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The Most Important Year: Pre-Kindergarten and the Future of Our Children

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An eye-opening look inside pre-K in America and what it will take to give all children the best start in school possible. At the heart of this groundbreaking book are two urgent questions: What do our young children need in the earliest years of school, and how do we ensure that they all get it? Cutting-edge research has proven that early childhood education is crucial for An eye-opening look inside pre-K in America and what it will take to give all children the best start in school possible. At the heart of this groundbreaking book are two urgent questions: What do our young children need in the earliest years of school, and how do we ensure that they all get it? Cutting-edge research has proven that early childhood education is crucial for all children to gain the academic and emotional skills they need to succeed later in life. Children who attend quality pre-K programs have a host of positive outcomes including better language, literacy, problem-solving and math skills down the line, and they have a leg up on what appears to be the most essential skill to develop at age four: strong self-control. But even with this overwhelming evidence, early childhood education is at a crossroads in America. We know that children can and do benefit, but we also know that too many of our littlest learners don't get that chance--millions of parents can't find spots for their children, or their preschoolers end up in poor quality programs. With engrossing storytelling, journalist Suzanne Bouffard takes us inside some of the country's best pre-K classrooms to reveal the sometimes surprising ingredients that make them work--and to understand why some programs are doing the opposite of what is best for children. It also chronicles the stories of families and teachers from many backgrounds as they struggle to give their children a good start in school. This book is a call to arms when we are at a crucial moment, and perhaps on the verge of a missed opportunity: We now have the means and the will to have universal pre-kindergarten, but we are also in grave danger of not getting it right.


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An eye-opening look inside pre-K in America and what it will take to give all children the best start in school possible. At the heart of this groundbreaking book are two urgent questions: What do our young children need in the earliest years of school, and how do we ensure that they all get it? Cutting-edge research has proven that early childhood education is crucial for An eye-opening look inside pre-K in America and what it will take to give all children the best start in school possible. At the heart of this groundbreaking book are two urgent questions: What do our young children need in the earliest years of school, and how do we ensure that they all get it? Cutting-edge research has proven that early childhood education is crucial for all children to gain the academic and emotional skills they need to succeed later in life. Children who attend quality pre-K programs have a host of positive outcomes including better language, literacy, problem-solving and math skills down the line, and they have a leg up on what appears to be the most essential skill to develop at age four: strong self-control. But even with this overwhelming evidence, early childhood education is at a crossroads in America. We know that children can and do benefit, but we also know that too many of our littlest learners don't get that chance--millions of parents can't find spots for their children, or their preschoolers end up in poor quality programs. With engrossing storytelling, journalist Suzanne Bouffard takes us inside some of the country's best pre-K classrooms to reveal the sometimes surprising ingredients that make them work--and to understand why some programs are doing the opposite of what is best for children. It also chronicles the stories of families and teachers from many backgrounds as they struggle to give their children a good start in school. This book is a call to arms when we are at a crucial moment, and perhaps on the verge of a missed opportunity: We now have the means and the will to have universal pre-kindergarten, but we are also in grave danger of not getting it right.

30 review for The Most Important Year: Pre-Kindergarten and the Future of Our Children

  1. 5 out of 5

    Shelly

    This books does a good job of showing where some preschool programs are doing well (in-depth on how) and where some are doing things that are not good (with studies cited and experts interviewed on why these practices should be discouraged). It covers diversity, financial, and other issues that come into play with preschools. I do have a problem with the idea presented in the title that pre-K is the most important year. And there seems to be a huge amount of pressure to have kids in a great pre- This books does a good job of showing where some preschool programs are doing well (in-depth on how) and where some are doing things that are not good (with studies cited and experts interviewed on why these practices should be discouraged). It covers diversity, financial, and other issues that come into play with preschools. I do have a problem with the idea presented in the title that pre-K is the most important year. And there seems to be a huge amount of pressure to have kids in a great pre-K class not only when they are 4, but even for all 3 year olds. I get that some kids need extra support that schools can provide, but to imply that kids' lives are damaged forever if they miss out on pre-K or only go for one year seems excessive. One parent is mentioned in the book as sending their child to preschool for "only" 3 days a week, as if they are failing their child by not having them in pre-K 5 days a week. And that isn't even a parent living in poverty with a child who may need extra support or education as a result of a rough or disadvantaged home life. I am all for good quality universal pre-K for 4 year olds, but I don't think all kids need to be in school all day (even a good play based school) 5 days a week starting at 2 1/2 or 3 years old.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bridget Vollmer

