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Confessions of a Counterfeit Farm Girl: A Memoir

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A laugh-out-loud memoir about a city slicker who discovers that Manolos and manure just don't mix. At her husband's prompting, suburban mom and New York career woman Susan McCorkindale agreed to give up her stressful six-figure job. Together, they headed down south to a 500-acre beef farm, and never looked back. Well, he didn't look back. She did. A lot. From playing spot t A laugh-out-loud memoir about a city slicker who discovers that Manolos and manure just don't mix. At her husband's prompting, suburban mom and New York career woman Susan McCorkindale agreed to give up her stressful six-figure job. Together, they headed down south to a 500-acre beef farm, and never looked back. Well, he didn't look back. She did. A lot. From playing spot the religious billboard on the drive to rural Virginia, to adapting to a world without Starbucks, to planning bright-orange hunter-resistant wardrobes for the kids (We moved here to get away from the madness of Manhattan only to risk getting popped on our own property?), this is her hilarious account of how a city girl came to love, or at least tolerate, country life.


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A laugh-out-loud memoir about a city slicker who discovers that Manolos and manure just don't mix. At her husband's prompting, suburban mom and New York career woman Susan McCorkindale agreed to give up her stressful six-figure job. Together, they headed down south to a 500-acre beef farm, and never looked back. Well, he didn't look back. She did. A lot. From playing spot t A laugh-out-loud memoir about a city slicker who discovers that Manolos and manure just don't mix. At her husband's prompting, suburban mom and New York career woman Susan McCorkindale agreed to give up her stressful six-figure job. Together, they headed down south to a 500-acre beef farm, and never looked back. Well, he didn't look back. She did. A lot. From playing spot the religious billboard on the drive to rural Virginia, to adapting to a world without Starbucks, to planning bright-orange hunter-resistant wardrobes for the kids (We moved here to get away from the madness of Manhattan only to risk getting popped on our own property?), this is her hilarious account of how a city girl came to love, or at least tolerate, country life.

30 review for Confessions of a Counterfeit Farm Girl: A Memoir

  1. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    McCorkindale is not a gifted story teller. She's far too self-conscious and the would-be funny parts are so belabored, overworked--that they just aren't funny. It was like spending six hours with a girlfriend who finds herself hilarious.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jackie

    I really think it deserves only about 1 1/2 stars at most. Her sarcasm was just wearing. A little goes a long way and she uses sarcasm a LOT. Her footnotes were frankly annoying. I would have preferred to read them as part of the book itself, as they were really parenthetical comments. This book was highly recommended and I had high hopes for it, but I just couldn't like it / her. Too self absorbed.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I realized why I didn't like this book much on p. 232 when the author explained, "I'm pretty sure he (her husband) thought that once the girl left the city, the city would leave the girl, but I'm simply incapable of making that kind of metamorphosis. In fact the reverse is true; I'm doing my best to Park Avenue this place up. You might say I'm on a mission to cosmopolitanize the country." Rather than learning or growing from her rural experiences, the writer remains adamant that Starbucks is a n I realized why I didn't like this book much on p. 232 when the author explained, "I'm pretty sure he (her husband) thought that once the girl left the city, the city would leave the girl, but I'm simply incapable of making that kind of metamorphosis. In fact the reverse is true; I'm doing my best to Park Avenue this place up. You might say I'm on a mission to cosmopolitanize the country." Rather than learning or growing from her rural experiences, the writer remains adamant that Starbucks is a need not a luxury. I think the book began as her blog, newspaper columns, and emails to friends, which I can see as being quite funny. It was when someone said, "you should put these into a book!" that the trouble began because I can't figure out her tone. Someone who is able to write and practice the piano daily must have some level of responsibility and dedication, but she refers to herself as a dumb blonde who doesn't listen to her husband, pays $25 to get her hair blown dry once a week, and lives on a farm for a year without purchasing a pair of practical boots. Are we supposed to like her? I think she'd be fun to have coffee with (Starbucks of course!) because her tone is so conversational but reading her writing wasn't that rewarding. And, her parenting seems inconsistent. She volunteers in her son's classroom (a plus in my book) although she (pretends?) she can't understand the science. She bemoans the cost and amount of McDonald's toys piling up in her home which made me want to call out "just say no!" when she reports on her kids begging her to turn in to Mickey D's. There's a nice chapter about the chemical basis of depression and I'm going to see what her husband writes. This book got me through a plane ride, but I don't recommend it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Abigail

