocen a una chica que se llama Amanda. Pero,se dan cuenta de que lo poco que saben de su vida es totalmente falso. ¿Quién es Amanda? ¿Qué relación la une con los tres chicos? Una novela de misterio que no dejará indiferente a nadie.


Compare

Callie, Hal y Nia son tres chicos que, accidentalmente, se encuentran en el despacho del director del instituto; aparentemente,no tienen nada en común... solo que conocen a una chica que se llama Amanda. Pero,se dan cuenta de que lo poco que saben de su vida es totalmente falso. ¿Quién es Amanda? ¿Qué relación la une con los tres chicos? Una novela de misterio que no dejar Callie, Hal y Nia son tres chicos que, accidentalmente, se encuentran en el despacho del director del instituto; aparentemente,no tienen nada en común... solo que conocen a una chica que se llama Amanda. Pero,se dan cuenta de que lo poco que saben de su vida es totalmente falso. ¿Quién es Amanda? ¿Qué relación la une con los tres chicos? Una novela de misterio que no dejará indiferente a nadie.

30 review for Proyecto Amanda: Invisible

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mirabelle

    I found myself at the bookstore yesterday looking for a good stand-alone book to read. I found this one. I liked the cover and the plot intrigued me, so I bought it. By the first page, I was already irked. One of my pet-peeves is designer label dropping. Urg. I just can't explain how much this annoys me. Let me tell you, there was plenty of label dropping. 'She opened her COACH bag', etc. oh, and 'she watched a REESE WITHERSPOON movie'. Current pop-culture references irk me too.. haha That was jus I found myself at the bookstore yesterday looking for a good stand-alone book to read. I found this one. I liked the cover and the plot intrigued me, so I bought it. By the first page, I was already irked. One of my pet-peeves is designer label dropping. Urg. I just can't explain how much this annoys me. Let me tell you, there was plenty of label dropping. 'She opened her COACH bag', etc. oh, and 'she watched a REESE WITHERSPOON movie'. Current pop-culture references irk me too.. haha That was just the beginning. We soon find out that the protagonist is in 9th grade. I usually prefer YA book about 16, 17, 18+ years old. A first I thought there was going to be a flash-forward a la Pretty Little Liars, but no such thing in sight. I decided to give our little 9th grader a chance, but alas, she disappointed. I found her completely unsympathetic. I did not feel the least bit emphatic towards her. Even when the parental/money issues were revealed. Callista was way too much a stereo-typical popular girl for me. Of course, she says that she's not 'as pretty' as her fiends and, etc. but that did not help me relate with her at all. I found her extremely snobby and annoying. And then there was the 'not to be snobby, but...' WELL, YOU'RE BEING SNOBBY. I really wanted to knock some sense into this girl. She could not stop critiquing the social-outcasts. I just could not relate. I found the writing juvenile. I'm not saying that the author is not talented. I'm just saying that the writing style seemed for a younger audience. I was very close to giving up by the fifth chapter. Then, I re-searched the book to see what others were thinking about it. That did it for me. I found out the book was the first in a 8 book series, and that it was meant to be very interactive - website and all. Well, no thank you. I just couldn't do it. I gave up. My rating might be a bit unfair since I gave up so early on... but I just couldn't do it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jake Rideout

    I was a little dubious about this at first. It sounded an awful lot like Paper Towns by John Green: girl commits wild act of vandalism, girl disappears, friends don't know what happened to girl and have to follow clues to find her. Beyond these basic plot points, though, Invisible i is nothing like Paper Towns. For a start, the main character, Callie, is a "mean girl" type who is hiding all the abnormal things about herself in order to fit in with the popular crowd. When her secret friend Amanda I was a little dubious about this at first. It sounded an awful lot like Paper Towns by John Green: girl commits wild act of vandalism, girl disappears, friends don't know what happened to girl and have to follow clues to find her. Beyond these basic plot points, though, Invisible i is nothing like Paper Towns. For a start, the main character, Callie, is a "mean girl" type who is hiding all the abnormal things about herself in order to fit in with the popular crowd. When her secret friend Amanda disappears, she is thrown together with two social pariahs and blamed for Amanda's last act of vandalism. She has to balance her desire to find Amanda with her desire to hide their friendship from the "I-girls," Kelli, Heidi, and Traci. By itself, this is a well-developed mystery with a really interesting protagonist. In addition to being the first of a new series, though, this is also an interactive project where readers can posit theories about Amanda, contribute music and art to the project website, and generally determine the trajectory of the series via the website www.theamandaproject.com. It's a really cool idea and I'm excited to see what kind of response it gets. In any case, the book is great and I highly recommend it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rene Kirkpatrick

