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Hero in a Halfling

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Not all halflings dream of magic... But Epik isn’t like the rest. Adventure. Excitement. He craves those things. He would rather learn magic, not follow a wizard on some fool's adventure.... Or so he thinks. The problem: magic is outlawed. After setting out for the city, what Epik finds in Dune All-En isn’t at all what he’d hoped. No magic. And few wizards. Luck, or something Not all halflings dream of magic... But Epik isn’t like the rest. Adventure. Excitement. He craves those things. He would rather learn magic, not follow a wizard on some fool's adventure.... Or so he thinks. The problem: magic is outlawed. After setting out for the city, what Epik finds in Dune All-En isn’t at all what he’d hoped. No magic. And few wizards. Luck, or something more sinister, is on the halfling's side. He meets Gabby, a wizard who is kind enough to rent him a room, or rather, a closet, at his now-defunct magical supply store. And as a group of mountain trolls threatens the city, Epik sees the opportunity to do something, well, epic. If only the halfling inside him would stop peeking out. Featuring halflings, dwarves, elves, and a ranger or two, Hero in a Halfling is perfect for fans of both Discworld and Middle-earth. Join Epik as he goes from halfling to hero, who just also happens to (still) be a halfling. Epik Fantasy Series Hero in a Halfling Knowing is Halfling the Battle (December 2017) Epik Fantasy Book 3 (Early 2018) Sign up for the mailing list to receive complimentary origin stories freebook.williamtylerdavis.com


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Not all halflings dream of magic... But Epik isn’t like the rest. Adventure. Excitement. He craves those things. He would rather learn magic, not follow a wizard on some fool's adventure.... Or so he thinks. The problem: magic is outlawed. After setting out for the city, what Epik finds in Dune All-En isn’t at all what he’d hoped. No magic. And few wizards. Luck, or something Not all halflings dream of magic... But Epik isn’t like the rest. Adventure. Excitement. He craves those things. He would rather learn magic, not follow a wizard on some fool's adventure.... Or so he thinks. The problem: magic is outlawed. After setting out for the city, what Epik finds in Dune All-En isn’t at all what he’d hoped. No magic. And few wizards. Luck, or something more sinister, is on the halfling's side. He meets Gabby, a wizard who is kind enough to rent him a room, or rather, a closet, at his now-defunct magical supply store. And as a group of mountain trolls threatens the city, Epik sees the opportunity to do something, well, epic. If only the halfling inside him would stop peeking out. Featuring halflings, dwarves, elves, and a ranger or two, Hero in a Halfling is perfect for fans of both Discworld and Middle-earth. Join Epik as he goes from halfling to hero, who just also happens to (still) be a halfling. Epik Fantasy Series Hero in a Halfling Knowing is Halfling the Battle (December 2017) Epik Fantasy Book 3 (Early 2018) Sign up for the mailing list to receive complimentary origin stories freebook.williamtylerdavis.com

30 review for Hero in a Halfling

  1. 5 out of 5

    Darque Dreamer

    Hero in a Halfling is enchanting and humorous. It has fantasy and whimsy galore. For those who enjoy journeys, and worlds, similar to The Lord of the Rings, you will love this! I quite enjoyed this one. It really drew me in with the massive amount of world building and details Davis created. It was fantasy at its best. It started off pretty slow, to allow for world development. It picked up to a mildly faster pace, but continued with the vivid details throughout. It had several points of view, and Hero in a Halfling is enchanting and humorous. It has fantasy and whimsy galore. For those who enjoy journeys, and worlds, similar to The Lord of the Rings, you will love this! I quite enjoyed this one. It really drew me in with the massive amount of world building and details Davis created. It was fantasy at its best. It started off pretty slow, to allow for world development. It picked up to a mildly faster pace, but continued with the vivid details throughout. It had several points of view, and some memory flashbacks, but never really lost its drive, or became confusing. I really enjoyed the story line. It had a few predictable moments, and I could definitely tell where most Davis' inspiration came from, but it also had a fair amount of entertaining, and shocking, twists. It even had many "pop culture" references that were thrown in to mix things up a bit, but they never took away from the story. Though I never became completely invested in any of the characters, I did enjoy them. Epik felt like a mix between the hobbits from Lord of the Rings, and from one of my favorite movies, Willow. I became attached enough that I will be reading the next books to see where his journey leads. Gerdy was another character that, though I didn't become 100% attached, I would love to see if she has a part in the next book. She was a strong, intriguing character that added a little depth to the story. I really loved the fantasy aspects. There were trolls, goblins, elves, and orcs, oh my! Everything in the story just felt so incredibly detailed and lively. Though the pace was slow, the development in the story, and the ending, left me thrilled to continue the journey. I'm hopeful that the next book will have a faster pace, and more action, since this one contained so much world building. I'd rate it 3.5-4 stars. Thank you to the author for sending me this free copy in exchange for my honest review!

