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Arthur Conan Doyle: The Hound of the Baskervilles [contains links to free audiobook]

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This ebook contains links to a FREE AUDIOBOOK that can be downloaded to your device! The Hound of the Baskervilles is the third of the crime novels written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle featuring the detective Sherlock Holmes. Originally serialized in The Strand Magazine from August 1901 to April 1902, it is set largely on Dartmoorin Devon in England's West Country and tells th This ebook contains links to a FREE AUDIOBOOK that can be downloaded to your device! The Hound of the Baskervilles is the third of the crime novels written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle featuring the detective Sherlock Holmes. Originally serialized in The Strand Magazine from August 1901 to April 1902, it is set largely on Dartmoorin Devon in England's West Country and tells the story of an attempted murder inspired by the legend of a fearsome, diabolical hound of supernatural origin.


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This ebook contains links to a FREE AUDIOBOOK that can be downloaded to your device! The Hound of the Baskervilles is the third of the crime novels written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle featuring the detective Sherlock Holmes. Originally serialized in The Strand Magazine from August 1901 to April 1902, it is set largely on Dartmoorin Devon in England's West Country and tells th This ebook contains links to a FREE AUDIOBOOK that can be downloaded to your device! The Hound of the Baskervilles is the third of the crime novels written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle featuring the detective Sherlock Holmes. Originally serialized in The Strand Magazine from August 1901 to April 1902, it is set largely on Dartmoorin Devon in England's West Country and tells the story of an attempted murder inspired by the legend of a fearsome, diabolical hound of supernatural origin.

30 review for Arthur Conan Doyle: The Hound of the Baskervilles [contains links to free audiobook]

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jayson

    (A) 85% | Extraordinary Notes: It establishes setting in gaps between deductions, treating the moor like a living thing: an alien primordial wasteland.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    (Book 781 From 1991 Books) - The Hound of the Baskervilles (Sherlock Holmes, #5), Sir Arthur Conan Doyle The Hound of the Baskervilles is the third of the crime novels written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle featuring the detective Sherlock Holmes. Dr. James Mortimer asks Sherlock Holmes for advice following the death of his friend, Sir Charles Baskerville. Sir Charles was found dead on the grounds of his Devonshire estate, Baskerville Hall. Mortimer now fears for Sir Charles's nephew and sole heir, Si (Book 781 From 1991 Books) - The Hound of the Baskervilles (Sherlock Holmes, #5), Sir Arthur Conan Doyle The Hound of the Baskervilles is the third of the crime novels written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle featuring the detective Sherlock Holmes. Dr. James Mortimer asks Sherlock Holmes for advice following the death of his friend, Sir Charles Baskerville. Sir Charles was found dead on the grounds of his Devonshire estate, Baskerville Hall. Mortimer now fears for Sir Charles's nephew and sole heir, Sir Henry Baskerville, who is the new master of Baskerville Hall. The death was attributed to a heart attack, but Mortimer is suspicious, because Sir Charles died with an expression of horror on his face, and Mortimer noticed "the footprints of a gigantic hound" about 50 yards from where Sir Charles lay dead. The Baskerville family has supposedly been under a curse since the era of the English Civil War when ancestor Hugo Baskerville allegedly offered his soul to the devil for help in abducting a woman and was reportedly killed by a giant spectral hound. Sir Charles believed in the curse and was apparently fleeing from something in fright when he died. ... عنوانهای چاپ شده در ایران: «درنده باسکرویل»؛ «شرلوک هلمز: آوای باسکروی‍ل»؛ «سگ باسکروی‍ل»؛ نویسنده: سر آرتور کونان دویل؛ انتشاراتیها: (نشر مرکز، هرمس، ثالث، رخ مهتاب)؛ ادبیات کارآگاهی؛ نخستین خوانش: روز اول آوریل سال 1997میلادی عنوان: درنده باسکروی‍ل؛ نویسنده: آرتور کانن دویل؛ مترجم: مهدی غبرائی؛ تهران، نشر مرکز - کتاب مریم، احمد شفیعی، 1375؛ در 126ص؛ شابک9643052281؛ موضوع: داستانهای نویسندگان بریتانیا - سده 20م عنوان: شرلوک هلمز: آوای باسکروی‍ل؛ نویسنده: آرتور کانن دویل؛ مترجم: احمد شفیعی؛ معصومه محمودی؛ شیراز، احمد شفیعی، 1379؛ در 71ص؛ شابک: 9643509060؛ عنوان: درنده باسکروی‍ل؛ نویسنده: آرتور کانن دویل؛ مترجم: مژده دقیقی؛ تهران، هرمس ( کارآگاه )، 1382؛ در 220ص؛ شابک 978963631895 چاپ چهارم 1393؛ عنوان: درنده ی باسکروی‍ل؛ نویسنده: آرتور کانن دویل؛ مترجم: نرگس مساوات؛ تهران، ثالث، 1391؛ در 201ص؛ شابک 9789643807641؛ عنوان: سگ باسکروی‍ل؛ نویسنده: آرتور کانن دویل؛ مترجم: مونا ولیپور؛ قم، رخ مهتاب، 1391؛ در 242ص؛ شابک: 9786006572895؛ سر آرتور کانن دویل، شاهکار خود یعنی سگ شکاری باسکِرویل را در سال 1902میلادی بنوشتند؛ سر چارلز باسکرویل، یکی از افراد سرشناسان «دارتمور»، به طرز مشکوکی می‌میرند؛ افراد محلی، مرگ ایشان را به یکی از داستان‌های خرافی نسبت می‌دهند؛ به نظر آن‌ها سگ تازی غول پیکری، با ظاهری ترسناک ایشان را کشته است، و نفرینی خانواده ی «باسکرویل» را گرفتار کرده است؛ وارث «سر چارلز»، «هنری باسکرویل»، از «آمریکای شمالی» به «انگلستان» می‌آیند، ولی «دکتر مورتیمر» دوست «سر چارلز» و همسایه ی او، نگران آن است که آن داستان‌های ترسناک، «سر هنری» را از آنجا دور سازد؛ برای همین به «لندن» پیش «شرلوک هولمز» می‌رود، و داستان را برای او بازگو می‌کند، و از ایشان می‌خواهد که پرونده را بپذیرد، و او را یاری کند؛ ولی «شرلوک هولمز» آن داستان را باور نمی‌کند، و از دیدگاه او، گفته ها خرافاتی بیش نیستند، اما «دکتر مورتیمر» به او می‌گوید: در کنار جسد «سر چارلز»، ردپاهای عجیبی را دیده، که به نظر شبیه به ردپاهای سگ تازی غول پیکری هستند، و...؛ تاریخ بهنگام رسانی 15/07/1399هجری خورشیدی؛ 28/05/1400هجری خورشیدی؛ ا. شربیانی