    **I won this book in a GR giveaway in exchange for a honest review** I was so happy I won this book since my son will be starting Pre-K next year and I was interested in knowing what to look for in a quality Pre-K. While some of the information in the book didn't apply to my current living situation, overall I found this a very eye opening book and found that sometimes even the more expensive Pre-K programs may not be the best option for your child. While this was book will definitely help someon **I won this book in a GR giveaway in exchange for a honest review** I was so happy I won this book since my son will be starting Pre-K next year and I was interested in knowing what to look for in a quality Pre-K. While some of the information in the book didn't apply to my current living situation, overall I found this a very eye opening book and found that sometimes even the more expensive Pre-K programs may not be the best option for your child. While this was book will definitely help someone in regards to what to look for in a quality school, at times I felt overwhelmed at all the options presented to a parent. There is so much pressure it seems to start kids early in a good education system and if not, one risks setting your child up for future failure. Why can't we go back to simpler times??? I think I went to a year of preschool when I was little and my husband didn't go at all. Anyways I really thought this was a well researched book and do recommend it to parents of young ones.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nari

    It’s an utterly depressing book if you have a child in preschool. You’ll end up questioning everything about it. It is a good read for parents and teachers alike. Bouffard highlights many of the discrepancies between schools and the inequalities between what the children low-middle-affluent families experience at their schools. Is there a simple solution for pre-k in the US? Not really. But bringing back play and getting rid of worksheets is a good first step.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    I learned so much about preschool education and how it affects people individually and society as a whole. I'm also terribly sad about how difficult it is for people to get access to quality preschool programs, though before reading this book I wouldn't have ben able to define what a quality preschool program looks like. Providing opportunity for cognitive development and learning is important. The burden falls on us to find solutions for providing quality education for everyone. I learned so much about preschool education and how it affects people individually and society as a whole. I'm also terribly sad about how difficult it is for people to get access to quality preschool programs, though before reading this book I wouldn't have ben able to define what a quality preschool program looks like. Providing opportunity for cognitive development and learning is important. The burden falls on us to find solutions for providing quality education for everyone.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    *Advanced copy won through a Goodreads giveaway.* Bouffard readily admits solving the preschool problem in this country won't be easy, but she does a wonderful job of actually showing us that it is possible. She leads us through multiple classrooms, explaining and allowing us to see what is truly beneficial to the children and families they serve, while also taking us behind the scenes to see what is involved in managing a successful preschool. No stone is left unturned as the political and finan *Advanced copy won through a Goodreads giveaway.* Bouffard readily admits solving the preschool problem in this country won't be easy, but she does a wonderful job of actually showing us that it is possible. She leads us through multiple classrooms, explaining and allowing us to see what is truly beneficial to the children and families they serve, while also taking us behind the scenes to see what is involved in managing a successful preschool. No stone is left unturned as the political and financial aspects are frequently brought into play too. While this book may end up being picked up more often by those involved in education, I would highly recommend it to parents. Not only as a way of knowing what to look for in a good preschool, but in a good school in general. It may not be what you think. I also can't help but wish this would find its way onto the desks of many politicians and those involved in our education system. It might just prove, well, educational.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    *Advanced copy* I really wanted to love this book, but as a preschool teacher I found it to be lacking what I personally was looking for. Although many great ideas were shared, they were nothing I hadn't learned in grad school or from coworkers. The author's purpose was to raise awareness of what is missing in so many preschool classrooms across the country, and she did that flawlessly. Preschool is about so much more than many people realize. Although I was disappointed, I do feel that this book w *Advanced copy* I really wanted to love this book, but as a preschool teacher I found it to be lacking what I personally was looking for. Although many great ideas were shared, they were nothing I hadn't learned in grad school or from coworkers. The author's purpose was to raise awareness of what is missing in so many preschool classrooms across the country, and she did that flawlessly. Preschool is about so much more than many people realize. Although I was disappointed, I do feel that this book would be extremely helpful to new and inexperienced early educators or parents wanting to educate themselves while choosing a preschool program.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Cat