  2. 4 out of 5

    William Tyler Davis

    Version 1.5 is done. Hoping that version 2.0 will deserve 5 stars. Or at the very least 4.5. Update: I still think this is only a 4 Star Book. I love the story, but I think my writing could use a few more years of work. My sentences need more variation, most are about the same length and read a bit choppy.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cameron Smith

    Hero in a Halfling is a Hobbitish story, set in (and around) a slightly modern fantasy city, and told with a Discworld-like voice. If you like the sound of that, hook in. While you won’t find anything completely new and unique within the pages, the story is light, fun, and will give you a chuckle. The characters are good and play their roles well. The story is about a halfling, Epik, with the desire to learn magic. To fulfill this dream, Epik departs the Bog for the city of Dune All-En; a city th Hero in a Halfling is a Hobbitish story, set in (and around) a slightly modern fantasy city, and told with a Discworld-like voice. If you like the sound of that, hook in. While you won’t find anything completely new and unique within the pages, the story is light, fun, and will give you a chuckle. The characters are good and play their roles well. The story is about a halfling, Epik, with the desire to learn magic. To fulfill this dream, Epik departs the Bog for the city of Dune All-En; a city that is a little more modern than you’d expect in a High Fantasy. Unfortunately for Epic, he arrives just after a city-wide ban on magic has gone into play. The city is influenced by New York, in shape and naming, with places like Jersy, Madhatten, Kings, Brook Glen, Sprite Island, and The Forge. Despite the bad luck, Epic finds a job in a tavern. There he meets Gerdy, the daughter of the owners—a dwarf and a human—who quickly becomes his new friend. He also meets Collus (or Coe), a ranger who Epik instantly notices as a bully. I really enjoyed the relationship between Epik and Coe. While they tolerate each other differently through the book, tension always rises between them. Eventually, Epik meets a wizard. Gabby owns a magic shop near the tavern, and Epik’s journey begins as he lodges with him; a closet being his new room. We do get a few points-of-view through the book. One extra character is Todder. A bloke who has been guarding the gate for 20 years. He seems a rather boring character at first, but towards the end of the story I found myself enjoying his perception of things more and more. He has a good temperament, likes Epik, and works well as a counter-balance to Collus. The story is full of satire, with heaps of pop-culture and fantasy references. After one of the trolls, Peg, said ‘Oh, Al’, then realising their kids were Kelly and Boulder, I found myself laughing at the Married with Children take. Characters often reference real-world things, confusing others, then unable to explain exactly what they meant. Titles of books appear in dialogue. Some character names pay homage to certain points of inspiration. The love-triangle with Epik, Gerdy, and Myra (a damsel in distress type character) was cleverly done. I enjoyed the way Epik tried to see reason to his emotions. The way the love-triangle finalised, however, had me in stitches! (view spoiler)[Gerdy and Myra end up together! The hero did not get the girl. Not yet! (hide spoiler)] As to be expected with the inspirations to Hero in a Halfling, the halfling becomes the hero. There were some twists with the theme of a new king, the least-bad-apparently-option claiming the title. We then get thrown a curve ball, and see some exciting plans for the sequel. (view spoiler)[It turns out that Gabby is still alive, is also Epiman (who is now king), and happens to be Epik’s father. Not simply a final twist for the sake of a twist, little hints had been sprinkled throughout the book. Oh, and this guy has a good handful of enemies that now know he is king. Bring on the conflict! (hide spoiler)] A fun read. If you are craving a comic fantasy set in a Tolkienesque world, and love pop/fantasy references, then you’ll enjoy Epik Fantasy.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Daryl Ball

    From the moment you read the synopsis and the opening quote from Sir Terry Pratchett, you basically know you're in for a humorous story. As far as fantasy goes it has a bit of everything - an unlikely hero, a wizard, corrupt officials, a plot against a king, a pub, dwarves, trolls, elves, I could go on. The humour and satire though really makes the story shine, it feels natural, the story doesn't suffer from it and sometimes when some of the humour is a bit more subtle..when you clue into it you From the moment you read the synopsis and the opening quote from Sir Terry Pratchett, you basically know you're in for a humorous story. As far as fantasy goes it has a bit of everything - an unlikely hero, a wizard, corrupt officials, a plot against a king, a pub, dwarves, trolls, elves, I could go on. The humour and satire though really makes the story shine, it feels natural, the story doesn't suffer from it and sometimes when some of the humour is a bit more subtle..when you clue into it you just need to pause and shake your head while grinning. It also has one heck of a twist or two by the time you reach the end. It's essentially my favourite type of fantasy story to read and it delivered big time.