    I have to tell you that I really wasn't expecting to like this as much as I did! A girl moves into town and starts at a new school. She makes a friend. Or two, or three. and then she disappears. All three of the people she makes friends with are certain they are her ONLY friend. When she disappears, the principal calls them all in to the office to find out what they know- Of course, they don't know why the others are in the office. It doesn't take too long for them to begin to get suspicious and I have to tell you that I really wasn't expecting to like this as much as I did! A girl moves into town and starts at a new school. She makes a friend. Or two, or three. and then she disappears. All three of the people she makes friends with are certain they are her ONLY friend. When she disappears, the principal calls them all in to the office to find out what they know- Of course, they don't know why the others are in the office. It doesn't take too long for them to begin to get suspicious and realize that she lied to them and that they have to work together to piece together the clues she's left behind. Really a fun book, psychologically fun. I can't wait to read the next one. Which I noticed should be coming soon!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    I picked up this book because I thought it was the newest book by one of my more beloved authors, Melissa Kantor, and was really surprised when the book cover credited Stella Lennon. So I thought, "Did I pick up the wrong book? And who the heck is Stella Lennon?" After much Googling, I realized that Stella Lennon was just an alias. Kantor actually DID write this book; it's just that the Amanda Project is a series, and the next two books are written by different authors that they all decided to j I picked up this book because I thought it was the newest book by one of my more beloved authors, Melissa Kantor, and was really surprised when the book cover credited Stella Lennon. So I thought, "Did I pick up the wrong book? And who the heck is Stella Lennon?" After much Googling, I realized that Stella Lennon was just an alias. Kantor actually DID write this book; it's just that the Amanda Project is a series, and the next two books are written by different authors that they all decided to just use one name for the series. After I realized that, I could finally go back to enjoying the book. The first thing I'd like to mention are the pictures. Simply adorable. I was reading this on the subway, and when I came upon the first image, I thought, "Aw, isn't this cute? The person who'd borrowed the book before me drew a little flower for me. And oh, wow, s/he drew me a bird too! What an artist!" After much inspection, I realized, no, someone hadn't left me drawings, the illustrations were part of the novel. Silly me, right? I liked it, overall. I love how the story unfolds with the action, instead of setting it up tortuously with irrelevant information. Everything you read here is related to Amanda, some way or another, and further provides clues into finding her. Even when it's about Callie's life, it's also about Amanda. Amanda still remains an enigma, but I'm intrigued by her. She's pretty awesome. People are probably going to somehow link her to Margo from Paper Towns, but let's not. Margo was annoying and seemed childish at points with her outrageous clues. Amanda, however, is really smart. She creates all these alias for herself and everything she says and does fall straight into pieces that it's hard not to applaud her intellect and careful planning. Even though she's driving the main characters crazing with her cryptic messages, I've sunk so deep into the mystery that I just need to know what's going to happen.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah

    I quit reading this because it's book 1 of 8, but the whole back cover is a breathless discussion of how readers can log onto the book's website and discuss where they think Amanda might be, and how they can influence the arc and their ideas might make it into later books! What this says to me is: I don't know what the fuck my plan is for the 7 books I have left to write. And if you don't know what your plan is, why should I invest my time? THAT'S WHAT I THOUGHT. I quit reading this because it's book 1 of 8, but the whole back cover is a breathless discussion of how readers can log onto the book's website and discuss where they think Amanda might be, and how they can influence the arc and their ideas might make it into later books! What this says to me is: I don't know what the fuck my plan is for the 7 books I have left to write. And if you don't know what your plan is, why should I invest my time? THAT'S WHAT I THOUGHT.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Omg so I just remembered this book that I read about 6 years ago. Hahaha I picked it up in the bookstore because it had my name in the title. I also remember how disappointed and confused I was after reading it. Ah memories.

