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The Book of Awesome Women: Boundary Breakers, Freedom Fighters, Sheroes and Female Firsts (Badass Women Biographies, For Readers of I Am Malala)

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#1 New Release on Amazon! ─ Super women. Who are some of the most awesome women in history? "The Book of Awesome Women shares stories and triumphs that are not often mentioned in mainstream history and is something you absolutely need to check out....Reading this book filled me with happiness and I just felt so amazed by what the women within this book have accomplish #1 New Release on Amazon! ─ Super women. Who are some of the most awesome women in history? "The Book of Awesome Women shares stories and triumphs that are not often mentioned in mainstream history and is something you absolutely need to check out....Reading this book filled me with happiness and I just felt so amazed by what the women within this book have accomplished."  The Book of Awesome Women Book Review from @kleffnotes, TheNerdyGirlExpress, December 11, 2017Sheroes: Women hold up half the sky and, most days, do even more of the heavy lifting including childbearing and child-rearing. All after a long day at the office. Women have always been strong, true heroes ? sheroes, oftentimes unacknowledged. As we shake off the last traces of a major patriarchal hangover, women are coming into their own. In the 21st Century, all women can fully embrace their fiery fempower and celebrate their no-holds-barred individuality. It is time to acknowledge the successful women of the world.Super women as female role models: From the foremothers who blazed trails and broke barriers, to today's women warriors from sports, science, cyberspace, city hall, the lecture hall, and the silver screen, The Book of Awesome Women paints 200 portraits of powerful and inspiring role models for women and girls poised to become super women of the future.Successful women: Some of the super women you will meet in The Book of Awesome Women: Dian Fossey Martina Navratilova Sojourner Truth Indira Ghandi Aretha Franklin Margaret Mead Coretta Scott King Georgia O'Keeffe Jackie Joyner-Kersee Joan Baez Eleanor Roosevelt Coco Chanel Anita Hill Nobel Peace Prize winner, Wangari Maathai and many more Now is the time to acknowledge the greatness of women!


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#1 New Release on Amazon! ─ Super women. Who are some of the most awesome women in history? "The Book of Awesome Women shares stories and triumphs that are not often mentioned in mainstream history and is something you absolutely need to check out....Reading this book filled me with happiness and I just felt so amazed by what the women within this book have accomplish #1 New Release on Amazon! ─ Super women. Who are some of the most awesome women in history? "The Book of Awesome Women shares stories and triumphs that are not often mentioned in mainstream history and is something you absolutely need to check out....Reading this book filled me with happiness and I just felt so amazed by what the women within this book have accomplished."  The Book of Awesome Women Book Review from @kleffnotes, TheNerdyGirlExpress, December 11, 2017Sheroes: Women hold up half the sky and, most days, do even more of the heavy lifting including childbearing and child-rearing. All after a long day at the office. Women have always been strong, true heroes ? sheroes, oftentimes unacknowledged. As we shake off the last traces of a major patriarchal hangover, women are coming into their own. In the 21st Century, all women can fully embrace their fiery fempower and celebrate their no-holds-barred individuality. It is time to acknowledge the successful women of the world.Super women as female role models: From the foremothers who blazed trails and broke barriers, to today's women warriors from sports, science, cyberspace, city hall, the lecture hall, and the silver screen, The Book of Awesome Women paints 200 portraits of powerful and inspiring role models for women and girls poised to become super women of the future.Successful women: Some of the super women you will meet in The Book of Awesome Women: Dian Fossey Martina Navratilova Sojourner Truth Indira Ghandi Aretha Franklin Margaret Mead Coretta Scott King Georgia O'Keeffe Jackie Joyner-Kersee Joan Baez Eleanor Roosevelt Coco Chanel Anita Hill Nobel Peace Prize winner, Wangari Maathai and many more Now is the time to acknowledge the greatness of women!

30 review for The Book of Awesome Women: Boundary Breakers, Freedom Fighters, Sheroes and Female Firsts (Badass Women Biographies, For Readers of I Am Malala)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kassie

