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Wuthering Heights: FREE Jane Eyre By Charlotte Brontë, 100% Formatted, Illustrated - JBS Classics (100 Greatest Novels of All Time Book 75)

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JBS Classics specializes in selling JUST BEST SELLERS (JBS). 'Wuthering Heights' by ‎Emily Brontë Kindle Formatting details: 'Wuthering Heights' by Emily Brontë 100% perfectly on ALL devices (including Kindle, Android, iBook, Cloud Readers etc.).�Book formatting details:�1) Active Table of Contents.Footnotes & Endnotes.2) Word Wise – Enabled.3) Illustrations & Table JBS Classics specializes in selling JUST BEST SELLERS (JBS). 'Wuthering Heights' by ‎Emily Brontë Kindle Formatting details: 'Wuthering Heights' by Emily Brontë 100% perfectly on ALL devices (including Kindle, Android, iBook, Cloud Readers etc.).�Book formatting details:�1) Active Table of Contents.Footnotes & Endnotes.2) Word Wise – Enabled.3) Illustrations & Tables (if any) are available with ZOOM feature on double-click. “Wuthering Heights” by 'Emily Brontë' Book Description Wuthering Heights is a wild, passionate story of the intense and almost demonic love between Catherine Earnshaw and Heathcliff, a foundling adopted by Catherine's father. After Mr Earnshaw's death, Heathcliff is bullied and humiliated by Catherine's brother Hindley and wrongly believing that his love for Catherine is not reciprocated, leaves Wuthering Heights, only to return years later as a wealthy and polished man. He proceeds to exact a terrible revenge for his former miseries. The action of the story is chaotic and unremittingly violent, but the accomplished handling of a complex structure, the evocative descriptions of the lonely moorland setting and the poetic grandeur of vision combine to make this unique novel a masterpiece of English literature.


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JBS Classics specializes in selling JUST BEST SELLERS (JBS). 'Wuthering Heights' by ‎Emily Brontë Kindle Formatting details: 'Wuthering Heights' by Emily Brontë 100% perfectly on ALL devices (including Kindle, Android, iBook, Cloud Readers etc.).�Book formatting details:�1) Active Table of Contents.Footnotes & Endnotes.2) Word Wise – Enabled.3) Illustrations & Table JBS Classics specializes in selling JUST BEST SELLERS (JBS). 'Wuthering Heights' by ‎Emily Brontë Kindle Formatting details: 'Wuthering Heights' by Emily Brontë 100% perfectly on ALL devices (including Kindle, Android, iBook, Cloud Readers etc.).�Book formatting details:�1) Active Table of Contents.Footnotes & Endnotes.2) Word Wise – Enabled.3) Illustrations & Tables (if any) are available with ZOOM feature on double-click. “Wuthering Heights” by 'Emily Brontë' Book Description Wuthering Heights is a wild, passionate story of the intense and almost demonic love between Catherine Earnshaw and Heathcliff, a foundling adopted by Catherine's father. After Mr Earnshaw's death, Heathcliff is bullied and humiliated by Catherine's brother Hindley and wrongly believing that his love for Catherine is not reciprocated, leaves Wuthering Heights, only to return years later as a wealthy and polished man. He proceeds to exact a terrible revenge for his former miseries. The action of the story is chaotic and unremittingly violent, but the accomplished handling of a complex structure, the evocative descriptions of the lonely moorland setting and the poetic grandeur of vision combine to make this unique novel a masterpiece of English literature.

30 review for Wuthering Heights: FREE Jane Eyre By Charlotte Brontë, 100% Formatted, Illustrated - JBS Classics (100 Greatest Novels of All Time Book 75)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jill McGivering

    Jane Eyre is often forced on schoolchildren before they're ready to enjoy it. It's such a shame if that turns them off the Brontes - the novels are a joy, full of passion, elements of the Gothic and strong characterisation. Jane Eyre is often forced on schoolchildren before they're ready to enjoy it. It's such a shame if that turns them off the Brontes - the novels are a joy, full of passion, elements of the Gothic and strong characterisation.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    Am so happy I finally picked up this book and treated myself to reading it. Oh, the journey of Jane from childhood through young adulthood - the successes and failures, the trials; and ultimately, her self-determination, perseverance, and confidence in the truth of what her heart and mind told her gave this reader a deeply satisfying experience. Surprisingly passionate at times, this book really packs a wallop near the end. I found myself reminded of fairy tales in all their grim and lovely twis Am so happy I finally picked up this book and treated myself to reading it. Oh, the journey of Jane from childhood through young adulthood - the successes and failures, the trials; and ultimately, her self-determination, perseverance, and confidence in the truth of what her heart and mind told her gave this reader a deeply satisfying experience. Surprisingly passionate at times, this book really packs a wallop near the end. I found myself reminded of fairy tales in all their grim and lovely twists and turns and very much put in mind of Beauty and the Beast. Withering Heights remains my favorite book but this was certainly a great work of literature and I’m so pleased I had the chance to read it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lia