  3. 5 out of 5

    Meghna Agrawal

    Yayyy!!!! Finally I could read a classic-crime-mystery novel in a single-sitting!! I have never-ever reviewed crime thrillers, will try to do justice for the benefit of the readers and myself (in preserving notes) :P For someone like me, who is mercurial, and not into crime or murder mysteries, why would I pick one? Trying to add a bit of excitement and transforming a languid lazy day into a gleeful one! Additionally, to test the waters, and check if a volatile being like me can stay riveted throu Yayyy!!!! Finally I could read a classic-crime-mystery novel in a single-sitting!! I have never-ever reviewed crime thrillers, will try to do justice for the benefit of the readers and myself (in preserving notes) :P For someone like me, who is mercurial, and not into crime or murder mysteries, why would I pick one? Trying to add a bit of excitement and transforming a languid lazy day into a gleeful one! Additionally, to test the waters, and check if a volatile being like me can stay riveted throughout without oscillating. And yes, this book kept me engaged, though I took a couple of coffee breaks. Moreover, the novel isn’t ginormous at all! Does this bewildering case of the fiendish hound, case of supernaturalism vs pragmatism, tug out my heart strings? It did heighten the spirits, but maybe the outgrown rationalism wasn’t sated. The naïve, innocent, and the guileless would admire it to the core, but living in a world of cause and reason, where my being has witnessed a lot of pragmatism, and the unexpected, the awe and the surprise element did amuse me, but did not land me into a state of euphoria or utter-fear! What is the plot all about? Not delving into the plot outline, as it would already be known due to existing swarming blurbs, or else would not want to be known, as it is a crime-thriller. Sharing just a surface-level outline to create the mystery:- A stranger, leaves behind a walking stick, in the absence of the duo - Sherlock Holmes and John Watson. Holmes, corrects the fallacious guesswork of Watson, about the walking stick. Holmes, conjectures about the stranger, Mr. Mortimer, are verified, when the following day, Mr. Mortimer, visits them, on account of the mysterious case of “The Curse of Baskervilles”. Readers are revealed about Hugo Baskervilles, the Devonshire family curse, and the reason of the menace of dogs. The descendant of Hugo, Charles(widower and childless, his generous donations are chronicled in columns) has recently died mysteriously. Holmes cites displeasure on not being notified and invited to the death-scene. Dr. Mortimer, dithers the question by calling it a supernatural case, and he needs advice on the new claimant of the estate, Sir Henry Baskerville(younger brother of Charles), the new heir, who is in grave danger next from the diabolical hound! Henry and Mortimer, visit Holmes the next day, with a news of Henry being warned by someone to keep away from the moor. Barrymore, Henry’s butler, is the prime suspect of Charles’s murder. Subsequently, we are introduced to Stapleton, Henry’s neighbor, who is aware about Holmes and Watson, and the hound and Charles. The story sets into motion… ################################## What appealed and engaged me the most? The novel opens, with a hint of danger loitering from a family fiend and not human beings! The combination of the gothic and the detective elements, The scientific mystery around the phosphorus which I had pre-read from the blurbs, The writing style which imitates a sense of urgency and straightforwardness, and hence kept me focused, and the remarkable insoluble-crime solving intrepid-duo of Sherlock Holmes, with an impeccable sense of observation, imperceptibly fantastic sense of reasoning and rationality, and his loyal friend, Watson, setting out to fight out the case of the diabolical hound. These were more-than-enough reasons to keep me engaged! Was the ending satisfying? With no cliffhangers, the ending was fulfilling. Though gradually as the plot progressed, I conjectured, who the culprit could be! But, for the unforeseeable, unanticipated and applaudable dramatic element introduced around the convict towards the plot-ending, a solid 4 stars!! #################################### My best-loved quotes on wisdom from the novel(in no-particular-order):- “I presume nothing.” “Evil indeed is the man who has not one woman to mourn him.” “There’s a light in a woman’s eyes that speaks louder than words.” “The world is full of obvious things which nobody by any chance ever observes.” My all-time -fav: “If he was vulnerable, he was mortal, and if we could wound him, we could kill him.”

  4. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    The Hound of the Baskervilles. A slavering demon dog from the pits of Hell, sent to hunt down the males in the cursed line of the Baskervilles as reparation for the evil deeds of their ancestor! Sounds legit... It had been a while since I'd read this particular adventure with Holmes & Watson so I figured it was time to revisit the most classic of all Sherlock's cases. I'd always thought it was cool that this one has a little element of horror to it. Not real horror, mind you. That superstitious sill The Hound of the Baskervilles. A slavering demon dog from the pits of Hell, sent to hunt down the males in the cursed line of the Baskervilles as reparation for the evil deeds of their ancestor! Sounds legit... It had been a while since I'd read this particular adventure with Holmes & Watson so I figured it was time to revisit the most classic of all Sherlock's cases. I'd always thought it was cool that this one has a little element of horror to it. Not real horror, mind you. That superstitious silliness that you find in older books like this. The kind where grown ass men have to take a vacation convalesce on a cruise to get over the fright of being chased by a large dog. Somehow, I remember this story making more sense when I was younger. The Baskerville legend seemed spookier and the reaction that the phosphorus coated dog caused seemed more realistic. But apparently, middle-age has made me less compassionate and more cynical towards people who squeal and faint when confronted with supernatural animals - among other things, to hear my husband & kids tell it. But that's beside the point and we don't need to talk about it. So, the gist of this little gem is that a concerned friend of the recently deceased owner of Baskerville Hall goes to Sherlock because he's worried about the new dude who is about to inherit the estate. His friend supposedly died of a heart attack on the moors, but there was something fishy about why he was out there AND he found big-ass paw prints near his friend's body. Now, he's not saying he believes in the curse, but something terrifying is obviously afoot. Ok, without giving away the scintillating plot, I can say that this one is just as wacky (I mean that in the best way) as the rest of the Holmes & Watson books. There's a sister-wife, a creepy portrait that holds all the clues, and a glowing canine sent from the Devil himself to run down their client. Or something like that. Is it a good mystery? Eh. Probably not by today's standards. I'm thinking most people will figure out whodunnit before Sherly explains it to an awestruck John. Still. This is easily the most well-known Sherlock Holmes story, and I'm not sure you can call yourself a real fan if you haven't read it yet. Recommended! Ralph Cosham - Narrator

