Hot Best Seller

The Gift of the Magi: By O. Henry : Illustrated & Unabridged (Free Bonus Audiobook)

Availability: Ready to download

The Gift of the Magi by O. Henry How is this book unique? Illustrations Included Free Audiobook "The Gift of the Magi" is a short story, written by O. Henry (a pen name for William Sydney Porter), about a young married couple and how they deal with the challenge of buying secret Christmas gifts for each other with very little money. As a sentimental story The Gift of the Magi by O. Henry How is this book unique? Illustrations Included Free Audiobook "The Gift of the Magi" is a short story, written by O. Henry (a pen name for William Sydney Porter), about a young married couple and how they deal with the challenge of buying secret Christmas gifts for each other with very little money. As a sentimental story with a moral lesson about gift-giving, it has been a popular one for adaptation, especially for presentation at Christmas time. The plot and its "twist ending" are well-known, and the ending is generally considered an example of comic irony. It was allegedly written at Pete's Tavernon Irving Place in New York City.


Compare

The Gift of the Magi by O. Henry How is this book unique? Illustrations Included Free Audiobook "The Gift of the Magi" is a short story, written by O. Henry (a pen name for William Sydney Porter), about a young married couple and how they deal with the challenge of buying secret Christmas gifts for each other with very little money. As a sentimental story The Gift of the Magi by O. Henry How is this book unique? Illustrations Included Free Audiobook "The Gift of the Magi" is a short story, written by O. Henry (a pen name for William Sydney Porter), about a young married couple and how they deal with the challenge of buying secret Christmas gifts for each other with very little money. As a sentimental story with a moral lesson about gift-giving, it has been a popular one for adaptation, especially for presentation at Christmas time. The plot and its "twist ending" are well-known, and the ending is generally considered an example of comic irony. It was allegedly written at Pete's Tavernon Irving Place in New York City.

30 review for The Gift of the Magi: By O. Henry : Illustrated & Unabridged (Free Bonus Audiobook)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    2018 update: I read it again. And got misty-eyed again. Go read it. Here's a handy link: https://www.auburn.edu/~vestmon/Gift_... In this classic 1905 Christmas story, one of O. Henry's best and most famous (free online at Amazon and many other websites), we meet Della and Jim, a young married couple who are as poor as church mice. All Della wants is to buy her beloved Jim a wonderful Christmas present ... but even after saving every penny for months, all she has is $1.87. A way to get enough mon 2018 update: I read it again. And got misty-eyed again. Go read it. Here's a handy link: https://www.auburn.edu/~vestmon/Gift_... In this classic 1905 Christmas story, one of O. Henry's best and most famous (free online at Amazon and many other websites), we meet Della and Jim, a young married couple who are as poor as church mice. All Della wants is to buy her beloved Jim a wonderful Christmas present ... but even after saving every penny for months, all she has is $1.87. A way to get enough money to buy him a present suddenly occurs to her. It will be a sacrifice, but she doesn't waver. I don't know how many times I've read or heard this story. But I still found myself sniffing and wiping my eyes as I read the classic words:But in a last word to the wise of these days let it be said that of all who give gifts these two were the wisest... Everywhere they are the wisest. They are the magi.May we all have more love in our hearts, and wisdom in the ways that matter most. Merry Christmas!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The Gift of the Magi, O. Henry The Gift of the Magi is a short story, written by O. Henry (a pen name for William Sydney Porter), about a young married couple and how they deal with the challenge of buying secret Christmas gifts for each other with very little money. As a sentimental story with a moral lesson about gift-giving, it has been a popular one for adaptation, especially for presentation at Christmas time. The plot and its twist ending are well-known, and the ending is generally consider The Gift of the Magi, O. Henry The Gift of the Magi is a short story, written by O. Henry (a pen name for William Sydney Porter), about a young married couple and how they deal with the challenge of buying secret Christmas gifts for each other with very little money. As a sentimental story with a moral lesson about gift-giving, it has been a popular one for adaptation, especially for presentation at Christmas time. The plot and its twist ending are well-known, and the ending is generally considered an example of comic irony. It was allegedly written at Pete's Tavern on Irving Place in New York City. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز بیست و یکم ماه فوریه سال 1976میلادی عنوان: هدیه سال نو؛ نویسنده: او. هنری (ویلیام سیدنی پورتر)؛ مترجم: زهرا حاج سیدتقی؛ تهران، کتابهای طلایی، امیرکبیر، 1355؛ در 22ص؛ کتاب هدیه سال نو مشهورترین اثر «ویلیام سیدنی پورتر» نامدار به «او هنری» میباشد؛ «ویلیام سیدنی پورتر» متولد سال 1862میلادی در «نیواورلئان امریکا» هستند؛ ایشان در سال 1910میلادی، در شهر «نیویورک» از این سرای درگذشتند؛ نامداری ایشان بیشتر مرهون داستانهای کوتاه و احساساتی، و نیمه واقع گرایانه ی ایشان است، که در آنها اغلب به زندگی مردم فرودست، و طبقات پایین جامعه میپردازند؛ آثار ایشان به پایانهای عجیب و نامنتظره شهرت دارند، به گونه ای که پایانهای «پورتر» به سبکی در ادبیات تبدیل شده است؛ بیشتر داستانهای ایشان در زمان معاصر خود ایشان میگذرند، و از نظر مکانی نیز، اغلب در «نیویورک» روی میدهند؛ داستانهای «پورتر» بیشتر با مردم عادی همچون: «کشیش»، «پلیس» و «خدمتکار» سر و کار دارند؛ مشهورترین داستانش «هدیه ی سال نو»، ماجرای زوج جوانی ست، که از نظر مالی، با مشکل روبرو هستند، و با این حال، میخواهند برای یکدیگر، هدیه ی کریسمس با ارزشی بخرند نقل نمونه متن از کتاب هدیه سال نو: یک بار دیگر به دقت پول‌ها را شمرد؛ اشتباه نکرده بود؛ همان یک دلار و هشتاد و هفت سنت بود؛ پول ناچیزی بود با آن ممکن نیست چیز قشنگی خرید، چیزی که ارزش یک هدیه را داشته باشد ـ و فردا هم روز عید کریسمس بود؛ «دلا» زن جوانی پریده رنگ، افسرده و دلشکسته، سر بلند کرد؛ چه کند؟ چاره ‌ای جز این نداشت که خود را بر روی نیمکت رنگ و رو رفته بیندازد، و گریه کند…؛ پایان نقل؛ تاریخ بهنگام رسانی 09/04/1399هجری خورشیدی؛ ا. شربیانی