  5. 4 out of 5

    S.E. Anderson

    Gosh, I missed fantasy reading books like this one. A highly entertaining story which reads like a DnD campaign with your best friends. Like Lord of The Rings, but with hints of Terry Pratchett, with subtle humor and pop culture jokes thrown in so creatively that they don't take the reader out of the story. While most of the story is told from Epik's perspective, we get a healthy dose of flashbacks and a few other fun characters get to tell their side of the story. The villainous hand of the king Gosh, I missed fantasy reading books like this one. A highly entertaining story which reads like a DnD campaign with your best friends. Like Lord of The Rings, but with hints of Terry Pratchett, with subtle humor and pop culture jokes thrown in so creatively that they don't take the reader out of the story. While most of the story is told from Epik's perspective, we get a healthy dose of flashbacks and a few other fun characters get to tell their side of the story. The villainous hand of the king plotting his ruler's demise; the hilarious mountain trolls who just want to feast on human flesh; the soldier who's never seen real action before... the reader gets to see the wide scope of the action and feel invested in the plot, which has a rather quick pace that accelerates towards the end. The real strength of this book lies in the amazing characters, who could be doing absolutely anything and I would still read them. Gabby the Wizard had such personality; Epik was so likable; Todder too relatable. I would pick up the second book in an instant just to hang out with them again!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mairi Krausse

    Humorous story with many intended puns This book moves fairly slowly at first, with much description including characters thoughts and locations. But after it gets moving well, there is much adventure and excitement. Good book!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Meg

    I found this book a bit frustrating. It felt to me like it was written by Dr. Jekyl and Mr. Hyde. On one hand, the story was interesting and some of the writing was really good. On the other hand there were random pop culture references and puns and "jokes" (if you can call them that) that really just got in the way, causing me to stumble sometimes as if someone threw a rock in my path. For example you can be reading away about halflings and elves and castles and magic and then suddenly there's I found this book a bit frustrating. It felt to me like it was written by Dr. Jekyl and Mr. Hyde. On one hand, the story was interesting and some of the writing was really good. On the other hand there were random pop culture references and puns and "jokes" (if you can call them that) that really just got in the way, causing me to stumble sometimes as if someone threw a rock in my path. For example you can be reading away about halflings and elves and castles and magic and then suddenly there's a random reference to another fantasy book or even Radio Shack, of all things. It doesn't add to the story, it just messes up the flow. I occasionally made a sound out loud while reading based more on surprise about the random stuff that was thrown in there than out of actual amusement. I did think some of the dwarf and pub names were amusing though. I understand that the author likes and respects other well-known authors of the genre, but it isn't necessary to borrow their material. I can't bring myself to read the next book in the series because tripping so often while reading just isn't very fun, and in the end it all just left me feeling kind of sad that I wasn't able to enjoy the really good parts more.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    Audible version. I would give the book 3.5 stars. It starts off a little slow but picks up midway through. The writing seemed a little off to me, maybe it was the pacing of the story? The main character seems to have no potential, but everybody he meets seems to see something in him. Without giving any spoilers, he doesnt really accomplish or do much. The story came together in the end and the series may have potential, but I really didn't care for the main character. There was some humor, mainl Audible version. I would give the book 3.5 stars. It starts off a little slow but picks up midway through. The writing seemed a little off to me, maybe it was the pacing of the story? The main character seems to have no potential, but everybody he meets seems to see something in him. Without giving any spoilers, he doesnt really accomplish or do much. The story came together in the end and the series may have potential, but I really didn't care for the main character. There was some humor, mainly word play and puns. I received this book for free for my honest opinion. The narration was good, but I prefer more distinction between each character.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ken Feucht

    A valiant effort at humorous fantasy, but it falls flat. With jokes like a city section being called Manhadden and the area no one cares about being Jersy, the humor just felt forced. There were some clever jokes, but a third of the way in I just didn't care to go on, especially knowing this is meant to be part of a series. The plot was slow, and everything just felt like a set up for a joke. I can't recommend it, but it wouldn't be the worst thing to be stuck in a room with. I might even finish A valiant effort at humorous fantasy, but it falls flat. With jokes like a city section being called Manhadden and the area no one cares about being Jersy, the humor just felt forced. There were some clever jokes, but a third of the way in I just didn't care to go on, especially knowing this is meant to be part of a series. The plot was slow, and everything just felt like a set up for a joke. I can't recommend it, but it wouldn't be the worst thing to be stuck in a room with. I might even finish it if I run out of books on hand in the near future.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Alex Reyes

    The book was a lot of fun. I give it 5 stars because I wanted lighthearted, uncomplicated, silly fantasy and that's exactly what I got. I just found out today that there is a 1.5 book and I can't wait for the 2nd to come out.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    I enjoyed my visit to this Hobbit/Game of Thrones parody hybrid. The plot moved briskly and the jokes all landed.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Albert Still

    Received a free copy of the audiobook, decent story, loved the humor!

