Hot Best Seller

The Fall of Lilith

Availability: Ready to download

In The Fall of Lilith, Vashti Quiroz-Vega crafts an irresistible new take on heaven and hell that boldly lays bare the passionate, conflicted natures of God’s first creations: the resplendent celestial beings known as angels. If you think you know their story, think again. Endowed with every gift of mind, body, and spirit, the angels reside in a paradise bounded by divine l In The Fall of Lilith, Vashti Quiroz-Vega crafts an irresistible new take on heaven and hell that boldly lays bare the passionate, conflicted natures of God’s first creations: the resplendent celestial beings known as angels. If you think you know their story, think again. Endowed with every gift of mind, body, and spirit, the angels reside in a paradise bounded by divine laws, chief of which are obedience to God, and celibacy. In all other things, the angels possess free will, that they may add in their own unique ways to God’s unfolding plan. Lilith, most exquisite of angels, finds the rules arbitrary and stifling. She yearns to follow no plan but her own: a plan that leads to the throne now occupied by God himself. With clever words and forbidden caresses, Lilith sows discontent among the angels. Soon the virus of rebellion has spread to the greatest of them all: Lucifer. Now, as angel is pitted against angel, old loyalties are betrayed and friendships broken. Lust, envy, pride, and ambition arise to shake the foundations of heaven . . . and beyond. For what begins as a war in paradise invades God’s newest creation, a planet known as Earth. It is there, in the garden called Eden, that Lilith, Lucifer, and the other rebel angels will seek a final desperate victory—or a venomous revenge. “[A] compelling narrative that . . . strays far from traditional biblical text . . . A well-written, descriptive, and dark creation story.”—Kirkus Reviews


Compare

In The Fall of Lilith, Vashti Quiroz-Vega crafts an irresistible new take on heaven and hell that boldly lays bare the passionate, conflicted natures of God’s first creations: the resplendent celestial beings known as angels. If you think you know their story, think again. Endowed with every gift of mind, body, and spirit, the angels reside in a paradise bounded by divine l In The Fall of Lilith, Vashti Quiroz-Vega crafts an irresistible new take on heaven and hell that boldly lays bare the passionate, conflicted natures of God’s first creations: the resplendent celestial beings known as angels. If you think you know their story, think again. Endowed with every gift of mind, body, and spirit, the angels reside in a paradise bounded by divine laws, chief of which are obedience to God, and celibacy. In all other things, the angels possess free will, that they may add in their own unique ways to God’s unfolding plan. Lilith, most exquisite of angels, finds the rules arbitrary and stifling. She yearns to follow no plan but her own: a plan that leads to the throne now occupied by God himself. With clever words and forbidden caresses, Lilith sows discontent among the angels. Soon the virus of rebellion has spread to the greatest of them all: Lucifer. Now, as angel is pitted against angel, old loyalties are betrayed and friendships broken. Lust, envy, pride, and ambition arise to shake the foundations of heaven . . . and beyond. For what begins as a war in paradise invades God’s newest creation, a planet known as Earth. It is there, in the garden called Eden, that Lilith, Lucifer, and the other rebel angels will seek a final desperate victory—or a venomous revenge. “[A] compelling narrative that . . . strays far from traditional biblical text . . . A well-written, descriptive, and dark creation story.”—Kirkus Reviews

30 review for The Fall of Lilith

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nia Markos

    In the reimagining of heaven and earth, Vashti Quiroz-Vega has created a vast and rich story with characters that leap off the pages. Taking names of angels we know from the Bible she has brought them brilliantly to life. Rebelling against God, Lilith seeks to cause discord amongst her fellow angels, in order to rise above her creator. Not to go into too much detail, but the motives, actions, and fallout are well mapped out and give the story believability.   With a unique twist on the fall to Ea In the reimagining of heaven and earth, Vashti Quiroz-Vega has created a vast and rich story with characters that leap off the pages. Taking names of angels we know from the Bible she has brought them brilliantly to life. Rebelling against God, Lilith seeks to cause discord amongst her fellow angels, in order to rise above her creator. Not to go into too much detail, but the motives, actions, and fallout are well mapped out and give the story believability.   With a unique twist on the fall to Earth, Ms. Vega builds on her creation. The Garden of Eden, Adam and Eve, is the final battleground over Lilith's need for vengeance against God.  I could not put this book down. The story hooked me and kept me glued to the pages. I highly recommend The Fall of Lilith. 

  2. 4 out of 5

    John W. Howell

    "In The Fall of Lilith, Vashti Quiroz-Vega crafts an irresistible new take on heaven and hell that boldly lays bare the passionate and conflicted natures of God’s first creations: the resplendent celestial beings known as angels." This one line from the book blurb gives the reader a hint of the story's direction. What the reader of that one line will not know is the richness and depth of the story and characters. Ms. Vega has taken familiar names from the story of creation in the bible and breat "In The Fall of Lilith, Vashti Quiroz-Vega crafts an irresistible new take on heaven and hell that boldly lays bare the passionate and conflicted natures of God’s first creations: the resplendent celestial beings known as angels." This one line from the book blurb gives the reader a hint of the story's direction. What the reader of that one line will not know is the richness and depth of the story and characters. Ms. Vega has taken familiar names from the story of creation in the bible and breathed so much life into them that you would swear they were alive and had appeared on your favorite television drama. Although I would like to give a blow by blow description of all the beautiful things about this book I want to keep the story a surprise for those who haven't read it yet. Even though most of us know the story of the fallen angels, it still would be a spoiler to tell a lot about what happens. Suffice it to say that the tableau on which the story is told is vast and rich with descriptions that can only be made by a gifted writer. The detail of each of the angle’s personalities and motivations will astound and please even the most fickle. The action contained in the battle scenes have been well researched and constructed in such a way that one would think Ms. Vega had been there when they occurred. The love scenes were tender where they needed to be and rough where roughness was natural without stepping over the line into gratuitousness. There are several unique twists on the classic story of Adam, Eve and the fallen angels that are uniquely creative. One gets a better idea of the origin of sin and how evil came into to the world. Well, at least according to Mr. Vega. All in all a story that had continuity and pace and was very hard to put down. I would recommend this book to anyone who likes well-written fiction that is part fantasy, part thriller, and all entertainment.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Frank David