    Well-written and timely, there is a need for preschool education in this country. At the same time, I'm very conflicted about putting children in classrooms so young! I was fortunate to have been able to stay home and raise my daughter way back in the 80'sand early 90's. I laugh when I read books like this, not because I think they are absurd, or wrong, but they bring back memories of other moms I encountered when my daughter was in school yelling at me for thinking I was a teacher and who did I Well-written and timely, there is a need for preschool education in this country. At the same time, I'm very conflicted about putting children in classrooms so young! I was fortunate to have been able to stay home and raise my daughter way back in the 80'sand early 90's. I laugh when I read books like this, not because I think they are absurd, or wrong, but they bring back memories of other moms I encountered when my daughter was in school yelling at me for thinking I was a teacher and who did I think I was teaching my daughter so much and making their kids look stupid! One, I didn't exactly tie my kid to a chair. Two, we just spent lots of time together, as did other moms with their kids, and the kids just learned cool stuff lots younger! Lol! Kids are sponges! Parents have always been teachers! If parents would be parents, the kids would be better off and it doesn't take a formal classroom setting to teach. Good ideas in the book tho'. Too many children are missing parents to even bond with these days, might as well provide a free daycare in a preschool setting and hope for the best.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Elyse

    {Advanced copy won through a Goodreads giveaway} Very interesting and inspiring book. As a fairly new pre-kindergarten teacher I really enjoyed reading about some of the new best practices, especially because I am teaching in a center based program which means we aren't getting the extra resources and training that some of the top performing school district K1 programs are. Learning what is working best in larger programs allows me to bring in new ideas that will help my kids make it to kindergar {Advanced copy won through a Goodreads giveaway} Very interesting and inspiring book. As a fairly new pre-kindergarten teacher I really enjoyed reading about some of the new best practices, especially because I am teaching in a center based program which means we aren't getting the extra resources and training that some of the top performing school district K1 programs are. Learning what is working best in larger programs allows me to bring in new ideas that will help my kids make it to kindergarten better prepared. My only wish was that the book came with a DVD showing some of those best practices and classrooms in action like Teach Like a Champion. Written descriptions can only go so far, and I found myself interested enough in some of the newer techniques (especially the Tools of the Mind the author writes about) that I ended up scouring YouTube to see some teachers using the approach.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    Fascinating exploration of the importance of quality Pre-K education. A must-read for parents with children ages 2-5, and a still-relevant read for others, including educators of older children and adults.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    Trying to navigate the PreK options has not been an easy process, but this book helped me understand what questions to ask and how to prioritize what's really important for my 4 year old when choosing a quality PreK program. It's not as simple as public vs private. Trying to navigate the PreK options has not been an easy process, but this book helped me understand what questions to ask and how to prioritize what's really important for my 4 year old when choosing a quality PreK program. It's not as simple as public vs private.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

    Suzanne Bouffard gives a comprehensive overview of many areas of Head Start/Pre-k. Great read if you’re in ECE especially in a managerial or teaching role.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Xin Ru Toh