  3. 5 out of 5

    Annet

    I did not know this short story, thanks to Amalia, who brought me to this short book! In the spirit of Christmas, this is a heartwarming story about a young and poor couple who both, without knowing it from each other, sacrifice something personal and precious, to give each other a present at Christmas. Lovely, a classic I see here now, happy I have read it, recommended! Merry Christmas everyone!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Amalia Gavea

    “Life is made up of sobs, sniffles, and smiles, with sniffles predominating.” One of the most beautiful, most touching Christmas stories, set in New York at the beginning of the 20th century. A young couple is anticipating Christmas but the era is difficult and money is nonexistent. However, Christmas is a time for sharing and the young woman sacrifices the one thing she treasures the most to buy a gift for her beloved. The young man parts with a treasured heirloom to find the means for a spe “Life is made up of sobs, sniffles, and smiles, with sniffles predominating.” One of the most beautiful, most touching Christmas stories, set in New York at the beginning of the 20th century. A young couple is anticipating Christmas but the era is difficult and money is nonexistent. However, Christmas is a time for sharing and the young woman sacrifices the one thing she treasures the most to buy a gift for her beloved. The young man parts with a treasured heirloom to find the means for a special gift for his wife. And this is how a hymn to love, hope and companionship is born. “Being wise, their gifts were no doubt wise ones, possibly bearing the privilege of exchange in case of duplication. And here I have lamely related to you the uneventful chronicle of two foolish children in a flat who most unwisely sacrificed for each other the greatest treasures of their house. But in a last word to the wise of these days let it be said that of all who give gifts these two were the wisest. Of all who give and receive gifts, such as they are wisest. Everywhere they are wisest. They are the magi.''