    This will always be one of my favorite books. I read it every few years and never tire of it. It's a masterpiece of storytelling, characterization, and beautiful writing. The narrator, Jane, is such a believable character, and I always relate to her. The highlights for me: Bronte's portrayal of Jane as a child while she is downtrodden at Gateshead Hall. ("How much I wished to reply fully to this question! How difficult it was to frame any answer! Children can feel, but they cannot analyse their fe This will always be one of my favorite books. I read it every few years and never tire of it. It's a masterpiece of storytelling, characterization, and beautiful writing. The narrator, Jane, is such a believable character, and I always relate to her. The highlights for me: Bronte's portrayal of Jane as a child while she is downtrodden at Gateshead Hall. ("How much I wished to reply fully to this question! How difficult it was to frame any answer! Children can feel, but they cannot analyse their feelings; and if the analysis is partially effected in thought, they know not how to express the result of the process in words.") Delightful British sentences like: "I considered [the book] a narrative of facts, and discovered in it a vein of interest deeper than what I found in fairy tails: for as to the elves, having sought them in vain among foxglove leaves and bells, under mushrooms and beneath the ground-ivy mantling old wall-nooks, I had at length made up my mind to the sad truth, that they were all gone out of England to some savage country where the woods were wilder and thicker, and the population more scant." The inspiring example of Helen Burns and the impact she has on Jane's character. ("If all the world hated you, and believed you wicked, while your own conscience approved you, and absolved you from guilt, you would not be without friends...besides the race of men, there is an invisible world and a kingdom of spirits: that world is round us; and if we were dying in pain and shame, if scorn smote us on all sides, and hatred crushed us, angels see our tortures, recognize our innocence...and God waits only the separation of spirits from flesh to crown us with a full reward. Why, then, should we ever sink overwhelmed with distress, when life is so soon over, and death is so certain an entrance to happiness - to glory?") Jane's character when she is grown, which we understand better because we know of the people and events that had the most impact on her when she was young. Although she is "plain and little," she is intelligent, sensible, conscientious, feeling, honest, circumspect, defiant, in some cases, and as Mr. Rochester says, "indomitable." She is a person of her own making, and the contrast between her and her dissipated and silly cousins when she visits them as an adult is striking. Bronte conveys Jane's character principally through her words, her interactions with others, and Mr. Rochester's perception of her. She has a good balance of self-awareness and self-respect. ("Do you think, because I am poor, obscure, plain, and little, I am soulless and heartless? You think wrong! - I have as much soul as you, - and full as much heart! And if God had gifted me with some beauty and much wealth, I should have made it as hard for you to leave me, as it is now for me to leave you. I am not talking to you now through the medium of custom, conventionalities, nor even of mortal flesh: - it is my spirit that addresses your spirit; just as if both had passed through the grace, and we stood at God's feet, equal, - as we are!") The character of Mr. Rochester, who is so real that you could almost swear you've met him somewhere before. I love the pride, the perceptiveness, the slightly sarcastic humor, the to-the-point bluntness and even brusqueness, the ardent love, the wistfulness, and the mystery of the melancholy, which we later understand in full. ("I have plenty of faults of my own: I know it, and I don't wish to palliate them, I assure you....I started, or rather...was thrust on to a wrong tack at the age of one-and-twenty, and have never recovered the right course since: but I might have been very different; I might have been as good as you.") Jane and Mr. Rochester's love for each other. They understand each other; they are like each other, and they esteem each other. ("My bride is here," he said, again drawing me to him, "because my equal is here, and my likeness. Jane, will you marry me?") ("I grieve to leave Thornfield; I love Thornfield: - I love it, because I have lived in it a full and delightful life, - momentarily at least. I have not been trampled on. I have not been petrified. I have not been buried with inferior minds, and excluded from every glimpse of communion with what is bright and energetic, and high. I have talked, face to face, with what I reverence; with what I delight in, - with an original, a vigorous, an expanded mind. I have known you, Mr. Rochester; and it strikes me with terror and anguish to feel I absolutely must be torn from you for ever.") Jane's courageous decision to refuse to live with Mr. Rochester, even though it broke her heart. ("I had already gained the door: but, reader, I walked back - walked back as determinedly as I had retreated. I knelt down by him; I turned his face from the cushion to me; I kissed his cheek; I smoothed his hair with my hand. 'God bless you, my dear master!' I said. 'God keep you from harm and wrong - direct you, solace you - reward you well for your past kindness to me.'...He held his arms out; but I evaded the embrace, and at once quitted the room.") The character of St. John. Bronte gives us plenty of interesting information about him, but leaves it up to the reader to decide if his ultimate decision to be a missionary is foolish or noble. Occasionally I talk to people who don't like the ending of Jane Eyre, which is strange to me. I can only think that they have no appreciation for truly happy endings, or that they weren't paying enough attention to the narrative to understand that what happened was absolutely necessary for the ending to be happy. "Why couldn't Mr. Rochester's first wife have died," they wonder, "withOUT Mr. Rochester's getting blinded and maimed?" Although Jane was a governess and Mr. Rochester her master - two people in entirely different social strata - Mr. Rochester recognized in Jane an equal. In contrast, Jane (who loved Mr. Rochester dearly and believed herself to be his equal in spirit)was keenly aware of their social and monetary differences. How could she not be? Mr. Rochester's well-bred guests treated her like a piece of furniture. Her contrasting sketches of her own "Portrait of a Governess, disconnected, poor, and plain" and the imagined "Blanche, an accomplished lady of rank," led her to say, "Mr. Rochester might probably win that noble lady's love, if he chose to strive for it; is it likely he would waste a serious thought on this indigent and insignificant plebeian?" And when her friend Mrs. Fairfax learned of Jane's and Mr. Rochester's engagement, Mrs. Fairfax's reaction was: "How it will answer, I cannot tell: I really don't know. Equality of position and fortune is often advisable in such cases." (This disturbed Jane because she felt it was true.) Mr. Rochester tried to lavish Jane with jewels and fine dresses, but she refused, seeing that she would feel too awkward and out of character: "Don't send for the jewels, and don't crown me with roses: you might as well put a border or gold lace round that plain pocket handkerchief you have there." She was happy to remember, while they are shopping for finery, that she has an uncle who may leave her an inheritance. "It would, indeed, be a relief if I had ever so small an independency; I never can bear being dressed like a doll by Mr. Rochester." In short, although Jane knew her character and person to be Mr. Rochester's equal, she was continually conscious that they were not on equal footing as regards her station in life. She felt it most keenly when she loved him and did not yet know if he loved her - when he made her jealous and envious of Blanche Ingram, when he left for weeks and seemed to ignore her. She was at his mercy. He could honor her by choosing her instead of any other of the many women available; but her favor was worth little by her own estimation, as he was virtually her only option. After Jane left and Mr. Rochester was blinded and lost his right hand, he was a changed person. ("His form was of the same strong and stalwart contour as ever: his port was still erect, his hair was raven-black; nor were his features altered or sunk: not in one year's space, by any sorrow, could his athletic strength be quelled, or his vigorous prime blighted. But in his countenance, I saw a change: that looked desperate and brooding...He descended the one step, and advanced slowly and gropingly towards the grass-plat. Where was his daring stride now?") Jane proclaimed early on in their first conversation after remeeting that she had inherited five thousand pounds and was "an independent woman" who was quite free to build a house next to his and love and help him. This was important to her. She also made a point of teasing Mr. Rochester about handsome St. John's proposal to her (echoing Mr. Rochester's onetime use of Blanche Ingram as an object to provoke jealousy). Jane did not truly come in to her own until she felt to be on equal footing with Mr. Rochester. Her initial contemplation of marriage to Mr. Rochester was happy but uneasy. By the end of the book, she knew her place, had found her niche, and was completely assured of the essentialness of her presence in Mr. Rochester's life and affections. In the beginning of the book she was trampled on and treated poorly; at the end of the book she knew "what it is to live entirely for and with what I love best on earth." She held herself "supremely blest - blest beyond what language can express;" because, in her words, "I am my husband's life as fully as he is mine. No woman was ever nearer to her mate than I am; ever more absolutely bone of his bone, and flesh of his flesh. I know no weariness of my Edward's society: he knows none of mine, any more than we each do of the pulsation of the heart that beats in our separate bosoms...we are precisely suited in character - perfect concord is the result." Perfect concord wasn't possible until the end. What a satisfying ending!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Callie