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    All the stars! Sherlock Holmes is at his inscrutable and logical best, Dr. Watson is his devoted self and manages to actually be helpful, and the mystery is a solid one, with a gothic feel to it. And the Baskerville Hound is truly creepy. Holmes and Watson are visited one morning by a Dr. Mortimer, who explains the legend of the supernatural hound who haunts the Baskerville family. Many years ago, Hugo Baskerville kidnapped a local maiden, who escaped from his manor and ran off into the moors. Wh All the stars! Sherlock Holmes is at his inscrutable and logical best, Dr. Watson is his devoted self and manages to actually be helpful, and the mystery is a solid one, with a gothic feel to it. And the Baskerville Hound is truly creepy. Holmes and Watson are visited one morning by a Dr. Mortimer, who explains the legend of the supernatural hound who haunts the Baskerville family. Many years ago, Hugo Baskerville kidnapped a local maiden, who escaped from his manor and ran off into the moors. When Hugo tried to chase her down, a great black beast "tore the throat out of Hugo" and "turned its blazing eyes and dripping jaws" upon his friends, who rode off screaming. According to the old manuscript that Dr. Mortimer reads to Holmes and Watson:"One, it is said, died that very night of what he had seen, and the other twain were but broken men for the rest of their days."Now it seems the Hound has arisen again: Sir Charles Baskerville, a kindly older gentleman, recently died of a heart attack while running away from something that apparently terrorized him, and Dr. Mortimer reports that near him were the footprints of a gigantic hound. Sir Charles' heir, Sir Henry Baskerville, returns from Canada to take possession of the Baskerville estate. But a mysterious warning is left for Sir Henry: Also, some of Sir Henry's possessions disappear, and a sinister man is seen following him. Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson decide to get involved to try to protect Sir Henry from the fate that overtook his relative. Holmes, making excuses, sends Watson off to be Sir Henry's bodyguard. Off they go to the Baskerville estate on the lonely moor, where not only the Hound and, perhaps, a murderer, but also perils like a dangerous and crazed escaped convict and a quicksand-like bog await them. All in a day's fun! I think the mystery in this book is a better one than those in the prior Sherlock Holmes novels, A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. The women characters are a bit helpless (Victorian times and all), but Hound of the Baskervilles avoids the major racial and religious slurs and the lengthy (and tedious) flashbacks that diminish those books. If you want a good example of a Sherlock Holmes novel, I recommend you skip the first two and go straight for this one, unless you're a Sherlock completist.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Henry Avila

    In the sometimes cold, wet, windy region of southern England called Devonshire, where the land gradually disappears and the stormy sea can be seen, there was a legend of a demonic hound that haunted the Baskervilles family through the centuries, beginning in 1647. Hugo Baskervilles , a tough individual who got what he wanted; until if you are a believer in the supernatural, this vengeful animal mentioned before, came straight from hell, hunted down the vile man and shredding his throat, for a mi In the sometimes cold, wet, windy region of southern England called Devonshire, where the land gradually disappears and the stormy sea can be seen, there was a legend of a demonic hound that haunted the Baskervilles family through the centuries, beginning in 1647. Hugo Baskervilles , a tough individual who got what he wanted; until if you are a believer in the supernatural, this vengeful animal mentioned before, came straight from hell, hunted down the vile man and shredding his throat, for a misdeed against an innocent woman, a neighbor. The Bible says for this kind of crime future generations must be punished and ever since the Baskervilles Hall inhabitants have suffered. Now at the dawn of the supposedly enlightened 20th, such nonsense is laughed at but some don't, certainly not the present master of the manor, Sir Charles Baskervilles, an old gentleman and he has heard disturbing sounds from the nearby moor, a swampy area, when the rains arrive and it does often. Horses, their loud pitiful cries in the night, soon stop, as they sink in the mire and are never to be seen again. This desolate place of hills, boulders, wet bogs that remain always that, weird vegetation growing there, a dangerous region, which fogs frequently cover , making it treacherous for man and beast in the darkness, an empty stone huts where primitive people thousands of years ago lived, but not since...This gigantic, glowing hound the locals have viewed, are afraid of and Sir Charles's heart , one chilly evening stops while taking a walk outside...why? Rumors of the creature hunting again, permeates the small village near Baskervilles Hall, and the doctor James Mortimer who had treated the poor victim goes to London for help. Nobody else but the famous Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson will do, only the best can solve this case, but evidence points to a simple, regrettable occurrence, an old man dying from a bad, weak heart. Peculiar incidents in the illustrious city happen to the great detective , Holmes and Watson are puzzled, then a mysterious message of warning against going to Devonshire... from a woman. The next of kin Sir Henry Baskervilles, a nephew has come a long distant from America to take over but Holmes says he's too busy in London, to assist in the investigation and sends Watson alone...this doesn't sound right. The ultimate Sherlock Holmes story I think, it grips the imagination and never lets the suspense end, the mystery flows along almost smoothly, to the very satisfying conclusion.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Duane

    I think this is my favorite Arthur Conan Doyle story. What a combination; you have a mystery, a horror story with a demon like wolfhound, set on a dark English moor. I've never seen an English moor, but I've experienced them through the great books I've read. I've imagined Catherine stalking the moor in Wuthering Heights searching for her beloved Heathcliff. I've been with Jane Eyre on Marsh Glen when she heard the cry of Jane! Jane! Jane! from her forlorn Mr. Rochester, and I've felt the terror I think this is my favorite Arthur Conan Doyle story. What a combination; you have a mystery, a horror story with a demon like wolfhound, set on a dark English moor. I've never seen an English moor, but I've experienced them through the great books I've read. I've imagined Catherine stalking the moor in Wuthering Heights searching for her beloved Heathcliff. I've been with Jane Eyre on Marsh Glen when she heard the cry of Jane! Jane! Jane! from her forlorn Mr. Rochester, and I've felt the terror of being on Dartmoor at night with the howling of a demon hound close by. This is a great story and if you only read one Sherlock Holmes, this should be the one.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    Classic and so good! I am glad I finally read this. I am familiar with Sherlock Holmes, but I am not sure I have ever actually read any of the books. Throughout my life, I have seen many Holmes movies and various pop culture references, so it is all kind of mashed together in my head. By reading The Hound of the Baskervilles I now know with 100% certainty that I have read a Holmes book. And . . . it seems like it was a great place to start! Sometimes when reading classic mysteries, they get kind of Classic and so good! I am glad I finally read this. I am familiar with Sherlock Holmes, but I am not sure I have ever actually read any of the books. Throughout my life, I have seen many Holmes movies and various pop culture references, so it is all kind of mashed together in my head. By reading The Hound of the Baskervilles I now know with 100% certainty that I have read a Holmes book. And . . . it seems like it was a great place to start! Sometimes when reading classic mysteries, they get kind of muddled and confusing for me. When reading Agatha Christie, I often have to go back over sections to clear things up or when I get to the resolution, I will find I missed something. This has also happened for me when watching the Downey, Jr. Holmes movies. But, thankfully, this was not an issue for me with the Hound of the Baskervilles. The mystery is interesting, easy to follow, and progresses nicely. It has lots of the Holmes tropes that anyone with even a passive interest in Holmes would know about. All in all, a very satisfying experience. Looking to start your Holmes journey? I think starting here would be "Elementary"!😁😁😁