    I don't even know where to begin. This book was so amazing. It took the story of the fallen angels to a whole new level. Initially, I had hoped it was a story of Lilith, the first wife of Adam from Hebrew lore, but I was pleasantly surprised by the story I received. The book is long, it is actually two books in one. The first is the story of the angels in Heaven. The reader is given a glimpse into the adolescence of God's holy beings. You watch as Lilith learns of her ability to manipulate her s I don't even know where to begin. This book was so amazing. It took the story of the fallen angels to a whole new level. Initially, I had hoped it was a story of Lilith, the first wife of Adam from Hebrew lore, but I was pleasantly surprised by the story I received. The book is long, it is actually two books in one. The first is the story of the angels in Heaven. The reader is given a glimpse into the adolescence of God's holy beings. You watch as Lilith learns of her ability to manipulate her siblings. She takes this gift and begins her desire to be as God. She convinces several of her weaker siblings to join her cause which leads to the battle for Heaven. Book two takes you on the fallen angels' journey across the new world God created, Earth. Here you experience the joys and pains as the angels discover their new gifts and realize they are free from the laws that bound them in Heaven. Vashti is an incredible author with an amazing imagination. She created characters that you can't help but fall in love with, and in some cases absolutely hate. She used the fallen angels to explain several mythological creatures and I found that to be ingenious. I highly recommend this book to anyone who enjoys fantasy.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ted Berner

    When I saw this book was about the Fallen Angels, I jumped at the chance to read it. This is the first book I have read from this author and I can happily say it won’t be my last! What a fun and interesting twist to the Biblical event of God’s perfects becoming not so perfect. Were there really celestial beings created by God that turned to defiance of his rules eons ago only to experience the pleasures of the flesh? According to the Dead Sea Scrolls and many other texts from around the world, t When I saw this book was about the Fallen Angels, I jumped at the chance to read it. This is the first book I have read from this author and I can happily say it won’t be my last! What a fun and interesting twist to the Biblical event of God’s perfects becoming not so perfect. Were there really celestial beings created by God that turned to defiance of his rules eons ago only to experience the pleasures of the flesh? According to the Dead Sea Scrolls and many other texts from around the world, this event did indeed take place and humans have suffered the consequences from their actions, even unto this day. Vashti Quiroz-Vega does a wonderful job with this first book in her fantasy series of the Fallen Angels. I'm so looking forward to reading the next!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Adele Marie Marie

    I found this novel exciting to read. New ideas about Lilith and the angels abound in this tale. Refreshing and entertaining it also makes you wonder a great deal, especially if you have a religious background. Well written and the descriptions were wonderful. A book I would go back and read again after the initial rush of images and excitement. The characters come to life. Lillith makes me angry, which is the sign of a good read. I recommend this book highly.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Balroop Singh

    ‘The Fall Of Lilith’ by Vashti Quiroz Vega has been listed as ‘dark fantasy' but I didn’t find it dark as my focus was more on God, the omniscient, the forgiving and the kind but He doesn’t seem to show any kindness towards His “perfect” Angels and banishes them from Floraison because some of them revolted against His arbitrary and oppressive laws. The oath of celibacy and obedience are the two pledges, which the Angels have made but attraction – the natural instinct that they have been endowed ‘The Fall Of Lilith’ by Vashti Quiroz Vega has been listed as ‘dark fantasy' but I didn’t find it dark as my focus was more on God, the omniscient, the forgiving and the kind but He doesn’t seem to show any kindness towards His “perfect” Angels and banishes them from Floraison because some of them revolted against His arbitrary and oppressive laws. The oath of celibacy and obedience are the two pledges, which the Angels have made but attraction – the natural instinct that they have been endowed with, is too much to brush aside! Lilith, the rebel, the influencer who could enchant and seduce whosoever she wants, takes the lead and raises her own army to defy the Almighty and wrest control out of His hands. A powerful and incredible move but she is confident enough to win! The consequences are unbelievable and the suffering ineffable. Severe punishments are inflicted upon those who dared to question God’s power. Beelzebub suffered the most as he was gagged and chained and got a watery prison in a river for obvious reasons. The book celebrates the power of female dominance in the form of Lilith. She is individualistic, headstrong, overambitious and deceitful who could stoop to every level to wreak vengeance and accomplish her motives. Fired by the desire for divine power, she aspires to create her own wonders. Undeterred by the punishment she had to face for entering the forbidden garden in which she was tortured for three days, she continues on the chosen path. Not only is she instrumental in stirring the passions of males around her but also succeeds in leading many of them astray, assuring them that they possessed the potential to vanquish God and His loyal celestial beings. I have always liked strong female protagonists but this one I hate! There lies the success of the author! Vashti conveys some subtle messages too …we may detest rules but they “create stability, discipline, and promote safety.” Goodness and evil are two inevitable aspects of life, which cannot be eliminated because they were created by some sinister forces, which refuse to appreciate virtues.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jaye Tomas

    Once I started this, I couldn't put it down. Not your usual, run of the mill fallen angel story. Completely unique. Impatient for the next...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Colleen Chesebro