    I am only halfway through Wuthering Heights, but I already have so much to say that I have to come and write down all my thoughts before I forget them. Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte There are some things I like about this book, and there are some things that I really hate about this book. The following are simply a few of my thoughts: I'll admit, when I started reading, I didn't have a clue what was going on, or who the narrator was. Last night, I ended up re-reading the first 50 pages of the b I am only halfway through Wuthering Heights, but I already have so much to say that I have to come and write down all my thoughts before I forget them. Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte There are some things I like about this book, and there are some things that I really hate about this book. The following are simply a few of my thoughts: I'll admit, when I started reading, I didn't have a clue what was going on, or who the narrator was. Last night, I ended up re-reading the first 50 pages of the book to try and understand what was going on. After doing so, I was able to pick out who the narrator(s) was/were, and understood exactly the storyline and what would happen. On the topic of narrators, I like the fact that the book begins with an outsider, Mr. Lockwood, coming to Wuthering Heights to live. After encountering so many strange events during his stay and meeting with Heathcliff, his landlord, it stood for a very intriguing beginning. Then, when Mrs. Dean, or "Nelly," is introduced and he begs her to tell the story of Mr. Heathcliff and his strange behavior, I thoroughly enjoyed seeing a story take place through not one, but two different point of views. Though confusing at first, I was able to later get it and understand. I do not like the fact that both Catherine Earnshaw and Heathcliff are such evil characters. Catherine is the one who began her own demise (by accepting Edgar Linton's marriage proposal) when she really loved Heathcliff. Because of her stupidity and heart full of greed for Edgar's money, she betrayed Heathcliff, whom she loved. Heathcliff, overhearing her heartbreak over her decision, takes off and vows to make something of himself to prove to Catherine that he is worthy of his love and heart. BUT IT'S TOO FRICKING LATE! It's very bittersweet that he wants to prove his love, but divorce was a sin during this time period. Catherine would never leave Edgar, even if she did love Heathcliff more. Gah, and the fact that Heathcliff had grown so greedy for money, upon Catherine's mentioning that Isabella had money and loved him, he "wooed" her so to speak, and married her for nothing but money and a chance to enact revenge on Edgar Linton. Then Catherine claims that his battle with Edgar is what murdered her, when in fact she pretty much murdered herself because of her sheer stupidity. This is a dark story, and I honestly don't have a clue if it could be called a love story, because it's not. It's almost a warning AGAINST love. Emily Bronte is almost saying, "This is what love shouldn't be. Do not follow this example." For that, it's a great story of warning, and probably why I don't like this story all too much. Okay /endrant. I've got to go finish the last half--(Speaking of the last half, does there even need to be more? Catherine's dead. Heathcliff is mourning and pretty much wants to kill himself. (Do you see the Shakespeare ties with this, too? IT'S EVERYWHERE! Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, Macbeth . . . the madness, the "I'm so in love I'm going to kill myself," the tragedy, the depressing themes. Emily Bronte loved Shakespeare, I'm sure of it.) What's the point of more story? There isn't one anymore. At least, I think.) **update** I finished reading, and honestly, all I really have to say about the story is this: 1) Emily Bronte is twisted in imagining a story such as this and 2) Heathcliff is a sick, twisted, evil man and should rot in Hell with Catherine Earnshaw for eternity. The reason I give Wuthering Heights four stars, is the fact that the writing was great (though very wordy at times) and the underlying themes strong and powerful. If read mulitiple times, you could probably find something new and learn something new about it. That's why her writing is timeless, and very unforgettable. I'm sure that's why it's remembered as a classic, no matter how sick and twisted it may be. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte I have finished. It was beautiful. I will update my review some other time, right now, I am exhausted.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Shonda

    I found Wuthering Heights to be a dismal story. I felt sorry for all the characters in the story who had to meet Heathcliff, knowing that something tragic would happen to them when he got them under his thumb. At first I also felt sorry for Heathcliff, but later ended up despising him. I guess that is why the book it is such a classic. The storytelling is wonderful and I didn't want to stop reading until something good happened, which took a while. The ending was the one redeeming part of the st I found Wuthering Heights to be a dismal story. I felt sorry for all the characters in the story who had to meet Heathcliff, knowing that something tragic would happen to them when he got them under his thumb. At first I also felt sorry for Heathcliff, but later ended up despising him. I guess that is why the book it is such a classic. The storytelling is wonderful and I didn't want to stop reading until something good happened, which took a while. The ending was the one redeeming part of the story in my opinion and the only reason I would possibly read again.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tracy Robinson