  9. 4 out of 5

    Emily May

    It's hard to believe that I've never read Doyle's most famous Sherlock Holmes tale until now. I don't even know why I've been putting this off, the short stories that I've read about the well-known detective and his sidekick Dr Watson were pretty good but this little novel has remained on my "to read" list for years. And I found The Hound of the Baskervilles a really enjoyable little story, at times very creepy and at others balanced out with humour. The mystery kept me guessing until the end, e It's hard to believe that I've never read Doyle's most famous Sherlock Holmes tale until now. I don't even know why I've been putting this off, the short stories that I've read about the well-known detective and his sidekick Dr Watson were pretty good but this little novel has remained on my "to read" list for years. And I found The Hound of the Baskervilles a really enjoyable little story, at times very creepy and at others balanced out with humour. The mystery kept me guessing until the end, even when I thought I knew the answer there were numerous niggling doubts in the back of my mind. The challenge that Holmes and Watson face here is quite different from any of their other cases: a mystery that straddles the line between this world and the possibility of the supernatural. There is an old legend of the Baskervilles, that they are tainted by a centuries-old curse. The curse of the Hound of the Baskervilles, a spectral hell hound that chases down members of the family if they should venture out upon the moors at night and brings about their early demise. Many believe it is fairy tale nonsense, but what then is the explanation for the misfortune of the Baskerville family members? And what is that piercing howl that can be heard across the dark, misty moors at night? When the doctor of the late Charles Baskerville pays Sherlock Holmes a visit, both Holmes and Watson get pulled into something very old and dangerous, even the level-headed Sherlock Holmes begins to question whether his most recent villain is even of this world. So, this is a very creepy book. The image of the old, haunted mansion used in many horror stories seems rather overdone today but Doyle's example of this still works all these years after the book's publication. The atmosphere created by setting this mystery miles from civilisation and out on some creepy moors is highly effective, that kind of setting can make anyone start to believe in ghosts. This tale is told through the discovery of secrets that are hidden away in the house's very corridors and come out to play at night, red herrings are thrown in and everyone has a secret - it's hard not to be caught up in the creepiness and tension. Also, I know some people hate Sherlock Holmes' holier-than-thou attitude but I find him amusing. Same with Poirot and other characters who don't know how to be wrong, their arrogance will make you roll your eyes but I cheer for them too. I always want to congratulate authors who can take a somewhat insufferable character and turn them into someone everyone wants to succeed, there's something more challenging and more interesting with that, rather than just someone who is inoffensive to everyone but one-dimensional. Anyway, I really liked this and I think most mystery fans will too.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Piyangie

    I first read The Hound of the Baskervilles when I was about ten years old. It was both a fascinating and scary read for me at that time. I remember imagining that a large fierce hound might appear in our backyard at night and being uneasy about it! :) Almost thirty years later I find it more fascinating since I have outgrown my fear. :) And also, this time around I could appreciate the genius mind and brilliant power of observation and deduction of Sherlock Holmes. Out of all the Sherlock Holmes I first read The Hound of the Baskervilles when I was about ten years old. It was both a fascinating and scary read for me at that time. I remember imagining that a large fierce hound might appear in our backyard at night and being uneasy about it! :) Almost thirty years later I find it more fascinating since I have outgrown my fear. :) And also, this time around I could appreciate the genius mind and brilliant power of observation and deduction of Sherlock Holmes. Out of all the Sherlock Holmes books that I have read so far, this is where Sherlock Holmes shines the brightest. The mystery around the hound has always fascinated me, although I now know very well what it is. I love how Holmes unravels the mystery and how he lay out the plan to catch this "devil" of a beast using a human "bait". To me, this is the climax of the story where suspense and action are at their height. The scientific element that is involved in this mystery has captured my interest from my childhood. I remember being thoroughly fascinated by the use of phosphorus to cover the muzzle of the hound, and thinking that it was such a fine idea. :) I love this and enjoy it very much every time I read it. And even though I know the story, that doesn't impede my enjoyment of this beautiful mystery in any way. No matter how many times I might read this in the future, I know that each reading will be felt like a fresh reading for me. And that is exactly why this murder mystery is the only one to have graced my favourite shelf .

  11. 5 out of 5

    Caz (littlebookowl)

    4.5 stars! Ahh it's good to be back, I've missed you Sherlock Holmes! 4.5 stars! Ahh it's good to be back, I've missed you Sherlock Holmes!

  12. 5 out of 5

    emma

    every sherlock holmes title sounds like it was randomly generated by a computer

  13. 4 out of 5

    Luffy

    I'd been toying with the idea of reading books in French. I can understand the language - but as for speaking it, well here's another ball game. I read part of this edition in my class when I was 13 years old. I read when the hound was racing towards its would be victim. Would be victim...due to Sherlock Holmes' intervention. Holmes is a very fantastic, very popular character. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, though he claimed to loathe the character, had a hidden fondness for Holmes. The author was furio I'd been toying with the idea of reading books in French. I can understand the language - but as for speaking it, well here's another ball game. I read part of this edition in my class when I was 13 years old. I read when the hound was racing towards its would be victim. Would be victim...due to Sherlock Holmes' intervention. Holmes is a very fantastic, very popular character. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, though he claimed to loathe the character, had a hidden fondness for Holmes. The author was furious with the treatment of his creation in the hands of Maurice Leblanc, who was the creator of Arsene Lupin. Movie and TV adaptations come and go, but the purity of Sherlock Holmes is like vapor to the uninitiated. Us fans know secretly what makes him tick. But we cannot transcribe ourselves in certain terms. We lack the knowledge how to pin the exactitude of Homes as portrayed in the original 4 novels and 56 short stories. Same for the directors and wannabe authors who wish to ape Doyle. This was an experiment. And I think I succeeded in enjoying the story, known as it was to me in an earlier reading in English. The Hound of the Baskervilles was really wildly successful only in retrospective. Now it is part of the legacy of the detective. The meerschaum pipe and the hunting apparel are nearly part of folklore, and I enjoyed visiting it thoroughly. Highly recommended.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Brett C

