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Providence ACT 3 Limited Edition Hardcover

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This is the final soul-crushing arc of Providence, and nothing will be the same! Alan Moore’s quintessential horror series has set the standard for a terrifying reinvention of the works of H.P. Lovecraft. It is being universally hailed as one of Moore’s most realized works in which the master scribe has controlled every iota of the story, art, and presentation. The result This is the final soul-crushing arc of Providence, and nothing will be the same! Alan Moore’s quintessential horror series has set the standard for a terrifying reinvention of the works of H.P. Lovecraft. It is being universally hailed as one of Moore’s most realized works in which the master scribe has controlled every iota of the story, art, and presentation. The result has been a masterpiece like no other and a true must-have addition to his essential works in the field. We present a collected Providence Act 3 Hardcover edition that contains Providence issues #9-12, and all the back matter, in this one-time printing of this edition.


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This is the final soul-crushing arc of Providence, and nothing will be the same! Alan Moore’s quintessential horror series has set the standard for a terrifying reinvention of the works of H.P. Lovecraft. It is being universally hailed as one of Moore’s most realized works in which the master scribe has controlled every iota of the story, art, and presentation. The result This is the final soul-crushing arc of Providence, and nothing will be the same! Alan Moore’s quintessential horror series has set the standard for a terrifying reinvention of the works of H.P. Lovecraft. It is being universally hailed as one of Moore’s most realized works in which the master scribe has controlled every iota of the story, art, and presentation. The result has been a masterpiece like no other and a true must-have addition to his essential works in the field. We present a collected Providence Act 3 Hardcover edition that contains Providence issues #9-12, and all the back matter, in this one-time printing of this edition.

30 review for Providence ACT 3 Limited Edition Hardcover

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    And so Alan Moore’s meandering and flummoxing mash note to HP Lovecraft, Providence, comes to an awkward, unsatisfying and confusing end in Act Three. Watch in dismay as Robert Black continues to tediously research his book on New England folklore until he doesn’t and then the world sort of ends! Oh my god, what a load of pretentious bollocks! I really don’t understand the love for this series. But then I’m not an Alan Moore fanboy so perhaps therein lies the problem! There’s barely any story he And so Alan Moore’s meandering and flummoxing mash note to HP Lovecraft, Providence, comes to an awkward, unsatisfying and confusing end in Act Three. Watch in dismay as Robert Black continues to tediously research his book on New England folklore until he doesn’t and then the world sort of ends! Oh my god, what a load of pretentious bollocks! I really don’t understand the love for this series. But then I’m not an Alan Moore fanboy so perhaps therein lies the problem! There’s barely any story here. Black wanders a landscape filled with Lovecraft references before pointlessly meeting the writer himself and then basically disappears for no reason! I’m not sure if anyone knows how HP Lovecraft actually spoke but Moore gives him the most wanky speaking style possible here, having him make grandiloquent exclamations and calling old people young and vice versa for no reason. “Why, my dear Robertus! Please be afforded ingress to my meagre sanctuary. I trust my young granddaughter here has not already wearied you with her girlish entreaties?” Gah - it’s so annoying! When he’s not referencing Lovecraft’s stories Moore’s referencing his own as Providence links in with previous Lovecraftian comics The Courtyard and Neonomicon for the finale to no real effect (and, before some pedant chimes in, yes I know Alan Moore didn’t write The Courtyard comic, just the short story it was based on). I call it ineffective not just because reading them beforehand adds no greater understanding to this book but also because I have no idea what any of it meant or what he’s trying to say - Lovecraft was a messenger for otherworldly creatures whose work was misunderstood as fiction? Ok, so what? Moore is far too cryptic and inaccessible making it impossible to care about anything happening here. It’s not even entertaining to enjoy on a surface level. Jacen Burrows’ art is excellent though. The layouts are appealing, the linework is very skilful, and I liked how he took advantage of the wide panels to throw in sneaky background details and heighten the atmospheric weirdness. I’ve always found artists’ interpretations of Lovecraft’s work far more compelling than the original stories they’re inspired by and Burrows’ visuals here are vastly more fascinating and creepy than anything I’ve read by the author himself. Though I’m disappointed with them more often than not, I’ll always be drawn to Lovecraftian comics like Providence because I love horror and I would like to see the vast potential in his stories realised if someone who can write came along to reinterpret Lovecraft’s work. As it is, while it started well enough, the series failed to develop into something coherent or interesting. Outside of the Lovecraft and Moore fandoms, Providence definitely isn’t worth bothering with - a very overrated comic with its head stuck firmly up its bum!

  2. 4 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    A masterpiece. And I mean the whole series, now completed, with a soul-crushing finish. Providence is a 12 issue comics series, now being compiled into three hardcover books, and I expect eventually into one hardcover volume. Last year I said that the first book (first four issues) was the best comic I had read of 2016, and I am certain now that the entire series is among the best comics of 2017. Do I say this all the time? Nope. I have said something similar thus far twice previously this year, A masterpiece. And I mean the whole series, now completed, with a soul-crushing finish. Providence is a 12 issue comics series, now being compiled into three hardcover books, and I expect eventually into one hardcover volume. Last year I said that the first book (first four issues) was the best comic I had read of 2016, and I am certain now that the entire series is among the best comics of 2017. Do I say this all the time? Nope. I have said something similar thus far twice previously this year, as of June 23, 2017, about Roughneck by Jeff Lemire and My Favorite Thing is Monsters, by Emil Ferris. My three favorite comics of the year, so far. Three texts that couldn’t be more different, and yet all excellent in their own ways. And epic in scope in their own ways. In Providence the main character, Robert Black, is a young journalist hoping to turn novelist in 1919. It’s New England, it’s Lovecraft (meaning he is always commenting on Lovecraft stories and ideas), and it’s a specific time in American history. Black is both Jewish and gay. He keeps a Commonplace Book as he travels, researches, reads, recording ideas for stories, for plot, for themes, even as he experiences things. It’s a writer’s journal, the pages of which alternate with the comic itself. It’s a commentary on the events of the story we are reading, as with Watchmen where there are texts that parallel and comment on the main story. Black is also us, we are readers, we are learning to read the world. Black is interested in (Moore’s fictional) Sous Le Monde, a story that he understands to have inspired The King in Yellow by Robert Chambers, an actual collection of horror stories that came out in 1895. Chambers claimed that when some people read his stories they went mad, some even committing suicide. Lovecraft read Chambers’s horror stories in 1927 and folded them into his Chthulu mythos. Sous Le Monde is, by the way, French for Underworld, a perfect place for horror. Yellow is in Chambers’s and Lovecraft’s mythos the color of horror. Oh, and in this volume Black’s lover Jonathan (Lillian is the cover name for him) commits suicide. Let’s just say it all goes downhill from there. Providence is a horror comic work of literature that is an homage to H.P. Lovecraft’s world and works, taking place both within the world Lovecraft lived in and the worlds, the Chthulu mythos, he made in and through his texts. It is, like many of Moore’s works, intertextual, urging readers to read Lovecraft’s and others’s texts to understand his, to research what he has researched, to join him on his many-layered quest, into obscure secret societies, the horror writing of the late nineteenth century, the occult, in fact many of the things in Lovecraft that are central to his own understanding of the world. The whole thing is like so many of Moore’s works, incredibly ambitious, technically dizzying, disturbing, scary, and finally impressive, if a little overwhelming. It is better if you have read a bunch of Lovecraft, but you don’t have to to do be disturbed and freaked out by it. The art of Jacen Burrows is amazing. Refined, elegant, just really well done. And not for everyone. I will read it again, with the three volumes of Moore’s Neonomicon, when the hardcover of Providence comes out. A masterpiece.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jedi JC Daquis

