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Charles Dickens: The Complete Novels + A Biography of the Author (The Greatest Writers of All Time)

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This book contains several HTML tables of contents. The first table of contents (at the very beginning of the ebook) lists the titles of all novels included in this volume. By clicking on one of those titles you will be redirected to the beginning of that work, where you'll find a new TOC that lists all the chapters and sub-chapters of that specific work. Here you will find This book contains several HTML tables of contents. The first table of contents (at the very beginning of the ebook) lists the titles of all novels included in this volume. By clicking on one of those titles you will be redirected to the beginning of that work, where you'll find a new TOC that lists all the chapters and sub-chapters of that specific work. Here you will find the complete novels of Charles Dickens in the chronological order of their original publication. - The Pickwick Papers - Oliver Twist - Nicholas Nickleby - The Old Curiosity Shop - Barnaby Rudge - Martin Chuzzlewit - Dombey and Son - David Copperfield - Bleak House - Hard Times - Little Dorrit - A Tale of Two Cities - Great Expectations - Our Mutual Friend - The Mystery of Edwin Drood


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This book contains several HTML tables of contents. The first table of contents (at the very beginning of the ebook) lists the titles of all novels included in this volume. By clicking on one of those titles you will be redirected to the beginning of that work, where you'll find a new TOC that lists all the chapters and sub-chapters of that specific work. Here you will find This book contains several HTML tables of contents. The first table of contents (at the very beginning of the ebook) lists the titles of all novels included in this volume. By clicking on one of those titles you will be redirected to the beginning of that work, where you'll find a new TOC that lists all the chapters and sub-chapters of that specific work. Here you will find the complete novels of Charles Dickens in the chronological order of their original publication. - The Pickwick Papers - Oliver Twist - Nicholas Nickleby - The Old Curiosity Shop - Barnaby Rudge - Martin Chuzzlewit - Dombey and Son - David Copperfield - Bleak House - Hard Times - Little Dorrit - A Tale of Two Cities - Great Expectations - Our Mutual Friend - The Mystery of Edwin Drood

30 review for Charles Dickens: The Complete Novels + A Biography of the Author (The Greatest Writers of All Time)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Clark

    Specific reviews -The Pickwick Papers - Oliver Twist - Nicholas Nickleby - The Old Curiosity Shop - Barnaby Rudge - Martin Chuzzlewit - Dombey and Son - David Copperfield - Bleak House - Hard Times - Little Dorrit - A Tale of Two Cities - Great Expectations - Our Mutual Friend - The Mystery of Edwin Drood General notes on collected edition I would have liked some footnotes, but discussing with others gives me decent insight. This is a good bargain, and great way to get all of Dickens novels, but it benefits fr Specific reviews -The Pickwick Papers - Oliver Twist - Nicholas Nickleby - The Old Curiosity Shop - Barnaby Rudge - Martin Chuzzlewit - Dombey and Son - David Copperfield - Bleak House - Hard Times - Little Dorrit - A Tale of Two Cities - Great Expectations - Our Mutual Friend - The Mystery of Edwin Drood General notes on collected edition I would have liked some footnotes, but discussing with others gives me decent insight. This is a good bargain, and great way to get all of Dickens novels, but it benefits from research and interaction with other readers. There are a few strange spacings, and capitalizations, that I am not sure are meant to be there, but the content is, so far, correct.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Marshburn

    Finally! I assure you this book took me much longer than 2 months to read. I was first assigned this novel in 1995 for my freshman English class and I never finished it. So I guess you could say, this book took me 18 years to finish. It really is not Dickens' best book and I don't understand why it is assigned for high school reading. It is not even easily relatable for high school students. I think Great Expectations would actually be better for teenagers, as far as relevance. But at least I ca Finally! I assure you this book took me much longer than 2 months to read. I was first assigned this novel in 1995 for my freshman English class and I never finished it. So I guess you could say, this book took me 18 years to finish. It really is not Dickens' best book and I don't understand why it is assigned for high school reading. It is not even easily relatable for high school students. I think Great Expectations would actually be better for teenagers, as far as relevance. But at least I can finally say I finished it!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Cor T