  7. 5 out of 5

    The Book Whisperer (aka Boof)

    What a quirky little book this is! I had great fun reading it. It even has its own website – yeah it’s aimed at teenagers but I still had a blast reading it. Invisible I is the first book in The Amanda Project series. It starts with three pupils – Callie, Hal and Nia who are all in the same grade but have nothing in common – being summoned to the Principals office and accused of knowing where Amanda Valentino has disappeared to. They all claim ignorance to even knowing Amanda but it turns out tha What a quirky little book this is! I had great fun reading it. It even has its own website – yeah it’s aimed at teenagers but I still had a blast reading it. Invisible I is the first book in The Amanda Project series. It starts with three pupils – Callie, Hal and Nia who are all in the same grade but have nothing in common – being summoned to the Principals office and accused of knowing where Amanda Valentino has disappeared to. They all claim ignorance to even knowing Amanda but it turns out that they had all been picked as “guides” for Amanda when she joined the school and nobody else knew about their friendships with the quirky, independent Amanda. Although Callie, Hal and Nia previously had nothing to do with each other, especially Callie who was a member of the I-Girls (think Mean Girls), they find themselves teaming up to find out what happened to their secret friend, Amanda Valentino. Who was she? The plot thickens as they discover that they had all been told different things by her (where she was from, where she lived etc). They all discover that Amanda had each given them an animal totem that represented who they are too. This first book in the series is narrated by Callie Leary, who has major problems of her own and is also trying to cope with the disappearance of her own Mum as well as her friend. I believe that the second book is narrated by Hal (which leaves me to guess that there will be a third by Nia). In this first book Hal’s younger sister, Cornelia, sets up a website called The Amanda Project to help them find out where she is. This website actually exists and is great fun. I did the totem test and it turns out that my totem is a Raven (which means I am an intellec – oh yeah!!). Also, the book itself has the cutest illustrations in the pages:

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ange

    It's very obvious to me that this was totally inspired by the Pretty Little Liars sensation. Also, I know this is the beginning of a book series (that wasn't completed, I guess) and that's why not a lot is revealed in this first installment (well, basically nothing is revealed), I was just left with a lot of questions, but I don't think I'm going to get the answer to most of them since this series wasn't even completed. But well, this was on my TBR since FOREVER ago, so I felt I had to read it t It's very obvious to me that this was totally inspired by the Pretty Little Liars sensation. Also, I know this is the beginning of a book series (that wasn't completed, I guess) and that's why not a lot is revealed in this first installment (well, basically nothing is revealed), I was just left with a lot of questions, but I don't think I'm going to get the answer to most of them since this series wasn't even completed. But well, this was on my TBR since FOREVER ago, so I felt I had to read it to finally knock it off the shelf.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mana

    It was pretty interesting, but it kept repeating some of the same lines over and over again to where it was noticable , but not annoying. I think that it's one of thos books you breeze through without remembering anyithing o.O It was pretty interesting, but it kept repeating some of the same lines over and over again to where it was noticable , but not annoying. I think that it's one of thos books you breeze through without remembering anyithing o.O