    The thing is, I feel like that I don't deserve to review this high-caliber literary piece. Alan Moore has once again truly crafted a haunting and genuinely good story in graphic medium. Providence may not be a comics for all readers, but reading this from start to end is definitely an experience which is both grotesquely unique and horrifyingly beautiful. Providence Act 3 concludes Robert Black's excursion in search of the occult and mystical, in the end discovering way, way more than what he cou The thing is, I feel like that I don't deserve to review this high-caliber literary piece. Alan Moore has once again truly crafted a haunting and genuinely good story in graphic medium. Providence may not be a comics for all readers, but reading this from start to end is definitely an experience which is both grotesquely unique and horrifyingly beautiful. Providence Act 3 concludes Robert Black's excursion in search of the occult and mystical, in the end discovering way, way more than what he could handle. Without really spoiling too much, I can say that the last act leads to a deliverance from the waking world, revolving around an abundant number of Lovecraftian elements. Reading Providence is a truly unique experience. There is a significant number of pages where my mind really meanders away from the main material, partly because I cannot comprehend both the dialogue and lore and partly because I want to experience more of the subtle horror that surrounds our (naive) main character. Yes, there are parts of this graphic novel that I find hard to understand, but thanks to expositions and the Alan Moore trademark afternotes, Providence has slowly found a way to creep into my veins and thought. For maximum delight and complete experience especially in the last chapter, I advise that you read Alan Moore's The Courtyard and Neonomicon first, then Providence. These titles are definitely a good addition to your bookshelf. Jacen Burrows deserves a round of applause too. His artistic knack for use of subdued colors, wild abstractions and shiny gore makes Burrows a perfect partner of Moore in this genre of horror. I hope this guy draws stories of other stellar writers like Jason Aaron, Scott Snyder and Rick Remender. Providence is a must-read for Alan Moore fans or H.P. Lovecraft aficionados. This guy may have its ups and downs in the world of graphic literature, but this certainly is one of his many home runs.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Gianfranco Mancini

    Verbose, insane, disturbing. Damn you, Alan Moore! Some parts of this shall remain with me forever, in my dreams and nightmares. This is just the Watchmen of all horror graphic novels, Jacen Barrows is Steve Dillon reborn and that ending "In the Mouth of Madness" style was just a blast lefting me speechless. An hell of a ride and now I really have to re-read all 3 volumes together with Neonomicon as soon as possible. A must read for all fans of H. P. Lovecraft and the Cthulhu Mythos. A masterpiece. Verbose, insane, disturbing. Damn you, Alan Moore! Some parts of this shall remain with me forever, in my dreams and nightmares. This is just the Watchmen of all horror graphic novels, Jacen Barrows is Steve Dillon reborn and that ending "In the Mouth of Madness" style was just a blast lefting me speechless. An hell of a ride and now I really have to re-read all 3 volumes together with Neonomicon as soon as possible. A must read for all fans of H. P. Lovecraft and the Cthulhu Mythos. A masterpiece.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Elena Seymour

    Providence is definitely a beautiful piece of work, it is strikingly detailed and I'm sure makes perfect sense in insane universe of Cthulhu Mythos reimagined by Moore and Burrows. It also brilliantly works as an illustrated guidebook for the literary New England and it has the cutest and really precise depiction H.P.Lovecraft himself. But lord is it wordy and dreary! What we get basically is the pictorial summary of Lovecraft's essential works merged with the closure for Neonomicon comic in the Providence is definitely a beautiful piece of work, it is strikingly detailed and I'm sure makes perfect sense in insane universe of Cthulhu Mythos reimagined by Moore and Burrows. It also brilliantly works as an illustrated guidebook for the literary New England and it has the cutest and really precise depiction H.P.Lovecraft himself. But lord is it wordy and dreary! What we get basically is the pictorial summary of Lovecraft's essential works merged with the closure for Neonomicon comic in the last couple of issues (no endless pornography here, though). As a fan of the former and a hater of the latter, I didn't enjoy most of it. One cannot but admit the amount of work done by authors; still UNGODLY WORDY! Couldn't stop thinking of my favourite comic about H.P. I like to call it "The Sandwich Horror".

