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Nourished: A Memoir of Food, Faith & Enduring Love (with Recipes)

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A noted entrepreneur, food writer, and recipe developer serves up an evocative adventure story abouther quest to find healing, meaning, and a place at the table. Hunger comes to us in many forms, writes Lia Huber--we long to be satisfied not just physically, but emotionally and spiritually as well. Nourished invites readers on Huber's world-roaming search to find the necess A noted entrepreneur, food writer, and recipe developer serves up an evocative adventure story abouther quest to find healing, meaning, and a place at the table. Hunger comes to us in many forms, writes Lia Huber--we long to be satisfied not just physically, but emotionally and spiritually as well. Nourished invites readers on Huber's world-roaming search to find the necessary ingredients to nurture all three. She begins her quest with an Anthony Bourdain moment in a Guatemalan village: she's slipping fresh vegetables into a communal pot of soup she's cooking up for chronically undernourished children. Village grannies look on disapprovingly... until the kids come back for more. From there, Huber takes readers to the Greek island of Corfu, where she learns the joys of simple food and the power of unconditional love; to a Costa Rican jungle house (by way of an 8,000-mile road trip), where she finds hope and healing; and finally to California's wine country, where she steps into the person she was meant to be and discovers her calling to nourish others.


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A noted entrepreneur, food writer, and recipe developer serves up an evocative adventure story abouther quest to find healing, meaning, and a place at the table. Hunger comes to us in many forms, writes Lia Huber--we long to be satisfied not just physically, but emotionally and spiritually as well. Nourished invites readers on Huber's world-roaming search to find the necess A noted entrepreneur, food writer, and recipe developer serves up an evocative adventure story abouther quest to find healing, meaning, and a place at the table. Hunger comes to us in many forms, writes Lia Huber--we long to be satisfied not just physically, but emotionally and spiritually as well. Nourished invites readers on Huber's world-roaming search to find the necessary ingredients to nurture all three. She begins her quest with an Anthony Bourdain moment in a Guatemalan village: she's slipping fresh vegetables into a communal pot of soup she's cooking up for chronically undernourished children. Village grannies look on disapprovingly... until the kids come back for more. From there, Huber takes readers to the Greek island of Corfu, where she learns the joys of simple food and the power of unconditional love; to a Costa Rican jungle house (by way of an 8,000-mile road trip), where she finds hope and healing; and finally to California's wine country, where she steps into the person she was meant to be and discovers her calling to nourish others.

30 review for Nourished: A Memoir of Food, Faith & Enduring Love (with Recipes)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Terry ~ Huntress of Erudition

    Lia Huber is a beautiful writer - her words draw you into her rich & varied international experiences like just made, still warm from the oven, artisian peasant bread with melting butter, or a decadent, exotic dessert that you never heard of, but instantly becomes your favorite! In fact, I feel nourished in body & spirit just by reading this memoir. When I read the prologue for this book while commuting from work, I wanted to make a big pot of chicken vegetable soup when I got home and invite th Lia Huber is a beautiful writer - her words draw you into her rich & varied international experiences like just made, still warm from the oven, artisian peasant bread with melting butter, or a decadent, exotic dessert that you never heard of, but instantly becomes your favorite! In fact, I feel nourished in body & spirit just by reading this memoir. When I read the prologue for this book while commuting from work, I wanted to make a big pot of chicken vegetable soup when I got home and invite the neighbors in! I love how Lia expresses her faith in an organic way through her memoir and I hope it won't turn some people off from reading this book. It is really more about being spiritual and nurturing, rather than a specific brand of Christianity, and incorporating that aspect into every day life of being mindful of other people's needs. I wish there were more people like Lia Huber and her husband, Chris in the world. I have an advance copy of this book, but I am buying two more copies to give as gifts.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Elena

    I love me a good foodie memoir, and this is an exceptional one, especially since it also includes a lot of traveling, another favorite topic of mine to read about. Lia is an accomplished entrepreneur, food writer, and cook. She has struggled through a hefty number of health scares and has learned how nutrition can play a pivotal part in overall health and well-being. Through soul-searchining, adventurous travels as well as seemingly mundane everyday struggles of being a wife and writer and confu I love me a good foodie memoir, and this is an exceptional one, especially since it also includes a lot of traveling, another favorite topic of mine to read about. Lia is an accomplished entrepreneur, food writer, and cook. She has struggled through a hefty number of health scares and has learned how nutrition can play a pivotal part in overall health and well-being. Through soul-searchining, adventurous travels as well as seemingly mundane everyday struggles of being a wife and writer and confusing and scary diagnoses, Lia extracts deep wisdom about nourishing the body, mind, and soul. From vegetable-heavy chicken soup and cooking lessons for teens from a Guatemalan village who scoffed at the idea of eating chard (and ending up loving it), to watching a Greek family gather around the table and enjoy simple but delectable meals and welcoming her as their own, to a six-month quest through Mexico and South America to learn local cuisine and test-drive the idea of living in Costa Rica permanently, to struggling through the idea of ever becoming parents, to communication blunders between husband and wife, to her spiritual journey towards Christianity, to delicious-sounding recipes at the end of each chapter ... this book was a delight! I love her voice: humble, honest, with an almost lyrical aspect to it without being overly poetic or esoteric. She writes about food with obvious knowledge but also easy-to-understand and approachable for those (like myself) without culinary expertise. If you like foodie and travel memoirs with a dash (or two or three) of life lessons learned along the way, this may be on the menu for you. Reminds me of: A Homemade Life by Molly Wisenberg