    So this is a set of paragraphs with information on a bunch of women through the ages. Becca Anderson set them up within categories like science, music, etc and that's how she created the chapters. The information itself was fine and interesting. What I really couldn't stand was the word shero. It made the book and the information feel cheap. So this is a set of paragraphs with information on a bunch of women through the ages. Becca Anderson set them up within categories like science, music, etc and that's how she created the chapters. The information itself was fine and interesting. What I really couldn't stand was the word shero. It made the book and the information feel cheap.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    Hi yes, I have shelved this book on my trash shelf. Not because the book itself is trash, but BECAUSE THE NARRATOR WAS THE WORST NARRATOR I HAVE COME ACROSS. I don't think I'm exaggerating about how painful it was to listen to this narrator. She read the book in such a choppy manner that it was hard to tell when she had finished sentences. She also randomly would develop accents for 10-20 seconds. I don't think I've ever had such a horrible listening experience as this book. Legitimately felt li Hi yes, I have shelved this book on my trash shelf. Not because the book itself is trash, but BECAUSE THE NARRATOR WAS THE WORST NARRATOR I HAVE COME ACROSS. I don't think I'm exaggerating about how painful it was to listen to this narrator. She read the book in such a choppy manner that it was hard to tell when she had finished sentences. She also randomly would develop accents for 10-20 seconds. I don't think I've ever had such a horrible listening experience as this book. Legitimately felt like my ears were bleeding through this 13.5 hour long audiobook. Okay, so now that I'm down ranting, let's talk about the actual book. I felt like the book had really great intentions. Anderson talked about several different women throughout history, and of different skin colors, so yay for diversity! It was weird reading this though, because each story about the different women was a tiny snapshot of their life. I know this book's aim was to talk about a ton of women, but it made it mostly felt like random flash trivia about them. I would've liked each chapter to focus more on 2-3 women than the 10-15. Also, Malala is a prominent figure on the cover, yet I don't recall hearing her story throughout this whole book. Which is weird?? Overall, I'm glad I read it, but I will never listen to the audiobook again, even if someone paid me.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    This was a bummer. I bought this for my classroom and it’s a total letdown. I could have written this same book based off of basic Wikipedia searches, which is what each page felt like. The author crammed dozens of small snippets in, where a more detailed description of fewer women would’ve provided more insight on the women the author most found “awesome” And the use of “shero” was way overdone. I’ll put this on my shelf for my kiddos and I’m sure it’ll come in handy as a reference, but that ma This was a bummer. I bought this for my classroom and it’s a total letdown. I could have written this same book based off of basic Wikipedia searches, which is what each page felt like. The author crammed dozens of small snippets in, where a more detailed description of fewer women would’ve provided more insight on the women the author most found “awesome” And the use of “shero” was way overdone. I’ll put this on my shelf for my kiddos and I’m sure it’ll come in handy as a reference, but that may be it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Donna Merritt

    I was hoping this book would be as awesome as its title, but I couldn't get over the number of clichés, inconsistencies, typos, and in some cases, simple lack of fact-checking. My three main areas of concern: 1) The writing: The first chapter includes "Penthesilea: The Real Thing." Penthesilia was part of Greek mythology. Why mix facts (e.g., real Scythian women) with myths and falsehoods, especially when setting the tone for the book? Some women featured were, in my opinion, brutally violent or I was hoping this book would be as awesome as its title, but I couldn't get over the number of clichés, inconsistencies, typos, and in some cases, simple lack of fact-checking. My three main areas of concern: 1) The writing: The first chapter includes "Penthesilea: The Real Thing." Penthesilia was part of Greek mythology. Why mix facts (e.g., real Scythian women) with myths and falsehoods, especially when setting the tone for the book? Some women featured were, in my opinion, brutally violent or not worth admiring. Some women were given a tiny description and others went on far too long with little substance. And the idioms and clichés! I couldn't wait to get to the end just to stop underlining those. And what's with saying one Native American woman "went native" and tried to kill all the white people? "Went native" is a racist way of stating that she was defending her land. And Margaret Mead "got the jones for" another field study? Some of the writing was downright embarrassing (e.g., "hardscrabble Texas town from whence they hailed")—Ouch. The writing was often subjective without facts to support the claims (e.g., describing a "super grade point average" but not stating that average). Seems like every person in this book is destined for sainthood. The author thinks all these people were loved by everyone, much the way a certain "president" thinks of himself. I'd like to make up my own mind about how I feel about each of these woman without being told repeatedly how marvelous they are/were. (And speaking of are/were, at least one person who is no longer living was referred to in the present state: Gwendolyn Brooks. She died in 2000 and the book's copyright is 2017. According to the author, she's still writing.) The lack of consistency was a huge problem for me. Why isn't there a quote from every woman? Why aren't there photos of every woman instead of a select few? (One of the women pictured is Oprah Winfrey. We know what she looks like. And by the way, according to the author, Oprah is "currently soon" to release a memoir.) The correct use of italics and punctuation was scattered. Mark Twain would have had something to say, too, about the frequent use of the word "very." Why is there a separate chapter on women of color? There is, thankfully, a diverse group of woman throughout the book, so why were some woman singled out because of their skin color? 2) The Editing. Much of the writing issues and inconsistencies and typos could have been handled by a good editor. An editor should also have noticed mistakes such as the heading "Eco Awesome—Saving Mother Earth" starting several pages before that chapter did. Same for "Still She Rises"—it appears as a heading before the chapter starts. Further, an editor should have seen that in at least two places, the font size does not match the rest of the text. 3) The Design. Great cover! Maybe that's why the interior layout was disappointing; it could have been more professional. And was there really a need to feature the same superwoman shadow image at the start of each chapter? Where is the index so we can look up individual woman? Sigh. I believe the author's intentions were worthy, but I wish she had slowed down in order to make it a book worthy of her subjects and readers.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

    Loved the content because I’ve never heard of some of the women. However, the actual writing was pretty poor. I may delve into some of these women further.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Dani Weyand

