Hot Best Seller

Hero: Being the Strong Father Your Children Need

Availability: Ready to download

"Your go-to gift for new fathers." — Dave Ramsey, New York Times bestselling author, motivational speaker, and radio host Whether you know it or not, if you're a dad, you’e a hero— that's the message of bestselling author and pediatrician Meg Meeker. Even if you're struggling with all the demands of fatherhood, let Dr. Meeker reassure you: every man has it within him to be "Your go-to gift for new fathers." — Dave Ramsey, New York Times bestselling author, motivational speaker, and radio host Whether you know it or not, if you're a dad, you’e a hero— that's the message of bestselling author and pediatrician Meg Meeker. Even if you're struggling with all the demands of fatherhood, let Dr. Meeker reassure you: every man has it within him to be the hero father his children need. With simple step-by-step instructions and drawing on long experience—including her work with the NFL's Fatherhood Initiative—Dr. Meeker shows you how to be the father you want to be and your children need you to be. Discover why fathers are even more important to their children than their mothers are; why your children want you to be their hero—even if their relationship with you has been strained or distant; and secrets that can help divorced dads, widowed dads, and stepfathers maintain—or rebuild—a strong relationship with their children As Dr. Meeker writes, "If you want what is best for your children—if you want what is best for you—you should strive to be a hero father. In this book, I hope to show you how."


Compare

"Your go-to gift for new fathers." — Dave Ramsey, New York Times bestselling author, motivational speaker, and radio host Whether you know it or not, if you're a dad, you’e a hero— that's the message of bestselling author and pediatrician Meg Meeker. Even if you're struggling with all the demands of fatherhood, let Dr. Meeker reassure you: every man has it within him to be "Your go-to gift for new fathers." — Dave Ramsey, New York Times bestselling author, motivational speaker, and radio host Whether you know it or not, if you're a dad, you’e a hero— that's the message of bestselling author and pediatrician Meg Meeker. Even if you're struggling with all the demands of fatherhood, let Dr. Meeker reassure you: every man has it within him to be the hero father his children need. With simple step-by-step instructions and drawing on long experience—including her work with the NFL's Fatherhood Initiative—Dr. Meeker shows you how to be the father you want to be and your children need you to be. Discover why fathers are even more important to their children than their mothers are; why your children want you to be their hero—even if their relationship with you has been strained or distant; and secrets that can help divorced dads, widowed dads, and stepfathers maintain—or rebuild—a strong relationship with their children As Dr. Meeker writes, "If you want what is best for your children—if you want what is best for you—you should strive to be a hero father. In this book, I hope to show you how."