    Reviewing Great Expectations: Today’s TV writers would win an Emmy with the story of Great Expectations. If it was on Netflix I would have binged this hilarious and riveting show in one night! The story has every element of a coming-of-age long narrative arc drama: Pip has ridiculously unlikely family members (missing parents, the abusive 20 years older sister who later becomes a vegetable, her husband the blacksmith with the heart of gold, his overly self-important Uncle Pumblechook - “a large h Reviewing Great Expectations: Today’s TV writers would win an Emmy with the story of Great Expectations. If it was on Netflix I would have binged this hilarious and riveting show in one night! The story has every element of a coming-of-age long narrative arc drama: Pip has ridiculously unlikely family members (missing parents, the abusive 20 years older sister who later becomes a vegetable, her husband the blacksmith with the heart of gold, his overly self-important Uncle Pumblechook - “a large hard-breathing middle aged slow man, with a mouth like a fish, dull staring eyes, and sandy hair standing upright on his head, so that he looked as if he had just been all by choked, and had that moment come to,” two love triangles (Pip-Biddy-Joe and Pip-Estella-Drummle), the unlikely change agents who take Pip out of the marsh and fill him with great expectations (Abel Magwitch/Provis, his convict escapee from The Hulks, Miss Havisham and her frozen-in-time wedding tableau, wreaking revenge on men through her adoptee Estella), and the supporting characters - Miss Havisham’s cousins the Pockets, Jaggers the lawyer, his assistant Wemmick (with a cameo by Wemmick’s father, the Aged Pater), Trabb’s Boy who mocks Pip for his airs, the recurring bad guys Compeyson and Orlick - and finally, the overarching mysteries: who is the patron that anonymously pays for Pip to be raised as a gentleman, and who will live and who will die? For this story, like Game of Thrones, dares to kill off characters in the telling. And like Fleabag, Pip breaks the fourth wall with regularity - “I thought that with her I could have been happy there for life. (I was not at all happy there at the time, observe, and I knew it well.)” Dickens’ readers must have been so enthralled with the serialized story that he could spend an entire chapter/episode on Herbert and Pip attending a community theater performance of Hamlet out of sympathy for the priest Mr. Wopsle. Pip laughs uproariously the whole time as mistakes are made and the hecklers in the audience turn it into a comedy of errors. Is this chapter necessary for plot or character development? I don’t think so, but this Gentle Reader enjoyed it thoroughly. As a classic, Great Expectations is known for its themes of guilt, revenge, redemption, and class - but I just thought it was darn good stuff. Didn’t understand/for book group discussion: why did Pip wait to tell Provis about Estella being alive until it was too late for him to meet her? Also the ending: I thought it was lame that it was left as a possibility that Pip and Estella might get together - “I saw no shadow of another parting from her” - this must have been for commercial reasons because it makes no sense otherwise.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Travis Crump

    No proper table of contents Since the only point of these kindle books is good formatting it is very disappointing that there isn't a proper table of contents to navigate chapters with kindle controls.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Alicia Dimas

    Poor quality text I love Charles Dickens and it is a pity this e-book is so full of grammatical errors. Impossible to ignore the constant mistakes, I had to buy a different collection.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Neil O'Brien

    Very good , I think it was really fun . I don't like having to write this review I would rather be reading this e book I think I will go to

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chetna

    I can't review I feel silly to review a book by Charles Dickens.. There is so much to learn and relearn from his works.. I can read them all over again..

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sandi McCourt

    Currently reading David Copperfield and enjoying it very much.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Margot Rose

    I love his books I do not wish to write a review, I want to read the complete edition first i have not read bleak house yet!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Amy DeLong

    This took me over 6 months to read. Some of the stories like Olivier Twist and David Copperfield are really good reads. Other stores are long, drawn out with chapters that don't seem to fit in. There are times it seems Dickens is just writing extra stuff that needed take place just to stretch out the book. This is a mixed collection. So books are a great read, others are a great bore.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Clelia Zotti

    I'm putting this apart for the moment. I had already read, in various editions, and more than once, 5 of Dickens' novels (Oliver Twist, Nicholas Nickleby, Great Expectations, David Copperfield, The Pickwick Papers) but I always wanted to read them all. So, I began this collection with The Old Curiosity Shop, but I didn't really like it (amongst other things, I'm still disappointed by the fact that the old man used as a narrator at the beginning just disappears), and when I had to choose the next I'm putting this apart for the moment. I had already read, in various editions, and more than once, 5 of Dickens' novels (Oliver Twist, Nicholas Nickleby, Great Expectations, David Copperfield, The Pickwick Papers) but I always wanted to read them all. So, I began this collection with The Old Curiosity Shop, but I didn't really like it (amongst other things, I'm still disappointed by the fact that the old man used as a narrator at the beginning just disappears), and when I had to choose the next one, either by reading the first chapter of Bleak House or Hard Times, or by making a little background research on Barnaby Rudge or Dombey and Son, they sound too convoluted, the characters were not that interesting. So,for the moment, I'll stick with rereading the ones I like. Sorry,Charles!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Steve

  13. 4 out of 5

    Walter Phillips

    A message of purpose. This was (for me) a challenge. Dickens documented in an entertaining way the conditions he observed in his beloved country. Great story teller..

  14. 4 out of 5

    R CTeal

  15. 4 out of 5

    Helen Kiruiru

  16. 5 out of 5

    Steven Schilling

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sidney J Tillbrook

  18. 5 out of 5

    Karen Ortwein

  19. 4 out of 5

    James Harms

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mr Colin

  21. 5 out of 5

    phillip

  22. 5 out of 5

    Diane Couser

  23. 4 out of 5

    Saibez

  24. 5 out of 5

    Leighton

  25. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  26. 5 out of 5

    Celine Naa Aba Palm

  27. 5 out of 5

    Helen Giambruni

  28. 4 out of 5

    PAT CHERRY

  29. 4 out of 5

    Doug Manion

  30. 5 out of 5

    Beth Wendricks

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