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kelsey

    I read the book "The Amanda Project" When I first started reading this book I was confused, because it talked about this group of girls called the IGirls. They are a group of girls who think that they run the whole school just because their families are well known in the world, as famous people or people who own there own business in the community. But what the other girls in the group didn't know was that one of there friends Callie was friends with this girl Amanda, and something about Amanda I read the book "The Amanda Project" When I first started reading this book I was confused, because it talked about this group of girls called the IGirls. They are a group of girls who think that they run the whole school just because their families are well known in the world, as famous people or people who own there own business in the community. But what the other girls in the group didn't know was that one of there friends Callie was friends with this girl Amanda, and something about Amanda is that no one likes her because they all think that she is weird, strange, also that she doesn't fit in with everyone else. Callie then finds out that Amanda is friends with other people that she didn't think Amanda would hangout with. Once you get further into the book you find out that Callie and the other 3 people that Amanda is hanging out with named Nia, & Hal that all three of them which are Callie, Hal, & Nia have something in common. Which that Amanda is playing a game with all three of them. They get blamed for things that Amanda has done like, spray paint the principle's car, trash his office, all three of them have henna tattoos of animals that Amanda thinks represents them. Then you find out that Amanda has put something into each of there lockers a note or a clue to where she could be, because she is missing. Then they find out that Amanda has told them different things that aren't true like where she lives, where she works, what her last name is, & They have know clue who Amanda really is because their friendship with her has been a lie the whole time. I hope that everyone reads it and the rest of the series. Overall, I think that people who like mysteries, Drama, & Adventure this is a book for you. I would give this 3 stars because I think that the author could've had a romance between Callie & Hal after her & Lee break up. If they made a movie out of this series I would watch it to see who would play them.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    As the new girl in math class, Amanda Valentino is the most unique, mysterious, and independent person that Callie has ever met, and she has chosen Callie to be her "guide" through life at a new school. But when Amanda mysteriously goes missing, Callie finds herself and two other "friends" of Amanda's getting accused of knowing information about her whereabouts. The three uncover that Amanda has lied about her life to each of them, causing them to wonder who Amanda really is and where she could As the new girl in math class, Amanda Valentino is the most unique, mysterious, and independent person that Callie has ever met, and she has chosen Callie to be her "guide" through life at a new school. But when Amanda mysteriously goes missing, Callie finds herself and two other "friends" of Amanda's getting accused of knowing information about her whereabouts. The three uncover that Amanda has lied about her life to each of them, causing them to wonder who Amanda really is and where she could possibly be. I read this for a "Youth Literature in the Digital Realm" course, and though the "digital" aspect of this book was unfortunately lacking eight years after publishing, I did enjoy the missing girl story that the novel sets up. It doesn't function that well as a stand-alone novel and leaves many questions unanswered, but it sets up the mystery in a way that will encourage you to read the other novels in the series.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Gwen

    As a junior high librarian, being an adult reading YA lit is either an occupational hazard or a job requirement and I'm not sure which way this book causes me to think. I don't know why I picked it up, but I did. The characterization of the three main character teenagers was believable, but I hate educators, administrators and parents written as such heavily negative stereotypes. I was willing to suspend belief until I noticed that the character, Amanda, was named as/after one of the authors. Th As a junior high librarian, being an adult reading YA lit is either an occupational hazard or a job requirement and I'm not sure which way this book causes me to think. I don't know why I picked it up, but I did. The characterization of the three main character teenagers was believable, but I hate educators, administrators and parents written as such heavily negative stereotypes. I was willing to suspend belief until I noticed that the character, Amanda, was named as/after one of the authors. The further I read the more obvious it became that this story wasn't wrapping up in one book and I definitely had no plans to read more books to drag out this ridiculousness. The grains of a story line with Callie's missing mom were weak, but the unexpected turn of events near the end of book one (of a 4 or 5 book series) AND the fact that the next book continues the story from another character's POV has me willing to read on.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lucy ♡

    I really enjoyed this book once I got into it. I love anything that has a bit of mystery about it. I wish she described what features the characters in the book had more so I could picture them better. All she really seemed to describe was their hair and outfit. It was a page turner and couldn’t put it down but once I finished the book, Amanda was still missing. I realise it is a series of books but I was hoping their would be a big clue like a good cliffhanger at the end of the book but nope. T I really enjoyed this book once I got into it. I love anything that has a bit of mystery about it. I wish she described what features the characters in the book had more so I could picture them better. All she really seemed to describe was their hair and outfit. It was a page turner and couldn’t put it down but once I finished the book, Amanda was still missing. I realise it is a series of books but I was hoping their would be a big clue like a good cliffhanger at the end of the book but nope. The ending disappointed me. I can’t afford to buy all the rest of the books yet but if you are someone who can afford to buy them all then I would recommend it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Amber Smith

    It took me a while to read it as it didn't capture my attention as fully as other books can, but I was intrigued enough to finish it. It wasn't until closer to the end that I became more enthralled and the book leaves off enough that I want to read the next book. This book in the series is told by Callie, a popular girl. Her speech is just high school enough, but doesn't annoy me. I hope the next book, told by a different perspective, is as enthralling. It took me a while to read it as it didn't capture my attention as fully as other books can, but I was intrigued enough to finish it. It wasn't until closer to the end that I became more enthralled and the book leaves off enough that I want to read the next book. This book in the series is told by Callie, a popular girl. Her speech is just high school enough, but doesn't annoy me. I hope the next book, told by a different perspective, is as enthralling.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Veronica Ardary