30 review for Hero: Being the Strong Father Your Children Need

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    “The Creator of all, the source of all power and wisdom, has one great desire: to be called Father. You share that name with God.” I do not think there is a greater cheerleader for dads today than Dr. Meg Meeker. This book is friendly, practical, encouraging, and inspired. I think that every dad could be blessed by what Dr. Meeker has written in Hero: Becoming the Dad Your Children Need. Both a love song to dads and a playbook to equip them, this dynamic book will affirm their worth, inform their “The Creator of all, the source of all power and wisdom, has one great desire: to be called Father. You share that name with God.” I do not think there is a greater cheerleader for dads today than Dr. Meg Meeker. This book is friendly, practical, encouraging, and inspired. I think that every dad could be blessed by what Dr. Meeker has written in Hero: Becoming the Dad Your Children Need. Both a love song to dads and a playbook to equip them, this dynamic book will affirm their worth, inform their attitudes, empower their actions, and encourage their very souls. This book is for all dads: seasoned dads, young dads, married dads, divorced, widowed, and single dads. Endorsed by Jim Daly, Dr. Les Parrott, Philip Rivers, Dave Ramsey, Rob Davis, David Tyree, and Benjamin Watson, Hero is about God’s perfect creativity and the unique role fathers fill in the lives of their children. “It’s time for the men in this country to rise up, stand firm, and truly become the heroes their kids need them to be. I truly believe that, with a world of strong fathers, there simply is no limit to what the next generation can achieve.” -Dave Ramsey, Forward to Hero Dr. Meg Meeker is a Christian, a pediatrician, a wife, a mother, a daughter, and a contributor to the NFL Fatherhood Initiative. Dr. Meeker’s long experience in clinical medicine, her friendships with dads of many stripes, her family relationships, and her work with Christian fatherhood organizations uniquely qualify her to understand the pressures that dads are under today, the ways in which fathers leave an indelible mark on the health and well-being of their children, and the societal ramifications that evolve when our culture devalues fatherhood. In this book, Dr. Meeker seeks to celebrate masculine fatherhood and empower dads to know their irreplaceability and worth. She does this in part by debunking secular myths and lies about what children need. Additionally, her intention is to equip dads to overcome their own wounds, help dads to heal wounds they may have inflicted on their children, and remind dads that their Father in heaven is always there to support them. “What happens is that when a father spends meaningful time with a child, the experience is magnified. As a father, you have the power to make time stand still. It’s the power to make fifteen minutes every other week seem like an hour of every night… you alone have this power. I have never heard children talk this way about teachers, or about other people who play important roles in their lives. It’s all about dad, because nothing is more important to children than acceptance and affirmation from their father.” Moms, this is for you too. If you wish to bless the father of your children, may I suggest that you read this book with an open mind and a heart for the health and well being of your kids? As a wife and a mom, I read this book so that I could know how to best encourage and support my husband. I want my children to have the best father possible. I know that no man is perfect, but I also know that he is the perfect father for my children and that children naturally adore and admire their dads (even in situations of divorce where children do not live with their dad). This is how God designed it to be. He calls men and women into different roles for our own good, for the good of our children, and for His glory. The role that God has designed for dads cannot be fulfilled by moms. “We fought a battle of the sexes without remembering that battles leave casualties – and we certainly did leave casualties… After thirty years of working as a pediatrician, I can say without a doubt that the sexual revolution was a disaster for kids – with families far more fractured and fragile than they were before and with kids far more endangered physically, through an epidemic of sexually transmitted diseases, and emotionally, because of a breakdown of the nurturing bonds kids need.” We live in a very broken culture. One in which it is considered insensitive to say that children need their dads. We fear hurting women who have been abandoned, abused, or betrayed by the men in their lives. We hesitate to highlight the gaping hole that is left by a dad who leaves, for whatever reason. Tragically, however, no matter how much we fear hurting those women, children are absolutely hurt when we do not acknowledge the pain that fatherlessness causes in their lives. Our right concern about not wanting to cause pain to single and divorced moms has caused us to remain relatively silent on an issue that is causing destruction in the lives of men and children. Dads are not well served when we do not acknowledge their intrinsic and irreplaceable role. Children are absolutely harmed when they are left fatherless. Children need their fathers and, when a father cannot or will not be found, they need devoted father figures. This book unabashedly acknowledges these truths. “One of my challenges to dads is to put their love on the line: prove it.” Sometimes books like this can be disorganized. Even if the author’s points are perceptive and erudite, some books in this style wander all over the landscape and fail to really commission readers into making the necessary changes in their lives that will affect the results they are hoping for. Not so with this book. Dr. Meeker is categorically a physician who intends to look after the psychological and emotional health of her readers and to prescribe for them a heavy dose of truth and encouragement. Organized in an intelligent way, the book is divided into ten chapters, each of which explores an aspect of fatherhood. Each chapter starts with a friendly reflection on the topic and then moves into examples from Dr. Meeker’s clinical experience. Teaching and cheerleading the whole time, the chapter ends with practical advice that can be applied to the life of any father. Like her friends at the NFL Fatherhood Initiative, Dr. Meeker views the subject of this book, fathers, as men in need of a solid and practical plan to capitalize on their natural talents, hone their skills, and encourage confidence. “‘Father’ is a word of such profound significance, meaning, and hope that it was the first word Jesus uttered when he was crucified. It was the cry of a man who agonized for the people he loved. Those people are us. And the Father he cried out for watches over us still, just as you, in your children’s imaginations, will always watch over them, just as Brett Favre’s father was always watching over him. Be worthy of your children. Be like your own Father, the one who is in heaven.”