  3. 5 out of 5

    Catie Flowers

    This book is a fascinating (and mouth-watering) read, and I enjoyed it for MANY reasons. I was drawn in by Lia writing that there are a number of ways to be 'hungry.' This book is not even trying to be another cookbook to make life easier or food prep quicker. Nourished is a personal story of all the kinds of 'food' she needed as she moved through her life--relationships, meaning, integrity of knowing one's true self, generosity of giving and receiving, and of creating a stable home. As a hypera This book is a fascinating (and mouth-watering) read, and I enjoyed it for MANY reasons. I was drawn in by Lia writing that there are a number of ways to be 'hungry.' This book is not even trying to be another cookbook to make life easier or food prep quicker. Nourished is a personal story of all the kinds of 'food' she needed as she moved through her life--relationships, meaning, integrity of knowing one's true self, generosity of giving and receiving, and of creating a stable home. As a hyperanalytical word person, I was very impressed with the clean style and the winsome voice. What I mean by that is that Lia writes straightforwardly, colloquially, and transparently, without dramatizing her struggles. I myself was deeply moved by her humility, owning up to her flaws and putting them before God. She tells us many of the steps of her life over a couple of decades, describing her dreams in a way that draws one in with excitement, and then describing the actual outcome, sometimes unsuccessful, of those plans. Over a number of years, Lia had severe health challenges, which she names and owns, but does not describe gory details or try to elicit any sympathy except to mention, rather offhandedly, that certain symptoms affected her work and her life. At the end of each chapter, I got rewarded by a very good recipe, but inside each chapter, the narration made me turn the pages with anticipation. I was getting to know a true and dynamic person strong enough to be vulnerable in writing. It felt as though Lia let us the readers see her heart grow, and her spirit deepen. As a memoir, it would be lovely, but as book about God and food and a maturing life, it is extraordinary. In almost every chapter, along with seeing what Lia DID, readers are able to understand her burning passion for food to be GOOD and AVAILABLE. It particularly moved me when she exhorted herself to get out of the way of God, and let way be made for something new or bigger. She has a generous desire to cook for others, everyone really, and that exuberance made up somewhat for not getting to learn about certain parts of her life. (This would be my only disappointment with the book! I would start a new chapter, and it might commence a year or more after the preceding one. A writer's and editor's prerogative, of course. I had become quite mesmerized by the plot...) Because she stays with the 'nourishing' (in all forms) motif, it becomes evident to the reader how Lia grows from caring and worrying about establishing herself, and even beginning a restaurant, to the time near the end of the book when she goes to Central America, and very recently to Mexico, to teach young people to cook and love tasty vegetables. She opens UP her vision of what can and might be. I felt that she was becoming far more motivated to encourage others, as each chapter unfolds. By the end of Nourished, we the readers see and feel her intense and, in my opinion, loving drive to share healthy food with all the world. It is my earnest hope that when the book reaches publication, it will be very widely read. There is certainly no one who does not wish or need to be nourished!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Cathie

    The author is a talented writer on travel and food writing. Working at a PR firm that focused on travel, this path eventually led her to food writing where she wrote for Cooking Light, Bon Appétit to name a few. She writes of her move to Costa Rica and her return to Corfu made for interesting reads. I wanted to enjoy this book, but I was distracted by the health issues, anxieties, and breakdowns in her quest to find healing, meaning, and a place at a table. I had to remind myself this is a memoi The author is a talented writer on travel and food writing. Working at a PR firm that focused on travel, this path eventually led her to food writing where she wrote for Cooking Light, Bon Appétit to name a few. She writes of her move to Costa Rica and her return to Corfu made for interesting reads. I wanted to enjoy this book, but I was distracted by the health issues, anxieties, and breakdowns in her quest to find healing, meaning, and a place at a table. I had to remind myself this is a memoir (not a food memoir, per se) where she shares her trials and tribulations, and finding faith, Christianity. There was mention of writing a cookbook and a previous book she wanted to publish, which didn't materialize. There was also mention of pasta making and opening a restaurant. However, squeezing in numerous experiences of 22 years – including pursuing a masters degree and adoption – in this one book, at times for me was reading overload. That unfortunately took away from staying engaged reading her travel and food experiences, which had been my expectations. That and the recipes at the end of each chapter. What I truly enjoyed were the recipes! Once I finished, I found myself thinking I was not really sure if I felt she "felt" nourished or if the intent all along was to introduce NOURISH Evolution. On the website, her introduction reads: “I’m Lia Huber and I know how easy it is to feel like you’re spinning in a million directions.” That is how I felt reading this.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Pamela Knudson