    The Fall of Lilith is a high fantasy that delivers the reader into the imaginative realm of Floraison, better known as Heaven. Forget what you learned in Sunday School. This version of events has nothing to do with Lilith, Adam’s first wife, from the Hebrew texts. If you love inventive fantasy, read on! Book One is dedicated to the lives of the heavenly angels in Floraison where they live under God’s laws. They are required to adhere to the rules, with no questions asked. The young angel’s days a The Fall of Lilith is a high fantasy that delivers the reader into the imaginative realm of Floraison, better known as Heaven. Forget what you learned in Sunday School. This version of events has nothing to do with Lilith, Adam’s first wife, from the Hebrew texts. If you love inventive fantasy, read on! Book One is dedicated to the lives of the heavenly angels in Floraison where they live under God’s laws. They are required to adhere to the rules, with no questions asked. The young angel’s days are filled living blissfully in a celestial Garden of Eden. As these heavenly beings mature, they develop into spectacular angels with resplendent wings and powers that are unsurpassed. God eventually separates his godly offspring into groups by rank: Seraphim, Cherubim, Thrones, Dominions, Virtues, Powers, Principalities, Archangels, and Angels. However, this newfound maturity creates problems for the angels. Raised like sisters and brothers, they suddenly take notice of their own bodies with feelings of love and desire for each other. Lilith feels the first pull of the lust for free-will and wastes no time in questioning God’s rules. Lilith is the catalyst, and as some of the angels follow her lead, there are others that revolt and refuse to succumb to her wiles. The great manipulator, Lilith convinces a group of angels to rebel against God and his laws believing they can change Floraison into what they desire. The war between good and evil escalates quickly, and the penalties for failure are harsh. Lilith and her cohorts are banished from God’s kingdom of Floraison and sent to earth. They are stripped of their heavenly abilities and made to live like humans. Book Two deals with the survival of the earthbound angels. On earth, their celestial forms have been changed. The most noticeable transformations are in Lucifer and Lilith, although some of the angels are made to suffer unbearable lives because of their deceit. Lucifer becomes the red demon and Lilith, now possesses the lower body of a snake. God’s wrath is reflected in each of the fallen angel’s new forms. Life on earth for the angels is unforgiving and the struggle to survive is strong. The one constant is Lilith and her unquenchable thirst for power and control. Her machinations don’t stop on earth. Instead, they increase, leading to a spectacular ending that will surprise you. There is a subtle message that resonates with the story besides the good vs. evil theme. It centers on the realization that not all rules are bad – some control is needed to tame the chaos. An excellent lesson for modern times. Vashti Quiroz-Vega skillfully created Lilith, the protagonist, as the epitome of the evil enchantress. The rest of the characters swirl around her larger than life vileness. I was enchanted by the novel, the characters, and the creative ingenuity of both worlds. It’s a long read but well worth every word. I’ve added this book to my Me Time category for Fantasy. If you love angels, you won’t want to miss this epic story! MY RATING: Character Believability: 5 Flow and Pace: 5 Reader Engagement: 5 Reader Enrichment: 5 Reader Enjoyment: 5 Overall Rate: 5 out of 5 FAIRIES

  9. 4 out of 5

    M.J. Mallon

    I read this as part of the #ABRSC read and review. Amazing, I absolutely loved this wonderful novel by Vashti Quiroz Vega. I rarely read long books but this kept my attention throughout both book 1 and book 2. In fact, it was such a quick read. I’d highly recommend reading The Fall of Lilith if you love high fantasy books with amazing descriptive prose, unique and highly imaginative writing and fabulous characters. The main protagonist Lilith isn’t at all keen on God’s decree that they should be I read this as part of the #ABRSC read and review. Amazing, I absolutely loved this wonderful novel by Vashti Quiroz Vega. I rarely read long books but this kept my attention throughout both book 1 and book 2. In fact, it was such a quick read. I’d highly recommend reading The Fall of Lilith if you love high fantasy books with amazing descriptive prose, unique and highly imaginative writing and fabulous characters. The main protagonist Lilith isn’t at all keen on God’s decree that they should be celibate. She is a power crazed angel who plots and schemes, bringing a heck load of drama, horror and strife to the storyline! Advisory: It’s not a YA book as there are passages of steamy scenes that take it beyond YA! It ticks every single box. Splendid, a definite favourite. Highly recommended. Review on my blog. Read as part of the #ABRSC Read and Review on Goodreads. https://mjmallon.com/2018/01/20/abrsc...