  2. 4 out of 5

    Joey

    My old college roommate is by all accounts a very good and cool guy. He has a cool job, a family he loves, and he drag races and plays in the World Series of Poker fairly routinely. When he gave me a book on being a dad, I knew I had to bump it to the top of my book stack. Dr. Meg Meeker’s Hero didn’t disappoint. Meeker is a thirty-year pediatrician and has become something of a parenting guru who has written several books and makes frequent television appearances. She’s also involved with the N My old college roommate is by all accounts a very good and cool guy. He has a cool job, a family he loves, and he drag races and plays in the World Series of Poker fairly routinely. When he gave me a book on being a dad, I knew I had to bump it to the top of my book stack. Dr. Meg Meeker’s Hero didn’t disappoint. Meeker is a thirty-year pediatrician and has become something of a parenting guru who has written several books and makes frequent television appearances. She’s also involved with the NFL’s Fatherhood Initiative (several current and former football players make cameos in the book). Meeker has also been on the TED stage. She is Christian and apparently a friend to Christian money guy Dave Ramsey, who wrote the foreward to her book. That gives you an idea of where her parenting philosophy may be traditional and also informed by medical training and scholarship. Whether or not you are very religious, I think you will find value in the book. Christianity takes maybe three pages-worth of the 176 pages of substance in the book. The overall premise is this – whether you feel like a hero or not, your children view you as a larger than life figure. What you do matters to them immensely, and they’re always watching. Your kids want your approval and acceptance and want to learn how to live from you. What you do matters more than what you say. While this premise sounds intimidating, I found it comforting and encouraging. Meeker says being a good dad is simple (if not easy): Be the hero that your kids already think you are. Model the behavior you want them to adopt. My two favorite quotes: "Act sacrificially. Leaders always put the welfare of others first – in your case, dad, that means your wife and children." "Fathers forget to play with their kids because they think they need to “get things done”…nothing is as urgent or more important than spending time with your family…Give yourself a breather – and play. You won’t regret it."

  3. 5 out of 5

    Coralie

    Well, I did not expect to sit down and read through this entire book today. It was a really, really easy read. Let me begin by disclaiming that I am not the book's primary intended audience. I am neither a father nor a man. I am not even a parent; however, my book club is reading the book and I still found value in participating. Personally, it gave me a new perspective of fathers and men, of my own father. Furthermore, the book gave me insight and, I hope, a way to better understand and relate Well, I did not expect to sit down and read through this entire book today. It was a really, really easy read. Let me begin by disclaiming that I am not the book's primary intended audience. I am neither a father nor a man. I am not even a parent; however, my book club is reading the book and I still found value in participating. Personally, it gave me a new perspective of fathers and men, of my own father. Furthermore, the book gave me insight and, I hope, a way to better understand and relate to my future husband. There were several principals I took away from the book that I can apply as a mother one day and several principals I intend to discuss with my future husband. The book made me think about my own relationship with my father and my childhood and where we stand presently. It gave me a way to look back and reconcile some things with myself. That said, my point is that I believe the book is useful and provides great value for more than just fathers and men. Dr. Meeker has written a very simple book that speaks of the profound value of fathers in the family life. She presents sound research, practical applications of potential processes, relatable antidotes, and an abundance of encouragement for fathers. This book is chock full of messages to reaffirm the value and necessity of good, heroic fathers in our families. Not only does she state and show the need for good men, but she states that every man has the potential and ability to become those heroes for their children and wives. This is an excellent read, insightful, and I plan to search for more of Dr. Meeker's work on mothers and women, for books in which I am the intended audience. I would highly recommend this book to any man or woman who desires to uplift fatherhood and become a better person themselves.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    I am a big fan of all of Meg Meeker's books. When I became a parent 7 years ago I found her books. Her advice on parenting, motherhood and raising strong children speaks to my heart. I was extremely excited to read Hero- and this book did not disappoint. This book is a "how to" book for dads, explains the different ways moms and dads parent, gives ideas for dads of how to attacks problems that come up with parenting all while building up dads to show them that they are the heroes in their childr I am a big fan of all of Meg Meeker's books. When I became a parent 7 years ago I found her books. Her advice on parenting, motherhood and raising strong children speaks to my heart. I was extremely excited to read Hero- and this book did not disappoint. This book is a "how to" book for dads, explains the different ways moms and dads parent, gives ideas for dads of how to attacks problems that come up with parenting all while building up dads to show them that they are the heroes in their children's eyes. Not only is this book great for dads and any father figure it is great at showing the differences in parenting of moms and dads. One example Meeker describes a comparison In terms of football- women want to talk about the problem and dads want to run the play. Kids need both ways to resolve a problem. An example of how moms and dads interact differently was eye opening- when teaching kids to swim Mother's usually stand in front, making eye contact and encouraging the child into the safety of their arms. While dads stand behind their kids so they did not face sympathetic pair of encouraging eyes but the challenge of the water. With two of my children swimming- this was exactly what happened. It was interesting to have this ahhh haa moment while reading and seeing that dad's way of teaching is really important. This book was uplifting and encouraging of the role dads play as heroes in their child's lives. I highly recommend this book for all dads (and moms can sneak a read too when the dads aren't looking). This is going to be at the top of my list of baby shower gifts for new dads.