  6. 4 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    I liked the final act, but probably not as much as I should have. I know it ties into The Courtyard and Neomomicon, but really it just got so weird and far out I got a little lost. The world is thrust into a Lovecraftian apocalypse when all manner of creatures and elder gods show up in modern times. This volume does leap ahead from 1919 to now, and I think something was lost in the fast jump cut. Overall not bad, I suppose this was meant to be one of those dark endings you sometimes see in horro I liked the final act, but probably not as much as I should have. I know it ties into The Courtyard and Neomomicon, but really it just got so weird and far out I got a little lost. The world is thrust into a Lovecraftian apocalypse when all manner of creatures and elder gods show up in modern times. This volume does leap ahead from 1919 to now, and I think something was lost in the fast jump cut. Overall not bad, I suppose this was meant to be one of those dark endings you sometimes see in horror, but it just wasn't what I was expecting after all the build up. Then again, if it had been what I expected I suppose that would have made it predictable. Overall this was a real treat for Lovecraft fans (or even non-fans just familiar with his work) and the art was superb. Jacen Burrows is incredibly underrated as an artist. If you have any interest in Lovecraft, really positive or negative, you should read this series.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Marina

    Amazing! I really didn't know how they'd make it to portray the unspeakable horrors of Lovecraft in the page--I seem to remember HPL often describing things as "indescribable", a nice cop-out that doesn't work on comic books--and it didn't disappoint at all. The first two issues escalate the terror in the same way the previous ones have done--here, Robert's common book is key, more meta than ever. I truly loved this thorough the series, how Robert Black describes the workings of a horror story w Amazing! I really didn't know how they'd make it to portray the unspeakable horrors of Lovecraft in the page--I seem to remember HPL often describing things as "indescribable", a nice cop-out that doesn't work on comic books--and it didn't disappoint at all. The first two issues escalate the terror in the same way the previous ones have done--here, Robert's common book is key, more meta than ever. I truly loved this thorough the series, how Robert Black describes the workings of a horror story while unknowingly becoming the centre of one and checking all of the boxes himself. It does make him appear sort of clueless half the time, until you understand that this is his way to cope with all of this. Until he cannot do it any more. The third issue I wouldn't have understood (or I would have missed more than half the nuances and secret nods) without https://factsprovidence.wordpress.com/. And then the four issue is the one that delivers, the one you need to have read Neonomicon for, and the one that brings it all together. They truly pulled it off: the dream-like horror of the Lovecraft universe is increased by the simple fact that humans stop perceiving things as weird, and accept them as they are. How this makes everything worse, I don't know, but it definitely does.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

    Well this was a roller coaster ride. I rather liked this series overall. I'm not sure it's Moore's best, but it certainly makes my top 5. The last two issues get really weird. I liked Issue 11, but I can see some getting lost if they don't get the references. William S. Burroughs, Robert E. Howard, and Jorge Luis Borges all make small appearances for a reason. The last issue left me a little clueless. I think I have to read Moore's original Lovecraftian comic book now to fully get this series. I Well this was a roller coaster ride. I rather liked this series overall. I'm not sure it's Moore's best, but it certainly makes my top 5. The last two issues get really weird. I liked Issue 11, but I can see some getting lost if they don't get the references. William S. Burroughs, Robert E. Howard, and Jorge Luis Borges all make small appearances for a reason. The last issue left me a little clueless. I think I have to read Moore's original Lovecraftian comic book now to fully get this series. If you like Lovecraft (and more than just reading his stories) and you like Moore when his is at his most bizarre this comic is a good read. Moore clearly did his Lovecraftin homework before writing Providence.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    Well, Alan Moore’s Lovecraft epic did improve. But I’m still unconvinced it needed 12 lengthy issues. There really was an awful lot of the protagonist, who to me was always Nice Lovecraft*, wandering around New England getting into vaguely Cthulhoid scrapes he didn’t entirely grasp. A friend pointed out the comic overtones to much of it, and yes, at times it could get a bit ‘Oh no! Nyarlathotep is coming round for tea and a Deep One’s just eaten my trousers!’…but while Jacen Burrows' art is defi Well, Alan Moore’s Lovecraft epic did improve. But I’m still unconvinced it needed 12 lengthy issues. There really was an awful lot of the protagonist, who to me was always Nice Lovecraft*, wandering around New England getting into vaguely Cthulhoid scrapes he didn’t entirely grasp. A friend pointed out the comic overtones to much of it, and yes, at times it could get a bit ‘Oh no! Nyarlathotep is coming round for tea and a Deep One’s just eaten my trousers!’…but while Jacen Burrows' art is definitely reminiscent of Steve Dillon’s, he’s seldom shown Dillon’s knack for getting a laugh. And then after each of the first ten issues, you’d get the backmatter, which with one entertaining exception would be Nice Lovecraft’s diary wherein he hammered home the point of the story by recounting his own partial understanding of events, changed a few names of guys he’d fancied to emphasise that it was a bad time for being gay, and then came up with a few sketchy ideas for what we know as Cthulhu Mythos stories subsequently to be written by Actual Lovecraft, whom he eventually meets. Oh, and all of the Mythos elements had the serial numbers filed off, which I know is standard in comics when you want a Superman analogue or whatever, but makes less sense with public domain stuff like the Necronomicon and such; the final issue went some way to explaining this (after all, the place names are different in our world and Lovecraft’s fictional one too), but even then, wasn’t the whole point of the weird elements that they’re survivals from the other pole of the world, from when what now seems real was dream and vice versa**? Now sure, there were a few nicely creepy scenes along the way, but I kept running into the same problem: why? What’s the point of all this? The penultimate issue finally moved things up a gear and started to give us an answer with a vertiginous recap of the 20th century. It made for genuinely queasy reading, like zooming through the same phantasmagoric fairground ride over again, seeing how deeply Lovecraft had ended up woven into the culture, and made me hope for a similarly powerful finale. Which I suppose we sort of got, but as much as anything the last issue seemed to be about tying a nice bow on to the previous Moore/Burrows Lovecraft riffs, The Courtyard and Neonomicon, and spelling out what had mostly worked fine when left implicit there. I’m quite prepared to admit that I may be missing some extra level which a reread would bring out, but there are plenty of other Moore comics I’m keener to reread than Providence, so for now I’ll simply have to admit that most of it wasn’t quite my thing. *The name ‘Robert Black’, then. Some of the other names, like Joshi, were deliberate nods to figures in HPL’s orbit. But this…it’s too far from Robert Bloch, and Bloch is too marginal to the Mythos, to quite work as a reference. Yet at the same time, they’re close enough to be an awkward distraction if they’re not one. Combine that with my general name-weakness and Nice Lovecraft he remains. **And does this in turn mean that once the stars are right and the Old Ones have returned, in the sunken cities of the Deep Ones and the cold expanses of Yuggoth, they’ll be haunted by stories of ‘hardworking families’ and ‘Tesco’?

