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Education and the Significance of Life

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The teacher probes the Western problems of conformity and loss of personal values while offering a fresh approach to self-understanding and the meaning of personal freedom and mature love.


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The teacher probes the Western problems of conformity and loss of personal values while offering a fresh approach to self-understanding and the meaning of personal freedom and mature love.

30 review for Education and the Significance of Life

  1. 5 out of 5

    Amit Mishra

    What is life? This question can be decoded only by real education, mark my words in real education. What Krishnamurti sir has tried to tell us what is meant by real education and how significant it is for life. Either we are doing the same work what our ancestors have done falling in the trap of luxury or we simply ran away from our duties. finding peace in an oblivion place can never be the solution. The author suggests many ways and tries to relate education with the practicality of life. Educ What is life? This question can be decoded only by real education, mark my words in real education. What Krishnamurti sir has tried to tell us what is meant by real education and how significant it is for life. Either we are doing the same work what our ancestors have done falling in the trap of luxury or we simply ran away from our duties. finding peace in an oblivion place can never be the solution. The author suggests many ways and tries to relate education with the practicality of life. Education stands for the overall betterment of human not only acquiring degrees can be called education. To read a detailed review of the book. Please follow the URL. https://bookwormreviews.in/spiritual/...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    Anyone with even one philosophical "bone" in their body should read this book. He ponders the deepest questions of life-our purpose and future; better still he offers workable solutions. This book guided me on the path to becoming a teacher. Its quite revealing; you have to read it with an open mind.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tasneemali

    Carefully wrought work of philosophy ! I genuinely enjoyed the journey of reading this book by this great intellect Krishnamurti.The book talks about the significance of life and education which is obvious as it's the title of the book. It emphasizes on the fact that we mustn't just focus on education as a mean for livelihood and way to learn certain techniques . That we must have this integrated outlook in life and learn for the sake of the science not for a coming or anticipated result. To get Carefully wrought work of philosophy ! I genuinely enjoyed the journey of reading this book by this great intellect Krishnamurti.The book talks about the significance of life and education which is obvious as it's the title of the book. It emphasizes on the fact that we mustn't just focus on education as a mean for livelihood and way to learn certain techniques . That we must have this integrated outlook in life and learn for the sake of the science not for a coming or anticipated result. To get life through knowing ourselves and be aware of our psychological needs , that it's the only way to know what we want out of life. And to raise our kids with these fundamental meanings , to teach them to understand life fully and be integrated , not to be just skilled technicians. Choosing the right educators for them , those who are passionate , genuine and integrated in the process of teaching . We must fundamentally transform ourselves first before we start revolting , reaction breeds opposition he says . Even if we revolt against a system or another we then join another group or system ,thus creating a pattern of though which we will again have to revolt against. Anyways I really feel enriched after reading this book .It definitely changed something in me and had me thinking deeply about many ideologies in life that we pass by everyday thinking it has no big of an effect .

  4. 5 out of 5

    John

    i highly recommend this book....be careful though because you might quit your job, school, relationship, or abandon your belief system.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Boopathy

    This is one of the first books that I had read on REAL EDUCATION...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ram Prasad

