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Feed the Resistance: Recipes + Ideas for Getting Involved (Julia Turshen Book, Cookbook for Activists)

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From favorite cookbook author Julia Turshen comes this practical and inspiring handbook for political activism—with recipes. As the millions who marched in January 2017 demonstrated, activism is the new normal. When people search for ways to resist injustice and express support for civil rights, environmental protections, and more, they begin by gathering around the table From favorite cookbook author Julia Turshen comes this practical and inspiring handbook for political activism—with recipes. As the millions who marched in January 2017 demonstrated, activism is the new normal. When people search for ways to resist injustice and express support for civil rights, environmental protections, and more, they begin by gathering around the table to talk and plan. These dishes foster community and provide sustenance for the mind and soul, including a dozen of the healthy, affordable recipes Turshen is known for, plus over 15 more recipes from a diverse range of celebrated chefs. With stimulating lists, extensive resources, and essays from activists in the worlds of food, politics, and social causes, Feed the Resistance is a must have handbook for anyone hoping to make a difference.


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From favorite cookbook author Julia Turshen comes this practical and inspiring handbook for political activism—with recipes. As the millions who marched in January 2017 demonstrated, activism is the new normal. When people search for ways to resist injustice and express support for civil rights, environmental protections, and more, they begin by gathering around the table From favorite cookbook author Julia Turshen comes this practical and inspiring handbook for political activism—with recipes. As the millions who marched in January 2017 demonstrated, activism is the new normal. When people search for ways to resist injustice and express support for civil rights, environmental protections, and more, they begin by gathering around the table to talk and plan. These dishes foster community and provide sustenance for the mind and soul, including a dozen of the healthy, affordable recipes Turshen is known for, plus over 15 more recipes from a diverse range of celebrated chefs. With stimulating lists, extensive resources, and essays from activists in the worlds of food, politics, and social causes, Feed the Resistance is a must have handbook for anyone hoping to make a difference.

30 review for Feed the Resistance: Recipes + Ideas for Getting Involved (Julia Turshen Book, Cookbook for Activists)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sanjida

    I got this as a gift, so I feel shitty not feeling it. Some of the recipes look interesting, and I'll pass them to my spouse who has the patience to follow recipes. It suggests you can be the person in the resistance who can make nutritious food. This sounds like personal fullfilment through right-thinking virtue signaling. On the other hand, it's great that the proceeds went to the ACLU. My place in the resistence is to know where fast cheap ready made comfort food is available, to tell you GMO I got this as a gift, so I feel shitty not feeling it. Some of the recipes look interesting, and I'll pass them to my spouse who has the patience to follow recipes. It suggests you can be the person in the resistance who can make nutritious food. This sounds like personal fullfilment through right-thinking virtue signaling. On the other hand, it's great that the proceeds went to the ACLU. My place in the resistence is to know where fast cheap ready made comfort food is available, to tell you GMOs are perfectly safe and important for food security in the developing world, gentrification is only a thing because your nice white neighborhood had restrictive covenants and still has restrictive zoning, and that structural discrimination and dehumanization will take more than dinner parties to combat.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Stella

    I found this surprisingly inspiring. It is a collection of essays and recipes by people in resistance movements. While some of the recipes seemed more complicated than I usually like, there were some simple and appealing ones, and I really appreciated the ethnic diversity included. My main take-away was that we all have something to contribute. Some people can write well, some can organize marches, some can knit pink pussy hats, some can cook or bake delicious and sustaining foods. I needed that I found this surprisingly inspiring. It is a collection of essays and recipes by people in resistance movements. While some of the recipes seemed more complicated than I usually like, there were some simple and appealing ones, and I really appreciated the ethnic diversity included. My main take-away was that we all have something to contribute. Some people can write well, some can organize marches, some can knit pink pussy hats, some can cook or bake delicious and sustaining foods. I needed that message right now. Glad my library got a copy of this book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ashanté