    Excellently written. I could not put it down. Lia is a GEM! This book takes you on a journey towards being nourished in body, mind & spirit. Each chapter has a delicous recipe that goes with the event or culture described in that chapter. It is simply delightful. I can't imagine anyone not really really enjoying this book! So dig in and be NOURISHED! Excellently written. I could not put it down. Lia is a GEM! This book takes you on a journey towards being nourished in body, mind & spirit. Each chapter has a delicous recipe that goes with the event or culture described in that chapter. It is simply delightful. I can't imagine anyone not really really enjoying this book! So dig in and be NOURISHED!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    This book is about four things; her illnesses, her relationships, God and food. Sadly, I only found the latter of interest. The text is peppered with mouth watering recipes a few of which I would like to try. However, many of them include latin food items that are not available in my grocery store. Interesting book but it left me flat. Thanks to Netgalley fo the advance copy in exchange for me review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Nourished follows Lia Huber's journey of how food and cooking shaped her life. Starting in Greece while studying abroad in college she discovers that food is more than just fuel for your body, food can nourish your soul. In her early twenties she was diagnosed with an autoimmune disease and also had to have a hysterectomy. These physical challenges inspired Huber to change how she ate to help heal her body. As she and her husband travel abroad and move around the US, food always brings Huber bac Nourished follows Lia Huber's journey of how food and cooking shaped her life. Starting in Greece while studying abroad in college she discovers that food is more than just fuel for your body, food can nourish your soul. In her early twenties she was diagnosed with an autoimmune disease and also had to have a hysterectomy. These physical challenges inspired Huber to change how she ate to help heal her body. As she and her husband travel abroad and move around the US, food always brings Huber back to her roots and her passion. I was really tracking with the first half of this book. Huber became a Christian after college, but had a non-traditional life - married, but childfree. Never wanting children helped her cope with having to have a hysterectomy since now she biologically couldn't have children anyway. Then all of a sudden she "realizes" she really did want to be a mother and suddenly so did her husband. So, they adopt in Guatemala - one of the countries they stayed in during a driving trip to Costa Rica. And so now that she's back in the Christian homemaker stereotype her life is complete. As a Christian woman who's childfree by choice, it just bothered me how quickly this switch was flipped for her and how perfectly everything worked out. I feel like this just reinforces the stereotype that every woman REALLY does want to be a mother deep down. After that part I really lost interest in the book and just skimmed the last few chapters.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    Delightful! A charming story of adventure, flavor & self-discovery This is one of the most enjoyable books that I’ve read in a long, long time. We meet Lia at a moment where she’s not entirely sure what she wants do with her life… Haven't we all been there? What’s clear is that she’s got a hunger for something more and I love how instead of getting stuck in jobs she doesn’t like or a relationship that doesn’t fit, she boldly chases her interests — of food, cooking and travel — leading to a sort o Delightful! A charming story of adventure, flavor & self-discovery This is one of the most enjoyable books that I’ve read in a long, long time. We meet Lia at a moment where she’s not entirely sure what she wants do with her life… Haven't we all been there? What’s clear is that she’s got a hunger for something more and I love how instead of getting stuck in jobs she doesn’t like or a relationship that doesn’t fit, she boldly chases her interests — of food, cooking and travel — leading to a sort of vision quest on a 8,000 mile road trip through Mexico, Guatemala and Costa Rica. With no guarantee of what the outcome will be, she discovers that your passions really can lead you to your purpose and along the way she is funny, brave and totally real. The way she describes food is mouth-watering! I wish I could be there to eat it all :) Lia’s story has themes and experiences that really do apply to women of all ages and stages of life — I ordered this book for my mom, my aunt and several of my girlfriends. I especially liked that it moved at an exciting clip, so much so that I didn’t want to put it down!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Carrie Morris

    It’s such a rare treat when we can gobble up the very thing we’re craving. Lia Huber’s book, Nourished, stirs readers’ hunger for adventure, then transports us with her as she travels across borders and immerses herself in the families and rich traditions she encounters there. For those of us yearning to grow in our experience of God, Lia takes us along on her faith journey with a refreshing spirit of transparency and (sometimes irreverent) reverence. And when we find ourselves salivating at her d It’s such a rare treat when we can gobble up the very thing we’re craving. Lia Huber’s book, Nourished, stirs readers’ hunger for adventure, then transports us with her as she travels across borders and immerses herself in the families and rich traditions she encounters there. For those of us yearning to grow in our experience of God, Lia takes us along on her faith journey with a refreshing spirit of transparency and (sometimes irreverent) reverence. And when we find ourselves salivating at her descriptions of the creative, complex recipes she shares with her fortunate friends and students, but frustrated by thinking, “I could never make that!” we turn the page to discover the tantalizing recipes printed there. Ahhh! Lia has provided us with such a satisfying read. She succeeds in nourishing us on every front!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Stacia Ahlfeld

    I won an advanced copy of this book in a giveaway, and it was so very good! The story of Lia's life is exciting to anyone who loves to travel and learn about other cultures. At one point in my life, I wanted to be an ethnomusicologist, which is the study of other cultures in music. This was just like that... but with food! I ate it up. (pun intended) Lia's writing style is clean and easy to understand. It's very conversational - kind of like you're sitting in a comfortable kitchen or on a patio o I won an advanced copy of this book in a giveaway, and it was so very good! The story of Lia's life is exciting to anyone who loves to travel and learn about other cultures. At one point in my life, I wanted to be an ethnomusicologist, which is the study of other cultures in music. This was just like that... but with food! I ate it up. (pun intended) Lia's writing style is clean and easy to understand. It's very conversational - kind of like you're sitting in a comfortable kitchen or on a patio over tea/coffee/whatever drink you like and having a chat between friends. It's hard to put down because you don't want to end the conversation. I haven't tried any of the recipes yet, but I plan to. I'm always looking for new ways to cook vegetables. My son used to love them, but now he only wants raw carrots, cucumbers, and pickles. There's so much more, my son! :) I want to say so much more, but I don't want to give anything away. If you read a sample chapter somewhere, I can tell you that the entire book is that good. That's kind of what happened to me. I got to read the prologue somewhere, and then I was hooked. I was excited to win an early copy so I could get my hands on the rest. I'm thinking I might be buying a few copies of this later this month to give as Christmas presents.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Erin Miller