  10. 5 out of 5

    Olga Miret

    An epic-story, which will make you reconsider what you thought you knew about angels, demons, and everything in between. I have seen this book described as “epic” and I agree, not only for its length (it is two books in one) but also for its topic. It does talk about all things in Heaven and Earth, near enough, from the creation of the angels and the battle of good and evil to the fall of the angels and their revenge plans once on Earth (that don’t bode well for humanity). The author’s writing st An epic-story, which will make you reconsider what you thought you knew about angels, demons, and everything in between. I have seen this book described as “epic” and I agree, not only for its length (it is two books in one) but also for its topic. It does talk about all things in Heaven and Earth, near enough, from the creation of the angels and the battle of good and evil to the fall of the angels and their revenge plans once on Earth (that don’t bode well for humanity). The author’s writing style in this book is reminiscent of the Bible, although the story is told from quite a different point of view, and it deviates from the narrative most Christians are familiar with (I am intrigued to know how the story will resonate with readers not familiar with the Christian tradition, although the world building is detailed enough for anybody to be able to follow the events). I am not a bit Fantasy reader, mostly because I am not that fond of lengthy descriptions (I admire authors who do it well), although this story has the added interest of providing a major variation on a story many of us are familiar with. As typical of the genre, there is plenty of telling (in fact, all the characters are storytellers, and we get to hear the angels’ voices often, narrating their own adventures, or even fictional ones, like a fascinating story Lilith narrates in book 1), and beautiful descriptions of Floraison, the part of Heaven inhabited by the angels, of the angels, and also of the creation of Earth, and of Earth itself in book 2. We follow the story in a chronological order, from the time when the angels are quite young, growing up and learning about their powers (this part reminded me of YA books set up in special schools for young people with special abilities, and also of parts of The Hunger Games, when the characters had to train for the battle ahead), through to the battle between good and evil and their fall to Earth. Although the story is narrated in the third person, we follow the points of views of a variety of angels, mainly Lilith, the main character, but also most of the others at some point. These angels reminded me of the Greek gods. They are not the celestial beings many of us imagine, but more human than human. They have their personalities, their peculiar characters, their flaws, their desires, and they are far from goodie-goodie-two-shoes. Even the good angels have faults… (Oh Gabriel…). We get to know Lilith’s cunning and devious nature better than that of others (she is rebellious, proud, has a superiority complex, and does not seem to feel true affection for anybody, even her supposed friends), but we see that Lucifer is proud and is not a good looser from early on (when he is following the rules), and some of the other angels are weak, easily manipulated, and only worried about their own well-being and interests. The God of this story does not tolerate rebellion or deceit, and he severely punishes his children for their misdeeds. The author excels at writing the punishments and tortures the angels are subject to, and these parts of the book are not for the faint-hearted. I know she writes horror too, and this is quite evident in her penchant for devising monstrous characters and pretty cruel and sadistic tortures. As is often the case, the bad characters are more interesting than the good ones (that we mostly lose sight of in book 2, apart from some brief appearances). I would not say any of the characters are very sympathetic. Lilith is put to the test and punished for being what she is (and considering angels are given free-will, that seems quite cruel), but she displays psychopathic traits from the beginning and it is difficult to blame her nasty personality on her experiences. She is strong and determined, but she abandons her friends, is manipulative, and goes to extremes that make her exceedingly unlikeable. I have no problem with having a truly horrible character as the main voice of a book, although I missed something that helped me connect with her (there are moments when she hints at a weakness or hurt, but I did not feel they were particularly convincing. Perhaps a sense of humour, no matter how dark, would have helped, but other than some instances of silly behaviour very early on, there are moments of wonder but not many laughs). Gadreel is perhaps the easiest character to empathise with, and she grows and develops during book 2 (to begin with she is constantly complaining and moaning, but she gets more confident, although she is not traditionally good either). Satan does horrible things, especially to Lilith (who is not blameless by a long stretch, not that such abuse could be ever justified in real life), but he is an interesting character and quite loyal to his friends. And he also does much of what he does out of love, however misguided. I don’t know what that says about me, but I really like Dracul, Satan and Lilith’s child. He is described as quite an ugly thing, but I find him cute. There you have it. For me, book 2 is more dynamic and moves faster than book 1. I particularly enjoyed the fact that the adventures of the fallen angels on Earth allow us to read about their first impressions of the world as it would appear to somebody who had never been here, a totally brand new place. Such estrangement and sense of wonder are fascinating and the writing captures it well. The fact that the fallen angels find themselves in a hostile environment and have to learn to work together to survive adds to the interest. Of course, Lilith has her own plans, and she makes sure she convinces others to follow. The character of Lilith reminded me of the typical figure of the femme fatale in film noir (or the spider woman, or… well, I’m sure you can think of many epithets such females have received over the years), who is powerful but her power consists in manipulating and deceiving males, convincing them that they are in charge, while she pulls the invisible strings. I do admire such characters, especially when the circumstances are dire and that seems to be the only option to get ahead. There is always a difficult balance to maintain between creating a strong negative female character that can hold her own and ensuring it does not reinforce the usual story tropes that blame women for all of world’s ills from the beginning of times. This book made me wonder once more about the well-known narrative (and let me tell you, there are some twists that will keep readers on their toes) of events, which amounts to a civil war in Heaven, where there is no reconciliation and no possible redress or forgiveness for those who rebelled against the established order and lost. I also had to wonder about the rules imposed in Floraison and what seems to be a bias against LGBT (sex is bad, but same-sex sex is worse and is more severely punished), which has always been an issue that has caused much religious debate. This book is a tour-de-force that I’d recommend to readers who love to be challenged by narratives that push the limits of well-known stories and make us rethink and reconsider the stories we have been told. And one for those who love strong and wicked female characters. And baby demons…

  11. 4 out of 5

    Guy Worthey

    I have not read much of this genre before, so pardon my naiveté. I don't even know what to call it, but it's 'angel fantasy' where Judeo-Christian theology is reworked and retold as fantasy fiction. Oddly, when I read Fall of Lilith, I had just read Kara'a Quest by Pam Funke, in the same genre, so I guess it's a thing. Anyway, it took me a little getting used to. The angels are not spirits, but recast as humans with wings and superpowers, fully flesh and rife with flaws. Clearly, the "flaws" asp I have not read much of this genre before, so pardon my naiveté. I don't even know what to call it, but it's 'angel fantasy' where Judeo-Christian theology is reworked and retold as fantasy fiction. Oddly, when I read Fall of Lilith, I had just read Kara'a Quest by Pam Funke, in the same genre, so I guess it's a thing. Anyway, it took me a little getting used to. The angels are not spirits, but recast as humans with wings and superpowers, fully flesh and rife with flaws. Clearly, the "flaws" aspect means you can tell a story, and Quiroz-Vega does, emphatically. The writing is smooth and the story is full of twists and turns. There was a bit of 1001 Arabian Nights flavor, with stories within stories as Lilith injects tales from her visions of the future into the serene world the angels inhabit. Getting my logic-nerd hat on for a moment, the premise caused me some cognitive dissonance. Lilith's dark character is driven by visions of the (human) future, but this gift of visions was granted by God, who would of course be the only entity capable of visioning the future clearly. So, basically, driving Lilith insane and having her corrupt the other angels had to have been God's idea from the start. A little echo of this happened early on, when God punished Lilith by sending her into a forbidden forest. The sole purpose of the forest was to act as torture chamber, where Lilith was creepily punished. So God, long ago, built angel-torture forests. He also builds angels with mortal desires and full-on sex drives, then expects them to be forever chaste. But, then again, we have precedent from the Book of Genesis where God plops down a spectacular tree in the Garden of Eden and carefully, carefully points out exactly the one singular apple that should never be eaten. (Just to beat the analogy into the dirt: You hand an adolescent a private computer and the URL for something forbidden that starts with "p", and tell him that he should never never watch that thing that starts with "p." And then leave the room.) However, that said, the creepy punishments and the manifestations of the full-on sex drives were extremely well written, with plenty of space left over for imagination. The characters were compelling. The story had that flavor of a good tragedy where you just can't stop watching the slow-motion train wreck in progress. Or, maybe, the character of a good horror story, where you want to hide your head under the covers but you can't help yourself peeking.