    I had originally read this series when it first came out, but recently something reminded me of it and I couldn't recall what it was all about, so I decided to re-read it. I did recall that I really liked it and I can say that that holds true today. It was a very easy read and held my interest from the beginning. I could identify with the characters and the story was very interesting. I had originally read this series when it first came out, but recently something reminded me of it and I couldn't recall what it was all about, so I decided to re-read it. I did recall that I really liked it and I can say that that holds true today. It was a very easy read and held my interest from the beginning. I could identify with the characters and the story was very interesting.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Goodwin

    I absolutely loved reading this book. It kept me wondering where was Amanda, Chole, or whomever she said she was. The intensive feeling I got from this story really made me wish that there was more information without using my own imagination! The way this book is written, you get to personally add your touch as to what happen with Amanda!!! I give this a definite 100%!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Keshia Swaim

    Interesting concept, though I am too late for the interactive element of this story. Fairly well written, but Amanda just doesn't feel like a teen to me. And there are too many story lines hanging out there. Interesting concept, though I am too late for the interactive element of this story. Fairly well written, but Amanda just doesn't feel like a teen to me. And there are too many story lines hanging out there.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Heather S.

    I enjoyed Callie's character development throughout the story. I enjoyed Callie's character development throughout the story.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Faith

    I think that the book is really interesting.

  20. 4 out of 5

    After-Dahlia

    read this book!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Codie

    This book didnt keep me interested as much as I hoped it would, just didn't care for it too much at all. This book didnt keep me interested as much as I hoped it would, just didn't care for it too much at all.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jesse Yates

    I love mystery books. So I really liked this one. Who is Amanda really?

  23. 4 out of 5

    Joliw

    who does thorn hill blame for spraying his car

  24. 5 out of 5

    Princess

    I genuinely enjoyed the book

  25. 4 out of 5

    Madina Habib

    I really love reading books like this and I think after reading this book, I had a really long book slump mostly because of how many times I would pick it up and go over the chapters again