  13. 5 out of 5

    CJ

    Fun characters, okay story. Read it for the humor and the experience in Epik's world.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Steve Thomas

    This is part of a continuing series to highlight comic fantasy and discuss the book in general and try to classify the style of humor. “Hero in a Halfling” by William Tyler Davis is mostly the story of Epik, a halfling with an absentee father who has been bullied for most of his life. After two chance encounters with a wizard, Epik becomes convinced that he’s in a Bilbo/Gandalf mentoring situation and eventually works up the nerve to skip town to seek destiny, adventure, and magic. The trouble is This is part of a continuing series to highlight comic fantasy and discuss the book in general and try to classify the style of humor. “Hero in a Halfling” by William Tyler Davis is mostly the story of Epik, a halfling with an absentee father who has been bullied for most of his life. After two chance encounters with a wizard, Epik becomes convinced that he’s in a Bilbo/Gandalf mentoring situation and eventually works up the nerve to skip town to seek destiny, adventure, and magic. The trouble is, a paranoid king has just made magic illegal thanks to the maneuvering of his Evil Vizier. There’s a lot to like about this book, and the main draw is Epik. It’s great watching him grow, learning to stand up for himself and, well, come of age. But I’m here to talk about humor. “Hero in a Halfling” has everything: good banter, silly situations, funny descriptions, snarky footnotes, and plenty of original gags that landed, such as a great running gag where a lazy, disinterested POV character calls everyone by the wrong name only to be corrected at the most inopportune times. There are also references to other stories. A lot of references. Too many references. Davis wears his influences on his sleeve or, more accurately, his table of contents. Seriously, five of the chapters are named after Discworld novels, one is a reference to Discworld, and there chapters titled after Tolkien quotes, a Douglas Adams book, a Harry Potter book, and so on. The text is full of references and anachronisms, and sometimes Davis uses italics or character reactions to make sure you can’t miss them. These are pretty varied, usually shout-outs to fantasy novels and fairy tales, but I also caught references off the beaten path like “Married With Children” and “Homestar Runner.” Unfortunately, these started to grate on me as I read. Between the frequency of the references, which often came with strained set-ups and zero payoff (for me), I was groaning way too often. I didn’t feel like they added to the story and were just references for their own sake. This book got me thinking about what works for me and what doesn’t when it comes to references and homages. I think I like them best when they’re subtle and don’t draw attention to themselves, like the Classic Rock references in Kings of the Wyld. They’re a nice bonus that lets a perceptive reader feel like they’re in on a joke. What I don’t like is when the plot or dialogue contorts itself to work a reference in, and unfortunately that happens a lot in “Hero In A Halfling.” Reference Jokes are like high fives. The best ones are spontaneous and never spoken of. What happens here is more like someone walking up to you and saying, “Hey, bro! High five! BOOM. Down low. That was a sweet high five.” I want to emphasize here that even though the reference jokes annoyed me personally, that’s just one man’s sense of humor. If you liked Ready Player One or any of the [Insert Genre Name Here] Movies, you’re going to have a better time with this one than I did. I’m also harsher on them because I really liked a lot of Davis’ other material throughout the book, so I know Davis can do better. That stuff, along with just generally being a good story, kept me going. Davis, if you’re reading this, you’re a funny author and I encourage you to stand on your own legs more often in future books. I know I just complained for two paragraphs, but I really did enjoy this book overall. As I mentioned, there was some very good character work here and I loved a lot of the more original jokes. The story ends on a very intriguing note and I plan on reading the sequel. A few excerpts that show the sort of jokes you can expect: There was the low hum of murmuring under cloaks while they loitered by the donuts at the pastry table, feigning disinterest, taking one, then two, before finally the cloaked figures took their seats. ‘Some Jedi muggle parked his frakking didgeridoo in the carpark too close to my Tardis, like a pointy eared Spock.’ The next arrest was a bit more involved. A woman was taken in for brewing up her morning pot of coffee. Though she claimed not to be a witch, she had trouble explaining the wart on her nose. The law would later be amended. Without the magic of coffee, the kingdom would simply not run. “However, I have heard tell recently of a ghost in the woods. Some Shadow lurking in the trees. My companions have said they’ve heard the wind talking. [...] And do you know the name of the wind?”