  5. 4 out of 5

    John Funderburg

    Very well-written and informative. Dr. Meeker uses plenty of good stories to illustrate her point, and I was able to pull some important lessons to implement right away.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Marcy

    The three questions in chapter 5 that every Father(or parent really) needs to answer for their child is huge. Dealing with your child while keeping these questions in mind is practical, realistic and can change a life. Your child's life. The three questions in chapter 5 that every Father(or parent really) needs to answer for their child is huge. Dealing with your child while keeping these questions in mind is practical, realistic and can change a life. Your child's life.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Brooks

    ALL DADS MUST READ. Dads everywhere need to be reminded of how important their role as a father is. You are your child's hero. Meg Meeker reminds us of this and calls us to being the hero our children need. ALL DADS MUST READ. Dads everywhere need to be reminded of how important their role as a father is. You are your child's hero. Meg Meeker reminds us of this and calls us to being the hero our children need.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    My scale for rating books: 1 star = hated it 2 stars = didn't like 3 stars = liked it 4 stars = loved it 5 stars = life changing It was especially nice to read a book that built up manhood and didn't mock manliness. Though it may be my own selection bias, I've become more aware of television commercials, sit-coms, etc. portraying the dad as a simpleton and buffoon and mom as mature and all knowing. Take the Simpsons, Modern Family, and any Lowes or Home Depot commercial as an example. I became acutel My scale for rating books: 1 star = hated it 2 stars = didn't like 3 stars = liked it 4 stars = loved it 5 stars = life changing It was especially nice to read a book that built up manhood and didn't mock manliness. Though it may be my own selection bias, I've become more aware of television commercials, sit-coms, etc. portraying the dad as a simpleton and buffoon and mom as mature and all knowing. Take the Simpsons, Modern Family, and any Lowes or Home Depot commercial as an example. I became acutely aware of pattern in the nightly, bed-time reading to my three-year old daughter. I began refusing to read the Berenstain Bears books to her (her favorite) at bed time because their mother is constantly portrayed as mature and all wise while their father the dimwitted buffoon. Refer to Berenstain Bears Go to the Doctor, Berenstain Bears: Too Much TV, or Berenstain Bears: Too Much Junk Food. The best thing for a child is two mature parents. Repeatedly exposing a child to stories where one parent is less capable and mature than the other sets a bad example and undermines the parent portrayed as less competent in the eyes of the child. That said, upon completing this book I rated it 3 stars in spite of the fact that I really liked it more than 3 stars would indicate on my scale above. The 3-star rating was a result of the quantitative and qualitative claims made were anecdotal and without citations or references. The first citation was encountered 44% through the book. There was, however, an extensive bibliography at the end of the book. A week after reading and implementing the guidance, I have decided to increase the rating to 5 stars (life changing). I have realized incredible results with all three of my children – 2 boys (10 & 8) and 1 girl (3). They were very well behaved to begin with my relationship with them is even stronger. They are more obedient and I’m more patient with them. Temper-tantrums are fewer in occurrence and deescalate even quicker. This book has certainly improved my life and relationship with my kids (regardless of the scarcity of citations/references). For that fact, I have revised my rating to 5 stars as it has been life changing.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ben Burke