    This was a short, easy read. As someone who researches food access, I appreciated the combination of recipes (embodied experience) and essays reflecting on justice and equity. The essays are short and assume you have some knowledge of the people who wrote them. I didn’t, so I had to google. My favorite essay was written by Shakirah Simley, because she explicitly addresses anti-black racism and state violence at the intersection of food. Overall, good read. At some point, I’ll cook my way through This was a short, easy read. As someone who researches food access, I appreciated the combination of recipes (embodied experience) and essays reflecting on justice and equity. The essays are short and assume you have some knowledge of the people who wrote them. I didn’t, so I had to google. My favorite essay was written by Shakirah Simley, because she explicitly addresses anti-black racism and state violence at the intersection of food. Overall, good read. At some point, I’ll cook my way through the recipes and update the review.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    Time for an attitude shift: this book was uplifting, inspiring and left me eager to bake. Written by a cookbook author, activist and put-your-money-where-your-mouth-is super human, Julia Turshen compiled this book of inspiring essays and recipes by grass roots organizers working around the country to improve lives in their communities. The proceeds from the book go the ACLU. Check out Julia Turshen's Instagram for more inspiration.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Savannah

    Ohhhhhh, I liked this book, but I had wanted to love it. (Julia Turshen ILU so much, please don't hate me if you read this.) As someone who's already pretty immersed in social justice, perhaps I'm not the target audience? But I was hoping for more actual connections between theory and food-related activity, and this ended up with mostly a lot of calls to action. The lists of ways to engage at the end were welcome, but bog standard, and in some situations unhelpful. Having worked at a lot of nonpr Ohhhhhh, I liked this book, but I had wanted to love it. (Julia Turshen ILU so much, please don't hate me if you read this.) As someone who's already pretty immersed in social justice, perhaps I'm not the target audience? But I was hoping for more actual connections between theory and food-related activity, and this ended up with mostly a lot of calls to action. The lists of ways to engage at the end were welcome, but bog standard, and in some situations unhelpful. Having worked at a lot of nonprofits, many of them definitely do not want meals for meetings, or snacks dropped for their staff. When I've worked in activism and the non-profit sector, the two things orgs actually need are money and time volunteered in (very!) specific ways. Anything else is usually a nicety created to make volunteers and donors feel good about what they're doing. I was hoping for an examination of ways that food can be helpful outside of trying to fit it inside of that matrix, but perhaps the thing here is that there actually aren't a lot of those.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Katy

    I rarely read cookbooks that are not vegan or at least vegetarian, but this book is an amazing resource beyond the recipes it provides. I especially loved the essay on Practical Activism by Mikki Halpin (I will be applying some of their advice to my life and practice, for sure!) as well as the Ground Rules to Organized Activism by Callie Jayne (not really new information for me, but great to see it laid out like this!). I also thought the How Food Can Be a Platform for Activism essay by Shakirah I rarely read cookbooks that are not vegan or at least vegetarian, but this book is an amazing resource beyond the recipes it provides. I especially loved the essay on Practical Activism by Mikki Halpin (I will be applying some of their advice to my life and practice, for sure!) as well as the Ground Rules to Organized Activism by Callie Jayne (not really new information for me, but great to see it laid out like this!). I also thought the How Food Can Be a Platform for Activism essay by Shakirah Simley invaluable. I am grateful to have come across this wonderful resource.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Judy

    I received this book as part of a Goodreads giveaway and the following is my honest opinion. I found the book hard to read, not because of the writing, but because it talks about the world in which we live in today. I also found it comforting to think of people seeing food as a form of comforting those who are affected by the current political climate, as well as a way to contribute to the protests we all need to be making. A read for those who are involved and those who want to be.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Channon Coats