    3.5-4. I remember reading this on my own in my late teens and enjoying it. This time around I still love Heathcliff but found myself wishing for a bit. I love seeing connections with this book in modern day literature across genres. Angsty men and troubled relationships and lovers that just can’t seem to make it work.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Cox

    Jane Eyre: Years after I first read this in high school, and I still love this story. Such feeling, such heart, such brokenness and healing. Everything my emotional heart adores. Content: profanity, expletives, replacement expletives, tobacco, alcohol Wuthering Heights: This story was just as emotional as the first time I read it and the numerous times I’ve watched the Ralph Fiennes movie version. There’s something completely broken yet absolutely intriguing about Heathcliff. He’s such a brute, but Jane Eyre: Years after I first read this in high school, and I still love this story. Such feeling, such heart, such brokenness and healing. Everything my emotional heart adores. Content: profanity, expletives, replacement expletives, tobacco, alcohol Wuthering Heights: This story was just as emotional as the first time I read it and the numerous times I’ve watched the Ralph Fiennes movie version. There’s something completely broken yet absolutely intriguing about Heathcliff. He’s such a brute, but he’s also hurting and yearning for love. I adore the way Miss Brontë wrote this novel, because the reader almost feels obligated to love Heathcliff – because Cathy refuses to do so. Content: profanity, expletives, alcohol

  8. 4 out of 5

    Vmay

    I didn't really like this book. I didn't really like this book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Faith

    (Note to self, this is my first review). There are three primary problems that I had with this book. I will say first that this is purely my opinion and that fellow readers are free to and invited to disagree. The first problem that I had with this book is that the style of narration makes the story more confusing (to me at least) and (to an extent) detaches the reader from the events that occur. The narrator, the "I", is a Mr. Lockwood, a stranger to the Wuthering Heights area and a visiting te (Note to self, this is my first review). There are three primary problems that I had with this book. I will say first that this is purely my opinion and that fellow readers are free to and invited to disagree. The first problem that I had with this book is that the style of narration makes the story more confusing (to me at least) and (to an extent) detaches the reader from the events that occur. The narrator, the "I", is a Mr. Lockwood, a stranger to the Wuthering Heights area and a visiting tenant. The first few chapters are a bit discombobulating as it isn't clear how or why he is relevant to the story. Then, when this Mr. Lockwood interacts with Nelly Dean, the latter becomes the primary narrator of the history of Wuthering Heights and its inhabitants. So... the reader is basically Lockwood and the story is told to us through Nelly's observations and recounting of events. This would be alright except that the story sometimes pauses to account for Mr. Lockwood's actions and going abouts which distances the reader from the story and reminds them that it all happened in the past. Second, almost every character in this story is just... despicable. Heathcliff in particular is absolutely despicable--he is an abuser, a controller, and has a disturbing obsession with a woman (Catherine) that is described as a love of sorts when in reality it is just toxic. Other characters (Linton the junior, Cathy the junior, Hareton, etc.) are also fairly self-absorbed and make bad decisions. While I get the appeal of having complex characters that don't make stereotypically good decisions like typical protagonists, it is also very difficult to follow along and feel INVESTED in a story when there isn't really a character to love and/or root for. Third, while some themes of this story are often listed to be "redemption" and "love", the reality of this story is that actions towards others have long lasting consequences. Jealousy is a powerful motivator, one that can even overpower that of so-called love, and abuse is a horrible thing that perpetrates itself through generations and rears its ugly head even after the original actors have passed on.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ilse Wouters

    So, I´ve re-read Wuthering Heights in this Anniversary Year for Emily Brontë (she was born in 1818)...although most of the people described in the book are not exactly the most cheerful, nor sympathetic characters, the story (oh, that passion!) still keeps up, and what to say about the landscape of the Yorkshire Moors, so present in this book! In 1991, during my first stay in West-Yorkshire, I ventured to Haworth (had a ride in the Worth Valley Railway, a steam train still operated during the we So, I´ve re-read Wuthering Heights in this Anniversary Year for Emily Brontë (she was born in 1818)...although most of the people described in the book are not exactly the most cheerful, nor sympathetic characters, the story (oh, that passion!) still keeps up, and what to say about the landscape of the Yorkshire Moors, so present in this book! In 1991, during my first stay in West-Yorkshire, I ventured to Haworth (had a ride in the Worth Valley Railway, a steam train still operated during the weekends), visited the Parsonage and had a walk up the Moors from there to what is considered the place EB took as a setting for the Wuthering Heights farmhouse...I´ll never forget it, and it definitely is part of the charm of this story! Even nowadays it can be rough and "wuthering" up there ;-)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Deanna

    Jane Eyre ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Jane, such a lovely, proper young woman. A lady whose morals and principles hold out over her heart, and who is rewarded with her happy ending. Solid story. The characters were interesting and engaging. Few twists and turns, a dab of the supernatural, and a happy ending. Everything one would expect from a quintessential Gothic romance. Wuthering Heights ⭐️⭐️ I can't decide who I hated more, Heathcliff, Catherine, or every other character. Boring story. it felt as if the story was Jane Eyre ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Jane, such a lovely, proper young woman. A lady whose morals and principles hold out over her heart, and who is rewarded with her happy ending. Solid story. The characters were interesting and engaging. Few twists and turns, a dab of the supernatural, and a happy ending. Everything one would expect from a quintessential Gothic romance. Wuthering Heights ⭐️⭐️ I can't decide who I hated more, Heathcliff, Catherine, or every other character. Boring story. it felt as if the story was an outline of a plot half finished. None of the characters were likable or made you invested in their story enough to care if they lived, died, had a happy or sad conclusion. I feel this story is a bit more true to the Gothic romance core. Having these two stories together is really nice. Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights had similar themes, story elements, characters, but couldn't be more different. Enjoyed following Jane and Mr. Rochester's story. Couldn't care less about Catherine and Heathcliff.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Taylor Childress

    this review is for wuthering heights: it feels silly giving a classic 3 stars but it was such a mid read. the story itself was actually fire but it truly was miserable turning each page cuz it was told in such a long way. sorry emily but charlotte did it better with jane eyre 😧❤️‍🔥

  13. 5 out of 5

    Silje

    A reread of Wuthering Heights.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tyna

    5+ stars. I adore Jane Eyre. Reading it is perfect in every way. Treasure!!!!!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Aashi Nizami

    Whatever our souls are made of.. His n mine are the same..