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lawyer

    O. Henry's "The Gift of the Magi," illustrated by Lizabeth Zwerger was among my gifts to my wife our first Christmas together. It is one of our annual traditions that I read it to her each Christmas. Yes, I'm hopelessly romantic. I imagine we'll finally hit a year when I hear a gentle snore when she nods off as I'm reading. "ONE dollar and eighty-seven cents. That was all. And sixty cents of it was in pennies. Pennies saved one and two at a time by bulldozing the grocer and the vegetable man and O. Henry's "The Gift of the Magi," illustrated by Lizabeth Zwerger was among my gifts to my wife our first Christmas together. It is one of our annual traditions that I read it to her each Christmas. Yes, I'm hopelessly romantic. I imagine we'll finally hit a year when I hear a gentle snore when she nods off as I'm reading. "ONE dollar and eighty-seven cents. That was all. And sixty cents of it was in pennies. Pennies saved one and two at a time by bulldozing the grocer and the vegetable man and the butcher until one’s cheeks burned with the silent imputation of parsimony that such close dealing implied. Three times Della counted it. One dollar and eighty-seven cents. And the next day would be Christmas. There was clearly nothing to do but flop down on the shabby little couch and howl. So Della did it. Which instigates the moral reflection that life is made up of sobs, sniffles, and smiles, with sniffles predominating." I doubt anyone will howl about spoilers, because I can't imagine anyone who doesn't know this story. "Now, there were two possessions of the James Dillingham Youngs in which they both took a mighty pride. One was Jim’s gold watch that had been his father’s and his grandfather’s. The other was Della’s hair. Had the queen of Sheba lived in the flat across the airshaft, Della would have let her hair hang out the window some day to dry just to depreciate Her Majesty’s jewels and gifts. Had King Solomon been the janitor, with all his treasures piled up in the basement, Jim would have pulled out his watch every time he passed, just to see him pluck at his beard from envy. So now Della’s beautiful hair fell about her rippling and shining like a cascade of brown waters. It reached below her knee and made itself almost a garment for her. And then she did it up again nervously and quickly. Once she faltered for a minute and stood still while a tear or two splashed on the worn red carpet." Of course, Della sells her hair to buy a watch fob chain for Jim's watch. And Jim sold his watch to buy a set of hair combs Della had long admired in a shop window. O.Henry concludes it this way: "The magi, as you know, were wise men—wonderfully wise men—who brought gifts to the Babe in the manger. They invented the art of giving Christmas presents. Being wise, their gifts were no doubt wise ones, possibly bearing the privilege of exchange in case of duplication. And here I have lamely related to you the uneventful chronicle of two foolish children in a flat who most unwisely sacrificed for each other the greatest treasures of their house. But in a last word to the wise of these days let it be said that of all who give gifts these two were the wisest. Of all who give and receive gifts, such as they are wisest. Everywhere they are wisest. They are the magi." At times in our Christmas rush we tend to turn our thoughts to the material. Don't get me wrong, I love opening a present as much as the next man. But the greatest gift is love. It's true. Hair grows fast enough. A watch can always be replaced. I'll pass on things in pretty paper. I'll take love any day. Thanks for a timeless classic, Mr. Porter, errr...Mr. Henry. And of all the editions of this tale I've seen, the beautiful illustrations of Ms. Zwerger make this book a treasure to share with someone for whom you care very, very much. Now...where's that wine bottle opener? Candles...uhm,hmm. Book. Wife. All's right with the world.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Angela M

    A beautiful reminder of loving and giving. Merry Christmas!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Calista

    I recently read this for the first time as a short story in a collection of O. Henry’s works. This is done up as a children’s picture book. I don’t think it works all that well as a children’s book. It is too wordy and there are a lot of words needing to be explained to them (not that that’s bad and I rather like introducing new words, but there are a lot at once). The artwork was lovely, very sparse with a feeling of poverty, desperation, and some warmth. You can see that Jim and Della love eac I recently read this for the first time as a short story in a collection of O. Henry’s works. This is done up as a children’s picture book. I don’t think it works all that well as a children’s book. It is too wordy and there are a lot of words needing to be explained to them (not that that’s bad and I rather like introducing new words, but there are a lot at once). The artwork was lovely, very sparse with a feeling of poverty, desperation, and some warmth. You can see that Jim and Della love each other and it’s amazing to see Della’s hair. I still don’t know what to think about this story. I have to admit I think it’s such a waste to sell their possessions for something and then the other person did the same and your gift is worthless, but it’s the thought that counts. The story just never lands for me as something wise. I guess it shows the growth I still need to do. The kids weren’t crazy about this story. They both gave this 1 star. They were bored and it took 2 nights to read this as the first night they gave up through it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    PattyMacDotComma

    5★ I love this old O Henry story, first published in 1905, and I like to re-read it every now and then. Seemed like a good finish for 2016. “One dollar and eighty-seven cents. That was all. And sixty cents of it was in pennies. Pennies saved one and two at a time by bulldozing the grocer and the vegetable man and the butcher until one’s cheeks burned with the silent imputation of parsimony that such close dealing implied. three times Della counted it. One dollar and eighty-seven cents. And the 5★ I love this old O Henry story, first published in 1905, and I like to re-read it every now and then. Seemed like a good finish for 2016. “One dollar and eighty-seven cents. That was all. And sixty cents of it was in pennies. Pennies saved one and two at a time by bulldozing the grocer and the vegetable man and the butcher until one’s cheeks burned with the silent imputation of parsimony that such close dealing implied. three times Della counted it. One dollar and eighty-seven cents. And the next day would be Christmas. There was clearly nothing to do but flop down on the shabby little couch and howl. So Della did it.” So opens the famous Christmas story about a young couple with no money and no prospects but a lot of love. He has a handsome watch in need of a chain. She is a beautiful girl with long, glorious tresses. O Henry tells the funny, heartfelt story of how they sacrificed for each other. “Of all who give gifts these two were the wisest. Of all who give and receive gifts, such as they are wisest. Everywhere they are wisest. They are the magi.” Worth reminding ourselves every year. This is available free at Project Gutenberg. http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/7256

  9. 4 out of 5

    Toni

    This has been one of my favourite stories since I was a child. Can't imagine winter holidays without reading this one.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sheri

    A lovely Christmas read that demonstrates how sacrifices are much easier to carry out and bear when one knows and shows unconditional love. Read online at Project Gutenberg: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/7256/7... A lovely Christmas read that demonstrates how sacrifices are much easier to carry out and bear when one knows and shows unconditional love. Read online at Project Gutenberg: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/7256/7...