    I thoroughly enjoyed this detective story. This is my first Sherlock Holmes book. The story does a great job of combining elements of mystery and subtle supernatural horror. Though the book is serious there are elements of humor with some quirky dialogue. The vibe of the book was spooky. It is set in the shadowy English autumn centering around the English folk legend of a demonic hellhound. Arthur Conan Doyle does a great job of using imagery with phrases like "the moonlit night, the desolate moo I thoroughly enjoyed this detective story. This is my first Sherlock Holmes book. The story does a great job of combining elements of mystery and subtle supernatural horror. Though the book is serious there are elements of humor with some quirky dialogue. The vibe of the book was spooky. It is set in the shadowy English autumn centering around the English folk legend of a demonic hellhound. Arthur Conan Doyle does a great job of using imagery with phrases like "the moonlit night, the desolate moor, the ghastly spectre, the apparition". The story has the mystery, the clues, the inductive reasoning, and eventually solving the case. I definitely give it five stars and I probably will read it again in a few years. I highly recommend this one to anyone who enjoys a good book. Thanks!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Paul Weiss

    "A devilish affair" When Henry Baskerville, the last remaining scion of the family, travels from Canada to England to take up residence in Baskerville Hall after the puzzling violent death of his uncle, Sir Charles, he is immediately greeted with a string of baffling mysteries not the least of which is the legend of an enormous hound residing on the moors in Devon. Dr James Mortimer, family friend to the Baskervilles, engages Holmes and Watson to advise and protect Henry and to resolve the issue "A devilish affair" When Henry Baskerville, the last remaining scion of the family, travels from Canada to England to take up residence in Baskerville Hall after the puzzling violent death of his uncle, Sir Charles, he is immediately greeted with a string of baffling mysteries not the least of which is the legend of an enormous hound residing on the moors in Devon. Dr James Mortimer, family friend to the Baskervilles, engages Holmes and Watson to advise and protect Henry and to resolve the issue of the hound's existence once and for all. Not one to believe in supernatural phantoms such as this spectral hound from hell endowed with "blazing eyes and dripping jaws", Holmes dispatches Watson to scout out the terrain and place the neighbouring residents under the proverbial magnifying glass - Stapleton, the accomplished entomologist and his beautiful sister, Beryl, who attempts to warn off Henry from taking up residence in the hall; Frankland, a crotchety busybody with a telescope and his troubled daughter, Laura Lyons, recovering from an ill-advised marriage; and the Barrymores, long time butler and housekeeper to the Baskerville family, who are clearly carrying a disturbing secret of their own. True to the well-established paradigm of the Holmes canon, Doyle allows Watson to tell the tale with a deliciously full serving of speculation, theorizing based on "incomplete data", emotion, gentlemanly bravado, flowery Victorian atmosphere, elegant dialogue, and extensive detail on the routine of daily living at the turn of the century such as communicating by telegram and traveling by coach. His development of the bleak, dark, gloomy atmosphere of the moor is masterful: "Over the green squares of the fields and the low curve of a wood there rose in the distance a grey, melancholy hill, with a strange jagged summit, dim and vague in the distance, like some fantastic landscape in a dream." An easy one evening read over the comfortable space of a couple of hours, The Hound of the Baskervilles moves swiftly from the traditional cozy opening of Holmes' Baker Street digs to a resounding climax that is packed with more excitement and action than almost any other story in the entire Holmes litany. Two thumbs up and a five star recommendation to readers of all ages! Paul Weiss

  16. 4 out of 5

    Reading_ Tamishly

    The story is about solving a murder mystery when Sir Charles Baskerville was found dead at Baskerville Hall (which, by the way, exists still) fearing some big hound was behind the murder. I find the writing really good (easy to read and enjoyable), the plot quite unique, the description of the different characters distinct from one another and the ending quite thrilling. You will come across a few morally gray characters in the story. The murder mystery isn't that difficult to solve but it's the w The story is about solving a murder mystery when Sir Charles Baskerville was found dead at Baskerville Hall (which, by the way, exists still) fearing some big hound was behind the murder. I find the writing really good (easy to read and enjoyable), the plot quite unique, the description of the different characters distinct from one another and the ending quite thrilling. You will come across a few morally gray characters in the story. The murder mystery isn't that difficult to solve but it's the way how Sherlock and Watson handled the characters and the situation together that gave much needed oomph to the plot.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Luís

    That's a meticulously woven story, which I eagerly could read because ACD placed many phenomena on elucidating throughout the investigation. A sensational masterpiece was full of logic that would serve as a model for many current authors who dilute their history, always bloodied to attract the reader. That's a meticulously woven story, which I eagerly could read because ACD placed many phenomena on elucidating throughout the investigation. A sensational masterpiece was full of logic that would serve as a model for many current authors who dilute their history, always bloodied to attract the reader.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    Well, I just felt sorry for the hound 🤨 I have such a hard time understanding some things in classics but that’s ok, I still like the book. I need to go back and watch the old black and white again Mel 🖤🐶🐺🐾 Well, I just felt sorry for the hound 🤨 I have such a hard time understanding some things in classics but that’s ok, I still like the book. I need to go back and watch the old black and white again Mel 🖤🐶🐺🐾