    Up from 2.5

  12. 4 out of 5

    Taylor

    I loved this book so much! Currently writing a review on my blog, but this is a must read!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    Ah...this book hit the spot! As described; this memoir of Lia's answer seeking journey grabbed me; I held on not wanting to put the book down. Her companions help move the story along helping to reveal the answers to Lia's questions. The countries to which she traveled, the delicious recipes, and her experiences wove a story worth telling and definitely worth reading. I'm looking forward to trying the few vegan/vegetarian recipes she included alongside those that include meat. Ah...this book hit the spot! As described; this memoir of Lia's answer seeking journey grabbed me; I held on not wanting to put the book down. Her companions help move the story along helping to reveal the answers to Lia's questions. The countries to which she traveled, the delicious recipes, and her experiences wove a story worth telling and definitely worth reading. I'm looking forward to trying the few vegan/vegetarian recipes she included alongside those that include meat.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Gheeta

    I'm surprised at how much I enjoyed this book. Huber's writing style is remeniscent of Madeleine L'Engle's in her Genesis series and other nonfiction: informal yet informed and very thought provoking. Initially, I was a little leery about how much time Huber spent talking about her spiritual journey. I'm in a stage of hiatus and reevaluation around my own journey and I can imagine someone without much formal "churching" or spiritual self-examination might find these parts especially grating, but I'm surprised at how much I enjoyed this book. Huber's writing style is remeniscent of Madeleine L'Engle's in her Genesis series and other nonfiction: informal yet informed and very thought provoking. Initially, I was a little leery about how much time Huber spent talking about her spiritual journey. I'm in a stage of hiatus and reevaluation around my own journey and I can imagine someone without much formal "churching" or spiritual self-examination might find these parts especially grating, but they are essential to her autobiographical narrative. As an adopted child whose journey to the US started because her own mother has an autoimmune disease, I feel like I have a shared story with Huber's daughter Noemi. I can remember my parents' stories of the adoption process for me as well as my younger brother. They're so similar. Even better, this journey incorporates recipes that for some of the most influential dishes Huber shares about. I can't wait to start trying them and hopefully sharing them as part of my own personal narrative. Each chapter is accompanied by a recipe--I wish I'd noticed the pattern sooner in order to mark them for future reference! Some of the recipes feature more exotic or especially ethnic ingredients you might not be able to find in a typical grocery store. I'd recommend looking at your ethnic grocery stores if you have them in your area--particularly the Asian or Latin markets as they will be more likely to have the produce items mentioned when they're in season. Finally, this was a prepublication promotional copy...Thank you so much for the opportunity to be one of the first to review this! I can't wait to see what the final draft looks like!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Renee Haas

    I found Huber's writing to be refreshing, honest and direct. She invites the reader into her kitchen, her family and her life and her journey reminds us all that happiness can be found in the food that we eat and the love that we share. These simple and heartfelt values will inspire you. I found Huber's writing to be refreshing, honest and direct. She invites the reader into her kitchen, her family and her life and her journey reminds us all that happiness can be found in the food that we eat and the love that we share. These simple and heartfelt values will inspire you.

  16. 4 out of 5

    William J.

    I won this book from Goodreads first-reads and absolutely loved reading about food, faith and enduring love. I also loved the recipes you will find spread throughout the book. I made the Garlic-Lime Grilled Shrimp tonight and it was delicious. I can't wait to make the Pastel Impossible (Impossible Cake) which has a chocolate cake batter and a flan batter. I also am going to make the Bolognese Sauce with the pasta dough recipe that has a Bechamel Sauce for a Lasagna Recipe. I highly recommend tha I won this book from Goodreads first-reads and absolutely loved reading about food, faith and enduring love. I also loved the recipes you will find spread throughout the book. I made the Garlic-Lime Grilled Shrimp tonight and it was delicious. I can't wait to make the Pastel Impossible (Impossible Cake) which has a chocolate cake batter and a flan batter. I also am going to make the Bolognese Sauce with the pasta dough recipe that has a Bechamel Sauce for a Lasagna Recipe. I highly recommend that you buy, gift, but most importantly read this fantastic memoir and try the recipes. I know you won't be disappointed.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    This was a deeply satisfying book on a number of levels. Huber is a fantastic writer whose wordcraft is rhythmic while managing to be both conversational and descriptive. The latter is particularly important since, in Nourished, she writes of her travels as well as various foods and how each affected her spiritually and physically. Throughout the book, I found her unflinching self-analysis refreshing. She doesn't try to gloss over the times she acted like a petulant child, nor does she make herse This was a deeply satisfying book on a number of levels. Huber is a fantastic writer whose wordcraft is rhythmic while managing to be both conversational and descriptive. The latter is particularly important since, in Nourished, she writes of her travels as well as various foods and how each affected her spiritually and physically. Throughout the book, I found her unflinching self-analysis refreshing. She doesn't try to gloss over the times she acted like a petulant child, nor does she make herself into someone who has now transcended all of life's problems. This is her story of finding herself, finding God, and finding her role in life, and it was a wonderful story to read. The recipes, by the way, are outstanding. There are a few which call for ingredients I'd have to special order or travel to get, but the vast majority are accessible. I've now made all but three and have to say that each was revelatory. At some point, I hope to find the energy to make the Lobster Gnocchi she made for her father's 70th birthday feast but, until then, I'll dream about it. Definitely, a book to read if you enjoy food, travel, and reading of others' spiritual growth.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Cayla