    To quote JK (Jiddu Krishnamurthi): "Conventional education makes independent thinking difficult." JK stresses the fact that conventional education lays more stress on knowledge maximization and not on imagination/creative thinking. He comes down harshly on the drawbacks of conventional education system which for some reason or the other we find it difficult to do away with. He does suggest some alternative, which too we find it difficult to practice becuase of our own inertia to break free from t To quote JK (Jiddu Krishnamurthi): "Conventional education makes independent thinking difficult." JK stresses the fact that conventional education lays more stress on knowledge maximization and not on imagination/creative thinking. He comes down harshly on the drawbacks of conventional education system which for some reason or the other we find it difficult to do away with. He does suggest some alternative, which too we find it difficult to practice becuase of our own inertia to break free from the conventional system of education.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    This book covers much more than education: parenting, sex and marriage, creativity. His insights are just as relevant today as 60 years ago. What does that say about "progress" in "modern" society? Memorable quotations: "As long as education is based on cut-and-dried principles, it can turn out men and women who are efficient, but it cannot produce creative human beings." (23) "The real problem in education is the educator. Even a small group of students becomes the instrument of his personal impor This book covers much more than education: parenting, sex and marriage, creativity. His insights are just as relevant today as 60 years ago. What does that say about "progress" in "modern" society? Memorable quotations: "As long as education is based on cut-and-dried principles, it can turn out men and women who are efficient, but it cannot produce creative human beings." (23) "The real problem in education is the educator. Even a small group of students becomes the instrument of his personal importance if he uses authority as a means of his own release, if teaching for him a self-expansive fulfillment. But mere intellectual or verbal agreement concerning the crippling effects of authority is stupid and vain." (36) "Religion is not a form of conditioning. It is a state of tranquility in which there is reality, God; but that creative state can come into being only when there is self-knowledge and freedom. Freedom brings virtue, and without virtue there can be no tranquility. The still mind is not a conditioned mind, it is not disciplined or trained to be still. Stillness comes only when the mind understands its own ways, which are the ways of the self." (39) "Life is a well of deep waters. One can come to it with small buckets and draw only a little water, or one can come with large vessels, drawing plentiful waters that will nourish and sustain. While one is young is the time ti investigate, to experiment with everything." (44) "This imitation of what we should be, breeds fear; and fear kills creative thinking. Fear dulls the mind and heart so that we are not alert to the whole significance of life; we become insensitive to our own sorrows, to the movement of the birds, to the smiles and miseries of others." (57) "Intelligence is not separate from love." (63) "Wisdom is not marketable, it is not a merchandise that can be bought with the price of learning or discipline." (64) "A man who merely imparts information with the world crashing about him is not an educator." (96) "The moment one asks 'how,' one is confronted with insurmountable difficulties, and the teacher who is eager to dedicate his life to education will never ask this question, for he knows that there is no method by which one can become the right kind of educator. If one is vitally interested, one does not ask for a method that will assure one of the desired result." (111) On creativity: "We read vast numbers of books, listen to magnificent music, look at works of art, but we never directly experience the sublime... Discovery is the beginning of creativeness; and without creativeness, do what we may, there can be no peace or happiness for man." (124) Thank you, Krishnamurti. :)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Milo

    The primary premise of the book is that nearly all of the education system (govt. based, religious based, private) fail our children. These systems educate children to be good at techniques or skills, but do not educate them to know themselves. Without knowledge of oneself, children will grow to be conflicted between the reality of their true nature, and the constrictions of conforming to civil society or religious doctrine. An educational system that truly sought to benefit the children would be The primary premise of the book is that nearly all of the education system (govt. based, religious based, private) fail our children. These systems educate children to be good at techniques or skills, but do not educate them to know themselves. Without knowledge of oneself, children will grow to be conflicted between the reality of their true nature, and the constrictions of conforming to civil society or religious doctrine. An educational system that truly sought to benefit the children would be staffed by adults who were continually studying themselves, and striving to deepen their own awareness, not just conformists seeking the safety of job, income and leisure. Only when open-minded, self-aware adults teach with true love can children learn to know themselves, and so lead dignified, effective lives. We are far from this vision, but it is worth it for each of us to walk along this path.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Gail

    The ideas in this book are a ten - absolutely wonderful and needed as much, if not more, today as ever. The writing style is a little more difficult, hence I'm giving it a 4 rather than 5, but I probably shouldn't. If every child were taught this way by teachers as Krishnamurti describes, the world would be a different place.

  10. 4 out of 5

    한 카트

    One of my favorite thinkers to read even if I don't always agree with everything he says. This one though, seemed a bit too repetitive and the solutions he suggests have no realistic bearing in real life.