  12. 5 out of 5

    D.G. Kaye

    The tale of Lilith takes us into the world above where angels reside in God's kingdom, then ultimately leading to the descent of many of them later on to earth as Lilith's plotting and dire need to gain power and overthrow God's ultimate power takes us on an incredible journey of desire, deceit and seduction as Lilith ensnares some of her fellow angels to join her on her rebellion to overtake God's power. The characters are exquisitely fleshed out, many of the angels and their hierarchy we are fa The tale of Lilith takes us into the world above where angels reside in God's kingdom, then ultimately leading to the descent of many of them later on to earth as Lilith's plotting and dire need to gain power and overthrow God's ultimate power takes us on an incredible journey of desire, deceit and seduction as Lilith ensnares some of her fellow angels to join her on her rebellion to overtake God's power. The characters are exquisitely fleshed out, many of the angels and their hierarchy we are familiar with are spun into a tale of a separation of the angels - the good and the evil, chosen by their own free will. Some of these angels remain as we know them exactly for what they stand for, while in this story, even angels can behave badly by the powers of persuasion. Lilith is a force to be reckoned with, and reckoning will fall upon her as she continues her journey after being evicted from heaven (Floraison), stubbornly refusing to give up her mission to overtake God's creations. The story is loosely based on the Old Testament bible and well crafted into the author's own tale of good versus evil with vivid imagery and characters (angels) we feel compassion for as well as others we'll find ourselves rooting for them to get their just desserts. I can't wait for Book 2!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Anya Pavelle

    This is a very imaginative telling about the fall of angels, the creation of the world in the Judaeo-Christian tradition, and what comes after from Lilith's point of view. Lilith is definitely not a sympathetic figure; in fact, as a reader, I disliked her, but I still became immersed in the story. The book starts off before the angels rebelled, when they were young. Gradually, as they grow, up, Lilith becomes disillusioned with her world and the rules that govern it. She corrupts certain angels This is a very imaginative telling about the fall of angels, the creation of the world in the Judaeo-Christian tradition, and what comes after from Lilith's point of view. Lilith is definitely not a sympathetic figure; in fact, as a reader, I disliked her, but I still became immersed in the story. The book starts off before the angels rebelled, when they were young. Gradually, as they grow, up, Lilith becomes disillusioned with her world and the rules that govern it. She corrupts certain angels around her and then helps foment rebellion. The tone of this book is that of a religious narrative, so the reader should expect the same level of formality. The descriptions of the celestial realm are beautiful and well thought out. I'm not religious, so I read this as a fantasy novel/alternative mythology. Recommended for fans of this genre.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sheena Lemmerz

    Really good read I enjoyed this book it pulls you in. Is extremely descriptive and just really interesting as a whole. Definitely would recommend.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Devinder Dhiman

    I enjoyed reading about the various characters of this book, They are angels with wings to fly, one of them has additional abilities to change into different shapes. other one can breath fire, third one can sense the presence of others at any distance from him. There are others too with special abilities including Lilith, who can influence anyone by her words and can see future. All of them are created by God Himself to live in Floraison, with strict rules. Most of them followed the rules, but L I enjoyed reading about the various characters of this book, They are angels with wings to fly, one of them has additional abilities to change into different shapes. other one can breath fire, third one can sense the presence of others at any distance from him. There are others too with special abilities including Lilith, who can influence anyone by her words and can see future. All of them are created by God Himself to live in Floraison, with strict rules. Most of them followed the rules, but Lilith despised following those rules because she had visions about the freedom to be bestowed upon yet to be created mankind of Earth. She revolted against God for not allowing the angels of Floraison the same freedom. The revolt led to a bloody war between angels who followed rules and the others who were influenced by the designs of Lilith. Lilith and her supporters lost badly in the revolt and God condemned them to fall on Earth and bear punishment of hard living on earth. They had to endure the punishment given by God in various forms. Fighting with various animals of earth, escaping from natural disasters such as volcanoes, earthquakes, dust storms in deserts etc. and finding food for survival were only some of the problems they had to tackle. This story of the survival of fallen angels on earth is very interesting till the last page. Besides the story, I liked the use of vocabulary in this book to express the various actions and thoughts. Honestly, I learnt the use of many new words from this book. Most interesting part of this book for me was the narration of a story by Lilith.

  16. 4 out of 5

    A.N. Willis

    A fascinating take on the fall of Lucifer and the other angels from heaven, with Lilith (here an angel) taking center stage as the anti-hero. Beautifully detailed and immersive. And one of the most gorgeous covers I've seen in a while!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Marcus Monroe

    “The Fall of Lilith” Review form On a five-star rating, five being highly satisfied one unsatisfied Story/Concept: 4______________________ Re-readability: _5_____________________ Originality:_4________________________ Book length: _5______________________ Overall satisfaction: 5_________________ Review questions: (five being highly interested, one being not interested) 1. Did “The Fall of Lilith”, keep you interested? : 5 (five being that you would recommend, one being no recommendation) 2. Would yo “The Fall of Lilith” Review form On a five-star rating, five being highly satisfied one unsatisfied Story/Concept: 4______________________ Re-readability: _5_____________________ Originality:_4________________________ Book length: _5______________________ Overall satisfaction: 5_________________ Review questions: (five being highly interested, one being not interested) 1. Did “The Fall of Lilith”, keep you interested? : 5 (five being that you would recommend, one being no recommendation) 2. Would you recommend, “The Fall of Lilith” to a family member, friend, acquaintance? : 4 (five being Yes place it in my favorites, one being no do not add it among favorites) 3. Would you place, “The Fall of Lilith” in your personal favorites of literature? ex: (personal library collection) : 5 This portion below is for personal mentions and constructive comments: “Author Vashti Q has bestowed her audience an epic origins story etched on the very walls of perdition. Author Vashti Q's vivid and eerie storytelling kept me bound within her pages and cringed at the edge of my seat from the sheer passion and labor she placed in this work of literature. I mention with assurance, the fall of Lilith will be talked about and discussed upon for decades to come and I'm glad to have had the task of reviewing this outstanding story.” Review by Marcus G. Monroe O.A.B. representative & Author of Deranged: Volume one, and Deranged: the series