    in our society today it's ready to get distracted with everything fighting for our attention. technology and other efficiencies have made knowledge and relationships more ubiquitous. however, with all of this connectivity is it easy to get not focus deep. this book is all about that: focusing on what is truly important because, believe it or not, they are focusing on you. drawing from personal interviews and personal insights, Dr. Meeker immerses you in examples of what a good father is and shou in our society today it's ready to get distracted with everything fighting for our attention. technology and other efficiencies have made knowledge and relationships more ubiquitous. however, with all of this connectivity is it easy to get not focus deep. this book is all about that: focusing on what is truly important because, believe it or not, they are focusing on you. drawing from personal interviews and personal insights, Dr. Meeker immerses you in examples of what a good father is and should be: a hero in every sense of the word. saving your family from the society and pitfalls that labor to tear them from you and destroy them.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jared Fannin

    First things first, this book is written from an Evangelical world view and frequently mentions God and quotes scripture from time to time. I'm not saying that "non-religious" folk can't learn anything from the material in the book, but if that world view does not align with your own view than I would advise a different book. Now that that's out of the way, on to the review. Right out of the gate, I was very pleased with the writing style chosen by Dr. Meeker. She often illustrates concepts by us First things first, this book is written from an Evangelical world view and frequently mentions God and quotes scripture from time to time. I'm not saying that "non-religious" folk can't learn anything from the material in the book, but if that world view does not align with your own view than I would advise a different book. Now that that's out of the way, on to the review. Right out of the gate, I was very pleased with the writing style chosen by Dr. Meeker. She often illustrates concepts by using stories of her clients and how she advised them in certain situations. It was a great alternative to blinding the lay reader with science that is often hard to follow and difficult to understand so I very much appreciated that. As for the material itself, I personally got a lot out of it. Lots of actionable advice that you can start using today to better improve your relationship with your kids regardless of age. This is a great introduction to the overall subject of fatherhood. Having read this, I'm now looking for something that delves a little deeper into the psychology behind the father/child relationship. Overall a great book that I would recommend to new fathers or more senior fathers alike.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Shalyce

    Love, love, love that fatherhood and its importance is being talked about! I read this book for insights into how I can help support my husband as my children's father. My biggest take away from that is to let him parent--step back sometimes and leave it between the kids and their father. I don't have to and shouldn't be involved in and monitoring every interaction. I may be a tad controlling in this area, so a great insight for me on that. I think this would be a valuable book for any father (or Love, love, love that fatherhood and its importance is being talked about! I read this book for insights into how I can help support my husband as my children's father. My biggest take away from that is to let him parent--step back sometimes and leave it between the kids and their father. I don't have to and shouldn't be involved in and monitoring every interaction. I may be a tad controlling in this area, so a great insight for me on that. I think this would be a valuable book for any father (or mother) to read to be reminded of the value of father's in their children's life. I found it especially significant that some pretty poor dad's still made a big and positive difference in their children's life when compared to not having a dad, so imagine how impactful good, striving fathers are. I think this also highlighted how beneficial two parent households are when possible. I loved that she didn't shy away from spiritual aspects. Now for the content: I found some of the content "meh" and other content, "Yes! Wow!" While some of the content was just average in value for me, still a worthwhile read.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Charlie Moynahan