    My hats off to all the magazine editors who turned Susan McCorkindale down, editors about whom the author bitches in some of the last chapters. Those editors were right--this is not funny or well-written. Too bad the editors at Penguin didn't think so. Whiny, annoying, and downright poorly written. I just plain didn't like it. All the parentheticals and footnotes are a poor attempt to be funny and/or conversational with the reader, but end up simply as evidence of a lack of thought given to comp My hats off to all the magazine editors who turned Susan McCorkindale down, editors about whom the author bitches in some of the last chapters. Those editors were right--this is not funny or well-written. Too bad the editors at Penguin didn't think so. Whiny, annoying, and downright poorly written. I just plain didn't like it. All the parentheticals and footnotes are a poor attempt to be funny and/or conversational with the reader, but end up simply as evidence of a lack of thought given to composition structure. And the substance of the book? Honestly, I think the author is one of those people who could find something to bitch about no matter where she was or what she was doing. She lost credit for me right off the bat when she claims to be some genuine New Yorker, but somehow can't find anything better to crave in the city than Starbucks. Starbucks???!!! Really??? I can find better coffee in the "sticks." Speaking of the sticks, this woman's big foray into the "sticks" was to Fauquier County, Virginia--fancy Northern Virginia horse country less than an hour from D.C. You know what, lady? Go spend a week, hell, go spend a day, in southern Phillips County, Montana, and then maybe, just maybe, you can claim that you've spent time in the "sticks." Then again, something tells me you wouldn't last that long out there. The folks in Phillips County have little tolerance for whining.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tracy

    I couldn't resist picking up this book when I found it on a sale table. Sounded like an fun concept (I have my own dreams of living on a farm one day), plus it's set in Virginia. However, so far I'm not enjoying it much. One reason being that the author is far to much of a whiny princess to be likable. Ok, I managed to finish and, frankly, I hated it. The only reason I slogged through was because of the location of their farm, which is about an hour from where we live. We actually just visited th I couldn't resist picking up this book when I found it on a sale table. Sounded like an fun concept (I have my own dreams of living on a farm one day), plus it's set in Virginia. However, so far I'm not enjoying it much. One reason being that the author is far to much of a whiny princess to be likable. Ok, I managed to finish and, frankly, I hated it. The only reason I slogged through was because of the location of their farm, which is about an hour from where we live. We actually just visited the area last weekend and it's gorgeous. I'd give a limb to live on one of the farms there. This book began as a weekly email to her family and friends, which she then turned into a blog. It really should have stopped there. I can see how this "memoir" might have worked as a blog, but as a book it falls flat. The humor is extremely forced (and not particularly funny) and most of the situations seem exaggerated, but I'm sure those who actually know her and the family might think she's hilarious (?). I just found it all incredibly annoying. Anyone want a free book?

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    I tried really really hard to like this book but the stupid footnotes (multiple sarcastic notes on EACH page - so distracting) just ruined the book for me each time I had to pause to read them. They really ruined the flow of the book. As far as her writing goes, yes she was overly sarcastic, but that's fine. Yes, she gloated a lot about her plush job and spoiled life style, but that's just goes to show that there really are people out there that are THAT self absorbed. If I hadn't had to pause e I tried really really hard to like this book but the stupid footnotes (multiple sarcastic notes on EACH page - so distracting) just ruined the book for me each time I had to pause to read them. They really ruined the flow of the book. As far as her writing goes, yes she was overly sarcastic, but that's fine. Yes, she gloated a lot about her plush job and spoiled life style, but that's just goes to show that there really are people out there that are THAT self absorbed. If I hadn't had to pause every 2 or three paragraphs to read the footnotes I would have enjoyed the book more. She just took it too far.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Katy

    I picked this book up because I'm a city mouse faced with the very real possibility that my work and life may take me to the country. I was hoping for a memoir that would ready me for the transition. This was not it because this may be one of the worst books ever written. While I won't go so far as to call the author names, I will go so far as to say that she has written herself as a summarily unlikable hag with a penchant to believe the world somehow owes her something. Reading this book was pa I picked this book up because I'm a city mouse faced with the very real possibility that my work and life may take me to the country. I was hoping for a memoir that would ready me for the transition. This was not it because this may be one of the worst books ever written. While I won't go so far as to call the author names, I will go so far as to say that she has written herself as a summarily unlikable hag with a penchant to believe the world somehow owes her something. Reading this book was painful. The style reads "I AM TRYING MY DARNDEST TO BE CLEVER - SMIRK AT THE WORLD WITH ME!" and "GIVE ME A MOVIE DEAL BECAUSE MY LIFE IS SO IMPORTANT!" but I sadly fear that this one neither warrants a smirk nor a movie. After abandoning this one to the trash bin in my bathroom, a friend dug it out and read a few chapters, had some unkind things to say about my taste in books, and put it back in the waste basket. All of that said, I have read some of Ms. Corkindale's pieces for The Huffington Post and what she excels at (because she can write, I'll give her that much) is tapping into the emotion and poignancy of certain moments - not slathering every passage with what comes off as superiority (even if it isn't meant that way). If she could capture that and put it into a book, I would give her another shot.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Trisha Clark