  15. 4 out of 5

    OldBird

    A silly, fun fantasy story that maybe tries a little too hard to be Terry Pratchett-inspired, it still hits most of the right notes. It's by no means a laugh out loud comedy, following the way of the knowing nod to tropes, amusing observations, and the intelligent narration of stupid situations that marked the late Mr Pratchett's work. It's the story of a halfling named Epik who dreams of adventure and magic, and is drawn to the city of Dune All-En in search of both. Sadly, the King's just issued A silly, fun fantasy story that maybe tries a little too hard to be Terry Pratchett-inspired, it still hits most of the right notes. It's by no means a laugh out loud comedy, following the way of the knowing nod to tropes, amusing observations, and the intelligent narration of stupid situations that marked the late Mr Pratchett's work. It's the story of a halfling named Epik who dreams of adventure and magic, and is drawn to the city of Dune All-En in search of both. Sadly, the King's just issued a decree that magic is banned within the city walls. He's afraid of the proverb that says each monarch of Dune All-En can only ever rule for ten years; something unfortunate always seems to happen to them after that time and he's become convinced that magic could play a part in his demise. Our halfling hero is undeterred, meeting the half dwarf Gerdy, her beautiful half elven friend Myra, and the sneaky/snarky wizard Gabby who's not about to throw his wand down regardless of any royal decree. There also seems to be a conspiracy of some sort burbling away in the shadows. And of course Epik's unwittingly put his hairy foot right in it... I like the story. It's clever in it's own stupid way, which is probably the best thing a parody of fantasy can aspire to be. I love the slow and twisted political maneuverings plot line (view spoiler)[even if I hoped there would have been more of a dig at Big "Farmacy" culture considering it seemed so central and then... went away (hide spoiler)] . The characters are amusing and warmly likeable (even if Todder was an obvious Vimes-a-like). The duds only come where a joke feels like something the author wanted to do and so forced it into the situation rather than letting it come up naturally (one about mass market paperbacks was very shoehorned in). I also didn't always "get" some of the jokes - I think they're American references that just didn't make it to my side of the Atlantic (also: use of "mom" and "ass" reminds you just why you're not getting all the NYC in-jokes). The little footnotes and direct asides also went a bit on the derivative side, not fitting with the rest of the narration. Again, it felt a bit try-too-hard to be like Terry Pratchett rather than the author trusting his own voice. It's still an amusing and well-constructed first novel. It's a light enough read that even with all the twists int he plot, it's never too hard to follow. I'll certainly be coming back to find out more about Epik!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Anike Kirsten

    Humourous but with the right amount of seriousness to make this a good fantasy. Davis's writing style is lovely and easy to follow. I usually don't like omniscient point-of-view but Davis pulls it off well. Fleshed out characters and a natural plot arc had me fully immersed in this book and I can't wait to read the next. While there was the repetition of information, it wasn't distracting. And I especially loved the jabs and nods to famous works like (obviously) The Lord of the Rings as well as Humourous but with the right amount of seriousness to make this a good fantasy. Davis's writing style is lovely and easy to follow. I usually don't like omniscient point-of-view but Davis pulls it off well. Fleshed out characters and a natural plot arc had me fully immersed in this book and I can't wait to read the next. While there was the repetition of information, it wasn't distracting. And I especially loved the jabs and nods to famous works like (obviously) The Lord of the Rings as well as The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Erik Dewey

    A decent read, but not very funny, just an occasional grin. The plot itself moves at a decent clip, but all of the setup doesn't really pay off in the end. Good characters, though, and an enjoyable read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kutsua

    DNF - is it just another clone of late Mr. Prattchet? If so, well, it is a brave, though misdirected effort.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Colin Hardy

    If I were to say anything about this book it would be to give it time. This is one of those stories that take a while to bed-in. The central character is not what the reader would expect, he doesn’t show a lot of potential and doesn’t seem to have a lot of opportunities and yet he survives. He moves from one adventure to another attracting a range of characters that clearly see something of interest in him. As with many such books the story jumps around quite a lot in order to establish locations If I were to say anything about this book it would be to give it time. This is one of those stories that take a while to bed-in. The central character is not what the reader would expect, he doesn’t show a lot of potential and doesn’t seem to have a lot of opportunities and yet he survives. He moves from one adventure to another attracting a range of characters that clearly see something of interest in him. As with many such books the story jumps around quite a lot in order to establish locations and plotlines. The world building is sufficient to support the story but does not spend a lot of time providing atmosphere to individual locations. There are a number of character groupings, each of which has a plotline. These are slowly developed and are drawn together with individuals gaining prominence. Characters are lost through violence or death but this is only covered at a superficial level and so there is nothing that would be inappropriate for a younger audience. Humour is scattered throughout which is Pratchett-like but with a US slant. Nevertheless, the nuances are largely understandable to an international audience resulting in the odd chuckle here and there. The style of writing is not heavy and is readily approachable. As noted above, it is recommended that the reader give the book a chance. Plotlines will come together and there is a growing coherence to the story. Characters do not necessarily grow as individuals but rather their significance becomes clearer. Once all these threads have been drawn together the story takes on a largely singular plot line with the characters playing a lesser or greater role. One of the central characters is used to reveal some of the mystery items in the plot that otherwise would have been difficult to explain. This is the first book in a series and as it draws to a close it is clear that much of the scene setting remains unresolved. In addition new plot lines are introduced to widen the story for the next instalment. Overall the story is not gripping or particularly exciting but it is satisfying by the time you reach the end. The success of the book lies in whether the reader would move on to the next one in the series. I would certainly give it a go.