  11. 5 out of 5

    SSC

    This book questions the education system, distinguishes intellect and knowledge from integrated intelligence and provides an alternative model to education. An integrated view to education incorporates mind and heart rather than the acquisition of facts, technical skills or specialization. It is presented as a potential solution to the sorrow and destruction in the world which is perpetuated by an education system which favours conformity over creativity, divides individuals into us and them, an This book questions the education system, distinguishes intellect and knowledge from integrated intelligence and provides an alternative model to education. An integrated view to education incorporates mind and heart rather than the acquisition of facts, technical skills or specialization. It is presented as a potential solution to the sorrow and destruction in the world which is perpetuated by an education system which favours conformity over creativity, divides individuals into us and them, and is a tool for acquiring property, wealth and security. While improvements to education resonate including those of educators motives being more than a vocation or way to make a living, practical application runs contrary to the way humans operate. It is natural to want security for ones self and family, the survival instinct is within us. It is hard to see how this model of education will gain momentum when the world is competitor, one needs an education to be employed and the markets focus on efficiency, scale and lowering unit cost. This book raises important questions in what an education means and what we want out of it; these are inspired ideas to incorporate into one's life and their children's life, however it is difficult to see its broader application

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ram

    To quote JK (Jiddu Krishnamurthi): "Conventional education makes independent thinking difficult." JK stresses the fact that conventional education lays more stress on knowledge maximization and not on imagination/creative thinking. He comes down harshly on the drawbacks of conventional education system which for some reason or the other we find it difficult to do away with. He does suggest some alternative, which too we find it difficult to practice becuase of our own inertia to break free from t To quote JK (Jiddu Krishnamurthi): "Conventional education makes independent thinking difficult." JK stresses the fact that conventional education lays more stress on knowledge maximization and not on imagination/creative thinking. He comes down harshly on the drawbacks of conventional education system which for some reason or the other we find it difficult to do away with. He does suggest some alternative, which too we find it difficult to practice becuase of our own inertia to break free from the conventional system of education.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kanchan Mandanekar

    The purpose of education is to create better human beings. Better in relation to the previous or current humans in our civilization. But how do we define better? Hint: people who are not indulging in destruction through war and religion. Clearly, neither in the east nor west have we succeeded to provide education that will enrich a person than simply giving him technical knowledge for earning a livelihood. The author very succinctly describes how educators can play a vital role. First, by freeing The purpose of education is to create better human beings. Better in relation to the previous or current humans in our civilization. But how do we define better? Hint: people who are not indulging in destruction through war and religion. Clearly, neither in the east nor west have we succeeded to provide education that will enrich a person than simply giving him technical knowledge for earning a livelihood. The author very succinctly describes how educators can play a vital role. First, by freeing themselves from societal and religious pressures and then teaming up with students to create integrated human beings, and not people who are divided by internal conflicts thus reflecting in the external world where everyone is in conflict with another (For example, most organised religious over emphasize on sexual morality at a time when there are burning questions about war and destruction. This just reflects their own state of being thus having a cascading effect on the followers eventually growing conflict everywhere). Lastly, the author hits the heart of philosophy and true religion - creativity as a state of being and way of life than simply creative expression. I will highly recommend this book to anyone who faces existential questions on the meaning of life. This book will have ample directions for such a seeker.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kiran Prabhu D P

    Jiddu Guruji’s work is always deep and especially this one makes me wonder the fallacy of the education system with all its ego and ecstasy built , I wonder what is the future of our kids , of becoming this and that but forgetting the actual existence of merely being and watching and to be sensitive to the worlds unto themselves . I wonder nothing but truth will prevail when we deeply feel for the kids , for the society and our education system is nothing but overbearing . We have a responsibili Jiddu Guruji’s work is always deep and especially this one makes me wonder the fallacy of the education system with all its ego and ecstasy built , I wonder what is the future of our kids , of becoming this and that but forgetting the actual existence of merely being and watching and to be sensitive to the worlds unto themselves . I wonder nothing but truth will prevail when we deeply feel for the kids , for the society and our education system is nothing but overbearing . We have a responsibility to make them aware of these atrocities don’ed upon themselves by us which creates a divide within their own mind and with the society . There is an urgent need to remove all these bias and thoughts and make them still like water through which they can see through and feel the every essence of love which is necessary for humanity to exists in this world . Simply brilliant narrative about our education system and what has gone wrong so badly with it that the world we live is the world we want to escape from !!!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Julius Nguyen

    Everything in this book resonates deeply with my core values. I highly recommend this to anyone. Yet, be careful because you might quit your job, school, relationship, or abandon your belief system. To be free is not an end, but it is free at the beginning of the journey. Define your "free"?