    The city mouse moves to the country in this REALLY, REALLY funny book. Susan put her hyper-personality in the pages with her signature tangents that are even funnier as footnotes, lists, indexes and much more that pop up throughout for a truly enjoyable read. The best part (and the most important part, I think) of the book is its ability to speak to you personally, whatever hat you are wearing at the moment - working mom, stay-at-home-mom, wife, daughter, sister, friend, PTA president - about to The city mouse moves to the country in this REALLY, REALLY funny book. Susan put her hyper-personality in the pages with her signature tangents that are even funnier as footnotes, lists, indexes and much more that pop up throughout for a truly enjoyable read. The best part (and the most important part, I think) of the book is its ability to speak to you personally, whatever hat you are wearing at the moment - working mom, stay-at-home-mom, wife, daughter, sister, friend, PTA president - about topics that really hit home, from coffee, cleaning and exercising to bathing suits, families and juggling life. She gets to the point, makes you cry but leaves you laughing, all while helping you realize that it’s just life and it’s funny, so maybe we shouldn’t take ourselves so seriously— at least not all the time. Confessions of a Counterfeit Farmgirl is an amazing first book by a creative, talented author. Buy it and read it! And then tell all your chick friends!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Cox

    What a riot. This book kept me laughing from beginning to end. While there were spots that were more crude than funny, overall, this author knows how to tell a hilarious city-turned-farm-girl story. It was a quick read, and that cover is simply scrumptious! Note: The solar plexus was erroneously stated to be a part of the skull. Content: alcohol (excessive), expletives (including an adult encouraging a child to curse), profanity, crudity, sexual innuendo, talk of body parts

  10. 4 out of 5

    StillReadingBooks

    I must admit that I have a dream to live on a farm. Nothing like the farm she describes in this book. I would like 5-10 acres to have sheep... for my dogs. The thing is I am born and breed in the suburbs and while my husband is from a farm state (Nebraska) he is not only against living on a farm but he is not handy around the house. Worse he does not want to learn. So when I read the cover of this book I thought I could get some insight. Susan was the marketing director for the publishing company I must admit that I have a dream to live on a farm. Nothing like the farm she describes in this book. I would like 5-10 acres to have sheep... for my dogs. The thing is I am born and breed in the suburbs and while my husband is from a farm state (Nebraska) he is not only against living on a farm but he is not handy around the house. Worse he does not want to learn. So when I read the cover of this book I thought I could get some insight. Susan was the marketing director for the publishing company that publishes Family Circle. While it is her husband's idea to move to the farm, she was okay with leaving her job. She did not enjoy the job or the commute into New York everyday. Her husband's brother has money and purchases the farm with the idea that Stu ( Susan's husband aka Hemingway) and his family (Susan and their two sons) would live on and run the farm. Stu seems to jump in with enthusiasm and seems to be proficient at taking on the role of running a 500 acres cattle farm. Lack of knowledge never seems to be an issue on his part. Lack of money never seems to be an issue on anyone's part which I find interesting because Susan leaves a job that must have had a pretty nice paycheck attached to it. While the beginning of the book had me interested talking about the move, the why behind the move, and the initial getting use to where they lived, I felt that it became her talking about how she refused to wear farm clothes (even if where her designer shoes endangered her life), how there was no Starbucks, and how she had to drive 20- 45 minutes to get to any real shopping. She also spends a lot of time talking about the gross things her sons do... which makes me glad my kid is a girl. I enjoyed her voice that came through in the novel and her use of sarcasim. I just which there had been some change or depth to her. While I am sure this is not the case, she came across as someone that only worries about material possessions, and how they were harder to get. I did totally enjoy the chapter titled "Swimsuits in the Sticks" becaue everyone goes through same feeling every spring where trying on bathing suits, and as I mentioned she is funny. I wouldn't call her a counterfeit farm girl because she never attempts to become a farm girl. My understanding is that a publisher read her blog and approached her about publishing it as a book. Perhaps that is the most valuable thing I took away from the book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    A friend said she thought of me while she was in Border's and saw this book, so I picked up the first copy I could find. Let me just say, I would rate this book "Hated It" if that were an option. Susan McCorkindale is the meanest, most self-centered person I have encountered in a long time. I pushed myself through a few chapters thinking it would have to get better, but I threw the book down in disgust. Before I took the book back, I skimmed a bit, thinking I hadn't perhaps given her a fair shak A friend said she thought of me while she was in Border's and saw this book, so I picked up the first copy I could find. Let me just say, I would rate this book "Hated It" if that were an option. Susan McCorkindale is the meanest, most self-centered person I have encountered in a long time. I pushed myself through a few chapters thinking it would have to get better, but I threw the book down in disgust. Before I took the book back, I skimmed a bit, thinking I hadn't perhaps given her a fair shake, and there she was using bitingly rude "humor" to make fun of her mom for shopping for deals and NOT spending $700 on a skirt. Her treatment of her husband was equally as pathetic. I don't know what reality is for Ms. McCorkindale, but it's not mine.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    I couldn't do it. I just couldn't finish it. I love memoirs. I love fish-out-of-water-stories. I just couldn't get past the author's "oh aren't I clever / funny / darling" wink-wink writing style. No. You're not.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    I'm giving up on this. The author is shallow, vapid, immature, whines a lot, and is obsessed with doing as little as humanly possible. I'm not sure I can stand any more time spent with a woman who does so little and feels entitled to so much.