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nandakishore Mridula

    This story is an institution from my childhood. I first heard it as a child; my mother told it to me as a bedtime story (yes, my mom is like that). I was creeped out totally - and continued to be so while I read the story in umpteen plagiarised translations (where the hound was changed to all kinds of animal including a monkey) and finally in the original. I even saw two movie adaptations, one in Malayalam (Agnimrigam - bad) and one in Hindi (Bees Saal Baad - good). If you are a mystery buff and This story is an institution from my childhood. I first heard it as a child; my mother told it to me as a bedtime story (yes, my mom is like that). I was creeped out totally - and continued to be so while I read the story in umpteen plagiarised translations (where the hound was changed to all kinds of animal including a monkey) and finally in the original. I even saw two movie adaptations, one in Malayalam (Agnimrigam - bad) and one in Hindi (Bees Saal Baad - good). If you are a mystery buff and don't know the story of this one, then most probably you are not living on this planet! "The Hound of Hell" terrorises the Baskerville family, a curse visited on them because of a womanising ancestor who sold his soul to the devil to abduct a woman. The hound is apparently bent on killing all the members of the family. It is left to Holmes to battle the forces of darkness and save Sir Henry Baskerville, the last of the line. As mysteries go, this is not your classical whodunit, but it is an eerily suspenseful story which will keep you glued to the page. And I found the concept of the hound genuinely frightening - apparently Conan Doyle based this on a real Dartmoor legend. -------------------------------- I had the chance to visit Dartmoor and enjoy its wild beauty in 2009: also visit the house where Conan Doyle stayed while writing this book, which is now a museum.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Apatt

    “Really, Watson, you excel yourself,” said Holmes, pushing back his chair and lighting a cigarette. "I am bound to say that in all the accounts which you have been so good as to give of my own small achievements you have habitually underrated your own abilities. It may be that you are not yourself luminous, but you are a conductor of light. Some people without possessing genius have a remarkable power of stimulating it. I confess, my dear fellow, that I am very much in your debt." “Holmes, you ar “Really, Watson, you excel yourself,” said Holmes, pushing back his chair and lighting a cigarette. "I am bound to say that in all the accounts which you have been so good as to give of my own small achievements you have habitually underrated your own abilities. It may be that you are not yourself luminous, but you are a conductor of light. Some people without possessing genius have a remarkable power of stimulating it. I confess, my dear fellow, that I am very much in your debt." “Holmes, you are a condescending bastard” Well, Watson never said that, though I can imagine Martin Freeman’s rendition of Watson on Sherlock saying it or something similar. For Holmes is indeed one condescending bastard, and Watson is far too tolerant. The Hound of the Baskervilles is probably the only Sherlock Holmes book that can stand independently outside of the rest of the Holmes canon. People often don’t always think of it as a “Sherlock Holmes book”, but as a thrilling and scary novel in and of itself, regardless of who the hero is. In this, his most famous adventure, Sherlock Holmes is requested by Sir Henry Baskervilles, the current heir to the wealthy Baskervilles estate, to investigate the mysterious death of his uncle Sir Charles Baskervilles who apparently died of fright. More importantly, Sir Henry’s own life is at risk from the same possibly supernatural agency. Sherlock is all “You ain't nothin' but a hound dog cryin' all the time”, gyrating his hips like a demented pop icon, accompanied by his violin of course.* Arthur Conan Doyle has really outdone himself with The Hound of the Baskervilles, I have read quite a few of his books and this is the most superbly crafted; from the mystifying setup, the “red herring”, the shadowy figure who manages to elude even Holmes on several occasions and the horrifying climax. I love the business with walking stick in the first chapter and the stolen boots. Watson gets to do quite a lot of sleuthing in this one while Holmes is seemingly absent. There are three substantial chapters worth of Watson’s solo adventure, well done, doc! Watson is clearly no fool and he does not embarrass himself at any point, in spite of Holmes’ efforts. There are some problematical elements in this book. The female characters are all useless and even harmful through their lack of agency. The subplot with the escaped murderous convict is a bit dodgy. (view spoiler)[At the convict’s brother’s appeal, Henry Baskervilles and Watson agree not to pursue the man because he is going off to the US the next day (or something). So it’s OK to export British psychopaths to the US? ⁀⊙﹏☉⁀ (hide spoiler)] Still, the climax is definitely rousing, and Holmes finds out “who let the dog out” almost too late, but then with “almost” being the operative word it’s all OK. The Hound of the Baskervilles is great stuff of course, but–honestly-who hasn’t read it or seen some kind of adaptation? It’s elementary. * It’s in the book, I wrote it in with a Sharpie. Notes: • Audio book credit: Mostly read in Librivox’s audiobook format, magnificently narrated – gratis! - by David Clarke. Thank you! Quotes: “Interesting, though elementary," said he as he returned to his favourite corner of the settee. "There are certainly one or two indications upon the stick. It gives us the basis for several deductions.” Yay! He said The Word! \(^▽^)/ “I am afraid, my dear Watson, that most of your conclusions were erroneous. When I said that you stimulated me I meant, to be frank, that in noting your fallacies I was occasionally guided towards the truth.” Poor John! Dump him for Poirot! (though he’d need a time machine for that). “Would you have any objection to my running my finger along your parietal fissure? A cast of your skull, sir, until the original is available, would be an ornament to any anthropological museum.” LOL! That’s some kinky shit from Dr. Mortimer, Sir Henry’s pal. Pics: Favourite film version from 1959, Christopher Lee as hapless (not hooray) Henry! Big Finish's excellent cover for their dramatized audiobook adaptation. Awesome art by Matthew Stewart

  21. 4 out of 5

    Adrian

    Part of Sherlock Holmes Group Read Dec 2021 - 5 ⭐️ So this was the last book in the 18month group read of all the Sir ACD Holmes stories and novels run by me in the Group English Mysteries. Chronologically not the last written but it seemed appropriate to save Dartmoor and Grimpen Mire until the bleakest time of the year (here in the UK). So interestingly I have actually upped my 2017 rating to 5 stars as I thoroughly enjoyed the book despite it only being 4 years ago I read it. Maybe age is dimm Part of Sherlock Holmes Group Read Dec 2021 - 5 ⭐️ So this was the last book in the 18month group read of all the Sir ACD Holmes stories and novels run by me in the Group English Mysteries. Chronologically not the last written but it seemed appropriate to save Dartmoor and Grimpen Mire until the bleakest time of the year (here in the UK). So interestingly I have actually upped my 2017 rating to 5 stars as I thoroughly enjoyed the book despite it only being 4 years ago I read it. Maybe age is dimming my memory quicker, agh !! I love the descriptive passages of Cornwall and Dartmorr in particular and as ever the banter and relationship between our two heroes. You can "see" the genuine fondness ( I have shied away from the word love , should it offend anyone) and bonds of strong friendship between the two men (view spoiler)[in their surprise meeting on the moor (hide spoiler)] . Whilst I haven't yet got out my Sherlock DVD boxset (Jeremy Brett of course) to follow up my enjoyment, this is only because my library is still in boxes and will be for some time as it is the last room on our list to renovate !!. (As a complete aside and probably of no interest to anyone but me, my youngest son and his wife are currently with the twins in Switzerland with her parents, so what I hear you say, but wait a second. My son sent me a picture from the window of the chalet that his wife's parents own and there is, yes really The Reichenbach Falls ) Challenge (2017) read Feb 2017 Oh I do so love Sherlock. I have read this book a few times over the years (god, I sound ancient ha ha), but I never tire of it. I have also seen (and own) any number of movie/TV versions of this story and they all bring something to the story in their different ways. It is a wonderful story featuring a "fictional" character that surely half the world knows. As G K Chesterton put it, (most) other detective stories are judged on the intricacies of the story line and the characters are secondary, Conan Doyle excelled at his characterisations, creating a truly amazing central character that is not secondary to the stories but intrinsically linked with them. As with a Miss Marple last month, it makes me want to read more Sherlocks, how on earth am I going to fit it all in this year ??