    Political Cookery? I don't consider myself very political, so I got this book for two reasons: I love Turshen's thoughtful approach to cooking and the title sounded something more seriously different about cooking which I really have been thinking about lately, i.e., food speaks to more than nourishing bodies, it aldo nourishes minds and emotions. Thank you for crystallization in a way I hadn't quite considered. Marx said (much more intelligently than I) that if he had someone philosophically by Political Cookery? I don't consider myself very political, so I got this book for two reasons: I love Turshen's thoughtful approach to cooking and the title sounded something more seriously different about cooking which I really have been thinking about lately, i.e., food speaks to more than nourishing bodies, it aldo nourishes minds and emotions. Thank you for crystallization in a way I hadn't quite considered. Marx said (much more intelligently than I) that if he had someone philosophically by the age of six, he had them intellectually the rest of their lives, and when one adds in the full parameters of feeding them, it makes perfect sense. Thus, if I want someone to think as I do, act as I do, or simply as I would desire, I need to go all in. If I want to help them, change them, or indeed, change the world, I start simply and saintly, doing my best: feeding my culture, my religion, my hopes, doubts, fears and most of all, my love without any ideas attached, just feeding them to whomsoever was around at the moment. In some weird way this makes perfect sense. My father always said we were obligated by Life (or God) to leave our piece of the world better than we found it, down to wiping splashed water off the sink after washing our hands (even though my brother was a slob and left a wet mess that wasn't my fault, dammit!) without blame or fault as to who made the mess, just fix it bcs you can. Julia Turshen seems to believe one can fix a lot with food. I humbly agree and it helps that there are some unique and wonderful recipes in this book. The simple sweet potatoes and starkly divine. The bread pudding is to die for. The causes are up to us as she points out: every cause is served better with food, and some of my own precious ones are even served better without my words. Good on, Julia. Sorry, but by the grace of Julia Child, a Julia speaking to the inherent justice, equality and love in food allows first person relationship with that cook forever. Cuidada, chica, you are heard well. Yes, five stars as the issue includes recipes, kitchens, hearts, minds, and souls.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    This is a book filled with good intentions and heart. Ms. Turshen offers stories of caring and activism sprinkled with recipes from many people from a spectrum of backgrounds. Some feed the activist at home or while at the march or waiting to speak to their elected officials. Other recipes can feed the room as you organize next steps, clarify intentions, and in other ways make the world a better place. The book did make me hungry for more specific ways to get involved that might spark movement f This is a book filled with good intentions and heart. Ms. Turshen offers stories of caring and activism sprinkled with recipes from many people from a spectrum of backgrounds. Some feed the activist at home or while at the march or waiting to speak to their elected officials. Other recipes can feed the room as you organize next steps, clarify intentions, and in other ways make the world a better place. The book did make me hungry for more specific ways to get involved that might spark movement for particular people. I get this, or some version of it, a lot, “I’m just not sure what to do. I’m not sure of the right place for me to get involved. I know I need it to be active in an area I relate to and that allows me to use skills I am comfortable with. Otherwise, I know myself. I am likely to end up giving up and using my few free moments to curl up on the couch” (probably in fetal position). Some of my standard ideas and responses seem not to hit the mark. Appreciated the book and that the proceeds go to the ACLU, one of my cherished organizations.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Robert Hudder

    There really has to be two ways to read this book. One has to be the recipes and the other is the guide to the activism. I really wanted both to be tied together more closely as in food as resistance but found it more as a backdrop to activism. There are varied recipes in terms of diversity and some connections between activism and food kitchens. (Black Panthers and their food for example). I had already been trying to figure out how to go about making a more intentional community and I have bee There really has to be two ways to read this book. One has to be the recipes and the other is the guide to the activism. I really wanted both to be tied together more closely as in food as resistance but found it more as a backdrop to activism. There are varied recipes in terms of diversity and some connections between activism and food kitchens. (Black Panthers and their food for example). I had already been trying to figure out how to go about making a more intentional community and I have been enamoured with the ideal of intellectual salons for a long time. So, this book has pushed me a bit forward along the path. I have posted more about that here. So, I am sure that this would be good for someone who does not have a huge exposure to inclusive food or to activist friends. Maybe a youngster or someone coming into their own awakening.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Gwen

    Being interested in food, really caring about it, has a domino effect. You start caring about where it comes from, what it means to the people you are feeding, and what it means to be fed. (11–12) Better in theory than execution, with some decent recipe ideas and a strong push for intersectionality. On the whole, the essays were better than the recipes, although I wished for a stronger editorial voice and more information about each of the writers. h/t: Washington Post and Eater Being interested in food, really caring about it, has a domino effect. You start caring about where it comes from, what it means to the people you are feeding, and what it means to be fed. (11–12) Better in theory than execution, with some decent recipe ideas and a strong push for intersectionality. On the whole, the essays were better than the recipes, although I wished for a stronger editorial voice and more information about each of the writers. h/t: Washington Post and Eater