    This book discussed some of the harsh realities related to the historical, economic, political, and social issues in the early childhood education field. In particular, the book raised the problems of a lack of equity (due to social class and ethnicity) in access to quality early childhood education and how this exacerbates an achievement gap; overemphasis on direct instruction and academic tests (as compared to interactive, child-led, and play-based approaches with teachers documenting children This book discussed some of the harsh realities related to the historical, economic, political, and social issues in the early childhood education field. In particular, the book raised the problems of a lack of equity (due to social class and ethnicity) in access to quality early childhood education and how this exacerbates an achievement gap; overemphasis on direct instruction and academic tests (as compared to interactive, child-led, and play-based approaches with teachers documenting children's learning process rather than their final products); as well as the prevalence of overworked, underpaid, underqualified, and unsupported teachers. However, the author only discussed these issues at the individual and national level; I would have liked some global perspective comparing the situation in America to other developing and developed countries. This book also included discussion of effective (and less effective) early childhood education programmes. As an undergraduate majoring in Linguistics and minoring in Psychology, and as an aspiring early intervention educator/therapist, I enjoyed these inspiring descriptions of the teachers' efforts and methods. A key takeaway was that we should not make the mistake of underestimating children's cognitive abilities (as Piaget did); rather, children can be curious, competent, and active learners, provided we ask them the right questions and give them the appropriate support. For instance, asking children open-ended questions encourages them to make observations, share their thought processes, and reflect on their learning experiences. The book also shared some real-life examples of strategies for designing effective learning environments and curricula, such as the Reggio Emilia and Tools Of The Mind approaches. A downside of this book was that the author focused on children's intellectual skills and briefly touched on their social and emotional skills; there was virtually no mention of the development of children's motor and daily living skills. Other pertinent issues were also not addressed, such as children's health and safety, intervention for and inclusivity of children with special needs, the use of science and technology in classrooms, as well as alternatives like homeschooling and the role of parents in children's development.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Abby Suzanne

    Fun fact about me- I used to be a kindergarten teacher and early childhood education is kind of my jam. I love talking about it, and incorporate it into my research quite a bit. The Most Important Year by Suzanne Bouffard was on my list for a long time because of its content- the book is about pre-k, how it should be structured, funded, and how it best helps kids and families. If you're looking for accessible books about the ECE system, this is a really good one! I'd also recommend The Importanc Fun fact about me- I used to be a kindergarten teacher and early childhood education is kind of my jam. I love talking about it, and incorporate it into my research quite a bit. The Most Important Year by Suzanne Bouffard was on my list for a long time because of its content- the book is about pre-k, how it should be structured, funded, and how it best helps kids and families. If you're looking for accessible books about the ECE system, this is a really good one! I'd also recommend The Importance of Being Little, my personal favorite. I enjoyed how Bouffard covered a wide range of topics including teacher burnout and the massive teacher pay gap for ECE educators, but I think my favorite part of the book was her discussion of the sort of benevolent denial often used in the education of young Black children. Buckets of research suggests structural factors (literally everything- racism) negatively impact the development of young Black children, and some ECE schools attempt to address this "achievement gap" early by introducing drills and academic content far earlier, forcing sight words at younger and younger ages, making kids memorize numbers, etc. And while sometimes it is done during play, some researchers argue in taking this approach, ECE environments are denying Black children the autonomy and flexibility to learn the social and emotional skills they also need and are denying Black children access to a play, exploratory-based learning experience afforded to upper middle class white children at younger ages. In an attempt to close the "achievement gap" (which, let's be real, is not an achievement gap, but an intentional, structural, racist repression of black children's success) with the best of intentions, ECE environments are denying Black children the very type of early learning environments they (and all children) need most. Unfortunately, this section of the book was super short, but there are lots of great alternative discussions on the topic (see the National Black Child Development Institute if you're curious!).

  14. 4 out of 5

    Cara Huss

    As a preschool teacher there were parts of this book that I felt hit the nail on the head like pointing out that if public school systems take too many four year old preschoolers away from private/parochial preschools that serve children six weeks through five years these programs will either be forced to massively raise tuition for the younger children especially babies ( 3 children to 1 adult ratio) and toddlers ( 5 children to 1 adult ratio) or close. Either way is going to harm those familie As a preschool teacher there were parts of this book that I felt hit the nail on the head like pointing out that if public school systems take too many four year old preschoolers away from private/parochial preschools that serve children six weeks through five years these programs will either be forced to massively raise tuition for the younger children especially babies ( 3 children to 1 adult ratio) and toddlers ( 5 children to 1 adult ratio) or close. Either way is going to harm those families and children. I have not heard anyone present an answer to this problem and don't know of public school systems which have the space, staff, or desire tackle children starting at 6 weeks. There are many wonderful private and parochial programs in place that also take babies and we all need to work together not causing collateral damage. I also appreciated that she pointed out the problem of poor vertical articulation from preschool to the elementary grades. Hard fought gains in preschool can quickly be lost if they are not built upon in future years. I was less enthusiastic about the comparison between schools. I felt that some preferred programs did not have their negatives discussed specifically but the reader was assured that the curriculum would lead to good outcomes in the end, yet the discounted program had it's specific negatives looked at rather than if those children did all right in the end. For one set of programs they were looking at the forest and for the other they were looking at the trees. In the end the author told the reader what happened with the children the next year, I felt that she shined light on more problems that people often don't consider. Overall the book was thought provoking and worthwhile.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Colby