    Dr. Meeker is a parenting expert stemming from her work as a pediatrician, work for which I'm sure she is quite qualified and very capable of doing. This book, however, did not strike a solid chord with me. The tone of the book is very much "Dads are the best thing ever" and harkens a lot of concepts that assume a lot that isn't current reality - namely, that many moms these days are the breadwinners of families, and her book is strife with examples of terrible fathers (absent, alcoholic, etc) y Dr. Meeker is a parenting expert stemming from her work as a pediatrician, work for which I'm sure she is quite qualified and very capable of doing. This book, however, did not strike a solid chord with me. The tone of the book is very much "Dads are the best thing ever" and harkens a lot of concepts that assume a lot that isn't current reality - namely, that many moms these days are the breadwinners of families, and her book is strife with examples of terrible fathers (absent, alcoholic, etc) yet she uses perspectives of how the mom handled these dads (by not saying to the children that the dad was in need of help) that made the dad powerful and beneficial to his children. I had a hard time digesting a lot of those examples, because in my head they just didn't really make sense. Also, perhaps it was my copy, but the book had quite a few typos that detracted from the focus of the book. I'm not sure this is a real playbook for new dads, but perhaps could be helpful to fathers that have zero clue or need some specific direction that is biblically based.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    Meg Meeker wrote a terrific book for fathers based on research, common sense, and anecdotes she's collected. The book does an excellent job of highlighting the importance of a father in a child's life (while not downplaying the importance of a mother, of course). I have to say, it was refreshing to read something positive about dads. Today in popular culture, fathers seem to be portrayed as dumb, out-of-touch, sports- and/or sex-obsessed buffoons instead of mature men; I'd also venture to say th Meg Meeker wrote a terrific book for fathers based on research, common sense, and anecdotes she's collected. The book does an excellent job of highlighting the importance of a father in a child's life (while not downplaying the importance of a mother, of course). I have to say, it was refreshing to read something positive about dads. Today in popular culture, fathers seem to be portrayed as dumb, out-of-touch, sports- and/or sex-obsessed buffoons instead of mature men; I'd also venture to say that I know too many men that fit that profile, rather than the one of a strong, caring, in-touch man proposed in Meeker's book. This book was so good I'm ordering a copy for a guy that I work with who is expecting his first child--he won't be disappointed.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Rogers

    Dr. Meeker is one of my favorite go-to sources for parenting advice... I'm a big fan of her books and podcast. One of the things I have always loved about her is that she is a huge champion of fathers. She recognizes not only the importance of fathers, but the magnitude of their influence (good or bad). This is a great read for dads of any age (and a great gift for new dads!), but this book is also an important read for mothers as it illustrates how very different our parenting roles are as moth Dr. Meeker is one of my favorite go-to sources for parenting advice... I'm a big fan of her books and podcast. One of the things I have always loved about her is that she is a huge champion of fathers. She recognizes not only the importance of fathers, but the magnitude of their influence (good or bad). This is a great read for dads of any age (and a great gift for new dads!), but this book is also an important read for mothers as it illustrates how very different our parenting roles are as mother and father. Both are certainly vital and equally important. But when a daughter asks if she is worth fighting for, and when a son asks if he has what it takes... they always look to DAD.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Don

    Feel that they matter, happy with parents even if unhappy parents, just try, to multiply memories, live as they see you a hero, my precious daughter son, a leader with vision not a coach, drawn to moral courage and sacrifice, avoid anger alcohol, let dead bury dead the past, youth think immediate understand same and talk long term, talk about game women and play the game men, Born to Believe pray, not a friend a Dad, no one cared enough to say no per prisoners, guard your tongue love understandi Feel that they matter, happy with parents even if unhappy parents, just try, to multiply memories, live as they see you a hero, my precious daughter son, a leader with vision not a coach, drawn to moral courage and sacrifice, avoid anger alcohol, let dead bury dead the past, youth think immediate understand same and talk long term, talk about game women and play the game men, Born to Believe pray, not a friend a Dad, no one cared enough to say no per prisoners, guard your tongue love understanding truthful faithful appreciative, time as magical expansion, own story, stand up for kids make right choices, consistent, forgiveness.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Robert Gebhardt