  20. 4 out of 5

    J.L. Slipak

    OVERVIEW: Not all halflings dream of magic... But Epik isn’t like the rest. Adventure. Excitement. He craves those things. He would rather learn magic, not follow a wizard on some fool's adventure.... Or so he thinks. The problem: magic is outlawed. After setting out for the city, what Epik finds in Dune All-En isn’t at all what he’d hoped. No magic. And few wizards. Luck, or something more sinister, is on the halfling's side. He meets Gabby, a wizard who is kind enough to rent him a room, or rather OVERVIEW: Not all halflings dream of magic... But Epik isn’t like the rest. Adventure. Excitement. He craves those things. He would rather learn magic, not follow a wizard on some fool's adventure.... Or so he thinks. The problem: magic is outlawed. After setting out for the city, what Epik finds in Dune All-En isn’t at all what he’d hoped. No magic. And few wizards. Luck, or something more sinister, is on the halfling's side. He meets Gabby, a wizard who is kind enough to rent him a room, or rather, a closet, at his now-defunct magical supply store. And as a group of mountain trolls threatens the city, Epik sees the opportunity to do something, well, epic. If only the halfling inside him would stop peeking out. Featuring halflings, dwarves, elves, and a ranger or two, Hero in a Halfling is perfect for fans of both Discworld and Middle-earth. Join Epik as he goes from halfling to hero, who just also happens to (still) be a halfling. Epik Fantasy Series Hero in a Halfling Knowing is Halfling the Battle (December 2017) Epik Fantasy Book 3 (Early 2018) MY BOOK REVIEW: e-book format So here I am again, with an ebook Fantasy read. Think I'm a glutton for punishment lol, but it's a FANTASY! How could I resist?!! ... Fantasy books that don't pick up until half-way... why is that? When it did kick off, it was fantastic! Loved everything about it, the characters, the humor, the silly antics and fast pace of the adventure. The MC starts off 'gray' and grows slowly throughout the journey into a "red." There's nothing remarkable about him. As what I'd call a more "plot" driven story, this book did really well. Sure, sure, there's borrowed "feels" toward Tolkien and Pratchett's style of writing, two large icons to live up to. I just found it fun and easy to read, almost like watching a video game unfold. I even, yup I'm going to say this... I even felt a teeny tiny bit of a Stephen R. Donaldson's "Chronicles of a Thomas Covenant" vibe. OMG! LOL This is like the old style fantasy reads that I fell in love with as a child and couldn't get enough of. I know I'll be following this author for a long time. I gave this book: 4.5