  26. 5 out of 5

    Miranda

    There was a lot of potential for The Amanda Project but it just didn’t come together. I was intrigued by the plot and some of the plot points the story introduced, but there was a lot of stuff that kept it from being anything remarkable. The first major thing was the writing; it was very passive and there was a whole lot of telling and not showing. Whenever the main character Callie reacted to something, she would describe it as such: “What he just said made my stomach turn and I felt sick and n There was a lot of potential for The Amanda Project but it just didn’t come together. I was intrigued by the plot and some of the plot points the story introduced, but there was a lot of stuff that kept it from being anything remarkable. The first major thing was the writing; it was very passive and there was a whole lot of telling and not showing. Whenever the main character Callie reacted to something, she would describe it as such: “What he just said made my stomach turn and I felt sick and nervous.” It’s always laid bare for us but there’s no describing how her emotions really impact her body or her thoughts. I never really felt drawn into the scene because of it and I never really felt connected to the characters in the way that I should have. Whenever Callie mentioned her missing mother I couldn’t bring myself to care, and that’s probably not the reaction I should have had. The dialogue was often very clunky and never felt particularly teenagerish, only the impression of what an adult thinks teenagers sound like these days. At one point Callie even internally thinks “OMG” after a cute guy says something to her. There was a lot of use of words such as “like” and “totally” in an attempt to sound like how a teenager would talk, but it just came across as kind of sad. Despite the issue with the writing I was rather interested in the story, which does turn out to have a lot of promise if only the writing weren’t so shaky. There turns out to possibly be a connection between Callie’s mother, who is missing, Amanda’s disappearance and the later attack of another character. I was actually interested in seeing where this could go, but the author spent much more time with Callie’s group of friends, the I-Girls (so named because each of their names ends with “I”. Yes, I do find this stupid and stereotypical) and that dragged the story down by a lot. In fact the entire book just feels like a big, 320 page prologue for the next book in the series. The basics are laid down and the set up is done, but it makes for a very boring read. The characters were rather flat and one dimensional. The only one I was really interested in was Nia, one of Amanda’s other friends, but she doesn’t really progress past the cold, snarky girl with issues stereotype. There’s also Callie’s other group of friends, led by Heidi, who all have about as much depth as a shallow puddle. They’re just the stereotypical “Mean Girls”, and they serve only as a cheap, easy way of giving Callie some very basic character growth. She realizes they aren’t really her friends, her life has changed, she joins new friends, Heidi promises she’ll be sorry, etc. I’ve seen it done before and it was old then, too. Also, this may just be a little nit pick and I don’t know that it’s ever stated what decade this takes place in (though I would assume somewhere in the 2000s), but at one point the three main characters ask someone else to build a website for them to help them find Amanda. This would be fine, except apparently these three modern day teenagers, who very likely grew up in the age of the internet, don’t even know what a domain name is. Or HTML. I can get not knowing how to build a website from scratch, and I would have been fine if Kantor had left it at the three of them not knowing that kind of advanced HTML. But then to have it so that they don’t even know the basics of internet stuff? It was beyond ridiculous and it really took me out of the story. Overall The Amanda Project is just an “okay” novel. It’s a very washed down mystery thriller for young adults, and I do mean washed down. The pacing is shaky, as is the writing, the characters are one dimensional and I could never really care about them. I was interested in what happened to Amanda and just who she was, and the connection between her, Callie’s mother and other plot points in the novel. Those were genuinely interesting and I wish Kantor had spent more time on them instead of other parts that just felt tacked on to bump up the word count. I may pick up the next in the series just to see how the mystery is expanded on, but it won’t be any time soon.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    Amanda Valentino is not your typical high school student. She’s mysterious and eccentric, and on top of her “I don’t give a damn what you think” attitude, she’s also the new girl at Endeavor High School. And as anyone who’s ever been a freshman at a new high school or a “new kid” in any grade knows it’s never easy. Although Amanda makes it seem not only easy, but also fun if you can imagine that. Our narrator, Callie, is part of the “I girls” which consist of your typical, yet true to life “mean Amanda Valentino is not your typical high school student. She’s mysterious and eccentric, and on top of her “I don’t give a damn what you think” attitude, she’s also the new girl at Endeavor High School. And as anyone who’s ever been a freshman at a new high school or a “new kid” in any grade knows it’s never easy. Although Amanda makes it seem not only easy, but also fun if you can imagine that. Our narrator, Callie, is part of the “I girls” which consist of your typical, yet true to life “mean girls,” but Callie isn’t as much like her “friends” as they think she is. Callie is compassionate and real, she doesn’t have the perfect life and she’s not the happy-go-lucky girl that her schoolmates think she is. Really, the only friend she has is Amanda, her mother disappeared, and her father has decided to drink his way through their wine cellar because he believes his wife has left him. Everything continues to work like clockwork until one morning Callie is summoned to the ever annoying and rude Vice Principal, Mr. Thornhill, and is told that she and the two other people that have been summoned to his office are in trouble for something that Amanda has done (I love the car! Just saying!) and unless they tell him where she is, they will be punished. As Callie looks at two people she’s not friends with and is convinced that neither is Amanda, she begins to wonder more and more, “Where is Amanda?” The other two people involved are Hal and Nia. Neither are in Callie’s circle of friends, and neither are people she particularly wants in her circle, but there’s something about the connection to Amanda that they share that just might bring them together. Despite the petty differences and the typical high school girl style remarks and looks Callie and Nia give one another, it’s fairly easy to see where this is leading. They will be friends, even if it’s just to find out what has happened to Amanda. I would have preferred to know more about Amanda than her penchant for wigs, wild attire, and a few minor details, but I still found her to be my favorite character. I don’t think characters were mentioned in this story by mistake, I think each character has their role or at least will in one of the seven sequels planned for The Amanda Project. I also think Mr. Thornhill plays a bigger role in Callie’s life than she realizes, but in all my years of soap operas and living in fictional worlds where anything is possible, I think I know where he’ll play in (and I think older teens and adults may realize it too). Overall, I found it to be a good start to a teen mystery. It’s a book that’s not all about sex, drugs, or violence and while I’m definitely no prude, I find that totally refreshing. Invisible i is a fun, fairly quick read. It’s totally cute and has some really fun art throughout the book (although I have the ARC and it’s missing a bunch of it, there was still some that was great) [I have now seen the finished copy, and it's got some totally awesome artwork now, like seriously:]. I wish there had been more answers by the end; it did leave me curious about where this series is going and I will be back in July 2010 to find out! Plus, there’s a pretty cool interactive website attached to The Amanda Project, in which you can share your opinions, theories, and artwork about what happened to Amanda. There’s also a shop to buy some cool stuff inspired by Amanda and some The Amanda Project gear (I love the cute little buttons). If you’re looking for a cute, light mystery then it’s something you should check it out. Middle grade girls would totally love it, and fans of Mean Girls (Lindsay Lohan/Rachel McAdams movie that almost all of us know and most love) would probably enjoy it too!