  10. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    A mostly excellent, mind-bending conclusion to an otherwise slow-burn series. Finally all the little pieces (with a few exceptions) start to gel together, driving poor, hapless Robert Black towards his weird, Lovecraftian fate, whether he likes it or not. As with a lot of Alan Moore's recent work, this becomes deeply meta by its conclusion, which I count as a plus in this case. As Providence has essentially acted as a giant, story-driven piece of Lovecraft criticism, seeing all of its ideas and p A mostly excellent, mind-bending conclusion to an otherwise slow-burn series. Finally all the little pieces (with a few exceptions) start to gel together, driving poor, hapless Robert Black towards his weird, Lovecraftian fate, whether he likes it or not. As with a lot of Alan Moore's recent work, this becomes deeply meta by its conclusion, which I count as a plus in this case. As Providence has essentially acted as a giant, story-driven piece of Lovecraft criticism, seeing all of its ideas and propositions about the nature of dreams and fiction and fandom grow into a giant, visual metaphor felt very satisfying. While this series has frequently seemed plodding and like not much was happening, this volume really hammers home that a lot was actually going on the whole time (particularly in regards to the Commonplace Book entries at the end of each chapter, which I'm now glad I didn't skip, despite their density). That said, this finale isn't perfect. For starters, you absolutely must read Neonomicon before this. That book can be upsetting and exploitative, but truly you will not understand anything going on by the end of this book if you haven't also read that one. I do think it's worth it to check it out, as well. And a bigger problem is just the lack of finality in regards to certain characters, particularly Robert Black, the main protagonist for the previous 8 chapters. While this volume does technically conclude his journey, it does so in a way that I felt abandoned him as a character, using him more as a plot device than an actual human being. And while I do appreciate Moore's larger point he's making, I don't think he had to sacrifice Black's character arc in the process. After reading seemingly 10 million pages of Black's Commonplace Book entries, I felt like I knew him very well, and I wanted a more satisfying end to his story. Maybe that's not what Lovecraft would've done, but who cares? Lovecraft isn't writing this book, he's a character in it. In the grand scheme of things, though, I'm very glad I read this series. I'm not a massive Lovecraft head, and I still enjoyed all the subtle nods and the feeling of interconnectedness Moore crafted throughout Providence. If you're a fan of ethereal horror at all, I really recommend this. It's weird and scary while simultaneously having a lot to say, and that feels pretty rare in comics lately.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    For the most part, Providence Act 3 is a vastly superior book to its predecessor. Yes, we continue to get the Lovecraftian homages, here "From Beyond" (#9) and "The Whisperer in Darkness" (#10). But Moore finally goes beyond that, creating some interesting narratives of the sort that we've been waiting two books for. First, we get the introduction of Lovecraft as a character, which brings in interesting metatextuality, both in how Lovecraft got the ideas for his stories and for the part he places For the most part, Providence Act 3 is a vastly superior book to its predecessor. Yes, we continue to get the Lovecraftian homages, here "From Beyond" (#9) and "The Whisperer in Darkness" (#10). But Moore finally goes beyond that, creating some interesting narratives of the sort that we've been waiting two books for. First, we get the introduction of Lovecraft as a character, which brings in interesting metatextuality, both in how Lovecraft got the ideas for his stories and for the part he places in them. Second, we get a great timelag in the last two issues that paints Robert Black's story onto a much larger canvas. Unfortunately, this volume continues to have big problems too. The horrible, unreadable text dumps fortunately end with #10, but then the rest of Providence turns out to be a sequel to ... some other comic (Neonomicon, as it happens, which I'd avoided because of its graphic rapey-rapeyness). So, don't expect those issues to make full sense. Which is a pretty crappy end to an extensive 12-issue series.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Amy (Other Amy)

    "If I'm reading this right, our dreams and our world are two extremes of a bi-polar reality, that can flip from one state to the other. It shifted in our favour aeons ago, commencing human history. Ever since, interests from the displaced reality have tried to shift it back." "S-So... our dreams are a vanquished country, and it's trying to overthrow us?" So, I didn't realize that Providence was a sequel prequel to Neonomicon , instead of just a prequel. This book makes no sense whatsoever without "If I'm reading this right, our dreams and our world are two extremes of a bi-polar reality, that can flip from one state to the other. It shifted in our favour aeons ago, commencing human history. Ever since, interests from the displaced reality have tried to shift it back." "S-So... our dreams are a vanquished country, and it's trying to overthrow us?" So, I didn't realize that Providence was a sequel prequel to Neonomicon , instead of just a prequel. This book makes no sense whatsoever without the other one, so I stopped and read that. And then I wondered why the hell Moore didn't just leave it alone at the one book. Because really Robert Black's long meander through his final days is totally superfluous and fatuous. Also, the cosmic horror apparently really does come down to sex, which makes Moore seem prude and vaguely homophobic. Would not read again.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Periklis

    A magnificent work of recursive horror, examining the Cthulhu mythos as massive a condition, as any religion. It is also very entertaining as a work of fiction, alone...