    This was a perfect late summer read. Lia's journey to whole, nourishing food is filled with adventures and misadventures, all woven together into a lovely narrative. While she is far more than globetrotter than I ever was, I could relate so well to her evolving relationship with food. The recipes featured at the end of each chapter are mouth watering! You'll be inspired to get into the kitchen after this one. I received an advanced reader copy from the publisher; all opinions are my own. This was a perfect late summer read. Lia's journey to whole, nourishing food is filled with adventures and misadventures, all woven together into a lovely narrative. While she is far more than globetrotter than I ever was, I could relate so well to her evolving relationship with food. The recipes featured at the end of each chapter are mouth watering! You'll be inspired to get into the kitchen after this one. I received an advanced reader copy from the publisher; all opinions are my own.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Thank you to the author and the publisher for an ARC of this book in exchange for purchasing the hardcover edition and my honest review! I was also involved in a survey asking for cover recommendations, which was fun :)

  20. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    Disclosure: I received a free copy of Nourished by Lia Huber from the program "Blogging For Books" in exchange for an honest review. The story follows the adult life of author Lia Huber and in four parts, tells of her adventures through illness, finding faith, becoming a mother, and discovering how food can truly nourish mind, body, and soul. Lia is an unlikely but accomplished food writer, entrepreneur, and recipe developer. Flipping through the pages I learned of Lia's wanderlust spirit, her t Disclosure: I received a free copy of Nourished by Lia Huber from the program "Blogging For Books" in exchange for an honest review. The story follows the adult life of author Lia Huber and in four parts, tells of her adventures through illness, finding faith, becoming a mother, and discovering how food can truly nourish mind, body, and soul. Lia is an unlikely but accomplished food writer, entrepreneur, and recipe developer. Flipping through the pages I learned of Lia's wanderlust spirit, her thirst for meaning in life, and her craving to somehow leave a mark on the world - many of the traits I too meditate and pray about regularly. I could relate in many ways to Lia's story, and she was able to transport me to places I've never been because she is a beautiful wordsmith. I truly enjoyed her elegant descriptions of the foods which sustained and excited her and I appreciated the shared recipes at the end of each chapter. The novel focuses on the struggles of motherhood while finding meaning outside the home, how faith has changed and sharped her perspective, and the necessity to remove yourself from comfort zones to experience richness in life. All beautiful and relatable things, but perhaps a little lengthy for a memoir; the hardbound book is over 300 pages long. I can certainly see the value of Lia sharing her personal story and unselfishly giving readers a glimpse into her genuine struggles, however; I lacked a connection to her character, even though the book was all about her. There were several times people were introduced but with little to no background and I found myself lost in a sea of unknown characters, which was slightly disorienting. After finishing and reflecting on the book, I think the message is there, and clearly, Lia is a talented writer, but overall this one missed the mark for me, and I really wanted to love it. I think if I met Lia I would have so much to chat with her about ranging from the adoption of her daughter from Guatemala and her continued work in that region of the world, her passion for healthy eating and how food can revitalize your body, and her faith walk and her unwavering commitment to discern God's will in all her decisions, but when it comes to the book I am less enthused. Overall I give this book 3.5/5 stars. Read more about my thoughts on the book here: http://www.everyday-thoughts.com/2017...

  21. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Ule

    Thoroughly enjoyed this book--which I read as an ARC in one sitting rather than take a nap! A wonderful tale of maturing, growing, learning and seeking truth, all centered around food and God.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Albright

    [Note:  This book was provided free of charge by Blogging For Books/Convergent Books.  All thoughts and opinions are my own.] I wanted to like this book a lot more than I did.  I enjoy reading memoirs about food and faith [1], for example.  Yet there was something about this book that left me cold.  Part of it was the fact that the author was a particularly unsympathetic figure, with her continual whining and her left-wing politics and her harping on questions of sustainability and foodie snobber [Note:  This book was provided free of charge by Blogging For Books/Convergent Books.  All thoughts and opinions are my own.] I wanted to like this book a lot more than I did.  I enjoy reading memoirs about food and faith [1], for example.  Yet there was something about this book that left me cold.  Part of it was the fact that the author was a particularly unsympathetic figure, with her continual whining and her left-wing politics and her harping on questions of sustainability and foodie snobbery without being likable enough to discuss those subjects appealing.  Part of it was the fact that although the author claimed to be a Christian who takes the Bible seriously, she apparently has not consulted the food laws of the Bible to any great degree, given how often her recipes include pork, shrimp, or other animal products that God considers an abomination.  Her flagrant disregard of God's food laws is all the more remarkable given the author's evident problems with disease and inflammation, which would encourage someone to eat better, at least for the sake of her health.  The fact that the author persists in acting in ways contrary to her best interest as well as against God's ways while considering herself to be a moral voice to the reader in aspects of family and politics is irritating to the extreme. In terms of its contents, this is a book that is organized in a chronological fashion with a considerable degree of skill.  There are four parts to the book, which begins with the author as a college student engaged to a hunky Greek man from Corfu and then demonstrates her path from New Age spirituality to a social gospel sort of Christianity, to marriage, to various adventures involving food writing and entrepreneurship, adoptive motherhood after various health woes make it impossible for the author to bear children herself.  Continually the author shows that she hasn't moved far beyond her New Age spirituality with a mysticism that is immensely tiresome, almost as tiresome as her frequent tantrums with her husband even as she writes about inner peace and calm.  The sheer number of contradictions and hypocrisy in the author's approach makes it immensely hard to take the author's pronouncements about the right way to live properly.  It would be better if the author had tried to be more modest in her approach and less preachy, because it would be easier to read this book as an honest struggle of an imperfect person to find faith and family in the face of great difficulties than for the author to claim that she was a reluctant foodie only for her to prove as preachy as anyone else of that ilk. Ultimately, I feel rather divided about this book.  I am pretty sure that a market for this book exists among Left Coast social gospel liberal Christians who have a high degree of sympathy for adopting waifs from foreign countries and enjoying rather elitist food tastes while making strong pronouncements.  I happen not to be part of that target audience, unfortunately.  The recipes of this book would have been far better had they embraced the sort of food that is more widely available for most people in flyover country and if they had included few to no unclean meats, in stark contrast to the frequent references to pork and shellfish products.  The book would also have been far better if the author was less insufferable.  This book did not leave me nourished in any respect--the author's spirituality is poor, her biblical knowledge and godliness negligible, her personality irksome and bothersome, and her politics unappealing.  And at nearly 300 pages this book is not a short one, although mercifully it is a pretty fast read.  The author is certainly competent as a writer, but is missing a lot when it comes to appealing to a mainstream or conservative audience. [1] See, for example: https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2011... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016...