    I am very interested in the topic of early education since kids get to kindergarten with a large gap in this education before it has even begun. Quality education. From the early years is essential but can be gained at home if parents are involved and the child is socialized. This book is focuses on the different types of preschools that exist and the problems they face (mostly funding for teacher salaries and cost for parents). I found not interesting but the tone was slightly whiny instead of I am very interested in the topic of early education since kids get to kindergarten with a large gap in this education before it has even begun. Quality education. From the early years is essential but can be gained at home if parents are involved and the child is socialized. This book is focuses on the different types of preschools that exist and the problems they face (mostly funding for teacher salaries and cost for parents). I found not interesting but the tone was slightly whiny instead of proactive and solution focused. I’d like more particulars on what steps need to be taken to improve it. I don’t think that was the purpose the writer had but it is not useful unless it has more on that side of the problem.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nina

    Solid book overall for anyone in the early childhood space. The author focuses on the importance of pre-k, what the struggles/benefits are for parents and educators, and what still needs to be done. Author couples the research with stories from the field - really trying to paint the picture on pre-k in particular (very little on what happens and/or is needed in the years prior). Something that really bothered me structurally with the book is that the kindle version doesn’t link to footnotes. I️ Solid book overall for anyone in the early childhood space. The author focuses on the importance of pre-k, what the struggles/benefits are for parents and educators, and what still needs to be done. Author couples the research with stories from the field - really trying to paint the picture on pre-k in particular (very little on what happens and/or is needed in the years prior). Something that really bothered me structurally with the book is that the kindle version doesn’t link to footnotes. I️ kept wanting to see the sources for the authors assertions and it would basically turn into a scavenger hunt.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    This book could have been full of data. While there are statistics, there are personal stories that give this book heart. The stories push the author’s thesis for having quality Pre-K programs. The stories are inclusive and goes inside the classroom, talking with teachers, coaches, school administrators and parents. The chapters breakdown how students are taught, how they are shaped by their community which can impact their learning ability and the competitive process of attaining a Pre-K educat This book could have been full of data. While there are statistics, there are personal stories that give this book heart. The stories push the author’s thesis for having quality Pre-K programs. The stories are inclusive and goes inside the classroom, talking with teachers, coaches, school administrators and parents. The chapters breakdown how students are taught, how they are shaped by their community which can impact their learning ability and the competitive process of attaining a Pre-K education. Also, the effects that could occur such as the school-to-prison pipeline if they do not have access to their most important year.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    This book emphasizes a lot of what we already know regarding why pre-k is *so* important. I like that the author did not shy away from the truth that we get what we pay for. If we can't pay find additional money to fund pre-k for all, I'm ready to get rid of 12th grade as we know it. While I have nothing to do with and have never taught early childhood, I appreciated how she went through some of the pedagogy and practices in general of high-quality pre-k classrooms. No matter the level, we can g This book emphasizes a lot of what we already know regarding why pre-k is *so* important. I like that the author did not shy away from the truth that we get what we pay for. If we can't pay find additional money to fund pre-k for all, I'm ready to get rid of 12th grade as we know it. While I have nothing to do with and have never taught early childhood, I appreciated how she went through some of the pedagogy and practices in general of high-quality pre-k classrooms. No matter the level, we can grow teachers to be more intentional by constantly asking them to articulate their teaching methods.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    Certainly preaching to the choir for those in the early childhood field, but a valuable resource for parents and caregivers of young children approaching preschool age. It’s hard to know what to look for in a quality program when you don’t have the background and experience in what this looks like vs classrooms of older learners. I’d love to share this with potential families entering our school. Of course wish there was a magic solution as to how to make high quality preschool available equitab Certainly preaching to the choir for those in the early childhood field, but a valuable resource for parents and caregivers of young children approaching preschool age. It’s hard to know what to look for in a quality program when you don’t have the background and experience in what this looks like vs classrooms of older learners. I’d love to share this with potential families entering our school. Of course wish there was a magic solution as to how to make high quality preschool available equitably across the nation and make the profession a sustainable career for more teachers, but as a glimpse into this topic it was worth a read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