  14. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

    Goddamn. This might be Alan Moore's greatest work, which is saying something from the author of From Hell, Killing Joke, League of Extraordinary Gentleman, and Watchmen. Especially considering the Neonomicon. I only tolerated Neonomicon because I already had Providence 1 & 2 volumes under my belt, but even so, you see why Grant Morrison said: “We know Alan Moore isn’t a misogynist but fuck, he’s obsessed with rape.”--because there is a LOT of rape in Neonomicon, like a third of the book, and I st Goddamn. This might be Alan Moore's greatest work, which is saying something from the author of From Hell, Killing Joke, League of Extraordinary Gentleman, and Watchmen. Especially considering the Neonomicon. I only tolerated Neonomicon because I already had Providence 1 & 2 volumes under my belt, but even so, you see why Grant Morrison said: “We know Alan Moore isn’t a misogynist but fuck, he’s obsessed with rape.”--because there is a LOT of rape in Neonomicon, like a third of the book, and I still think that the pages (so many pages) lingered a bit too long on that. And there's no real looking away in Neonomicon--you have Nazi cop and a 40 lb box of rape, so I do ultimately agree with this review: http://www.comicbookgrrrl.com/2011/12... Especially what she says here: "The rape scene in Neonomicon is disgusting, debased and horrifying. To call it a "scene" is misleading; the horror goes on for pages and pages. Brears is reduced to a thing, merely there for the occultists pleasure, and by proxy, for the readers pleasure too. It's women in comics taken to the ultimate level, showing exactly how women in comics are regarded by other characters (and perhaps readers), and pointers are even left for readers to latch on to and in some way excuse the horrific assault. She's a recovering sex-addict; she cooperates with her rapist in order to escape; she doesn't seem overly traumatised afterwards; it's almost as if every bit of rape apologism is being thrown in there alongside the rape itself, daring people to try and excuse it. This comic is sick and wrong and horrible, and you are supposed to feel ill reading it. There's no softening here, no letting the reader look away. This is what happens to women in comics – they are viewed, they are used, and they are punished." It's still a bit complicated with the final volume of Providence, since this wraps up what happened in 1919 and then returns to the present day of Neonomicon, and what happens after that rape, and I think it's still somewhat fucked up in how it handles that, but at least the aftershocks still reverberate--it's a minor/major plot point. The rape ultimately doesn't matter so much, because the FBI agent doesn't care--her mind is almost gone, totally influenced by the creature growing within her but while she might not care, well it involves everybody else since helloooo end of the world with her baby. However, the end of Providence almost redeems Neonomicon, because it's not entirely gratuitous anymore and if I hadn't read Neonomicon then very little of the final half of Providence would make sense. Super recommend reading Providence 1 & 2, then Neonomicon, and then Providence 3 (I didn't intend that order, since Neonomicon came out first, but I'm very glad I did because I would have given up on this series entirely and you don't lose anything by saving it for 3rd). What does bother me is how basically every panel is a jewel, and I hope the artist Jacen Burrows illustrates everything Moore writes from here on out, because the artwork is jawdropping at parts and simply perfect--there are layers and layers of illusions and references in panels, the cursive diary entries are amazing--vast amounts of genius stuffed into each page--which makes me begrudge the multitude of rape scenes in Neonomicon because it took up space that could have been used to flesh out the other stuff happening in the background. Setting aside all of the above complications though--and I'm probably not selling this book very well--this is a masterpiece and one of the best comics I have ever read. We've been following the VERY clueless writer Robert Black as he researches the Stella Sapiente cult, which came to the U.S. in 1652, going to various New England towns (Athol, Salem, Manchester, Boston), and FINALLY realizes just what he has gotten himself into (and yeah, rape features somewhat into his awakening, though he's alllllmost repressed that memory). When Black does finally put the pieces together (and this series is great in showing just how much he misses and how much he understands), the payoff is completely worth it. https://factsprovidence.wordpress.com... Thumbs up for the website above--because when I finished this--there were a few panels I had no clue what was happening, so found the perfect annotation connection Borges and Burroughs and innumerable references in the final two issues that I puzzled over.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Craig

    Interesting, but not nearly as good as it should have been. Moore's pastiche of Lovecraftian references doesn't really add up to much, ultimately. Where volumes like The Courtyard and Neonomicon were actually weird and otherworldly and scary, this one just sort of peters out. Kind of a 'meh conclusion to the ultimate apocalypse.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kenny

    Alan Moore, Jacen Burrows and HP Lovecraft. Bliss. Aaaarghhh!!!!!

  17. 5 out of 5

    أحمد

    July 2017 - July 2020. Now is before.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Russell Grant

    Things wrap up in this one and I wish it was more satisfying. It leads into both THE COURTYARD and NEONOMICON, and I wish I had read those more recently to better appreciate this. That said, it's still good stuff, it just didn't wow me as much as I hoped. Could be high expectations. It did convince me that I really have to dive into HP Lovecraft and read the work that's inspired all this stuff.

  19. 4 out of 5

    RB

    I find myself still a bit haunted by the finale to Alan Moore's spectacular trilogy, "Providence". In this third part we get plunged not only back into the chaos of our protagonist's head, we get slammed down into the fantasy lands dreamed up by HP Lovecraft after taking what, in retrospect, was a leisurely stroll, with some ass-fucking detours, through Providence, talking amiably with our deluded, bigoted, eccentric writer of great horror tales, Howard Lovecraft in all his very-grey flesh. The I find myself still a bit haunted by the finale to Alan Moore's spectacular trilogy, "Providence". In this third part we get plunged not only back into the chaos of our protagonist's head, we get slammed down into the fantasy lands dreamed up by HP Lovecraft after taking what, in retrospect, was a leisurely stroll, with some ass-fucking detours, through Providence, talking amiably with our deluded, bigoted, eccentric writer of great horror tales, Howard Lovecraft in all his very-grey flesh. The words Moore chooses to insert in Lovecraft's mouth feel so true and authentic that I felt as if I needed to search through the collections of Lovecraft's prose and letters to be convinced that they were indeed lifted from words he'd written or spoke, but in the end, it does not matter. This is a magnificent undertaking that was pulled off with immense imagination and skill. Where other writers would devote the last act to wrapping things up so what we read makes some sort of sense, or simply ending it the way Lovecraft would, with a man going insane or developing a condition that will lead to death - and sure, the latter may be somewhat true, but what Moore does with this traditional Lovecraft ending is breathtaking, and with the help of Jacen Burrow's demented and beautiful artwork, the reader truly lands in a new realm that's rendered to feel as if we've entered some sort of eternal coma/Disneyland with Lovecraft's works replacing Mickey and co. Alan Moore loves his intertextual allusions and fun, and this book is no exception: putting aside Lovecraft, in the journal entries, Moore writes just as well as Thomas Ligotti on what makes a horror story work and what makes it crumble. Throughout these journal entries we are treated to musings on consciousness, death, writing, madness, imagination, creativity, and the list goes on. The way this series has been presented has been nothing short of a treat and I have to thank Moore for once again dragging me into a world I'll never forget and can't imagine having lived without.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alex Andrasik