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah Morgan

    Started off hating this, kept going, discovered quite a lot that I did like, particularly the emphasis on the necessity of peace in education.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mark Valentine

    What Henry David Thoreau achieved for the environmentalist movement with Walden, Krishnamurti has achieved for education with this slim volume. At stake is the essence of our civilization, so I know I have your attention: Krishnamurti outlines the complete, essential, rigorous, devoted, intentional, superlative, & practical guide to education...but let he who has ears.... Just look at this: Here's how Chapter 2 begins: "The ignorant man is not the unlearned, but he who does not know himself, and What Henry David Thoreau achieved for the environmentalist movement with Walden, Krishnamurti has achieved for education with this slim volume. At stake is the essence of our civilization, so I know I have your attention: Krishnamurti outlines the complete, essential, rigorous, devoted, intentional, superlative, & practical guide to education...but let he who has ears.... Just look at this: Here's how Chapter 2 begins: "The ignorant man is not the unlearned, but he who does not know himself, and the learned man is stupid when he relies on books, on knowledge and on authority to give him understanding." If that is not Ralph Waldo Emerson removed to 1981, than I'll eat my peas! Obviously I recommend this to educators, but for casual readers, free from our public school system who finally have the time and opportunity to read books for personal preference...read this, too. It's short, accurate, truthful and will situate your moral compass to education and schooling so that one will not interfere with the other.

  18. 4 out of 5

    John Leven

    The author's primary message is that society will continue to be "broken" as long as humans are driven by self-interest, fear of insecurity, tribalism, and social conformity. His prescription is a "profound inward revolution", free from egotism, fear, tribalism, and conformity that will create "new social order" and a much better world. While I appreciate the sentiment, there is almost zero evidence in the social sciences, life sciences, or history that suggests humans are actually capable of ove The author's primary message is that society will continue to be "broken" as long as humans are driven by self-interest, fear of insecurity, tribalism, and social conformity. His prescription is a "profound inward revolution", free from egotism, fear, tribalism, and conformity that will create "new social order" and a much better world. While I appreciate the sentiment, there is almost zero evidence in the social sciences, life sciences, or history that suggests humans are actually capable of overcoming those primal drives en masse. This essentially makes the author's quixotic calls for a "profound inward revolution" a waste of time for all but the most idealistic readers. Despite the author's dubious recommendation on how to fix civilization, I gave 2 stars instead of 1 because he did a decent job of identifying and explaining some of the major problems in society.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sunny

    I was really impressed with this short book by Krishnamurti. Its mainly about education but true education as a means to grow holistically as a human being and not the kind of education which will only allow you to progress into the next layer the world predisposes you to like a levels and then your degree and then into exams as you go into work. Some of his philosophy is breathtakingly simple and yet at the same time breathtakingly advanced also. you can tell that his mind is the atavistic prec I was really impressed with this short book by Krishnamurti. Its mainly about education but true education as a means to grow holistically as a human being and not the kind of education which will only allow you to progress into the next layer the world predisposes you to like a levels and then your degree and then into exams as you go into work. Some of his philosophy is breathtakingly simple and yet at the same time breathtakingly advanced also. you can tell that his mind is the atavistic precipitation of thousands of years of the evolution of his soul. Some of the other chapters covered topics such as: intellect and authority, education and world peace, the school as an institution, parents and our role as teachers, sex and marriage and art beauty and creation.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jack Ash