  22. 4 out of 5

    Alison

    I love Sherlock Holmes. I love his name, I love his clothes...I just love his style. Reading The Hound of the Baskervilles...I felt like I was reading the first detective novel ever written. Doyle defined the genre--he was the first and the best. My nine-year-old daughter loves Sherlock Holmes. She has a little Sherlock Holmes hat that we bought for dress as your favorite literary character day, and she loves nothing more than to put on her little brown trench coat from Target, suck on her plasti I love Sherlock Holmes. I love his name, I love his clothes...I just love his style. Reading The Hound of the Baskervilles...I felt like I was reading the first detective novel ever written. Doyle defined the genre--he was the first and the best. My nine-year-old daughter loves Sherlock Holmes. She has a little Sherlock Holmes hat that we bought for dress as your favorite literary character day, and she loves nothing more than to put on her little brown trench coat from Target, suck on her plastic pipe, and walk around our house interrogating the other members of our family on her quest for the truth--what happened to the little pink pig we haven't seen in ages...who didn't close up the bread when they were done eating it...who took (and did they dare read?) her sister's diary. And the best part is she's never read anything involving Sherlock Holmes--he's just this powerful force of nature and to have ever heard his name uttered is to love him and want to be him. The Hound of the Baskervilles is about a man who is murdered and everyone believes it to have been by a giant Hound from hell--a supernatural dog/beast that has been plaguing the men of his family for years according to local legend. Watson is there, and Holmes as well, to solve the mystery and save the day. This one was adapted for the screen an amazing 24 times. Required reading for everyone, IMO.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Piyush Bhatia

    Sir Arthur Conan Doyle - you beauty! The more outre and grotesque an incident is the more carefully it deserves to be examined, and the very point which appears to complicate a case is when duly considered and scientifically handled, the one which is most likely to elucidate it. While reading the novel, I had the same feeling that I have while watching an Alfred Hitchcock movie - keeps me thoroughly engaged, boggles the mind, swooning it with fright, and makes me fall off my seat with an admirat Sir Arthur Conan Doyle - you beauty! The more outre and grotesque an incident is the more carefully it deserves to be examined, and the very point which appears to complicate a case is when duly considered and scientifically handled, the one which is most likely to elucidate it. While reading the novel, I had the same feeling that I have while watching an Alfred Hitchcock movie - keeps me thoroughly engaged, boggles the mind, swooning it with fright, and makes me fall off my seat with an admiration so profound that I find it impossible to resist to read/watch another one of it (Indeed why would anyone resist it, 😂, just a metamorphic sense of saying!) Being the third Sherlock Holmes novel that I read, I'd say this one is the most profound of them all, as the plot is utterly well-connected. I'll rate it as the best Sherlock novel; "the valley of fear" still needs to be read by me, until then, this one tops my list of Sherlock Holmes series. The mystery is exciting and the closure is comforting! The only thing I wonder is that it is not even clear that Stapleton is actually dead. I read that it has been suggested that Doyle considered bringing Stapleton back in a later story, but as Sherlock himself mentions towards the end of the story, "what a man may do in the future is a hard question to answer." 5/5 without a second thought!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mai

    This has always been my least favorite 🤷🏽‍♀️

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tamoghna Biswas

    #RevisitingOldDays: My first encounter with Sherlock Holmes was at a time I wasn’t old enough to read an entire sentence in a go. My mother used to be up well past midnight every day, with this huge tome propped open on her pillow, and I couldn’t understand what on earth was she doing when everyone's supposed to sleep. I don't remember in particular what she was reading that day. I do remember what she told me, though. “You won't be able to stop reading either, once you can start reading on y #RevisitingOldDays: My first encounter with Sherlock Holmes was at a time I wasn’t old enough to read an entire sentence in a go. My mother used to be up well past midnight every day, with this huge tome propped open on her pillow, and I couldn’t understand what on earth was she doing when everyone's supposed to sleep. I don't remember in particular what she was reading that day. I do remember what she told me, though. “You won't be able to stop reading either, once you can start reading on your own.” Years later I started with meagre, most of the times disastrous translations, which more than once ruined my interest entirely. And this one was the first one I got to read in unabridged. Honestly, it was almost like an achievement back then, so much so, I couldn't savour the tale for just being too busy showing off. Erm... even in my head that sounds silly, but that's the way it was. More than a decade later, I'm here again. And I now understand why I loved this story so much back then amongst all the other works by Christie or Hadley Chase or Sheldon. Though, truth be told, I was slightly put off when I had realized that it was definitely not as far-fetched as many admirers try to make it look like. Well…it’s not flawless obviously, but it’s as near to it as a thriller can get, I feel. And it's not just the late 19th-century hangover, either. And definitely not just the obviously brilliant way the crime was solved. No. It’s the damp, bleak, almost tenebrous chilliness that we encounter ever since Dr. Mortimer began to relate to our detective the legend of the hound of the Baskervilles. And with the lucidity with which Conan Doyle delineated the moor, and the climax. As a matter of fact I read it once (among many other insignificant times) on a damp winter night, further chilled with the eerie whining of foxes. And well after midnight. Man, it was really an experience to last for a while. "A man's or a woman's?" Dr. Mortimer looked strangely at us for an instant, and his voice sank almost to a whisper as he answered: "Mr Holmes, they were the footprints of a gigantic hound!”