    A truly incredible and thought-provoking read. Docked it a star because the climax is...puzzling...in structure, as befits a reconfiguring of the Lovecraft mythos, but...still. Mind-bending, twisting, and widening. And for all its focus on mystery and horror, this is, as so often is the case with Alan Moore, a story about story. About the way words are a kind of magic that reshapes the world. It's not a new notion, but Moore's take is less...touchy-feely than the usual treatment. If words can cha A truly incredible and thought-provoking read. Docked it a star because the climax is...puzzling...in structure, as befits a reconfiguring of the Lovecraft mythos, but...still. Mind-bending, twisting, and widening. And for all its focus on mystery and horror, this is, as so often is the case with Alan Moore, a story about story. About the way words are a kind of magic that reshapes the world. It's not a new notion, but Moore's take is less...touchy-feely than the usual treatment. If words can change the world for the better, they can surely change it for the worse, too. It's a difficult notion to contemplate, but one that's hard to argue with once we're willing to ascribe positive power to them.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Koen Claeys

    While Neonomicon was still a reasonably accessible, exciting but grotesque comic, the following 'Providence' is much harder to grasp, extremely ambitious (even for someone like Alan Moore). The three hardcovers (12 issues) demand a lot from the reader. I could read for more than an hour in most issues, mainly because of the written pages. The fact that I am not a connoisseur of both the work and the life of H.P. Lovecraft makes it all harder to digest, especially since practically every page is While Neonomicon was still a reasonably accessible, exciting but grotesque comic, the following 'Providence' is much harder to grasp, extremely ambitious (even for someone like Alan Moore). The three hardcovers (12 issues) demand a lot from the reader. I could read for more than an hour in most issues, mainly because of the written pages. The fact that I am not a connoisseur of both the work and the life of H.P. Lovecraft makes it all harder to digest, especially since practically every page is full of references to the work/life of HPL. I have been under the spell of Providence for over two weeks, even though I didn't understand everything. This is probably the "hardest" comic I've ever read. Nothing but admiration for Jacen Burrows' artwork!!!! This must have been an extreme challenge and he passed this with flying colors.

  22. 4 out of 5

    DeAnna Knippling

    The lies unravel, the stars align - Alan Moore's Providence comes to an end. I'm not sure how to think of this yet - it's a very intertextual book, and I'm missing one of the main texts (The Courtyard) that apparently fits in with the rest of the work. I'm lost on more than a few references. But even without that, it was affecting. I don't want to give too much away, so I hardly know what else to say about it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rjurik Davidson

    Moore recuperates the problems of the earlier issues in this final, clever, Act. The problems in the earlier issues were narrative ones -- and it's pretty instructive, from a writing point of vier. The journalist Black's desire to write a history of New England occult culture lacks stakes. That is, there's nothing compelling -- either storywise or on a personal lever -- driving Black towards his goal. So in earlier volumes theres a meandering quality to the issues, which echoes some of Lovercraf Moore recuperates the problems of the earlier issues in this final, clever, Act. The problems in the earlier issues were narrative ones -- and it's pretty instructive, from a writing point of vier. The journalist Black's desire to write a history of New England occult culture lacks stakes. That is, there's nothing compelling -- either storywise or on a personal lever -- driving Black towards his goal. So in earlier volumes theres a meandering quality to the issues, which echoes some of Lovercraft's own stories, it must be said. Still, the "information gathering" on Black's part undermines any sense of drive of drama. "What's at stake?" we ask. This final collection redeems that, by expanding the story out to a more cosmic level, and suddenly Moore's cleverness, both structural and narrative, shine. He gives us a true sense of cosmic horror, even if many of the references require a good knowledge of weird literature. This one, then, redeems what otherwise would have been a flat story that began strongly, lost its way in the middle, but came through with cosmic grandeur.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Hunter

    This is the final soul-crushing arc of Providence, and nothing will be the same!That's the publisher over-touting one of its client's works. Soul-crushing? Nothing will be the same? No. My soul's fine, so's the world. At least Moore gave the long endnote-like journal entries a rest following issue #10. But then the story becomes a disjointed, confusing mess. Some suggestions from your Uncle Matt. Avoid this "reinvention" of HPL's work. Skip (or at least put on hold) reading the works of HPL wanna This is the final soul-crushing arc of Providence, and nothing will be the same!That's the publisher over-touting one of its client's works. Soul-crushing? Nothing will be the same? No. My soul's fine, so's the world. At least Moore gave the long endnote-like journal entries a rest following issue #10. But then the story becomes a disjointed, confusing mess. Some suggestions from your Uncle Matt. Avoid this "reinvention" of HPL's work. Skip (or at least put on hold) reading the works of HPL wannabes August Derleth and Clark Ashton Smith. Begin reading Lovecraft's works immediately. Read some of uber-authority S. T. Joshi's studies of HPL's life, times and thought. Go further in your Lovecraft studies only if you're a completist by nature.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Zare

    So I finally got my hands on final volume. And it is a very mixed bag. I wont go into details since that would be ruining experience for others. Lets just say that third act is basically a tie in between Providence story-line and Neonomicon story. (view spoiler)[Ending is very reminiscent of the birth of Christ but turned around for 180 degrees because we are talking about the dark forces here. (hide spoiler)] We have St John-like character here (our curious and ultimately darn weird and stupid-on So I finally got my hands on final volume. And it is a very mixed bag. I wont go into details since that would be ruining experience for others. Lets just say that third act is basically a tie in between Providence story-line and Neonomicon story. (view spoiler)[Ending is very reminiscent of the birth of Christ but turned around for 180 degrees because we are talking about the dark forces here. (hide spoiler)] We have St John-like character here (our curious and ultimately darn weird and stupid-on-oh-so-many-level's Mr. Black), that agent women from Neonomicon (that plays the role comparable to Mary) carrying something that will usher our world into darkness and all the others - call them wise three man (from the dark side) and locals witnessing the event (no shepherds here, this folk is sick and scary to the bone). Black finally realizes that horrid things he saw and witnessed in previous volumes actually exist and consequently goes off the rails - he acts very much like Sam Neil's character from the movie "In the Mouth of Madness" but it is too late. Finally he ends up in that weird room for listening records [that you will most surely remember from act 1]. Of course since this books aims at being artistic we have same elements that I mentioned in my previous reviews. We have Black chasing down guys wherever he goes (I can only say thankfully no monster raping in this volume) and finally he gets ... serviced? ... by a messenger from these monstrosities from beyond that has entire face in form of female genitals and of course goes down on Black. Most interesting part of the story is when Black finally connects the dots - when he realizes who is he talking to, ancestry and links between all these characters he came across. He then becomes aware they need to be stopped but unfortunately it is too late. Like in movie "The Fallen" he knows and they know he knows - he spirals into madness and ..... we bloody lose him from the story, one third in (???) And this is my second issue with this novel - ending is like stuff from bad dreams (as one of the remaining normal [I hope] characters says - is this all dream?). Art as always is gorgeous and Jacen Burrows shows that dream-like quality of all the events in great form and detail. But be it dream or not (everything looks like it is being erased in slow-motion by a giant eraser) ending is so abrupt and so unsatisfying ... its incredible. I dont ask for details in order to nit-pick them but ending is such reader is not sure what happened (I know I was asking myself "am I missing pages?"). Atmosphere and art are on the spot. But authors decision to abruptly pull the breaks and stop everything before ... I dont get it. Take for the example The Books of Magic by Neil Gaiman. Same dreamy out-of-this-world events, shadows lurking everywhere but book has start and the end. Even if this book ended in a similar way like "In the Mouth of Madness" (which is a variation of "I am Legend" book ending) it would be great. In order to detect lunacy story needs to give us same sane character - reader cannot be the one. All in all, not so good ending for the series. Could have been much better [for me at least since lots of people are truly enjoying it]. If you like Lovecraftian horror treat yourself and give this 4-volume story a try (4th being Neonomicon that should be read first - if you ask me). Although it has its bad sides story is good enough and brings horror to the mind of the reader (which is not something comics usually manage to do).