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    Lia Huber knows the healing power of good food. From her college summer in Greece, where she first experienced the Greek cuisine made from the freshest of ingredients, to her travels in Central America, where she and her husband struggled to find the most basic necessities, Huber has made herself a life based on cooking, eating, and creating flavorful, healthy meals.  Starting in her teens and continuing through her 20s, Huber battled pain and fatigue. It took many years and dozens of visits to d Lia Huber knows the healing power of good food. From her college summer in Greece, where she first experienced the Greek cuisine made from the freshest of ingredients, to her travels in Central America, where she and her husband struggled to find the most basic necessities, Huber has made herself a life based on cooking, eating, and creating flavorful, healthy meals.  Starting in her teens and continuing through her 20s, Huber battled pain and fatigue. It took many years and dozens of visits to doctors and specialists before anyone finally put a name to the pain and fatigue she'd been feeling: systematic lupus. Since there were no magic medicines that could fix that, Huber turned to food. Armed with cookbooks that taught her to make healthier choices, she opened herself up to the possibility of vegetables being edible. As she experimented with fresh, seasonal vegetables and herbs and spices, she very happily discovered that healthy food can taste even better than the processed foods she grew up on.  From there, her life took her to places all over the globe, where she discovered new ingredients and flavor profiles that just kept adding depth to her dishes. Years of writing for food magazines and developing recipes gave her courage and confidence to create a life filled with amazing flavor, a loving family, a strong faith, and good health. Nourished, Huber's memoir of food and travel, faith and family, is a beautifully written story of one woman's journey from illness to health, from skepticism to Christianity, and from eating out to cooking for herself and others as a way to promote health and connection.  Each chapter focuses on a story in Huber's life, ending with a delicious recipe that takes you back to the story through food. Most recipes are simple enough for beginners and can be recreated by a home cook. A few recipes for special occasion take more time and skill. From Zucchini Frittata to Impossible Cake, from Mama's Salt Cod Fritters to Crab Ravioli in Saffron Lemon-Butter Sauce, from Roasted Rack of Lamb with Sauteed Spring Peas to Fausto's Lasagna, Huber's recipes offer a wide variety of options for any palette.  This lovely memoir is an honest, moving story of finding connection and warmth through real food and real relationships. It's inspiring and comforting and incredibly hard to put down once you've started it. Like the food Huber cooks, Nourished is heart warming and fulfilling and will leave you wanting more.  Galleys for Nourished were provided by Crown Publishing (Convergent Books) through NetGalley.com, with many thanks. 

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    If I told you I enjoyed the book Nourished by Lia Huber that would be an understatement. But Nourished is, as it title defines, a book that is written with substance. Yes, it is a book with heart! If you are just popping in and haven't checked out my book reviews before, I probably should inform you that I am generally an emotional reader. And, I am most definitely someone who spends more time reading than I do watching television, and it has been that way for a long...long... time. So, I guess i If I told you I enjoyed the book Nourished by Lia Huber that would be an understatement. But Nourished is, as it title defines, a book that is written with substance. Yes, it is a book with heart! If you are just popping in and haven't checked out my book reviews before, I probably should inform you that I am generally an emotional reader. And, I am most definitely someone who spends more time reading than I do watching television, and it has been that way for a long...long... time. So, I guess it would not be surprising for you all to read that by page 10, tears welled up in my eyes, at the genuine expressions written on that page. When you read them, you will see how they point out, displays of emotion ...when vulnerable. Moving on from there, I adore recipes! I find when I do turn on the television, I flip the remote to a channel where someone is cooking, or perhaps touring a locale where food is involved. I am often drawn to a place where I can envision a lovely aroma and a slightly salty taste. And now that you are aware I am obsessed with food, I will tell you when it comes to recipes, I linger over those that mention vegetables and herbs I grow in my own garden.So,it was wonderful to find the ingredients for ' Sauteed Zucchini with Onions and Thyme' with the realization this was something I could obtain by walking out my back door. Well, not now since it is November and we've already had a good frost. But summers here in the Midwest do often bring in a decent yield. From time to time I am asked questions about the books I read. And, I was wondering, have you ever been asked the question "What is your favorite chapter of the book you are reading?" In this case it would be a difficult choice but I must tell you with chapter 14 I was longing to relocate. A pond with sycamore trees would be nice. Even better, if the area was near a gently sloping vineyard. As I read on, I soon found my mouth watering. Notably longing for the taste of a fig. Yes, I lick my lips as I think of that honey - sweetness! And, in truth, I've reread the first page of chapter 14 multiple times and it tickles many of my senses so perhaps it was my very favorite chapter - or very favorite page- of this book, anyway. I do LOVE receiving books to review like this. Not only does the book cover for Nourished appear delicious, the characters are brilliant and the writing - tasteful. I happily reviewed this book for Blogging for Books.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Belinda