  16. 5 out of 5

    Luke McDonald

    I liked Wuthering Heights twice as much as I probably should have and liked Jane Eyre half as much as it probably deserved

  17. 4 out of 5

    Shadle

    Jane Eyre is about a woman in the eighteenth century who falls in love with her employer and she has struggles when trying to show them to him. The main characters in this novel are Jane Eyre, Mr. Rochester and Helen Burns. When Jane realizes her feelings for Mr. Rochester she becomes confused in what she wants in life. "I am no bird; and no net ensnares me; I am a free human being with an independent will." (Bronte 53) The theme in this book is mostly love. For example, Jane and Mr. Rochester a Jane Eyre is about a woman in the eighteenth century who falls in love with her employer and she has struggles when trying to show them to him. The main characters in this novel are Jane Eyre, Mr. Rochester and Helen Burns. When Jane realizes her feelings for Mr. Rochester she becomes confused in what she wants in life. "I am no bird; and no net ensnares me; I am a free human being with an independent will." (Bronte 53) The theme in this book is mostly love. For example, Jane and Mr. Rochester are the main characters in this book that show love. I think Charlotte Bronte did a very pleasant job writing this novel. This book didn't necessarily move me, but I enjoyed it; it's a favorite. Something valuable I learned in this book would be the meaning of true friendship. I think my audience should totally read this because it is an enjoyable classic. I would give this book a four out of five. I would give it a four because it was interesting to read, but there were some things about the ending that Bronte could have gone in more depth too.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Meredith Henning

    This was the kindle version, Loved Jane Eyre, didn't love wuthering heights. This was the kindle version, Loved Jane Eyre, didn't love wuthering heights.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Earling-Hopson

    Jane Eyre is my favourite of all the Bronte books!!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Shuting