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nicolas Knight

    I started this book with a 5 star and took a star out everytime it commited a major sin. It didn't take long. Let's start with the reader. Oh gods the reader. I don't know who he is because i didn't bother to check. I will however put him on my little "He is the reader therefor get the text version" list. The guy who read OWorld Walker" had the same issue. Pauses in the middle of sentences. Just silence for a second in the middle of an importand description or a piece of dialogue. If it was a computer I started this book with a 5 star and took a star out everytime it commited a major sin. It didn't take long. Let's start with the reader. Oh gods the reader. I don't know who he is because i didn't bother to check. I will however put him on my little "He is the reader therefor get the text version" list. The guy who read OWorld Walker" had the same issue. Pauses in the middle of sentences. Just silence for a second in the middle of an importand description or a piece of dialogue. If it was a computer reader it'd be better. As a matter of fact, save your money and use an automated reader next time. It will be less grating. And then there's the tone. "Oh Gods, someone killed the MC's pet gerbil." Read with a little lilt. "All is flowers and rainbows" Read with the exact same tone. If someone comes out and tells me it IS a computer with a GREAT synthetized voice i won't be that shocked. And then there's the story. Now when you read Epic you think of majestic stories spanning kingdoms and dealing with the fate of the world. Prepare to be dissapointed. (view spoiler)[The main plot. which is unrelated to our protagonist BTW, is about a very stupid deputy mayor hum hum, I meant counselor to the king kicking magicians out of the city to help the merchant guild make more money. If you think this was a metaphor for New York in the early 2000's then preapare to be totally unshocked when you see the names of the cities and burroughs not even disguised as Brooklyn and New Jersey. Then there's the characters. The MC who barely appears in his own story is mostly forgettable. The supporting cast is entirely made up of one dimensional villains (There are no good people in this story, just some not actively villainous people). When the elf were described as not even disguised NJ guidoes is when the book lost the last star and that's only a quarter into the book. (hide spoiler)] Skip it. Run from the audiobook but the book isn't worth it even then.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    "Lighthearted Romp through a Tolkien-Inspired World" The author, William Tyler Davis, gave me a promotional audible copy of "Hero in a Halfling: Epik Fantasy Book 1" in exchange for a fair review. It was such a pleasure to be able to read this book. In the Halfing Epik's first adventure, Davis lays the foundations for a whimsical fantasy series that delightfully parodies the tropes we've come to know and love (or hate) in the great fantasy epics. The tone is innocent and aloof--much like Prachett "Lighthearted Romp through a Tolkien-Inspired World" The author, William Tyler Davis, gave me a promotional audible copy of "Hero in a Halfling: Epik Fantasy Book 1" in exchange for a fair review. It was such a pleasure to be able to read this book. In the Halfing Epik's first adventure, Davis lays the foundations for a whimsical fantasy series that delightfully parodies the tropes we've come to know and love (or hate) in the great fantasy epics. The tone is innocent and aloof--much like Prachett in his beloved Discworld Series--and is distinct enough to strike out on its own and stand unique amongst the rest of comedy-fantasy genre. The plot itself is not unprecedented. Davis cobbles together a band of unlikely characters similar to Tolkien's party in "Fellowship of the Ring." A halfling, a wizard, dwarves, elves, and orcs get dropped into a sandbox to play. Where "Hero in a Halfling" shines is in likable characters and playful humor-- sprinkled with geek-culture references that aren't too heavy-handed. The book is not without its faults, many of which a lot of new authors struggle with. The action sometimes stutters and setting needs to be made more clear at times. Davis relies a bit too much on dialogue and sometimes forgets to note visuals, audio, and sensation. However, these complaints are minor and do not detract from what the book sets out to achieve. "Hero in a Halfling" is whimsical tale not to be taken too seriously. Go into this book willing to poke a bit of fun at the fantasy genre and you'll be sure to finish with a smile. I will be following Epik--and William and Elijah--to the conclusion of the Halfling Epik's adventuring, and I am incredibly excited to see them find their strides in storytelling and narrating.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    A decent story The plot, itself was a good idea. The characters are wonderful. Even some of the jokes are good. What I didn't like was that some of the "jokes" were extremely stupid. At times so stupid they were funny. An example is when the orphaned children of the city go to the back entrance of the castle to await the leftovers that will be given away for free. The staff of the castle bring it out and then proceed to tear it up, smash it, and STOMP on it. This is called "food stamps". That ma A decent story The plot, itself was a good idea. The characters are wonderful. Even some of the jokes are good. What I didn't like was that some of the "jokes" were extremely stupid. At times so stupid they were funny. An example is when the orphaned children of the city go to the back entrance of the castle to await the leftovers that will be given away for free. The staff of the castle bring it out and then proceed to tear it up, smash it, and STOMP on it. This is called "food stamps". That ma have been witty once, but this is referenced all throughout the book. It turned me off. Another reason for the low star rating is at first it was really confusing and hard to get into. In the beginning it was hard to discern who, what, where, and when. But I did eventually figure it out and become unconfused. All in all it was a decent book, I will read the whole series, but I will only read it once.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Boneist

    This book felt like it was trying to copy Terry Pratchett’s Discworld, and it was the poorer for it. There are many similarities (different races, a night watch, a veteran of the watch, to name but a few) but the humour felt forced and why the references to things the characters wouldn’t have a clue about? Like the reference to a flesh wound; that’s a direct Monty Python quote, but the author chose to use exposition to explain the comment, rather than having it flow naturally as part of the stor This book felt like it was trying to copy Terry Pratchett’s Discworld, and it was the poorer for it. There are many similarities (different races, a night watch, a veteran of the watch, to name but a few) but the humour felt forced and why the references to things the characters wouldn’t have a clue about? Like the reference to a flesh wound; that’s a direct Monty Python quote, but the author chose to use exposition to explain the comment, rather than having it flow naturally as part of the story (as Monty Python did). The story didn’t really grab me, particularly for the first 3/4 of the book (I had to make myself sit down and read it, which is never a good sign), which is a real shame, as the finale is particularly good. However, not good enough to make me get the next book (maybe I’ll miss out on an excellent series - after all, if I’d started read The Colour Of Magic, I wouldn’t have bothered with the rest of the series! - but based on this book, I just can’t bring myself to).