  18. 4 out of 5

    Diane Shute

    Angels as you’ve never imagined! Quiroz-Vega spins a brilliant tale of deception from the story told by ancient biblical text. Seductive prose written with a clarity of vision describe the foibles of angels as Lilith leads her admirers to the inevitable fall from grace

  19. 4 out of 5

    Catina Small

    This is a twist on what could have happened, if, you were the main character.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kester Finley

    In "The Fall of Lilith" by author Vashti Quiroz Vega, dark fantasy takes center stage in this reimagined version of religious work from the Bible. The names and settings may sound familiar, but that is where the similarities end as Quiroz Vega takes her readers on a wild ride through multiple worlds and settings with angels steering the ship. The story opens up in an innocent time as angels playfully fill their days under the guidance of God. It’s not long before Quiroz Vega sets the stage for dr In "The Fall of Lilith" by author Vashti Quiroz Vega, dark fantasy takes center stage in this reimagined version of religious work from the Bible. The names and settings may sound familiar, but that is where the similarities end as Quiroz Vega takes her readers on a wild ride through multiple worlds and settings with angels steering the ship. The story opens up in an innocent time as angels playfully fill their days under the guidance of God. It’s not long before Quiroz Vega sets the stage for drama, action, and a rollercoaster of heart skipping scenes that explode in great detail from the pages as elements of fantasy, romance, and desires that bubble to the surface. The book mainly revolves around Lilith, an angel with a purpose, a deity with intent. Quiroz Vega expertly showcases Lilith’s innocence, her desires, her deeper emotional needs in full brazen detail along with numerous other players in Lilith’s “ultimate” game. Other characters were well written and added much needed differing viewpoints to the work as the reader, and those within the pages, get to see “the fall” on every level. Both gripping and hauntingly familiar, Quiroz Vega adds a very creative spin to what we already know and what we wished someone would have told us concerning the life of angels and God’s creation of our universe and planet. It was given four stars as the first few chapters weigh heavily on the religious side of storytelling, one that was a little harder to sift through for me personally, but definitely needed as it set the foundation for a very enjoyable read shortly thereafter as Quiroz Vega finds her pace and never lets up. “The Fall of Lilith” is a great read, a finely imagined fantasy based on religious fiction, and one that greatly improves once Quiroz Vega gets the core components out of the way. The dialogue is well written, and the characters interact perfectly with each other as they navigate their situations. I found some of the side stories relating to the other characters an enjoyable diversion and one that added extra depth to every player within the work. Quiroz Vega’s writing pulls you in, straps you down, and kicks you off a cliff as you watch what happens when a “woman” wants what a “woman” wants. As you bite your fingernails in “omg moments”, you’ll love every moment of the fall. Highly recommend!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Larry Landgraf

    The Fall of Lilith, written by Vashti Quiroz-Vega, is a fantasy story about some well-known biblical characters. Not being a religious person, I wasn’t sure what to expect, but even before I finished the story, my impression was WOW! I also didn’t know this book contained over five hundred pages. It contains two sections. The first section is about the angel’s preparation for their service to God, but there were too many rules for Lilith and a few others. I could feel early on that there was goi The Fall of Lilith, written by Vashti Quiroz-Vega, is a fantasy story about some well-known biblical characters. Not being a religious person, I wasn’t sure what to expect, but even before I finished the story, my impression was WOW! I also didn’t know this book contained over five hundred pages. It contains two sections. The first section is about the angel’s preparation for their service to God, but there were too many rules for Lilith and a few others. I could feel early on that there was going to be trouble in paradise, but nothing could prepare me for what was to come in section two. Section one seemed long, but that was necessary for me to get the numerous characters down in my mind. I knew and understood the characters well when they were exiled to Earth in section two. Once to Earth, I could not stop reading. I had to find out what was going to happen next. The story progressed quickly and before I knew it, I'd finished the book. I was left wanting more. The good news is that Vashti Q. has written a second book, the sequel, titled Son of the Serpent. I will put this one on my TBR list. The main character in the sequel is Dracul whom I only got a glimpse of at the end of The Fall of Lilith. Dracul’s mother, Lilith survived book one as well and I’m really surprised about this. She’ll be in the second book. I’m certainly happy about that. What a character! She’s one you’ll love to hate and I’m sure she’ll be stirring up more trouble in the Son of the Serpent. You’ll understand the ‘serpent’ thing after reading book one if you don’t already know. I won’t spoil it for you if you don’t. The Fall of Lilith packed a wallop. I enjoyed it immensely and will definitely be reading Son of the Serpent. I hope you’ll get started on the series too. You’ll want to know what you can look forward to if you get on God’s bad side. It is a fantasy, right?

  22. 4 out of 5

    Natalie Ducey

    In The Fall of Lilith, Vashti Quiroz-Vega has crafted a brilliant story with characters rich in diversity and imagery so vivid the reader is transported to another place and time. It’s impossible not to feel the tranquility and exquisite beauty of Floraison – Heaven. The descriptive detail is penetrating and offers a divine solace. We are introduced to characters that are celestial, yet relatable to mortal existence. A true testament to the superb character development. In book one, we witness the In The Fall of Lilith, Vashti Quiroz-Vega has crafted a brilliant story with characters rich in diversity and imagery so vivid the reader is transported to another place and time. It’s impossible not to feel the tranquility and exquisite beauty of Floraison – Heaven. The descriptive detail is penetrating and offers a divine solace. We are introduced to characters that are celestial, yet relatable to mortal existence. A true testament to the superb character development. In book one, we witness the beginning of God’s wrath on the fallen angels who choose to defy his commands of compliance and celibacy. Lilith is the mastermind of this uprising and lures the others to rebel in defiance of God’s directive. This rebellion casts friends into foes, allies into enemies. What transpires is a battle that is both riveting and revolting as we witness the primitive nature of survival take hold. The ruins fashioned by greed and loathing and far reaching. The fallen angels are dispelled from the magnificent beauty of Floraison and fall to God’s new creation – Earth. On Earth, the fallen angels endure hardships in their own distinctive forms. The detail of which is magnificent. In this graphic tale, the author seamlessly traces the origins of creation and the existence and influence of supernatural beings. Lilith’s fall to earth fuels her desire for vengeance, her quest for revenge is primal. To find and rule the Garden of Eden is her mission, and her ruthlessness knows no boundaries. Her loyalty is to her ego and lust for control. Will Lilith succeed in her quest? Will she reign over the Garden of Eden? Brilliantly written, The Fall of Lilith is a highly recommended epic read!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Eeva Lancaster