    Feminism and Fairy Tales in Wuthering Heights FW: this was written over one year ago. I am always a big fan of Emily Bronte. Since many scholarly evaluations tend to see Heathcliff as another ego of Catherine, the heroine in Emily Bronte’s novel Wuthering Heights, providing myriads of evidence of Catherine’s narcissism, for example, her overly quoted comment about the relationship between Heathcliff and Catherine, the identification of Heathcliff has been deemed as another Catherine or an ideal Ca Feminism and Fairy Tales in Wuthering Heights FW: this was written over one year ago. I am always a big fan of Emily Bronte. Since many scholarly evaluations tend to see Heathcliff as another ego of Catherine, the heroine in Emily Bronte’s novel Wuthering Heights, providing myriads of evidence of Catherine’s narcissism, for example, her overly quoted comment about the relationship between Heathcliff and Catherine, the identification of Heathcliff has been deemed as another Catherine or an ideal Catherine. What’s more, analysis from feminist point of view seems to exaggerate Catherine’s domination towards Heathcliff mentally and physically, and by this means, prove that Heathcliff is sheer the incarnation of Catherine. This essay tries to argue with this established sentiment for the independent identification of Heathcliff from Catherine. And by further elucidations, I will also try to substantiate the equality of social and domestic status of two genders, and thus, to show the great author Emily Bronte’s appeal for independence and real liberty of females. Firstly, Catherine and Heathcliff are two different persons. Their similarity can be explained by common childhood and mirror phase. In Childhood and Innocence in Wuthering Heights, Seichepine explains this point of view: The mirror-phase thus provides a link with reality, a link between the 'Innenwelt' and the 'Umwelt'. As for Catherine, she indeed proves unable to cope with the mirror-phase.' "And I dying! I on the brink of the grave! My God! Does he know how I'm altered?" continued she, staring at her reflection in a mirror, hanging against the opposite wall. "Is that Catherine Linton?"'. (Seichepine 212) Their antagonized relations were uncovered after Catherine married Linton. The wrestling of control over each other and ways to get it through different means according to different gender roles are vividly depicted. Both Catherine and Heathcliff have strong narcissism, however, this personal characteristic takes no place between them, since both of them feel an alter ego in the other, and both have something that the other possess not. In This Shattered Prison: Confinement, Control and Gender in Wuthering Heights, Crouse states as below: Catherine primarily views herself in relation to others and her acts of confinement become self-destructive whereas Heathcliff, in valuing hierarchy, is destructive of others. Emily Brontë shows that as both Catherine and Heathcliff follow traditional gender roles, neither is able to achieve the communion they had as children together. (Cruise 179) The second point is that Wuthering Heights is actually a prophetic love story-- how love from both of them is equally rewarded? This mutual dynamic equilibrium is developed through the story. And along the developing, both Catherine and Heathcliff experience great change in personality. During the childhood, Catherine’s protection is paid by Heathcliff’s loyalty. After the marriage, Catherine’s betrayal is rewarded by Heacliff’s hatred. Why Catherine betrayed Heathcliff She married Linton part of vanity and in depth, for she can do nothing to improve the social improvement of Heathcliff except by marrying a most prestigious family. Later she punishes herself by being killed by a nearly-suicide disease—out of repentence and regret. After Catherine’s death, her love is returned by Heathcliff’s morbid revenge and self-torture. Heathcliff later twists himself on purpose in order to keep in line with Catherine. At last, his suicide out of fantasy confirms to Catherine’s wish. In the duration, Catherine has lost her identity, suffering from a place where she does not belong: “This importance for women to define themselves in connection to others is essential to understanding Catherine’s behaviour of confinement throughout the novel. She seeks to find and maintain a place for herself within the web of relationships around her, particularly with Heathcliff, with whom she has the strongest attachment.”(Crouse 182) What does Emily Bronte want to express through Wuthering Hights? I see her strong Desire for love. Also, many Bronte experts have pointed out WH’s story pattern as a fairy tale, Heathcliff best represents Catherine, also Bronte’s desire for a male companion. It should hardly surprise us that a novel whose innermost significance gravitates around a nonsense — the famous, overquoted ‘Nelly, I am Heathcliff!’ — poses serious problems of interpretation. Referring to Heathcliff’s perfect fairy-tale model in Wuthering Height, Piciucco points out that: Of the famous couple, Heathcliff seems to me to be the one who is more noticeably fashioned on the stock images of traditional fairy tales, possibly because from the narcissist’s perspective he best represents the (male) projections of Catherine’s secret desires, and probably inhabits a more imaginary territory than Catherine in Emily Brontë’s fictional world.(Piciucco 222) William Somerset Maugham[1] points out Bronte might want to fulfill her unaccomplished wish by writing this semi-autobiographical WH. Bronte has been single and depressed to some extent in her short life. Heathcliff is a symbol of love and liberation to save her out of her shackles. Whether Heathcliff is another Catherine cannot be judged simply from her narcissism and their similarity. Love is too complicated and both of the characters have round-shaped different characters. If deeply explored, WH is a love story of a perfect love with two persons involved. The whole story is about how the two persons got apart from each other and finally got united again. During this infernal experience both grew and changed—in a different direction and cursed by different destinies. However, their love is still epically great since they love each other the same way—the same passionately and self-devotedly. Bernard Paris has gone further by describing Catherine and Heathcliff s relationship as "a mutual dependency," whereby both characters lack "a sense of themselves as autonomous beings with separate identities" (Tytler 108). However, the ending of the story has always been doubted as whether it really shows what Emily Bronte wants to express through Wuthering Heights, since the ending part where little Catherine and Edgar unite together, a much more moderated result than what most would expect and seemingly incoherent with the previous plots. In Dunn’s Reviewing The Birth of Wuthering Heights: Emily Bronte at Work by Edward Chitham, she quotes Chitham, a Bronte expert’s speculation on this: For example, when Chitham points out that the second Catherine's love for the sickly Linton mocks her mother's great passion for his strong father, are we seeing the impact of Charlotte's and Anne's suggestions for taming Emily's work? This cannot be answered, but with the information Chitham provides about the context for the revision of Wuthering Heights, the question itself gains importance. (Dunn 81) Therefore, whether the ending has been changed for some pragmatic consideration and whether Emily Bronte has prepared for us a much more dramatic but at the same coherent with the them she tries to convey is worth pondering. Emily has sharpened such two everlasting male and female characters in the treasury of literal world. Her incomparable genius and strong passion has indeed involved an equally intense appeal for the equal social and domestic status between Catherine and Heathcliff, and then all the tragedy may be avoided and all the underlying fairy-tale elements can come into real being, without such brutal and regrettable zigzags and sufferings. As previously many scholars have pointed out that Wuthering Heights pivots how Catherine strived for her freedom and liberation, I agree with this. However, many people tend to attribute her oppression to her dependence on Heathcliff and therefore lack of character independence. However, I would here again argue that Heathcliff as an unorthodox prince created by Emily to fit into her fiction’s extraordinary but still discernable pattern of fairy tales, is never the source of oppression or misery. It is the unfairness and lagging situation in the social roots which leads her family’s inequality in domestic rights. Social position and respectability in this period were directly tied to possession of property. A country house owned by landed gentry like the Earnshaws and the Lintons was known as a "seat," a broad term that included both the tangible assets (for instance, the house and land) and intangible assets (for instance, the family name and any hereditary titles) of the family that owned it. In Wuthering Heights, the first Catherine tells Nelly that she is marrying Edgar Linton because to marry Heathcliff would degrade her (they would be beggars) and because she plans to use Linton's money to help Heathcliff to rise. Seats passed from father to first-born male or to the next closest male relative if there were no sons in a family. The only way around this process was to invoke a device called "strict settlement," in force between 1650 and 1880, which allowed a father to dispose of his holdings as he liked through a trustee. Because Edgar Linton dies before ensuring that his daughter Catherine will inherit Thrushcross Grange, the land passes first to her husband, Linton, and after Linton's death to his father, Heathcliff. When we have a brief review about that period, we can find out that In contrast to earlier times when incest was forbidden by law, in eighteenth-century England marriage between first cousins was looked upon favorably as a way of preserving position and property. A typical union was one of a woman who married her father's brother's son, which kept the seat of the bride's family under their control. In Wuthering Heights, in a perverse twist, the second Catherine Linton marries her father's sister's son, and in the absence of a strict settlement ends up losing her family's seat. Landholding families typically maintained a large staff of servants who fulfilled the functions (for a man) of steward, valet, butler, and gardener, or (for a woman) of lady's maid, housekeeper, cook, and nurse. In a household the size of Wuthering Heights, whose inhabitants did not entertain, combining functions made economic sense. In the novel Joseph serves as both valet and steward, and Ellen as housekeeper, though her duties are fairly broadly defined. (Li Run 5) That’s why both Catherine and Heathcliff have to experience such morbid and seemingly unavoidable disasters in the pen of Emily Bronte. She tries to wake up the people to make revolutions of this noxious inequality. Fortunately, her voice has been answered and will at last be understood fully too. Works Cited Works in English Crouse, Jamie S. This Shattered Prison: Confinement, Control and Gender in Wuthering Heights. Brontë Studie. Vol. 33, November 2008 Dunn, Richard J. Reviewing The Birth of Wuthering Heights: Emily Bronte at Work by Edward Chiham. Studies in the Novel. Vol. 31,Summer 1999. Piciucco,Pier Paolo. Wuthering Heights as a Childlike Fairy Tale. Brontë Studie. Vol. 31, November 2006 Seichepine, Marielle.Childhood and Innocence in Wuthering Heights. Bronte' Studies. Vol. 29, November 2004 Tytler, Graeme . "Nelly, I am Heathcliff!": The Problem of "Identification" in Wuthering Heights. The Midwest Quarterly. Vol. 47, Winter 2006 Works in Chinese Li Run. Huxiao Shanzhuang De Lishi Beijing Yanjiu(The Background Research of Wuthering Heights). Yanshan Press, 2002 [1] William Somerset Maugham (1874 – 1965) was an English playwright, novelist and short story writer. He was among the most popular writers of his era, and reputedly, the highest paid author during the 1930s.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Laura Bermejo