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tina

    First off, I’m glad I purchased this book and regardless of my review, I’m happy that the proceeds of its sale go to the ACLU. That being said, I wanted this to be much more than it was. The essays and tips didn’t feel inspiring - perhaps because they were discussing things I already thought/felt/was aware of. I expected more connections between food & activism than what it provided. Beyond that though, I feel like the recipes are a bit more complicated than I expected, and many call for ingredi First off, I’m glad I purchased this book and regardless of my review, I’m happy that the proceeds of its sale go to the ACLU. That being said, I wanted this to be much more than it was. The essays and tips didn’t feel inspiring - perhaps because they were discussing things I already thought/felt/was aware of. I expected more connections between food & activism than what it provided. Beyond that though, I feel like the recipes are a bit more complicated than I expected, and many call for ingredients I just can’t access where I live. I just found those issues to be unfortunate considering the book talks about feeding those that are busy and of inclusivity. I just hoped for a more useful book. No hate or disrespect to the author!!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Feed The Resistance is short and sweet — powerful essays and practical advice to both drive empathy for groups of lesser privilege AND teach key tools to engage in activism. It’s so overwhelming to face an entire world of issues and problems, this book provides steps to get started on making a difference. I love the recipes in this book as well. Ranging across many cultures, I loved especially the recipes for groups of people and I resonate deeply with the idea that people can be brought togethe Feed The Resistance is short and sweet — powerful essays and practical advice to both drive empathy for groups of lesser privilege AND teach key tools to engage in activism. It’s so overwhelming to face an entire world of issues and problems, this book provides steps to get started on making a difference. I love the recipes in this book as well. Ranging across many cultures, I loved especially the recipes for groups of people and I resonate deeply with the idea that people can be brought together more than physically, but emotionally and spiritually over the table.

  14. 4 out of 5

    L

    I bought this book in late 2017 because the proceeds from its sale are donated to the ACLU. Initially, I found it distressing to read as it reminded me of all sorts of things I wanted to escape thinking about, but I kept reading it one recipe or entry at a time and eventually found it comforting and inspiring. I've made two of the recipes (so far), and they turned out great. So, there are many reasons to love this little book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    I thought this was more about activism and organizing than recipes, so it's my fault for being disappointed. If you're looking for simple recipes that can easily scale up for a crowd, there are some useful ones here. And there are a few short essays about activism, but the bulk of the book is recipes.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sara-Kay

    Interesting concept, appealing layout / formatting, and interesting / diverse voices contributing. Left me wanting a little more, though. And many of the recipes seemed highly impractical. I love the idea of this book more than the actual finished product.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Donna Hutt Stapfer Bell

    Food for the body as well as the fighting spirit I'm going to see how many copies of this I can give away as gifts this Christmas - portable support, both for feeding and giving sound advice!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Maya Gee

    Not my type of book Some big ideas are the main focus of this book but I feel like they’re not elaborated on enough. It’s a very quick read. I haven’t tried any of the recipes but some seemed very interesting.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ellen

    Great context around some really good recipes. It reminds me of when I discovered Moosewood Cookbook and joined my local food coop. Fast forward 40 years and here we are! I wish it was a longer book but it simply means I need to check out Julia Turshen's other books.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Beverly

    I like cookbooks with full color photos and spines that allow you to lay the book flat on the counter but I like the message of this book and the recipes too so I’m giving it four stars despite its format. Looking forward to some great meals!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Juli Anna

    A lovely and important little volume with a lot of heart. As with any contribution-based affair, there was some variation in quality from piece to piece, and I could tell that this was a little rushed in its conception, but I still enjoyed it very much.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mara Shaw

    Inspiring words from people who are persisting in their efforts to make society more equitable. PLUS, delicious dishes you can make affordably for feeding large crowds of co-persisters. I bought 4 copies as gifts for a few of my inspirations.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Heidi

    Delicious, inspiring, and for a good cause. A great combination.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Daniela

    An inspirational book . I cannot put into words how much I enjoyed it.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

    I can’t wait to get my hands on a physical Copy of this book to add to my collection! The essays are well written and informative and inspiring! Can’t wait to try out a few of the recipes!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sasha Boersma

    It’s ok. Mix of essays about activism breaking up collections of recipes. The connection between the two aren’t very clear. Many recipes are provided by activists involved by causes.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Loved this book. Great recipes with Turshen's usual practical brilliance and amazing additional voices. This book made me feel hopeful just as exhaustion set it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    Good essays, good recipes.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Megan Seely

    Great essays on Activism in between recipes. Recipes look great—I’m looking forward to trying.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Auld

    this is a great book. it tells how to organize a lead a group and also shows how to make good food. I look forward to some of these dishes.

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