    I loved the book's cover, and I'm interested in Angelology, and so I got a copy of The Fall of Lilith. In the beginning, it felt like I was reading a YA novel, only, instead of teenagers up to no good, they were angels. This book is the story of how Satan and Lilith and the rest of the rebel angels fell from heaven, and what happened after they fell to Earth. The characterization was superb. That's why I gave it a 4-star. I loved the character development. And this is a politically correct book, I loved the book's cover, and I'm interested in Angelology, and so I got a copy of The Fall of Lilith. In the beginning, it felt like I was reading a YA novel, only, instead of teenagers up to no good, they were angels. This book is the story of how Satan and Lilith and the rest of the rebel angels fell from heaven, and what happened after they fell to Earth. The characterization was superb. That's why I gave it a 4-star. I loved the character development. And this is a politically correct book, if you consider that the Archangel Gabriel had a one-time sexual encounter with Beelzebub. How original is that? Loved it. It's not a YA novel since there are smatterings of rated R scenes. The book is polished, with negligible errors here and there, and is of fairly high quality in terms of editing and formatting. The author is a wonderful and imaginative writer. The words flowed, and there was nothing in the narrative that made me fidget or roll my eyes. I thoroughly enjoyed the story... until it ended. Imagine finding a good partner, and you thought everything was going well between you two. You were happy, and looking forward to good things. And then one day, your partner just disappeared from your life, without telling you why, without anything.... That's how I felt about the ending. I kept on turning the page of my kindle, because I couldn't believe it was over. But, well, it really was. I wasn't satisfied with how it ended. But then, if I think about it, what sort of happy ending could there be for Lilith? Still, I highly recommend this book to fantasy readers. Vashti Quiroz-Vega is a writer to watch out for. And you'll enjoy the unique take on the angels.

  24. 4 out of 5

    D. Peach

    The Fall of Lilith is a creative telling of the biblical story of the dark angels’ fall from heaven. God created angels as sexual beings, gave them free will, and then told them sex was prohibited and would result in eternal damnation. Not a particularly wise decision from the Almighty. Lilith is a beautiful angel who is narcissistic, devious, and sexually manipulative from page one through to the end. She makes Satan seem like a nice fellow and ultimately puts all of creation at risk. The world- The Fall of Lilith is a creative telling of the biblical story of the dark angels’ fall from heaven. God created angels as sexual beings, gave them free will, and then told them sex was prohibited and would result in eternal damnation. Not a particularly wise decision from the Almighty. Lilith is a beautiful angel who is narcissistic, devious, and sexually manipulative from page one through to the end. She makes Satan seem like a nice fellow and ultimately puts all of creation at risk. The world-building is lovely with many lush descriptions of the beautiful landscapes of heaven and Earth, creatures both real and mythical, and the angels. The book contains graphic violence and suffering as the dark angels undergo their punishments, and there are numerous sexually explicit scenes, including rape, since sex is Lilith’s primary means of sowing division and controlling the male angels. Women are certainly the root of all evil in this telling. As the villain in the story, Lilith has no redeeming qualities whatsoever. The other main characters, all dark angels, are more nuanced with spells of remorse, love, and loyalty, despite continually hurting and betraying each other. The most notable exception is Gadreel, and she was the most interesting character to me as she strove for redemption in the midst of terrible circumstances. This is a long read, and the prose could use some tightening, primarily to reduce redundancies. I found the frequent point of view changes disorienting, but dialog was well-done, and the formal language seemed appropriate for angels. The ending is satisfactory, though the story, of course, continues. I’m curious to see where the author takes it.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Yvette Calleiro

    I really enjoyed this book. I love when stories put a spin on biblical/historical stories, and this one definitely kept me entertained. Lilith is a deceptive little thing, and I loved reading about her journey, though I will admit that Gadreel held most of my affection throughout the book (which would probably really anger Lilith...lol!). The author does an incredible job in character building. Each and every one of her characters is unique and has a voice of his/her own. The author writes in th I really enjoyed this book. I love when stories put a spin on biblical/historical stories, and this one definitely kept me entertained. Lilith is a deceptive little thing, and I loved reading about her journey, though I will admit that Gadreel held most of my affection throughout the book (which would probably really anger Lilith...lol!). The author does an incredible job in character building. Each and every one of her characters is unique and has a voice of his/her own. The author writes in third person omniscient, and many might even call it head-hopping because she shares the thoughts and feelings of each character, but she does a brilliant job of making it clear whose point of view is being used. I enjoyed being able to experience each character's emotions and reactions in the moment. The book is also very descriptive, and the author did a great job of world-building. The areas of paradise were written in such a way that I just wanted to lose myself in them, whereas the areas of danger were written so that the reader could truly feel the angst of the characters. The story line is fantastic! I loved how deceptive and despicable Lilith was, how vain (and stupid) Lucifer was, and how many angels fell into the webs that they wove. I loved their individual punishments and how they reacted to them. My heart broke for Gadreel and then hardened against her and then softened again. Because I know that a book two is coming, I'm looking forward to reading more about Gadreel and Dragon, and I cannot wait for Lucifer and Dracul to learn about Lilith's newest deception!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Joy Lo-Bamijoko