    Between moors and mist, Wuthering Heights rises itself as one of the characters in this passional, Romanticism novel. This will be the home of the half part of the characters, a well-known family, the Earnshaws, while in the other part of the valley, in a less uncanny emplacement, Thrushcross Grange has become Lintons family´s dwell. These two families will be connected when Catherine Earnshaw feels her life will be completed -at least, socially, of what to be expected from her- when marrying Ed Between moors and mist, Wuthering Heights rises itself as one of the characters in this passional, Romanticism novel. This will be the home of the half part of the characters, a well-known family, the Earnshaws, while in the other part of the valley, in a less uncanny emplacement, Thrushcross Grange has become Lintons family´s dwell. These two families will be connected when Catherine Earnshaw feels her life will be completed -at least, socially, of what to be expected from her- when marrying Edgard Linton, a decision that, on the other hand, makes Heathcliff, the gypsy adopted half-brother of Catherine, and also her true lover, becomes radically the villain; with a broken heart, his challenge in life from now on will be headed to make not only his adopted family´s life horrible, painful, grotesque, but also, producing pain to the Linton´s family...He is the Romanticism antihero and only will find salvation in laying forever with his loved one. But until that moment eventually arrives, he has a child with Isabella Linton, Edgard´s sister, and raises Hindley´s son (Hareton), who´s Catherine´s nephew, by taking advantage of Wuthering Heights, by being a tyrant and determining strongly poor Hareton´s life. In the meantime, little Cathy, Edgard and Catherine´s child, grows up and by disobeying his father, discovers Wuthering Heights with all the bad aura hidden in it. Heathcliff tells her the truth about the love her mother had for him, but she doesn´t believe it and from then, a tense fight will begin to take place between them both but affecting the two families, until the end, until death. Narrated in a beautiful and really modern way, the history we read begin with new Heathcliff´s tenant of Thrusscross Grande, Mr. Lockwood, visiting him in Wuthering Heights and feeling really strange and fearful feelings. Then, he´ll ask the nanny Ellen Dean to tell him the story of why that grumpy Heathcliff lives with his adoptive brother´s son, Hareton, and his adoptive sister´s daughter, Cathy, in a structure of russian doll telling that amazes because when we reach actually the present moment again, the story still have more to say. At least, until everyone gets to have what they were wishing for, because in this foggy atmosphere, for ghosts and spirits death won´t be the end, and everything could be possible...

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tara Ray

    I believe I gave Jane Eyre a 3.5, but I’m giving Wuthering Heights a 4.5. I’m cutting my review of the entirety of the book straight down the middle. Jane Eyre’s storyline was interesting enough, but I felt it was a little too long and a little too hard to follow. I found myself getting bored at times. However, Jane and Rochester’s love story was great. I loved the ending. Wuthering Heights was awesome. Gothic through and through. Not many likable characters in this one, and whether or not Nelly I believe I gave Jane Eyre a 3.5, but I’m giving Wuthering Heights a 4.5. I’m cutting my review of the entirety of the book straight down the middle. Jane Eyre’s storyline was interesting enough, but I felt it was a little too long and a little too hard to follow. I found myself getting bored at times. However, Jane and Rochester’s love story was great. I loved the ending. Wuthering Heights was awesome. Gothic through and through. Not many likable characters in this one, and whether or not Nelly was wholly reliable is yet to be seen. Was Heathcliff really as bad as she made him out to be? (Don’t take this as me saying that he wasn’t bad, because he definitely was lol). Was Cathy Jr. as good as Nelly claimed? (Also debatable imo). Heathcliff and Catherine were toxic af, as individuals and as a possible couple. I even liked the dash of supernatural here, too. Good stuff. Hareton is my sweet little summer child who I just want to hug for eternity. I loved how Emily Bronte turned the characterizations on their heads multiple times throughout. Am I supposed to feel sorry for Heathcliff or contempt? How about for Linton? How about Isabella and Edgar? Overall, both of these books are highly recommended if you’re in the right headspace for them. They do take a lot of concentration and patience with the older English, but they’re both worthwhile and classics for a reason. ❤️🖤

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lynette Lark

    Fabulous book! I always believed that this was a book for young people; I was wrong. The 1945 edition that I'm reading is exactly like the cover shown above except it does not contain "Wuthering Heights." I read "Wuthering Heights" last year and hated it. (I tried to add a copy of my book on Goodreads except now Goodreads won't allow you to add an edition anymore. Instead, they want you to take a picture of your edition and then they will find it for you, so this wrongly attributed edition is wh Fabulous book! I always believed that this was a book for young people; I was wrong. The 1945 edition that I'm reading is exactly like the cover shown above except it does not contain "Wuthering Heights." I read "Wuthering Heights" last year and hated it. (I tried to add a copy of my book on Goodreads except now Goodreads won't allow you to add an edition anymore. Instead, they want you to take a picture of your edition and then they will find it for you, so this wrongly attributed edition is what I'm forced to declare. Thus, I'm reading 345 pages of "Jane Eyre" and no pages of "Wuthering Heights"!) The illustrations (wood engravings) in the book are really amazing and gave me many interesting visuals. Also, as I read the story I watched "Jane Eyre" (the series) on YouTube. Timothy Dalton who played Mr. Rochester was really very good, and the actress who played Jane was incredibly talented as well. I thoroughly enjoyed watching the parts of the book I'd read the night before. By-the-by, I liked most of the characters in the story except St. John (pronounced "Sinjin) Rivers. He was a cold, hard, narcissistic bully, but I was satisfied with how things ended for him. It was a case of "watch what you wish for" all throughout the book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Elena Sotelo-McCrary