  26. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    And so ends Alan Moore's highly imaginative and meticulously crafted melding of major elements of legendary horror writer H.P. Lovecraft. It ends with a bang, no doubt. This final "Act" collects issues 9 through 12 of the 12-issue "Providence" mini-series. By this point in the story, protagonist Robert Black has attempted to dismiss his encounters with horrifying figures and scenarios as merely a temporary mental breakdown caused by the suicide of his lover back in New York City. And in the first And so ends Alan Moore's highly imaginative and meticulously crafted melding of major elements of legendary horror writer H.P. Lovecraft. It ends with a bang, no doubt. This final "Act" collects issues 9 through 12 of the 12-issue "Providence" mini-series. By this point in the story, protagonist Robert Black has attempted to dismiss his encounters with horrifying figures and scenarios as merely a temporary mental breakdown caused by the suicide of his lover back in New York City. And in the first part of this final act, he is able to maintain this self-delusion while he strikes up a friendship with H.P. Lovecraft himself. However, we readers can now start to put all of the pieces together and see just what Robert and Lovercraft's roles are in a greater, far more terrifying picture. This was my second read-through this series. I had read several Lovercraft stories nearly twenty years prior to my first read. Then, I went back and picked them up again. Doing this, along with knowing the complete arc of "Providence" makes a second reading highly rewarding, and this is especially true with this final volume. All of the foreshadowing and seemingly minor details from earlier issues take their place within the larger tale. I can see exactly why some reviews of this series liken it to Moore's 1980s seminal masterpiece "Watchmen." Though an extremely different tale, with an even darker tone, "Providence" shows just the kind of care, attention, and craftsmanship that Moore puts into such works. Even though I've now read the series twice, there are still implications and story decisions which can be interpreted several ways, despite the story's arc being very clear. I will say that one will not be able to read only "Providence" to get the full tale. In the final two issues, which comprise the latter half of this "Act 3" collection, the tale of Robert Black shifts back (or flashes forward, if you want to put it that way) and connects to the stories told in the earlier mini-series "The Courtyard" and "Neonomicon." If one hasn't read those series, the end of "Providence" is likely to give the reader severe whiplash. The main reason I don't give this set (and the series) five stars is that Moore is, though with immense skill, still playing with someone else's toys. I would give it that final extra push, if many of the most interesting and terrifying concepts in this story weren't ones that Lovecraft himself included in his short stories nearly a century ago. But my hat is definintely off for just what Moore did with those concepts, as he takes them beyond even what their highly talented creator did with them, offering us a modern tale of horror that keeps the Lovecraft spirit alive. And a word of warning, for those who may not know it already - this entire series is rather explicit with its sex and violence, which is rather the point that Moore is trying to make with the tale. If one is put off by such things, they will want to avoid this series. For the rest of us, I would recommend it quite highly.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alex Fyffe

    There may be spoilers in these scribbles: One panel in this volume stopped me in my tracks. Robert Black and H. P. Lovecraft have been having another one of their delightful conversations about literature--Black's journey has been filled with thought-provoking dialogue philosophizing about the potential of art--when suddenly Lovecraft's words lose their charm, and Black slowly starts to realize that he's talking to a kind of monster. "I am confident, however, that Samuelus cleaves to a platonic id There may be spoilers in these scribbles: One panel in this volume stopped me in my tracks. Robert Black and H. P. Lovecraft have been having another one of their delightful conversations about literature--Black's journey has been filled with thought-provoking dialogue philosophizing about the potential of art--when suddenly Lovecraft's words lose their charm, and Black slowly starts to realize that he's talking to a kind of monster. "I am confident, however, that Samuelus cleaves to a platonic ideal in such matters [of homosexuality], rather than debase himself with loathsome actuality. I have heard much of such horticultural specimens that seem to flourish in New York, presumably a stomach-turning spectacle... In Samuelus we see one valiantly overcoming his animal nature to create enduring verse. All the more remarkable when one acknowledges that Loveman, though exceptional to that unlikeable tribe, is a Jew." To Black, a homosexual Jew, as well as to the sympathetic reader, this encounter with Lovecraft's casual bigotry is a punch to the gut, and the following page opens with a wordless panel that sums it all up. Lovecraft is lighting a lamp in the foreground, completely illuminated, and his shadow is cast behind him, covering the whole room, including Mr. Black, who is slouching in a chair with a disappointed look. This visual metaphor is enhanced by the fact that Lovecraft had admitted to writing a story based on Black's ideas and was thinking of using more of them (which we have known all along are the stories that Lovecraft would go on to write). Everything that makes Black who he is has been consumed by the alluring flame of this weird man, and his very identity has been negated. Providence, which has felt like a long love letter to the man and his work, turns into a harsh criticism. It is after this conversation that Black starts to finally realize the horror he has found himself in is actually real. He attempts to flee but too late. He returns home, a shell of a man, broken by the idea that he is a piece in a large machine, a piece that played its small part, knowing that he will never be the writer he wanted to be, that his very person will never be acknowledged by a senseless world that casts aside the voices of some while elevating the voices others, regardless of their compassionate quality. The rest of the novel deals with the aftermath of the first ten chapters, the way cults and religions form and change the very fabric of our perceived realities, how ideas far outlive their creators and are perpetuated down the decades, gaining in influence, until the world itself is transformed by them. For better or worse, we live in a construct that was created before most of us were born, and we either go insane or adapt. We are all deeps ones now, swimming in the existential horror of the 20th century's residue.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tobin Elliott