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ines

    It is so delicate this story, I don’t deny that at the beginning it seemed a little exaggerated this visceral love, so much to get an haircut in order to find money for husband's gift. At the end the tenderness of this love, between this wife for her husband, really melted my heart.... I read it with my 7-year-old daughter, who did not understand at once that for a great love, the wife offered and gave everything she had most precious.... when she grasped the concept, looking at the wonderful ima It is so delicate this story, I don’t deny that at the beginning it seemed a little exaggerated this visceral love, so much to get an haircut in order to find money for husband's gift. At the end the tenderness of this love, between this wife for her husband, really melted my heart.... I read it with my 7-year-old daughter, who did not understand at once that for a great love, the wife offered and gave everything she had most precious.... when she grasped the concept, looking at the wonderful images, she was near to cry 👧🏽💖💖 Che delicatezza questa storia, non nego che all' inizio mi sembrava un pò esagerato questo amore viscerale, tanto da arrivare a tagliarsi i capelli pur di trovare dei soldi. Alla fine la tenerezza di questo amore, tra questa moglie per suo marito, mi ha veramente sciolto il cuore.... L' ho letto con mia figlia di 7 anni, che non ha capito e colto subito che per un amore grande, si offre e si dona tutto quello che si possiede.....quando ha afferrato il concetto, riguardardosi le meravigliose immagini, le è venuto da piangere 😢 👧🏽

  12. 4 out of 5

    Brian Yahn

    The Gift of the Magi gives you an interesting question to think about: is it worth it to sacrifice one thing you love for another? Sort of like a bird in the hand is worth more than two in the bush. While the twist ending cleverly ties the story into a nice Christmas bow, and the prose is enjoyable the whole way through, the the moral doesn't really resonate for me. It's like an analogy that doesn't work. Regardless, it's probably one of the best things to read on Christmas.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Bionic Jean