    5 stars for the content, there were so many interesting women that I enjoyed learning facts about. Instead of in-depth explorations of a few women’s achievements, you get blurbs about... a lot. I honestly couldn’t even say how many, 50? 100? I do appreciate the inclusion of right-leaning women but the book does gloss over a lot of controversies. This otherwise fine book looses stars because it uses words like “shero”, “sheroism”, “femtastic”, and “herstory”. I get it, but I absolutely hate it. I 5 stars for the content, there were so many interesting women that I enjoyed learning facts about. Instead of in-depth explorations of a few women’s achievements, you get blurbs about... a lot. I honestly couldn’t even say how many, 50? 100? I do appreciate the inclusion of right-leaning women but the book does gloss over a lot of controversies. This otherwise fine book looses stars because it uses words like “shero”, “sheroism”, “femtastic”, and “herstory”. I get it, but I absolutely hate it. If that’s not something that bothers you, you’ll probably enjoy this.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rosanne Macek

    It's shocking how many of these women I've never heard of. History has erased so many women and their important accomplishments. The author highlights these "sheroes" from throughout history and what they achieved. There is about a page devoted to each women so it's fun to pick up the book periodically and read about a few, or pick and choose. The fun part is now I have a long list of women I want to learn more about. And the author would like to publish another volume and has a form in the back It's shocking how many of these women I've never heard of. History has erased so many women and their important accomplishments. The author highlights these "sheroes" from throughout history and what they achieved. There is about a page devoted to each women so it's fun to pick up the book periodically and read about a few, or pick and choose. The fun part is now I have a long list of women I want to learn more about. And the author would like to publish another volume and has a form in the back for readers to nominate other forgotten "sheroes." Time to rewrite "herstory!"

  8. 4 out of 5

    Leanne

    This book was not what I expected. I thought it would be longer stories about a small group of women. This covered many women, which was nice, but the depth left me wanting. I also found it strange how some women had long sections dedicated to them while others had only a paragraph. In particular, Martina Navratilova is an accomplished tennis player, and inspiring woman yet she only had a paragraph and it mostly focused on her sexuality. I found that disappointing and insulting.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Abby

    I had hoped to read some stories that would uplift and inspire in these heavy times. Instead I was continually struck by poor writing, lack of editing, and shallowness of research. Worst of all, the book is full of micro-aggressions against Black women...and even women in general! The author’s perspective is outdated and damaging. Such a huge disappointment.

  10. 5 out of 5

    MaryBeth Long

    It is hard to take this book seriously, but I tried. The book is writen in a breathy gossip-column style. Mother Jones, the co-founder of the Industrial Workers of the World, is called "Mo Jo Rising" and she is allocated equal text with Yoko Ono. Martina Navratilova, who was named the best tennis player of the year for 30 years, gets a paragraph of text mainly dealing with her sexuality. Finally, the book is also full of invented words that sound like they burbled forth from the mouth of a middl It is hard to take this book seriously, but I tried. The book is writen in a breathy gossip-column style. Mother Jones, the co-founder of the Industrial Workers of the World, is called "Mo Jo Rising" and she is allocated equal text with Yoko Ono. Martina Navratilova, who was named the best tennis player of the year for 30 years, gets a paragraph of text mainly dealing with her sexuality. Finally, the book is also full of invented words that sound like they burbled forth from the mouth of a middle school cheerleader: “shero,” “femtastic,” “herstory” and lots of cliches like "Jane Goodall, not just monkeying around" and "Clare Boothe Luce: Luce Cannon". I bought this book for my teenager and after reading it myself, I decided it was too banal for a teenager. I give it one star for introducing me to a couple of news-to-me historic figures including the Night Witches, Nazi-fighting Soviet pilots.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Karen Mathis

    Dynamic and mind-blowing! I was embarrassed at how little I know about woman's history. I was so proud as I read about the global female leaders who put their safety on the line for causes to bring greater good to the world. Although at times it comes as a firehose of info, the overall effect is one of the most inspiring learning experiences . There are sheroes and love stories intertwined at times. Each one of the amazing stories could be a book in itself. Dynamic and mind-blowing! I was embarrassed at how little I know about woman's history. I was so proud as I read about the global female leaders who put their safety on the line for causes to bring greater good to the world. Although at times it comes as a firehose of info, the overall effect is one of the most inspiring learning experiences . There are sheroes and love stories intertwined at times. Each one of the amazing stories could be a book in itself.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Roni Thomas

    It’s going to be amazing.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Krystal Linn

    I have lots of names for future research and reference.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Debora Williams

    Awesome book every women should read this

  15. 4 out of 5

    James

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lori Pitts

  17. 4 out of 5

    Izzy

  18. 5 out of 5

    Susan

  19. 5 out of 5

    Anna

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rowan

  21. 4 out of 5

    Colle

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tara

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

  24. 5 out of 5

    Maggie Gannon

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lea Cavazos

  26. 5 out of 5

    Bookish Hound

  27. 5 out of 5

    Fernando Hissataka

  28. 5 out of 5

    Oana Bălan-Budoiu

  29. 4 out of 5

    Emma Ahmad

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Reese

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