    This book was interesting and I'm glad I read it. All of the stories and conclusions seem to come from anecdotal evidence and personal experience (so basically the opposite of Emily Oster), but I found it interesting nonetheless. Some of my notes: Kids seek dad's love more than mom's. Mom's always around, not dad, so they feel that the love needs to be earned Kids do better when parents are together, even if unhappy, rather than divorced and happy 6 plays: 1. play with kids 2. pray with kids 3. say This book was interesting and I'm glad I read it. All of the stories and conclusions seem to come from anecdotal evidence and personal experience (so basically the opposite of Emily Oster), but I found it interesting nonetheless. Some of my notes: Kids seek dad's love more than mom's. Mom's always around, not dad, so they feel that the love needs to be earned Kids do better when parents are together, even if unhappy, rather than divorced and happy 6 plays: 1. play with kids 2. pray with kids 3. say the truth 4. Be steady 5. Be firm (provide discipline) 6. Stay committed

  17. 4 out of 5

    Wellington

    The beginning of this book brought tears to my eye. Meg brought some really touching stories / secrets to the light. The last half of the book was more preachy and fizzled out for me. The book did make me wonder about looking from a "harder" or "softer" angle. Sometimes, you can be hard on yourself to do better or you can be soft on yourself and say you're perfectly fine the way you are. Unlike the books, I've been reading lately, this book falls in the harder category specifically calling out fa The beginning of this book brought tears to my eye. Meg brought some really touching stories / secrets to the light. The last half of the book was more preachy and fizzled out for me. The book did make me wonder about looking from a "harder" or "softer" angle. Sometimes, you can be hard on yourself to do better or you can be soft on yourself and say you're perfectly fine the way you are. Unlike the books, I've been reading lately, this book falls in the harder category specifically calling out fathers to do better.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    This book is truly wonderful... Unlike so many "self help" books these days, this book actually gives practical advice and information. There is no question that I got a lot of ideas out of it for how to become a better father. Though I am an atheist-pagan... I found the spiritual (predominantly Christian) values and lessons contained in this book to be helpful and enlightening. I was not off-put by them, though some readers may be. I am truly grateful to have read it, and probably will read it aga This book is truly wonderful... Unlike so many "self help" books these days, this book actually gives practical advice and information. There is no question that I got a lot of ideas out of it for how to become a better father. Though I am an atheist-pagan... I found the spiritual (predominantly Christian) values and lessons contained in this book to be helpful and enlightening. I was not off-put by them, though some readers may be. I am truly grateful to have read it, and probably will read it again someday. I've already started implementing changes in how I raise my three boys.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Erick P

    Just when you think you know about being a dad. You forget that the position comes with the hero title from the very beginning. It's a weird journey. But this book reminded me it was meant to be that way. And that it's not about about getting everything right but the big things right. After all, we share same title as God. It is what He wanted to be called by his children. Father. I needed to be reminded of the importance and responsibility of that title. It gives me energy to know that we're sup Just when you think you know about being a dad. You forget that the position comes with the hero title from the very beginning. It's a weird journey. But this book reminded me it was meant to be that way. And that it's not about about getting everything right but the big things right. After all, we share same title as God. It is what He wanted to be called by his children. Father. I needed to be reminded of the importance and responsibility of that title. It gives me energy to know that we're suppose to do is hard by design.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Colby Park

    Great book Meg. Dr. Meeker shares pertinent and helpful information for all types of fathers. Whether you consider yourself a great, struggling, or poor father Dr. Meeker provides advice and actionable tips for everyone. She writes from a child's standpoint which is key to understanding where your child comes from. This has been very helpful for me, a father of 4 young children. Thank you Meg! Great book Meg. Dr. Meeker shares pertinent and helpful information for all types of fathers. Whether you consider yourself a great, struggling, or poor father Dr. Meeker provides advice and actionable tips for everyone. She writes from a child's standpoint which is key to understanding where your child comes from. This has been very helpful for me, a father of 4 young children. Thank you Meg!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    This would have been 5 stars, but it's mostly rehashed material from Strong Fathers Strong Daughters. Meg Meeker did a great job at helping understand that while fatherhood is extremely important, most of it comes down to just being there and loving your kids. I may have enjoyed this more than SFSD, but I'm not sure. If you haven't read any books by Meg Meeker, this is a great one. If you have, is still very good, but won't seem very new This would have been 5 stars, but it's mostly rehashed material from Strong Fathers Strong Daughters. Meg Meeker did a great job at helping understand that while fatherhood is extremely important, most of it comes down to just being there and loving your kids. I may have enjoyed this more than SFSD, but I'm not sure. If you haven't read any books by Meg Meeker, this is a great one. If you have, is still very good, but won't seem very new