    When I had read this book many years ago it was such a beacon of different-minded thinking that I found myself questioning everything. Krishnamurti brightens the world and shows the brilliantly detailed flaws of education, social classes, and governmental ideals. I wish that I had found this book earlier in life; when I was once the youthful sheep, ever grazing the hypocrisy and mediocre blades of complacency and ignorance. It left an impression upon me that will never leave. The only cons of th When I had read this book many years ago it was such a beacon of different-minded thinking that I found myself questioning everything. Krishnamurti brightens the world and shows the brilliantly detailed flaws of education, social classes, and governmental ideals. I wish that I had found this book earlier in life; when I was once the youthful sheep, ever grazing the hypocrisy and mediocre blades of complacency and ignorance. It left an impression upon me that will never leave. The only cons of this book are written in the context of things that I haven't had enough life experience to develop an opinion upon; Hence, no interest. However, these passages are only few and far between.

  21. 4 out of 5

    M.

    Krishnamurti stresses self-knowledge and creating an environment free from fear to help create an atmosphere in which real education can take place. In this seminal book he critically examines what is wrong with education as it stands, relating it to society at large and the need for a new and different world order. One of the most compelling and thought-provoking books ever written on education. This philosophy is based upon the insight that no child can be trained in anything that their soul i Krishnamurti stresses self-knowledge and creating an environment free from fear to help create an atmosphere in which real education can take place. In this seminal book he critically examines what is wrong with education as it stands, relating it to society at large and the need for a new and different world order. One of the most compelling and thought-provoking books ever written on education. This philosophy is based upon the insight that no child can be trained in anything that their soul is not ready to receive. Read it with a grain of salt.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    The first two chapters are a must on how learning to pursue success is not the same as being educated. The last two chapters take a more radical turn as Krishnamurti starts conceptualizing solutions to the crisis in education. His comments, while valuable, are permanently relegated to the realm of philosophy because there are no connections to organizing such alternatives in the midst of success-minded societies.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ariadna73

    What I like of this book so far is the fact that the educator needs to be a respected person; but not because somebody named him the educator; but because he is an outstanding human being that makes all his students look up at him. This is a very early work of Krishnamurti; and I am reading it out of curiosity; because I think that his later work is more interesting because his ideas in his later works are more elaborated and clearly explained.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nishant

    "Creativeness is a state of being in which the conflicts and sorrows of the self are absent, a state in which the mind is not caught up in the demands and pursuits of desire." The central theme of this long essay is that the alternate education should aim at self-exploration: free and beyond materialism. I would like to disagree with his idea of education but this is a recommended read to get a critical analysis of existing system and issues associated.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    I first saw Krishnamurti when I was 14, while recovering from the flu. He was being interviewed for a PBS special and he was talking about his childhood and education. Being 14, much of what he said confused me, but as I mature, his work has became much more meaningful and profound. This volume is my favorite.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Steve Gordon

    Though a bit muddled at times, a book with many great ideas on what education should be. And as a high school English teacher in the US, I can tell you that American education is flying at light speed in the opposite direction of Krishnamurti's beliefs. Kafka, Orwell, and Swift locked in a room for ten years couldn't narrate the profound idiocy of the leading lights of American education.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Pheonyx Roldan Smith (theOCGproject.com)

    it's a good read of obvious truths. a little heavy on "this should be this way" and "that should be that way" but for the most part, a good many things resonated. definitely more philosophical than "spiritual" per se, but it's a fine line between the two often times anyway.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Anand Pal

    J krishanamurti gave a very good analysis, why our education fails to make a peace around the world and creating more conflict. "Education is not merely acquiring knowledge, gathering and correlating facts; it is to see the significance of life as a whole."

  29. 4 out of 5

    Regina Marie

    Amazing that so little has changed in education since Krishnamurti gave these talks in the 1950's: The system still needs to be reformed. Added insight to my decision to quit my current job teaching high school.

  30. 4 out of 5

    The Bookself

    If you highlight your books, I'll save you the trouble. The whole book deserves highlighting. A groundbreaking work on the role of educators in a world which thrives on conformity rather than individual thought.

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