    Who does not love presents? Especially those with an element of surprise. The wondering, the planning, the heart in the mouth moment when the present is actually given … But in your mind’s eye, are you the recipient, or the giver? As we go through life, this seems to change. Tiny children love their own birthdays, and also feel almost unbearably excited waiting for Santa Claus to come. As they grow older, the idea of giving someone they love a present grows in appeal. By the time they are fully ad Who does not love presents? Especially those with an element of surprise. The wondering, the planning, the heart in the mouth moment when the present is actually given … But in your mind’s eye, are you the recipient, or the giver? As we go through life, this seems to change. Tiny children love their own birthdays, and also feel almost unbearably excited waiting for Santa Claus to come. As they grow older, the idea of giving someone they love a present grows in appeal. By the time they are fully adult, giving a present to a loved one makes them just as happy—if not more happy—than receiving one for themselves. It is this curious, yet affecting phenomenon of behaviour which makes this story so poignant. O. Henry knew human nature so well. The Gift of the Magi is perhaps his most famous, and well-loved short story—and there were many! “O. Henry” was the pen name of the American short story writer William Sydney Porter. This story first appeared in “The New York Sunday World” in December of 1905, and was later published in O. Henry’s collection “The Four Million” the following April. His stories were not only very popular during his lifetime, but over a hundred years later, O. Henry is still considered to be one of the great American short story authors. What is the perfect present? A silly question perhaps, as it depends who it is for. And if it is for a very special person, how can you make it just right? Should you invest a lot of your time in it? Make something especially for them? Spend as much money as you possibly can, to get them the perfect gift? In O. Henry’s affecting short story, this is the problem faced by the young Mrs. Della Dillingham. She is married to Jim, but the couple have very little money, and live in a downmarket apartment, with a “shabby couch” and other poor furnishings. The rent is very cheap—8 dollars a week—and it doesn’t even have a working doorbell. Jim’s salary used to be higher, 30 dollars a week, but now it has been cut to 20 dollars. They have had to make economies, and cut their cloth to suit their budget. It must seem as if there is nothing beautiful in their life, at a first glance. But wait. They do not seem to see things like that at all. What they do have is a great love for each other. Even though their surroundings may seem bleak: “a gray cat walking a gray fence in a gray background,” they have a warm home life which brightens their lives. Jim always arrives home “to be greatly hugged”. It is Christmas Eve, and despite all her penny-pinching, Della has only 1 dollar and 87 cents left, to buy Jim a Christmas present, after paying all the bills. She is distraught, and goes all over town, on the cold December day, looking in shop windows to find something she can afford. “One dollar and eighty-seven cents. That was all. And sixty cents of it was in pennies. Pennies saved one and two at a time by bulldozing the grocer and the vegetable man and the butcher until one’s cheeks burned with the silent imputation of parsimony that such close dealing implied. Three times Della counted it. One dollar and eighty-seven cents. And the next day would be Christmas.” And it cuts to the quick, this watching the pennies, and the suspicions others might have of their meanness. We see their pride; their attempts to better themselves through hard work—yet times are hard. Perhaps James “Dillingham” Young is being pretentious in his three names, and should affect more modesty. Maybe he should accept his place now that he earns less. But the narrator quickly show us that such outward appearances are trivial; as nothing compared with what matters. The couple’s hearts are in the right place: “But whenever Mr. James Dillingham Young came home and reached his flat above he was called “Jim” and greatly hugged by Mrs. James Dillingham Young, already introduced to you as Della. Which is all very good. “Tomorrow would be Christmas Day, and she had only $1.87 with which to buy Jim a present. She had been saving every penny she could for months, with this result. Twenty dollars a week doesn’t go far. Expenses had been greater than she had calculated. They always are. Only $1.87 to buy a present for Jim. Her Jim. Many a happy hour she had spent planning for something nice for him. Something fine and rare and sterling—something just a little bit near to being worthy of the honor of being owned by Jim.” It seemed a hopeless task. And yet eventually: “She found it at last. It surely had been made for Jim and no one else. There was no other like it in any of the stores, and she had turned all of them inside out. It was (view spoiler)[ a platinum fob chain (hide spoiler)] simple and chaste in design, properly proclaiming its value by substance alone and not by meretricious ornamentation—as all good things should do.(view spoiler)[ It was even worthy of The Watch. (hide spoiler)] As soon as she saw it she knew that it must be Jim’s. It was like him. Quietness and value—the description applied to both.” Della knows this is the perfect present. Furthermore it is one which would be appropriate for any company; a source of pride, and one would last her husband a good long time, rather than the shabby one he used now: (view spoiler)[ “With that chain on his watch Jim might be properly anxious about the time in any company. Grand as the watch was, he sometimes looked at it on the sly on account of the old leather strap that he used in place of a chain.” (hide spoiler)] This, then, is Jim’s greatest treasure, a beautiful object, and the most valuable item he has, a (view spoiler)[ gold pocket watch which used to belong to his father and his grandfather (hide spoiler)] . Della too has just one precious asset (view spoiler)[ her long, lustrous, hair which falls almost to her knees. As it falls, it looks like a “cascade of brown waters”. (hide spoiler)] These two treasures may not seem much to us, the narrator says, but to the young couple they compare with King Solomon’s treasures and the Queen of Sheba’s jewels. Value is subjective; to Della and Jim, their prized possessions mean every bit as much as these mythical jewels could. We see too, the beautiful simplicity, of these two symbols. (view spoiler)[ Jim’s watch has great sentimental value for him, having been passed down from generation to generation. Gold may represent the money they lack, but it also symbolises purity, inner value, and permanence. Jim has given up his family for Della, and the watch also symbolises all the time which he gives her; the hours he works to support the household, and at home. He is never late returning from his job. Della’s hair also has a deeper significance. It is so long that she must have been growing it all her life, yet she is to cast it off without a second glance in order to buy Jim the perfect present. It represents both her youth, and her beauty. When she has seen the beautiful platinum chain, Della goes straight home. She has had an idea—an inspiration! She unfastens her beautiful hair and stands in front of the mirror, thinking. Her hair is much admired, and she knows where she could exchange it for money—at a hair salon in town. Before she can change her mind, she rushes off to Madame Sofronie: “‘Will you buy my hair?’ asked Della. ‘I buy hair,’ said Madame. ‘Take yer hat off and let’s have a sight at the looks of it.’ Down rippled the brown cascade.” (hide spoiler)] The shopkeeper Madame Sofronie is brusque and professional, giving a fair price for the market, without emotion: “‘Twenty dollars,’ said Madame, lifting the mass with a practised hand.” All Della can think of is the perfect present. Yet something in her suspects this may be something she—or Jim—regrets. “‘Give it to me quick,’ said Della.” Della receives her 20 dollars, which would be just enough money (view spoiler)[ to buy a perfect platinum chain she sees in a shop window for $21.00, with a little over. She is jubilant! And yet … will Jim still love her without the beautiful long brown hair? Della returns home to make the best of her remaining hair, styling it into curls, and preparing dinner and coffee, ready for when Jim comes home. She even says a little prayer, hoping that Jim will still find her pretty without her luxurious tresses. “She got out her curling irons and lighted the gas (hide spoiler)] and went to work repairing the ravages made by generosity added to love. Which is always a tremendous task, dear friends—a mammoth task.” Della could not see what she had done with any sense of sacrifice. All that concerned her was the consequences. She cannot settle; lurching between excitement and panic. What will happen. When Jim comes home from work, he behaves oddly. Things seem to be going all wrong. Why is he so quiet? He stares at Della, and she bursts out: “‘Jim, darling,’ she cried, ‘don’t look at me that way. (view spoiler)[ I had my hair cut off and sold because I couldn’t have lived through Christmas without giving you a present … (hide spoiler)] Say ‘Merry Christmas!’ Jim, and let’s be happy. You don’t know what a nice—what a beautiful, nice gift I’ve got for you.’” And now, before she can give her unwrapped present to him, we learn why Jim is behaving so oddly. (view spoiler)[ He casually reaches inside his overcoat pocket, and pulls out a package, handing it to her. Inside, Della finds a pair of beautiful bejewelled tortoiseshell combs for her hair. She had admired them for a long time, but they were well beyond the couple’s financial reach. (hide spoiler)] Della was ecstatic with joy. But then, the realisation came: (view spoiler)[ “They were expensive combs, she knew, and her heart had simply craved and yearned over them without the least hope of possession. And now, they were hers, but the tresses that should have adorned the coveted adornments were gone.” And now the whole truth comes out. Della bursts into tears, jumps up, and holds out her gift for Jim. Just as the costly, much longed for hair combs are now completely useless because she had cut off her hair, Jim had sold his own prize possession, the gold watch he had inherited, in order to buy her combs. Thus the watch chain, which would have been so perfect for it, is also completely useless. (hide spoiler)] O. Henry made it clear by his title that this was to be a special story about the feast of Christmas, and the tradition of giving gifts at that time: “The magi, as you know, were wise men—wonderfully wise men—who brought gifts to the Babe in the manger. They invented the art of giving Christmas presents.” “And here I have lamely related to you the uneventful chronicle of two foolish children in a flat who most unwisely sacrificed for each other the greatest treasures of their house. But in a last word to the wise of these days let it be said that of all who give gifts these two were the wisest … Everywhere they are wisest. They are the magi.” The story’s narrator concludes that Jim and Della are truly wise. Their gifts may not have been so luxurious, but they were gifts of love and self-sacrifice. They could not afford to waste any money, especially on things they cannot use. In a way this story is financially foolish. But what each receives is of far more worth; beautiful and intangible. And even when all seemed to be lost the couple saw the future, and it was bright, because they were together. They are reminded how much they love each other and are willing to sacrifice to make each other happy. Although each had made a supreme sacrifice, neither seemed to think of it that way, or expect the other to have done so:    (view spoiler)[ “She hugged them to her bosom, and at length she was able to look up with dim eyes and a smile and say: ‘My hair grows so fast, Jim!’” (hide spoiler)] Of all those who give gifts, these two are the wisest. The Gift of the Magi is perhaps O. Henry’s crowning glory. The story is a Christian one, but it has parallels in other faiths. Like all the best stories, its message is a universal one; timeless and speaking to all cultures. Many of his stories are warm and sentimental, like this one, and show an optimistic sense of humour. And nearly all of them, like this one does, have a twist at the end. They have a style which lends itself to reading aloud, and appeal to all ages. In fact shortly after the first time I had read The Gift of the Magi for myself, I decided to read it to a large group of 10 and 11 year olds. I wondered … but they sat rapt, spellbound. Towards the end they barely breathed, and their reaction at the climax mirrored my own. A pang in the heart. Ooooh! O. Henry is a master storyteller, and this feels very real. “There was clearly nothing to do but flop down on the shabby little couch and howl.” “Life is made up of sobs, sniffles, and smiles, with sniffles predominating”. Is this a sad story? Of course it is. It is bitter-sweet, almost unbearably so. The couple seem to have lost everything they hold dear. But this is not so, of course and the story ends on a supremely optimistic note. (view spoiler)[“‘Dell,’ said he, “let’s put our Christmas presents away and keep ’em a while. They’re too nice to use just at present. I sold the watch to get the money to buy your combs.’” (hide spoiler)] “Out of his trance Jim seemed quickly to wake. He enfolded his Della … Eight dollars a week or a million a year—what is the difference? A mathematician or a wit would give you the wrong answer.” Yes, it is supremely ironic and sad. And so clear that even older children can recognise the pain and sacrifice. But as we grow older we realise what really matters in life, and what has supreme value over all material things. Perhaps the intention of the story is to highlight the difference between wisdom and foolishness. Jim and Della certainly behave impulsively, and do not seem to have much sense, or to weigh up the consequences of their actions. But ultimately this is a story of love.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Charles van Buren