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    Here was another book that I wasn't sure what I'd be getting into once I cracked the cover but I can tell you right now, I'm so glad I did. I've said it before and I'll say it again: I don't normally (nor purposely) read mysteries. I just tend to not gravitate towards them in a bookstore or wherever. This happened to be another BEA grab that I made so I was just blindly grabbing. From the blurb, if this were on a shelf, I probably wouldn't have given it a second chance. Boy would that have been m Here was another book that I wasn't sure what I'd be getting into once I cracked the cover but I can tell you right now, I'm so glad I did. I've said it before and I'll say it again: I don't normally (nor purposely) read mysteries. I just tend to not gravitate towards them in a bookstore or wherever. This happened to be another BEA grab that I made so I was just blindly grabbing. From the blurb, if this were on a shelf, I probably wouldn't have given it a second chance. Boy would that have been my loss. This is a perfect example of a blurb failing to live up to what's actually in the book and what you can miss by not giving something a chance. I was immediately sucked into the mystery of this book. I mean, it started right on page one when Callie gets called into the principle's office. The point of view is kept so strictly in Callie's eyes that the events unfold as Callie sees them and not before. The reader isn't privy to anything that the character isn't. What I really liked about the writing was that it was devoid of unnatural and contrived infodumps. All of the information about Callie's life, about Amanda, about Hal and Nia that she knows, is divulged through various mind-wandering memories, pseudo-flashbacks and inserts that are actually relevant to what's going on the moment they happen. The dialogue and the narrative is so realistic that it borders on stream of consciousness but with punctuation and is actually readable. Along those lines, the dialogue, the slang, wasn't overbearing. Again, it was realistic without being obnoxious. Of course you're going to have those chicks that talk more Valley than the rest but that kind of language was limited to them. Everyone has their own speech, each character was clearly defined in multiple dimensions and they all, even the I-Girls, stood out. Everyone had their flaws and it made them all richer characters for it. While the ending, not to mention everything n between, opens up a hell of a lot more questions than it answers, the sub-plot, Callie's issues with the I-Girls, resolves. Sort of. Through the search for Amanda, she comes into herself, develops more self-confidence and her will gets stronger. She's finally able to be the person that she wants to be as opposed to the one her friends want her to be. It's an empowering story for anyone, especially for teen girls. This was an excellent book. So excellent that I even signed up at the website, www.theamandaproject.com, until I had register's remorse because I have other things I need to be doing, unfortunately. But I want to know more about Amanda. I want to figure out who she is. I want to speculate. Oh to have more hours in our days! This first book in the series has me jonsing for the rest of them. I just hope the rest live up to the fantastic-ness that this one offered up.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Callista Leary is a member of the popular clique at Endeavor High, the I-girls. However, she’s also secretly the friend and guide to eccentric new girl Amanda Valentino. When Amanda doesn’t show up for school, Callie finds herself called to the Vice Principal’s office along with Nia and Hal, two students outside her social stratum. It seems that Amanda has disappeared, leaving a bold statement behind linking the three students together. It seems Callie was not Amanda’s only guide, and the three Callista Leary is a member of the popular clique at Endeavor High, the I-girls. However, she’s also secretly the friend and guide to eccentric new girl Amanda Valentino. When Amanda doesn’t show up for school, Callie finds herself called to the Vice Principal’s office along with Nia and Hal, two students outside her social stratum. It seems that Amanda has disappeared, leaving a bold statement behind linking the three students together. It seems Callie was not Amanda’s only guide, and the three students soon find themselves working together to find out where-and even who-Amanda Valentino really is. Callie, the protagonist of the first in the eight book Amanda Project series, is definitely a bit off putting at first. She and the rest of her friends, the “I-girls” (so named for the fact that all their names end on the same vowel), come off as the worst popular high school girl stereotypes. Each is rather interchangeable, and their attitude towards the other students at the school make Callie and her friends appear as very unlikeable cardboard characters. It soon becomes apparent this isn’t the case, as the reader soon learns that Callie is very insecure about her social status as well as her home life. Much of Invisible I revolves around Callie’s struggle to become comfortable with herself as an individual, and she becomes much more sympathetic as the story goes on. The mystery of Amanda is intriguing in itself, although little is actually revealed in this book alone. What little information is discovered leads to the main characters finding out just how little they actually know about the titular character. Amanda herself is more a MacGuffin than a character, appearing only in flashbacks. There is also a secondary mystery revolving around the disappearance of Callie’s mother that may or may not be connected to the major plot. Also of note is the book’s tie-in alternate reality game at www.theamandaproject.com. In-universe the website is created by the three main characters (Callie, Hal, and Nia,) and readers can share information about Amanda that may be incorporated in future novels. It’s a fun concept, and it will be interesting to see how it works out in regards to the progression of the story. The cover is credited to “Stella Lennon”, which as the website explains, is a pseudonym that will encompass the entire series. Each novel will be written by a different credited author, with the next two books set to be told from the perspectives of Hal and Nia. Invisible I was a pleasant surprise, and The Amanda Project looks to be a fun series, with an intriguing mystery and good character development. This review was based on a review copy provided by Barnes and Noble’s online community.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Merry M