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mark Porton

    My first foray into Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes was The Hound of the Baskervilles. I really enjoyed this mystery, which was quite surprising as Doyle’s literary style is what I would describe as intricate, ‘old-fashioned’ and very flowery. For example, rather than describe something as “Beautiful” he would write “The object encountered was entirely pleasant to the eye”, or something like that. This is maintained throughout the book and rather than find it too cumbersome or heavy, I foun My first foray into Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes was The Hound of the Baskervilles. I really enjoyed this mystery, which was quite surprising as Doyle’s literary style is what I would describe as intricate, ‘old-fashioned’ and very flowery. For example, rather than describe something as “Beautiful” he would write “The object encountered was entirely pleasant to the eye”, or something like that. This is maintained throughout the book and rather than find it too cumbersome or heavy, I found it immersive and interesting. The primary mystery involves the death of Sir Charles Baskerville at his estate in the beautiful countryside of Devon, but interestingly, the author also includes a number of mini-mysteries which I found engaging and helped keep my interest throughout. In fact, the story commenced with a mini-mystery involving the identity of the owner of a walking cane left in Holmes’ office. Dr Watson produced a very sound analysis of what type of person the owner might be by observing such things as wear and tear and bite marks on the cane itself. However, after Watson’s seemingly brilliant observations – Holmes then proceeded to critically tear apart Watson’s assumptions and arguments, piece by piece, until the poor man’s position was totally and irrevocably obliterated. This seems to be a bit of a theme – if I was Dr Watson, not sure I’d hang around with a bloke like Sherlock. Yet, despite this condescending treatment, Dr Watson seems to have almost a sycophantic relationship with Sherlock. It must be said though, Sherlock Holmes is a very impressive character. His lines of reasoning and modus operandi are always logical and altogether brilliant. To me, his powers of deduction always seemed to be sensible, he used very linear arguments and despite the red herrings lying about the place – he made complete sense. The narration by Dr Watson is a great tool used by the author to not only explain what was going on but to re-empathise parts of the narrative that may be a bit too complex (for my addled brain anyway), but he also used instruments such as Dr Watson’s written reports to Holmes, to further cement the plot into the readers mind. All in all, this was a lot of fun and riveting. This story was also a bit spooky – but not white knuckle scary. To further illustrate the beautiful pictures created by Doyle’s elaborate prose, I found myself having the most vivid dreams I have had in a long time (and I’m a vivid dreamer), most involved me living in some country mansion, waltzing around like someone important, saying incredibly useful and astute things to nobody in particular. These dreams stayed with me for quite a while after I woke up – so the author’s story telling style must have had an impact on me. This story was really good and a lot of fun, I’ll be reading more of Sherlock Holmes’ stories – I just wouldn’t want to hang with him. 4 stars

  27. 4 out of 5

    Simona B

    Re-read due to THE BEST CLASS EVER (aka Crime Fiction). I love my life.

  28. 4 out of 5

    R.K. Gold

    I’m not sure if I want to write a full review. It was so meh! I’ll think about it but for now I’ll just leave it a steady 3 maybe 2.5.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    Highly enjoyable! The Hound of the Baskervilles leans more towards horror than the usual Sherlock crime-solving mystery, but Arthur Conan Doyle worked his hero into this genre with the easy of slipping on a finger-print hiding glove. Since private investigator Sherlock Holmes' office is in town, taking us readers out of London and into the country can be tricky if it's not to seem forced. To avoid that, Conan Doyle has Holmes send his friend and volunteer assistant Watson out to check on this si Highly enjoyable! The Hound of the Baskervilles leans more towards horror than the usual Sherlock crime-solving mystery, but Arthur Conan Doyle worked his hero into this genre with the easy of slipping on a finger-print hiding glove. Since private investigator Sherlock Holmes' office is in town, taking us readers out of London and into the country can be tricky if it's not to seem forced. To avoid that, Conan Doyle has Holmes send his friend and volunteer assistant Watson out to check on this silly nonsense of a family curse. This is a brilliant move on the writer's part, as it allows us to get a solid dose of fright alongside Watson, who is a good deal more superstitious and way more prone to believe in boogiemen than Holmes. Once Holmes is on the scene we all stare abashedly at our shoes as he systemically unveils the mundane truth. Admittedly, I read The Hound... again because of a new interest in Sherlock Holmes after the latest movies and tv shows came out. I feel shame. But hey, it got me reading Arthur Conan Doyle's work once more, so that's what's important, right? Goddamn, that show is good... This reading time around, what struck me the most was the humor. I'd forgotten about the author's lighter side. Surprisingly, the horror aspect still affected me on at least some level, which is impressive considering I've read this before when I was a kid and also because I don't scare easy now that I'm an all growed up big boy!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Brad

    The ultimate tale of the ultimate Victorian hero, The Hound of the Baskervilles is a true masterpiece of the mystery genre, and quite possibly remains the finest mystery novel ever produced -- even if its first appearance was serialized in Strand Magazine. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's unforgettable hero Sherlock Holmes matches his wits against what appears to be a centuries old curse and the ghostly hound that exacts vengeance on the Baskerville ancestors for Sir Hugo Baskerville's sadistic misdeeds The ultimate tale of the ultimate Victorian hero, The Hound of the Baskervilles is a true masterpiece of the mystery genre, and quite possibly remains the finest mystery novel ever produced -- even if its first appearance was serialized in Strand Magazine. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's unforgettable hero Sherlock Holmes matches his wits against what appears to be a centuries old curse and the ghostly hound that exacts vengeance on the Baskerville ancestors for Sir Hugo Baskerville's sadistic misdeeds in the time of Oliver Cromwell. Of course, (I will try not to spoil it for anyone) the curse turns out to be a classic Victorian crime motivated by money and perpetrated with the application of science to prey on the superstitious nature of a people still getting used to the Industrial Revolution. Classic Victorian crime, indeed. But also classic Holmes. And this is the best of Holmes. The action is taut and well drawn, the mystery is compelling, Dr. Watson has a brief spell as the star while Holmes does some hidden work in the moors, the villain is an arrogant cad, and the supporting characters, from the unfortunate escaped convict, Bruce Seldon, to the suspicious Barrymores, round out the perfect population of Victorian archetypes (but it must be remembered that while these archetypes may seem cliche to us today, they would have been fresh and new when Doyle put pen to paper). There may be better Holmes short stories (I'll always be partial to "A Scandal in Bohemia" and the lovely Irene Adler), but none of the Holmes stories can compete with The Hound of the Baskervilles' breadth and scope. It is the mystery book that all mystery writers aspire to match for greatness, and the mystery book that all mystery readers must read if they are to call themselves fans of the genre. But let me put genre aside for a second and just say this: The Hound of the Baskervilles is a great mystery novel, yes. But it is also a great novel. One of the best ever written. Period.

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