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dennis Miller

    Not very satisfying. The performer is pleasant and easy to listen to, but the way she reads, coupled with the large number of platitudes and affirmations, it feels like a nocturnal self-improvement recording that is supposed to teach you while you sleep: "You are a strong, effective father. Be a hero. Do your best and it will be good enough...". I can't say that there is anything that I disagree with, but, as I said, it just left me unsatisfied. Not very satisfying. The performer is pleasant and easy to listen to, but the way she reads, coupled with the large number of platitudes and affirmations, it feels like a nocturnal self-improvement recording that is supposed to teach you while you sleep: "You are a strong, effective father. Be a hero. Do your best and it will be good enough...". I can't say that there is anything that I disagree with, but, as I said, it just left me unsatisfied.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ken Osborne

    Before reading this book, I was wondering the role fathers have with their children. I am pleasantly surprised of the role fathers have upon their children. It’s more significant than what is considered. I shouldn’t be surprised, however, I am. This book helped me to understand the significant role a father has with his children, his impact, presence. The quiet confidence that his children needs from him and his consistency.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tyler Sims

    This was an interesting read for me given I don't typically pick up books of this nature. Thought a great deal of this should be considered "common sense" but we all know about that... Some insightful thoughts however and some reminders that were good to hear. Very quick read and although aimed to Dad's probably a good read for all. This was an interesting read for me given I don't typically pick up books of this nature. Thought a great deal of this should be considered "common sense" but we all know about that... Some insightful thoughts however and some reminders that were good to hear. Very quick read and although aimed to Dad's probably a good read for all.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Augusto Restrepo

    Loved this book.! Fa great simple guide to build a great relationship with your son. Several tips and encouraging stories. The younger your son is when you read this book the better. It has also helped me understand something’s that before felt frustrating, that just now I understand as normal Dad-Son parts of the relationship building.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kris Troy

    She quotes Robert E. Lee as a "kindly" man and after advising men to control their sex drive, quotes Brett Favre who sent unsolicited dick pics to women. I'm sure she could have easily replaced those guys. Anecodotal and repetitive. But affirming in the sense that a father's role is incredibly important. She quotes Robert E. Lee as a "kindly" man and after advising men to control their sex drive, quotes Brett Favre who sent unsolicited dick pics to women. I'm sure she could have easily replaced those guys. Anecodotal and repetitive. But affirming in the sense that a father's role is incredibly important.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Will Howell

    This is an amazing book on the importance of fatherhood in a child's life. Most books tend to bash either the father or the mother. This one, however, does not. Meeker breaks the balance between the importance of a Dad in a child's life and the mom's as well. This book is perfect for a father! This is an amazing book on the importance of fatherhood in a child's life. Most books tend to bash either the father or the mother. This one, however, does not. Meeker breaks the balance between the importance of a Dad in a child's life and the mom's as well. This book is perfect for a father!

  28. 5 out of 5

    William "Spig"

    Read a trilogy of fathering books. This was the hands down best. Dr. Meeker has experience and the science that resonated truth for me. I recommend this book for fathers looking to make tangible steps forward in their journey.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Gabriel Diaz

    Truely helps you reflect on your relationship with your kids Eye opening book that helped realize some of the things Ive been doing wrong, areas of improvement and areas to strengthen. Great book for those looking to establish strong relationships with your family.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

    Too much anecdotal evidence and not enough scientific research backing up claims being made. Most of the suggestions are based on common knowledge so there wasn’t a lot of new insights to be gleaned from reading.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.