    Citation: Kantor, M. (2009). Invisible I. New York: HarperTeen. Age: 13+ Format: Book and website Genre: Mystery This is a cross-platform story which was developed as a marketing premise by all appearances. There is a series of books about a character who goes missing but the story is left unresolved so that young girls will contribute their own stories, poems and songs about what they thing happened to the character on the online site. If they purchase anything from it, then all the better. The st Citation: Kantor, M. (2009). Invisible I. New York: HarperTeen. Age: 13+ Format: Book and website Genre: Mystery This is a cross-platform story which was developed as a marketing premise by all appearances. There is a series of books about a character who goes missing but the story is left unresolved so that young girls will contribute their own stories, poems and songs about what they thing happened to the character on the online site. If they purchase anything from it, then all the better. The story is not terribly well written and contains frequent references to trademarked companies and items that will date the story in the years to come. The story is left unresolved which is frustrating. However, the story is aimed at the same audience as those for Twilight, so one should not have high expectations. This resource could be used to demonstrate some of the devices authors use to create mysteries, as an exploration of how the internet has changed many aspects of our lives, including recreational reading. It could also be used as a prompt for a creative writing piece for what the students think happened that they could then contribute to the website if they wished. The digital additions to the story are more of a “once you have read the story go here to find out what happened” type of addition, as opposed to being intrinsically linked with the book. The entire digital experience related to this book is for feedback and adaptations to the story. It is like completely authorised and encouraged fan-fiction. This could encourage creativity within the children who read the story. The interactivity is completely optional, therefore it does not actually add anything unless you wish it to. But the online side may be very beneficial to some of those who like exploring multiple ideas of how things should have gone. The presentation is very much aimed at teenage girls and is very pink. However, the design is good and would be appreciated by the target market. The accessibility of the book may not match the accessibility of the online side and vice versa, because the book may be obtained very cheaply from an opportunity shop for example by someone who has no access to the internet, or could be found as something interesting on the internet but being a child may not be able to locate a copy of the book. The premise on which this book and website were created is very good, however, it is poorly done as it seems to be more of a marketing strategy as opposed to something done for literary merits. It would be interesting to see future implementations of this sort of literature that do not use it as an opportunity to capitalise on children as a source of profit.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.