    I'm suspicious of any memoir penned before the author is 60. Middle age is our time of reckoning, putting together the fragments and trying to make sense of our chaos before we head into the other half of our lives when we are slightly less likely to take those big risks. Reading another person's epiphanies about their life experiences is what makes a memoir deeply satisfying and enriching. Otherwise, we're simply getting a fast-tracked calendar/journal of their lives to date. And that's where w I'm suspicious of any memoir penned before the author is 60. Middle age is our time of reckoning, putting together the fragments and trying to make sense of our chaos before we head into the other half of our lives when we are slightly less likely to take those big risks. Reading another person's epiphanies about their life experiences is what makes a memoir deeply satisfying and enriching. Otherwise, we're simply getting a fast-tracked calendar/journal of their lives to date. And that's where we are with Ms. Huber's memoir. She's had some adventures that would make her the life of any cocktail party -- running off to Corfu when she was 20 and besotted with a tall Greek, driving from San Francisco to Costa Rico, launching a food writing career without any cuisine training -- these are absolutely the escapades some of us would add to our bucket lists to count our lives well lived. But this isn't an adventure novel. It's a memoir. Parts of this book feel so carefully edited to skim the surface on personal issues and keep it PG-13. Other parts feel as though we're following Ms. Huber deep into the rabbit holes where we should arrive at THE THING. But we don't arrive on solid ground anywhere. A trip to Costa Rica? Great! Until it doesn't quite meet the expectations and then there's a hasty retreat. A novel? A TV show? An online venture? Great! Until none of it pans out for whatever reason. All the new things are so exciting until they aren't. Even deep schisms in her marriage are gently glossed over with two sentences about counseling, and we're off to the next thing. The last thing we land on is sustainable menus that improve health for both people and the planet. Big, huge noble idea. But glossed over. What I found at the end of this book is that I just didn't care if Ms. Huber failed or succeeded one more time with whatever pursuit on her list. That's really too bad because I found about 90% of this book very readable -- the writing was crisp, moving, perhaps a tiny bit overly Hallmark-y in the descriptions. I enjoyed reading the recipes that overlap the chapters. I understood her spiritual search and questioning, albeit how segregated it felt from the rest of her life. I empathized with her health issues. But I just didn't find the depth I needed here to make me care.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Virginia Campbell

    Author Lia Huber takes readers on an exceptional journey through continents, cultures, and cuisines in “Nourished: A Memoir of Food, Faith & Enduring Love (with Recipes). A successful and award-winning entrepreneur, she has also spent the last two decades as a food writer and recipe developer for such well-known publications as Cooking Light, Better Homes & Gardens, Eating Well, and Prevention. “Nourished” is her most personal work to date—an insightful and revealing recollection of the trials a Author Lia Huber takes readers on an exceptional journey through continents, cultures, and cuisines in “Nourished: A Memoir of Food, Faith & Enduring Love (with Recipes). A successful and award-winning entrepreneur, she has also spent the last two decades as a food writer and recipe developer for such well-known publications as Cooking Light, Better Homes & Gardens, Eating Well, and Prevention. “Nourished” is her most personal work to date—an insightful and revealing recollection of the trials and triumphs of her own life as she travels the world and experiences both spiritual growth and professional inspiration and expansion. Each chapter is accompanied by a recipe which reflects the content, and you will find such dishes as: “Garlicky Swiss Chard Tartines”; “Gnocchi with Mushrooms”; “Sautéed Zucchini with Onions and Thyme”; “Crab Ravioli in Saffron Lemon Butter Sauce”; “Scalloped Potatoes”; “Impossible Chocolate Cake”; and “Caramelized Corn”. Food is a universal language—we all have to eat—and the author speaks to us all with natural intuition and shared learnings about nourishment for body, mind, and spirit. Huber is the founder and CEO of NOURISH Evolution (nourishevolution.com), for which she was named Entrepreneur of the Year in 2012 by the International Association of Culinary Professionals, and Cook the Seasons (cooktheseasons.com), a subscription-based real food community and online menu planner. Lia has been a consultant on branding, messaging, and marketing for nearly 20 years for such companies as British Airways, Earthbound Farm, Bonterra Organic Vineyards and Spectrum Organic Products. She also coaches individuals and small businesses on creating and launching their own companies with her online program, Building Authentic Brands (buildingauthenticbrands.com). She lived in New York, New Orleans, Paris, Greece, Costa Rica and San Francisco before putting down roots in California's wine country with her family. Book Copy Gratis Convergent Books via Blogging for Books