    As I read this book, I started feeling ill at ease about the theme of the book. First, this is a story about the events surrounding life amongst the angels in heaven, which the author called Floraison, before the fall of Lucifer and his cohorts, and the creation of man on Earth. Although this is a fiction, I was in doubt about the roll that Lilith played. The book is titled, the Fall of Lilith. I wondered whether Lilith in this story was another name for Lucifer. But then she seemed to control t As I read this book, I started feeling ill at ease about the theme of the book. First, this is a story about the events surrounding life amongst the angels in heaven, which the author called Floraison, before the fall of Lucifer and his cohorts, and the creation of man on Earth. Although this is a fiction, I was in doubt about the roll that Lilith played. The book is titled, the Fall of Lilith. I wondered whether Lilith in this story was another name for Lucifer. But then she seemed to control the real Lucifer all through the story. If she was not Lucifer, my question is what exactly was she? The Good Book tells us that we, God’s creatures, do not see thing as God sees things. So, in telling about these Godly things, the author has simply shown us Godly things the way a created creature sees things, in very un-godly ways. I have mixed feelings about this read. There were scenes that were quite entertaining, and scenes that were quite troubling. For instance, the implied gay interest of Beelzebub for Gabriel, and the explicit sexual scene between Eve, Samael and Satan jarred my religious sense. The story, as it stands, needs some editing, especially with the transitions, and missing words here and there.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jan Sikes

    I have been wanting to read this book for quite some time and it finally came up on my TBR list. The author's depiction of the fallen Angels from biblical tales is compelling on many levels. How Satan and his small band of supporters got banned to earth was believable. The burning desire Lilith had to overthrow God and make heaven the way she wanted it to be, with her and Satan as the ultimate rulers is a great example of how, in life, misplaced goals and dreams can wreak havoc. Not only havoc, I have been wanting to read this book for quite some time and it finally came up on my TBR list. The author's depiction of the fallen Angels from biblical tales is compelling on many levels. How Satan and his small band of supporters got banned to earth was believable. The burning desire Lilith had to overthrow God and make heaven the way she wanted it to be, with her and Satan as the ultimate rulers is a great example of how, in life, misplaced goals and dreams can wreak havoc. Not only havoc, but irreversible consequences. Lilith is determined to come out victorious even to the very end of the book when all hope should be gone. The author wove the tale together with all the lies, deceit and manipulation one would expect from fallen angels. The writing could be much tighter as there was lots of repetition, but it didn't throw me out of the story. I had to see the outcome! If you are fascinated by the Angelic Realm, the hierarchy and the historic fall of Angels that led to the demise of the Garden of Eden and creation of Satan, you will enjoy this story.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    “Addictive and Amazing” From the get go I was hooked, it was a shame my workload was so great but every spare moment I had I read. The characters had depth and I found myself not having to keep checking back to know who each character was. The main character Lilith is as beautiful as she is dangerous, she set her mind on a goal and did whatever she could to gain the results she was after. Vashti this book is highly addictive and your imagination is amazing. I kept trying to imagine it in film fo “Addictive and Amazing” From the get go I was hooked, it was a shame my workload was so great but every spare moment I had I read. The characters had depth and I found myself not having to keep checking back to know who each character was. The main character Lilith is as beautiful as she is dangerous, she set her mind on a goal and did whatever she could to gain the results she was after. Vashti this book is highly addictive and your imagination is amazing. I kept trying to imagine it in film format and kept wondering how a film could be made true to the book. If you want a mixture of laughter, danger and treachery look no further. The story is about angels who fall from grace led by the title character Lilith and how they fair on earth. I am hoping for another book in the series as there are some unanswered questions as to what happens next, but equally it can be left to your own imagination, a truly wonderful read.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Charles Jones

    The Fall of Lilith is a fantasy marvel that I wasn’t expecting to be almost guttural and feral as it was in places. Vashti shows us the creation of the heavenly realm, the angels and eventually Earth. I was very impressed with the personalities of the different angels, and how connected I became with them. The beginning of the story has a childlike quality with the angels growing into themselves, and as they age, their personalities strengthen. Along with their changes the feeling of the words Va The Fall of Lilith is a fantasy marvel that I wasn’t expecting to be almost guttural and feral as it was in places. Vashti shows us the creation of the heavenly realm, the angels and eventually Earth. I was very impressed with the personalities of the different angels, and how connected I became with them. The beginning of the story has a childlike quality with the angels growing into themselves, and as they age, their personalities strengthen. Along with their changes the feeling of the words Vashti puts on the page match, leaving behind the sweetness of childhood, and bringing forth emotions that were relatable as they grew into adulthood. When Book 2 begins the grittiness intensifies as the fallen angels come forth transformed by their punishment. I love reading imaginative books no matter the genre, and The Fall of Lilith by Vashti Quiroz-Vega is one of those books.

  30. 5 out of 5

    D.L. Finn

    This is an interesting and unique take on a well-known Bible story from the old Testament. “The Fall of Lilith” follows a group of angels who rebel against the life they have in heaven, in a place called Floraison. Lilith is the driving force behind all of this as she encourages Lucifer to lead. As expected, the rebels find themselves on earth. This is my favorite part of the story and where it got interesting. I can’t say I rooted for Lilith, but there were others I was hoping things would work This is an interesting and unique take on a well-known Bible story from the old Testament. “The Fall of Lilith” follows a group of angels who rebel against the life they have in heaven, in a place called Floraison. Lilith is the driving force behind all of this as she encourages Lucifer to lead. As expected, the rebels find themselves on earth. This is my favorite part of the story and where it got interesting. I can’t say I rooted for Lilith, but there were others I was hoping things would work out for—like Gadreel. Ms. Vega crafted a well-written book with lots of depth, images to pull you in, and it definitely kept my interest as I wondered what was going to happen next. I recommend this book if you love fantasy with a Biblical connection-- or an action-packed tale of revenge.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.