    Wonderful to read anytime but particularly at Christmas Review of free Kindle edition A Public Domain Book Publication date: May 12, 2012 Language: English ASIN: B0082Z3S3G 26 pages This a is review of the described edition only. Not of the dumbed down version edited by George Lakon. One of or maybe the most beloved of O. Henry's stories. A Christmas standard for many people, this is a moving tale of true love, sacrifice and wisdom. "The Gift of the Magi" is one of the best segments in the 1952 movie, " Wonderful to read anytime but particularly at Christmas Review of free Kindle edition A Public Domain Book Publication date: May 12, 2012 Language: English ASIN: B0082Z3S3G 26 pages This a is review of the described edition only. Not of the dumbed down version edited by George Lakon. One of or maybe the most beloved of O. Henry's stories. A Christmas standard for many people, this is a moving tale of true love, sacrifice and wisdom. "The Gift of the Magi" is one of the best segments in the 1952 movie, "O. Henry's Full House." That segment was directed by Henry King and stars Jeanne Crain and Farley Granger. Great episode in a fantastic anthology movie .

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rebbie

    This is a timeless classic, and should be read by everyone at least once. In just a few short pages, O. Henry manages to convey one of life's heaviest lessons: love is the greatest gift of all; it is truly invaluable, unlike any material item one can buy.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Heartwarming Christmas story 😍

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dem

    What a wonderful little book for the Christmas season. I really enjoyed this little story set on Christmas Eve which tells the story of the true meaning of gift giving. I listened to this version and what a treat it was and I loved the little twist. Thank you to my Good Read Friends Diane and Carol for bringing this little book to my attention as I had never heard of it before. I hope to source a couple of copies of this for Christmas gifts as I think this little book would make a perfect present f What a wonderful little book for the Christmas season. I really enjoyed this little story set on Christmas Eve which tells the story of the true meaning of gift giving. I listened to this version and what a treat it was and I loved the little twist. Thank you to my Good Read Friends Diane and Carol for bringing this little book to my attention as I had never heard of it before. I hope to source a couple of copies of this for Christmas gifts as I think this little book would make a perfect present for couples.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Phrynne

    A perfect story to read around Christmas time. I had not read it before - thank you Amalia for bringing it to my attention. It is a short story about loving and giving. It is very sweet, a little sad, but ultimately very reassuring. O. Henry is regarded as an excellent writer of short stories and this one shows why. To pack so much into so few pages requires great skill. It was so enjoyable I read it twice to make sure I had not missed a thing. A perfect story to read around Christmas time. I had not read it before - thank you Amalia for bringing it to my attention. It is a short story about loving and giving. It is very sweet, a little sad, but ultimately very reassuring. O. Henry is regarded as an excellent writer of short stories and this one shows why. To pack so much into so few pages requires great skill. It was so enjoyable I read it twice to make sure I had not missed a thing.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    First published in 1905, this delightful little story (with a twist) depicts the true meaning of love and giving during the Christmas season.A first time read for me.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ahmed Ejaz

    Hahaha.... Sorry! I shouldn't have laughed but I couldn't control. Well ending was kind of funny but also kind of emotional for me. This story is a part of my English Textbook in College. So definitely had to read it. My English Professor gave the intro. of this story today and I read it while coming to home from college. OVERVIEW This story is about love. Della and Jim (husband and wife) have great love for each other. Both want to give each other a gift on Christmas. But they can't afford. S Hahaha.... Sorry! I shouldn't have laughed but I couldn't control. Well ending was kind of funny but also kind of emotional for me. This story is a part of my English Textbook in College. So definitely had to read it. My English Professor gave the intro. of this story today and I read it while coming to home from college. OVERVIEW This story is about love. Della and Jim (husband and wife) have great love for each other. Both want to give each other a gift on Christmas. But they can't afford. So they sell their precious things to buy a gift for each other. Della has beautiful hair and Jim has the Gold watch which was once his father's. In the end, I was laughing and feeling sad both at the same time. Overall it was a good read for me. I had read few stories from O. Henry before. I think this is his best so far. January 13, 2o17

  21. 5 out of 5

    Connie G

    "The Gift of the Magi" is one of my favorite Christmas stories. It shows a poor young couple sacrificing to give each other something special for Christmas. Although they are materially poor, they are emotionally rich in their love and devotion to each other. The story has a beautiful message and a twist at the end.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Duane

    Known as a Christmas story but it plays well at any time. O'Henry uses irony to tell a classic story of selfless love, sacrifice, and the power of giving. I can't imagine anyone not liking this story.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Candi

    4 stars "Of all who give and receive gifts, such as they are wisest. They are the magi." A lovely short story about the true meaning of Christmas. While caught up in the rush and chaos of the holiday season, I am thankful to be reminded of what is truly important - love, sacrifice and the giving of one's own self to another. Do yourself a favor and take a moment to read this timeless classic!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Diane S ☔