  27. 4 out of 5

    Steph Cherry

    This book drew me in right from the get go. Fresh ingredients showing love at an open table. I'm in. The great part is that we get to follow Lia around to all of the tables she held on her many adventures. Look at that book cover. Don't you want to sit right in the middle of that table and eat? She had me right off the bat describing eating homemade food in Greece. I followed her through her journey to finding love and losing her uterus to wondering what God had in store for her family. I don't w This book drew me in right from the get go. Fresh ingredients showing love at an open table. I'm in. The great part is that we get to follow Lia around to all of the tables she held on her many adventures. Look at that book cover. Don't you want to sit right in the middle of that table and eat? She had me right off the bat describing eating homemade food in Greece. I followed her through her journey to finding love and losing her uterus to wondering what God had in store for her family. I don't want to issue any spoiler alerts so you'll have to read the book to find out what happens. I do want to share this that stuck me. He very much intended me to bear things of beauty and worth. There's more to love, people. One thing is how she spoke about the food industry. Much of her early writing and attending food conferences included people who attempted to make food and elitist thing. Knowing how to do or cook something somehow made these critics feel superior. I can understand. I have been lectured on coconut oil and essential oil and everything under the sun. Lia made a beautiful point by saying that good food and rich tradition is meant to be a point of connection rather than a point of contention. I agree. Come to the table. Lastly, I was reading this book after leaving a homeless center in downtown Austin and came across this great section. It goes with what Jimmy Dorrell, founder of Church Under the Bridge, says about compassion not being about bending low from a place of superiority. It's about sitting among the broken. Y'all. Read it. It will make you want to eat good food and love people better. Amen. Somebody come cook with me. love, Steph

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    NetGalley provided me with an electronic copy of Nourished: A Memoir of Food, Faith & Enduring Love. I was under no obligation to review this book and my opinion is freely given. Nourished is Lia Huber's journey, as she finds strength, spirituality, and healing through food. From a small village in Guatemala, feeding the impoverished children a simple bowl of soup, to Greece, where she learns that uncomplicated food has a complexity all its own, and to Costa Rica, Lia's worldwide travels gives he NetGalley provided me with an electronic copy of Nourished: A Memoir of Food, Faith & Enduring Love. I was under no obligation to review this book and my opinion is freely given. Nourished is Lia Huber's journey, as she finds strength, spirituality, and healing through food. From a small village in Guatemala, feeding the impoverished children a simple bowl of soup, to Greece, where she learns that uncomplicated food has a complexity all its own, and to Costa Rica, Lia's worldwide travels gives her perspective and helps to set her future. Although the recipes are few, they do help to transform Nourished into more than just a travel memoir. The only time the author seems to be really passionate is when she talks about the food she has eaten and that which she has created. I understand that Lia's spirituality is an integral part of her life, but I thought her discussion of it overtook the book. I was looking to read a book about nourishment through travel, so I was not really interested in the religious aspects. Nourished was more of a personal journey through the author's life and, although I do applaud her for her courage and her determination, I felt like I was given too much of a view. The book just meanders along and never really found its footing. Readers who like travel books, especially ones with regards to the local cuisine, may find some of Nourished to their liking.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Katri Manninen

    This is a decent book. My three stars means that I was waiting for the book to end but it was good enough to listen it through (I listened it as an audiobook). I didn’t know the author from before so I didn’t know what the expect. I started listening this book as a food memoir and as a food memoir it isn’t that special. There are moments where she goes more in detail about the food, but for instance is quite vague about the changes in her diet and how they impacted her health. Towards the end the This is a decent book. My three stars means that I was waiting for the book to end but it was good enough to listen it through (I listened it as an audiobook). I didn’t know the author from before so I didn’t know what the expect. I started listening this book as a food memoir and as a food memoir it isn’t that special. There are moments where she goes more in detail about the food, but for instance is quite vague about the changes in her diet and how they impacted her health. Towards the end there’s less talk about food and more talk about her family and God and giving, which is fine but disappointing if you expected to hear her talk about food. Very often I felt she breezed through important events and their impact on her. In the audiobook the chapters end with her telling that recipe that relates to the chapter can be found in the attached PDF. Since the recipes are usually about dishes mentioned in the beginning of that chapter and the chapters often have an emotional end, these announcements feel jarring and stop the flow. I assume that had I read the book instead of listening, it wouldn’t have bothered me. If you’re her fan and don’t assume this is so much a book about food than her relationship with God and an overview of her life story, you’ll probably enjoy the book muck more than I did.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    Food, Adventure, Love, and Spirituality Lia Huber has had an interesting life so far. It’s not a life that is carefully planned. Lia seems to leap from one thing to another. However, there are stable themes: her love of food, the companionship with her husband, Christopher, spirituality, and a love of adventure. The book starts in Greece where as an eighteen-year-old, she’s engaged to a Greek man and is beginning to develop her love affair with food. The Greek romance didn’t work out, but Lia fou Food, Adventure, Love, and Spirituality Lia Huber has had an interesting life so far. It’s not a life that is carefully planned. Lia seems to leap from one thing to another. However, there are stable themes: her love of food, the companionship with her husband, Christopher, spirituality, and a love of adventure. The book starts in Greece where as an eighteen-year-old, she’s engaged to a Greek man and is beginning to develop her love affair with food. The Greek romance didn’t work out, but Lia found the theme of her life in cooking and writing about good food. I found all the parts of the book discussing her culinary adventures excellent. The recipes included at the end of each chapter will have you heading for the kitchen. I also enjoyed her travels. The trip through Mexico to spend time in Costa Rica made me want to visit the places she described. I hadn’t realized how delightful some on the interior towns in Mexico are. Lia hasn’t had an easy time with Lupus and a hysterectomy. She does make impulsive decisions that get her and her husband into trouble, but it’s all interesting to read. I recommend this book if you’re up for an armchair adventure. I received this book from Blogging for Books for this review.

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