  25. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Wright

    Fantasy with humor I chose this book when searching for stories about halflings. This story is about a halflings named Epik. The intentional mispelling is the first of the writers play with spellings and words that fit my sense of humour. He also employs odd but relatable characters such as Gerdy, a half-dwarf with unfortunate looks and fortunate attitude, Sergeant Todder a veteran city watchmen whom never truly lived, Coe a skilled asshole of a ranger, and Gabby the wizard. Gabby is one you just Fantasy with humor I chose this book when searching for stories about halflings. This story is about a halflings named Epik. The intentional mispelling is the first of the writers play with spellings and words that fit my sense of humour. He also employs odd but relatable characters such as Gerdy, a half-dwarf with unfortunate looks and fortunate attitude, Sergeant Todder a veteran city watchmen whom never truly lived, Coe a skilled asshole of a ranger, and Gabby the wizard. Gabby is one you just have to read to find put about. The cast of antagonists are just as quirky. The plot has a conspiracy, troll invasion, and a plague all surrounding the coming of age of the main protagonist Epik.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Kelly

    I was intrigued by the cover and the blurb, so took a chance and purchased this debut novel around launch day. Unfortunately, the cover and the blurb are the only things I enjoyed in this book. I don't want to rant about all the things that didn't work for me, so I'll just say two things. One, I really had to force myself to keep reading all the way to the end after the first chapter. Two, I encourage the author to reach out to friends and network to have the next book reviewed, feedback given, I was intrigued by the cover and the blurb, so took a chance and purchased this debut novel around launch day. Unfortunately, the cover and the blurb are the only things I enjoyed in this book. I don't want to rant about all the things that didn't work for me, so I'll just say two things. One, I really had to force myself to keep reading all the way to the end after the first chapter. Two, I encourage the author to reach out to friends and network to have the next book reviewed, feedback given, and a couple of full edits before publishing. In summary, this book was not for me, and I cannot recommend it.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Tara

    Sometimes it's nice to read something light and airy. Something that doesn't take itself too seriously. Especially after delving into deeper texts. This was funny. Funny in a great kind of a way! There were circumstances presented that every reader out there is like.... 'Yeah, yeah, that's exactly how that should go!!' And yet, in usual fantasy texts, it isn't always so! I found myself chuckling and nodding my head far too often here hahaha! The characters are very likable. There are twists and Sometimes it's nice to read something light and airy. Something that doesn't take itself too seriously. Especially after delving into deeper texts. This was funny. Funny in a great kind of a way! There were circumstances presented that every reader out there is like.... 'Yeah, yeah, that's exactly how that should go!!' And yet, in usual fantasy texts, it isn't always so! I found myself chuckling and nodding my head far too often here hahaha! The characters are very likable. There are twists and turns and a bit of heart sprinkled throughout. I've already purchased the next one for myself. I'm very much looking forward to following this author into the future!

  28. 5 out of 5

    JFH

    A light, frivolous read. Some fun, but not much to praise. The “clever” references to modern day items and 21st century idioms were forced and unnecessary. Epik never truly emerged as a hero, despite some heroic actions. The plot was contrived and convoluted. So much was left in mystery until the final pages that it became tiresome. At times it reads like a middle grade novel, but a few off color references seem to indicate the author wants to appeal to adults, thus missing either mark. The Gerd A light, frivolous read. Some fun, but not much to praise. The “clever” references to modern day items and 21st century idioms were forced and unnecessary. Epik never truly emerged as a hero, despite some heroic actions. The plot was contrived and convoluted. So much was left in mystery until the final pages that it became tiresome. At times it reads like a middle grade novel, but a few off color references seem to indicate the author wants to appeal to adults, thus missing either mark. The Gerdy/Myra twist at the end seemed totally out of character for both and only there for the author’s fetish. The best that can be said for it is that it was a quick read.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Andy Bird

    Not Bad. This is ok. It is a fantasy comedy and there are not many of these, let alone ones that are actually ok to read, but this one is. There are lots of parody moments from the classic fantasies, and the humour is quite well done. The story is good and keeps going at a nice pace all the way through and is interesting. The characters are also good, fun and believable. It’s quite niche and not a classic, but there are not many reasonable comedy books about let alone being within the fantasy ge Not Bad. This is ok. It is a fantasy comedy and there are not many of these, let alone ones that are actually ok to read, but this one is. There are lots of parody moments from the classic fantasies, and the humour is quite well done. The story is good and keeps going at a nice pace all the way through and is interesting. The characters are also good, fun and believable. It’s quite niche and not a classic, but there are not many reasonable comedy books about let alone being within the fantasy genre. I will read more in the series. Not for everyone but good if it’s your genres.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kamylyon

    Can it get any punnier? Epik is a halfling who wants to be a wizard. Gabby is a wizard. Gertie is a half dwarf. Myra might be part elf. But no one is who they seem to be. With multitudinous references to recent and not-so-recent pop culture, this tale reads like an homage to Piers Anthony, J. R. R. Tolkein, Monty Python and many, many others. Just the name brings to mind turtles of the ninja variety! I'd give it 10 stars, if they were available!

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