    What a wonderful little heartwarming story. One that represents what I think is the true spirit of Christmas. Sacrifice, giving and love.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cheri

    ”Of all who give and receive gifts, such as they are wisest. They are the magi." A short story by O. Henry about sacrifice, the true meaning of Christmas not being found in a toy store, or a department store, or a jewelry store, but in the love we share by giving of ourselves.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sanjay Gautam

    A story that has made a lot of girls cry! :p A very nice story with an emotional twist.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Anish Kohli

    I remember this story being part of my college curriculum. An engineering college, no less. So they did teach us literature, I guess. This was also the story that sparked a difference of opinion with my English teacher, the details of which I will skip, and as a result, I wasn’t allowed to sit in my English classes for the entire semester! Cool, eh? Yep, I was that kinda kid! Still am! Kraken doesn’t lash out at books alone! ;) Anyway, I picked it up as a Christmassy sort of a read, having compl I remember this story being part of my college curriculum. An engineering college, no less. So they did teach us literature, I guess. This was also the story that sparked a difference of opinion with my English teacher, the details of which I will skip, and as a result, I wasn’t allowed to sit in my English classes for the entire semester! Cool, eh? Yep, I was that kinda kid! Still am! Kraken doesn’t lash out at books alone! ;) Anyway, I picked it up as a Christmassy sort of a read, having completed my GR challenge, which I need to update and I am waiting on a LAZY ASS of a person! You know who you are! Classic or no, I will say what I felt. Try not to hate me guys! I’ll keep it real short too, considering the size of the book. This is the story of Della and Jim and their Christmas spirit. Della and Jim both want to buy each other presents and neither of them has the funds to do so. How they go about the act of giving in a selfless manner is what makes this story a classic, I guess. From the 30 odd pages of what I read from O. Henry, the writing sucks pretty bad! It reads like the author is talking to you and telling you the story. Like he is literally talking to the reader in places and it makes it damn weird. It’s the kind of writing that would make me DNF a book and that’s saying something bcz I don’t DNF. But that’s a statement on the writing, not the book itself. The story is a small and cute one and what it tries to convey is very pure. I probably won’t recommend it to anyone but considering the size of the story, I’d say, what the hell, try it out. I guess I am not one for classics? Oh well, off to read another classic then! :D

  28. 4 out of 5

    Pooja

    I read The Gift of the Magi in my high school. Many short stories will come but this story won't leave my mind. This couple's gift receiving and giving ideas are so different and fantastic, it can't be put into words. I read The Gift of the Magi in my high school. Many short stories will come but this story won't leave my mind. This couple's gift receiving and giving ideas are so different and fantastic, it can't be put into words.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Calista

    From a collection of stories “Stories by O. Henry This short story is short. It’s 7 pages. We meet Della, a wife longing to buy her beloved husband a lovely gift but she only has $1.87. What is she going to do? The couple has 2 treasures: the husbands gold watch and her beautiful long hair. I now know that this is what Emmett Otter is based off of, but that had a better ending on it than this little story. Needles to say, both of the couple sell their treasure to buy a gift for the other person. From a collection of stories “Stories by O. Henry This short story is short. It’s 7 pages. We meet Della, a wife longing to buy her beloved husband a lovely gift but she only has $1.87. What is she going to do? The couple has 2 treasures: the husbands gold watch and her beautiful long hair. I now know that this is what Emmett Otter is based off of, but that had a better ending on it than this little story. Needles to say, both of the couple sell their treasure to buy a gift for the other person. So the gift they receive, they no longer have use for the gift. The point is the gift is given from their heart and they both feel loved. I wish there was a little more to the story, but that is the original. I tell you what, O. Henry uses some big flashy words. People don’t write like that nowadays. I didn’t mind it, but it was unusual.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Veronique

    “Many a happy hour she had spent planning for something nice for him. Something fine and rare and sterling—something.” I hadn’t heard of this classic tale, but this Christmas, a friend of mine read it, plus it was mentioned in a Christmas film. That piqued my curiosity! Imagine my surprise when said friend send it to me!!! :O) Thanks Trish! Well, this was such a lovely story, very simple and yet so charged with meaning and feeling. The artwork in this illustrated edition works beautifully, showin “Many a happy hour she had spent planning for something nice for him. Something fine and rare and sterling—something.” I hadn’t heard of this classic tale, but this Christmas, a friend of mine read it, plus it was mentioned in a Christmas film. That piqued my curiosity! Imagine my surprise when said friend send it to me!!! :O) Thanks Trish! Well, this was such a lovely story, very simple and yet so charged with meaning and feeling. The artwork in this illustrated edition works beautifully, showing this turn-of-the century New York to the small setting of Della and Jim’s life. I can see myself re-reading this every Christmas :O)

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.