    I learned a lot Engaging children in their own language (play) is the research-based , best way, to start our children off on the right foot. But it takes more than this knowledge and good teachers. We need to overhaul the structure of early childhood education for everyone. We need funding, understanding and the will to help “others” and not just “our own”. The information in this book changed my views toward that direction. I think many of us know how to educate our own children, but when it co I learned a lot Engaging children in their own language (play) is the research-based , best way, to start our children off on the right foot. But it takes more than this knowledge and good teachers. We need to overhaul the structure of early childhood education for everyone. We need funding, understanding and the will to help “others” and not just “our own”. The information in this book changed my views toward that direction. I think many of us know how to educate our own children, but when it comes to helping others, we aren’t so eager.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Gelinette Rivera Ortiz

    Interesting read I homeschool my children but I also like to be informed and know that what I am doing is the correct thing to do. This book talks about how difficult and important is pre-k for those who are low income kids and even middle class parents and how messy the system is. Please read if you are looking to place your kid in the system. Be an active parent with your school and support the teachers and your child in this journey, it is crucial for your child and society that we as parents Interesting read I homeschool my children but I also like to be informed and know that what I am doing is the correct thing to do. This book talks about how difficult and important is pre-k for those who are low income kids and even middle class parents and how messy the system is. Please read if you are looking to place your kid in the system. Be an active parent with your school and support the teachers and your child in this journey, it is crucial for your child and society that we as parents push for better schools for our children.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Damilola Ajasa

    Great read about the importance of preschool and all the politics that goes into it. I learned some new words and approaches to early childhood education. As a pediatric nurse, I really value the work that Bouffard did to catch lay people up with the needs of children. While I think many people are aware, it was a good comprehensive survey of that focusing on the education system in Boston. I look forward to comparing and contrasting education philosophies and ideas from this book to Charlotte M Great read about the importance of preschool and all the politics that goes into it. I learned some new words and approaches to early childhood education. As a pediatric nurse, I really value the work that Bouffard did to catch lay people up with the needs of children. While I think many people are aware, it was a good comprehensive survey of that focusing on the education system in Boston. I look forward to comparing and contrasting education philosophies and ideas from this book to Charlotte Mason's education ideas.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    Really fascinating, looking at lots of different kinds of preschool/pre-k and how effective they are. Slightly guilt-inducing if your kid’s program doesn’t sound nearly as impressive as some described, but it also gave me lots of insights into why my husband and I feel differently about how kids should learn/what’s important.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    I enjoyed this book. It was more of a case study on what best practices for pre-K educators should use. I was hoping to find more of a guidance in how to put those ideas into action. All in all I enjoyed the discourse on techniques and practices that seem to work well for children.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Michael J

    Important book for parents with toddlers As a new parent, this was a great read to get insight into the importance of PreK for all children. I recommend this to anyone looking to better understand what to be aware of when evaluating school options for your child.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Yunis Esa

    Bouffard works is very insightful for parents and policymakers. I have learned something about the struggle and importance of pre-k and the fine line between discipline, learning, and fun.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Eduardo

    Eye-opening. Timely read now that I have a 1.5 year old daughter and another child on the way. Also a good read now that I am starting an education company.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Treycaria

    Great insight into ECE, it helps to understand various perspectives of how different preschools operate and teach.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ciara

    American-centric, but well-thought out and written information on Pre-K studies.

  30. 5 out of 5

    nicole

    It’s due today and on hold for someone else, but my queue is so long that I’m just going to let it go than rack up fines finishing it. Reading it gave me a lot of anxiety over my oldest’s preschool situation and what’s best for a kid who misses the kindergarten cutoff by one day looks very different when you’re finally going to have local family support versus when you didn’t during the February enrollment period.

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