    This classic that I had avoided I believed to be too dark for my reading habits. What I learned is that Emily Bronte was a wonder with words which made her characters come alive! It dawned on me that I should not avoid high tone literature (use of words and checking looking up vocabulary), but embrace them for the time in which they were written. I felt as if I were standing on the moor myself in all its glorious agony. I wondered too what it must have felt like to read it when it was first rele This classic that I had avoided I believed to be too dark for my reading habits. What I learned is that Emily Bronte was a wonder with words which made her characters come alive! It dawned on me that I should not avoid high tone literature (use of words and checking looking up vocabulary), but embrace them for the time in which they were written. I felt as if I were standing on the moor myself in all its glorious agony. I wondered too what it must have felt like to read it when it was first released. Powerful, sad, descriptive. I wondered too had the moors changed much? Check it out for yourself.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lexi L

    finished Jane Eyre, will be taking a break to read another book before stating withering heights. It was so good. the relationship between jane and rochester was so so so unbelievably toxic in the beginning, but after their time apart, their reunion was so sweet and their relationship seemed so pure? so very mixed emotions on this book and the main love dynamic, but i loved a lot of the supporting characters, minus st. john. he was misogynistic, and while he did seem okay at the end, i just didn finished Jane Eyre, will be taking a break to read another book before stating withering heights. It was so good. the relationship between jane and rochester was so so so unbelievably toxic in the beginning, but after their time apart, their reunion was so sweet and their relationship seemed so pure? so very mixed emotions on this book and the main love dynamic, but i loved a lot of the supporting characters, minus st. john. he was misogynistic, and while he did seem okay at the end, i just didn’t really like him that much, he didn’t have emotions and that lead to him hurting jane and i was rooting for jane. 85% recommend to people.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Serenity Snow

    Wuthering Heights is a bit of a slow story, but I love fantasy of it as well as the tormented romance between Cathy and Heathcliff. I was young when I read this, but I've reread it as an adult and still find it enjoyable. Jane Eyre was a story I read when I was young as well, but I enjoyed it then and I've read it as an adult and still enjoy it. I think Jane was representation of independence, strength and boldness for the time. However, these are timeless qualities I still admire in women today Wuthering Heights is a bit of a slow story, but I love fantasy of it as well as the tormented romance between Cathy and Heathcliff. I was young when I read this, but I've reread it as an adult and still find it enjoyable. Jane Eyre was a story I read when I was young as well, but I enjoyed it then and I've read it as an adult and still enjoy it. I think Jane was representation of independence, strength and boldness for the time. However, these are timeless qualities I still admire in women today.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sween McDervish

    I loved the cover and etchings in this edition, which echo the novel itself (I only bought the Wuthering Heights book, since I’d already read Jane Eyre). Oh the angst! I think a major flaw of this novel as read today is the fact its most interesting character, Heathcliff, mostly disappears halfway through without a compelling replacement, and remains a cipher throughout. I do like what E. Bronte does with the nested narrations, though I could have done more with the humour provided by the cluele I loved the cover and etchings in this edition, which echo the novel itself (I only bought the Wuthering Heights book, since I’d already read Jane Eyre). Oh the angst! I think a major flaw of this novel as read today is the fact its most interesting character, Heathcliff, mostly disappears halfway through without a compelling replacement, and remains a cipher throughout. I do like what E. Bronte does with the nested narrations, though I could have done more with the humour provided by the clueless Mr. Lockwood.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    I loved Jayne Eyre and could hardly put it down; but not so much with Wuthering Heights. I started it, expecting to find sympathy with the characters, and found almost all of them gradually more and more detestable and hateful. From there, I evolved to out and out heartache in the final chapters. So although it wasn't an especially uplifting read, which made it hard to continue sometimes, I have to say that the strong feelings I experienced still make it a worthy book. I loved Jayne Eyre and could hardly put it down; but not so much with Wuthering Heights. I started it, expecting to find sympathy with the characters, and found almost all of them gradually more and more detestable and hateful. From there, I evolved to out and out heartache in the final chapters. So although it wasn't an especially uplifting read, which made it hard to continue sometimes, I have to say that the strong feelings I experienced still make it a worthy book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Evangelina Reyes

    I enjoyed Jane Eyre so so much and I know that it will remain as one of my all-time favorites. As much as I wanted to savor this novel, I could not put it down. A book has not excited me this much in a while and I could not help but to mark up all of its different themes of love, class, society, etc. I know I’ll one day re-read it. (I will come back to review Wuthering Heights when I finish) (also first review) 🫶🏻🫶🏻🫶🏻🫶🏻🫶🏻🫶🏻🫶🏻

  30. 4 out of 5

    Enakshi

    (3.5/5 stars) Wuthering Heights only not Jane Eyre This is probably one of my least favorite reads of all time. I hated every character, and I thought the "upbeat" ending was a little uncharacteristic considering how the rest of the novel before it. That's all. The writing though was alright. The story was like a soap opera that never should have aired in the first place. (3.5/5 stars) Wuthering Heights only not Jane Eyre This is probably one of my least favorite reads of all time. I hated every character, and I thought the "upbeat" ending was a little uncharacteristic considering how the rest of the novel before it. That's all. The writing though was alright. The story was like a soap opera that never should have aired in the first place.

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