    "Lovecraft went on to write his stories, and they somehow came to permeate most Western culture. That's what's most inexplicable. I mean, why didn't anybody notice how unlikely that was? "Not just his work's improbable popularity, but its effects: all those people insisting the Necronomicon was real, all the hoax editions, other writers playing along... Think about it. Has that ever happened before, with any work of fiction?" "Well, probably not since the first Christians didn't realize the Gnosti "Lovecraft went on to write his stories, and they somehow came to permeate most Western culture. That's what's most inexplicable. I mean, why didn't anybody notice how unlikely that was? "Not just his work's improbable popularity, but its effects: all those people insisting the Necronomicon was real, all the hoax editions, other writers playing along... Think about it. Has that ever happened before, with any work of fiction?" "Well, probably not since the first Christians didn't realize the Gnostics were being symbolic." "Y'know, that's not a bad comparison. Religions are fictions that modify the world. It's just this fiction is more radical and aggressive." Well, thank the Great Cthulhu, Moore finally managed a story with a satisfying conclusion. It's been a hell of a long time since I read something of his that wrapped up in a decent way. Yes, there were bumps along the road, such as the drawn out pace of the first eight chapters (covered in Acts 1 and 2), though he does manage to pay it off in the tenth chapter. Having said that, the eleventh chapter was an often irritating and purposely disjointed way to span the next 90-odd years and bring us back up to the end of Neonomicon. The final chapter, while ultimately satisfying, was also a stunning info-dump, while still managing to turn the entire Lovecraftian mythos on its ear and give us something new. I'll say this for Moore: when he wants to write a story based on something that's come earlier, he certainly does his research. But for all that, what's most off-putting is his incredible self-indulgence in his writing. He's good when he wants to be, but he always seems to have an agenda that he also needs to ram down the readers' collective throats. Regardless, dude, despite some serious fuck-ups along the way, did manage to get the job done in the end. And I'd be completely remiss if I didn't, one last time, highlight the absolutely gorgeous artwork that accompanied this story. As far as I'm concerned Burrows is the Lovecraft artist. Having said that, I'm also glad I'm done the story.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Luke

    Look. I really wanted to like this. I dig Moore, and I (reservedly) dig Lovecraft, so I thought it'd be a perfect match! Unfortunately, Providence has taken on board Lovecraft's habit of hand-waving and letting the narrative kind of ooze to a close. Madness? Destruction? Whatever. *waves tentacle* Part of the the problem is that Providence carries on from two earlier Burrows/Moore collaborations set in a Lovecraftian universe. While this volume does pull a lot of threads together - most remarkably Look. I really wanted to like this. I dig Moore, and I (reservedly) dig Lovecraft, so I thought it'd be a perfect match! Unfortunately, Providence has taken on board Lovecraft's habit of hand-waving and letting the narrative kind of ooze to a close. Madness? Destruction? Whatever. *waves tentacle* Part of the the problem is that Providence carries on from two earlier Burrows/Moore collaborations set in a Lovecraftian universe. While this volume does pull a lot of threads together - most remarkably in a very cinematic death-shadowed sequence, set to Al Jolson - a lot of those threads are from the previous collaborations. Which I haven't read. So yeah, there was a whole lot of "eh, whatever" when a bunch of characters I'd never seen before showed up for the final minutes. This is, obviously, my failing as I haven't read the earlier works, but still: with no foreshadowing? Come on, man. The detail in the work, both in terms of art and writing are remarkable. It's a dense work, but to the point of gnomic inscrutability sometimes: I found my reading was improved immensely by this collection of notes. I'm not unaware of the histories of HPL and his circle, and I'm easily able to see where characters in the run have come from the source material, muddying the water between the real and the imagined - but even so, I felt myself wondering what the fuck was going on a lot of the time. Don't get me wrong: I am strongly in favour of the writing-a-universe-into-life thread that's pursued here, and I love that the run is essentially a love-letter to HPL and his circle - but it's so self-centred, so inward-looking that it seems more a passion project for personal meditation than something designed to be read by people who aren't Alan Moore. Let's see if reading the previous two projects helps any, I guess.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Adam Chamberlain

    "Doesn't that make it more rather than less horrible, the idea that this kind of seemingly supernatural intrusion into everyday life could happen to anyone, at least in their mind?" This third and final volume of Alan Moore's "Providence", collecting issues 9 through 12, takes his consideration of the work of H.P. Lovecraft to its logical conclusion and then far beyond. Ultimately, it positions Lovecraft's body of work as both influenced by a conduit for the dark forces that inhabited his imagina "Doesn't that make it more rather than less horrible, the idea that this kind of seemingly supernatural intrusion into everyday life could happen to anyone, at least in their mind?" This third and final volume of Alan Moore's "Providence", collecting issues 9 through 12, takes his consideration of the work of H.P. Lovecraft to its logical conclusion and then far beyond. Ultimately, it positions Lovecraft's body of work as both influenced by a conduit for the dark forces that inhabited his imagination, whilst also exploring his personal influences and inspirations, and his abiding influence upon the horror genre. Quite extraordinary, in every best sense of the word. Naturally, Moore, put it best himself in terms of what set out to achieve with this series: "I am attempting to apply some of the principles that I brought to my re-imaginings of other genres to Lovecraftian horror, in that we are hopefully situating the notably bizarre inhabitants of Lovecraft’s fiction in a world that is as absolutely credible and as immersive as we're capable of conjuring... The story has required that we address the Providence materialist/visionary as a character and that, though necessarily a fiction, our portrayal be as true to Lovecraft's life and his opinions as was possible. To this end, Providence is an attempt to marry Lovecraft's history with a mosaic of his fictions... Above all this is a reappraisal of Lovecraft, not as an icon of the horror story's past, but of its future. It may be that the stars are finally right."

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