  14. 4 out of 5

    LibraryCin

    3.5 stars The author, her husband and two sons (7 and 14-years, I think) were living in New Jersey and Susan was working in New York City when they decided to move to a farm in rural Virginia. Susan had to give up a very high paying job, though she wasn’t enjoying it anyway, for her husband’s dream of being a farmer. It was meant to be funny, and parts were humourous, but not a lot was laugh-out-loud funny for me. Despite the title, the author really didn’t do any farming (at least not as reporte 3.5 stars The author, her husband and two sons (7 and 14-years, I think) were living in New Jersey and Susan was working in New York City when they decided to move to a farm in rural Virginia. Susan had to give up a very high paying job, though she wasn’t enjoying it anyway, for her husband’s dream of being a farmer. It was meant to be funny, and parts were humourous, but not a lot was laugh-out-loud funny for me. Despite the title, the author really didn’t do any farming (at least not as reported in the book); her husband did it all. She did a lot of shopping, when she got into nearby towns and cities. I’m not into fashion at all, so any brand names she threw out there, I just assumed were shoe brands, as shoes seemed to be her favourite shopping/fashion item. Some of the acronyms, I wasn’t sure about. Despite my comments so far, I did enjoy the book, overall. It did make me realize that although I grew up in a small town (farming community, but not on a farm), it would be hard – even for me, the homebody and nonshopper – to move back. Not for the same reasons, but other shopping items might be tricky to come by (products not tested on animals, for instance).

  15. 4 out of 5

    Joni

    Stopping at page 104. I can't read any more. Too much sarcasm. She tried to be clever and funny but fell short. I like memoirs but this isn't a memoir.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kim Patterson

    I can't even finish this book, and that's very unlike me. It's just too painful. I vacillate between being extremely annoyed with the author to feeling pity for someone who is so miserable in every aspect of her life regardless of what she is doing or where she is. Materialistic and shallow, I don't think this woman can ever be happy with anything she has or any circumstance she finds herself in. It's too bad she can't just appreciate all that she has or at least something she has. I am pretty s I can't even finish this book, and that's very unlike me. It's just too painful. I vacillate between being extremely annoyed with the author to feeling pity for someone who is so miserable in every aspect of her life regardless of what she is doing or where she is. Materialistic and shallow, I don't think this woman can ever be happy with anything she has or any circumstance she finds herself in. It's too bad she can't just appreciate all that she has or at least something she has. I am pretty sure there are a lot of people out there who would love to have it so good in life. The insecurity she portrayed around her career was probably the most interesting part of the book. Content aside, I found the millions of snide remarks made in the footnotes completely annoying. At least after awhile I learned to not even bother to read her obnoxious comments along the bottom of the page. But even then, I could not find it within myself to finish. As far as I can tell, Susan never grows as a person through this whole experience so save yourself the time and just read the book jacket or the Kindle sample if you must. You'll get the drift. I can't believe someone actually published this book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Molly

    Somewhat funny but unexceptional fish-out-of-water memoir. The humor is the second biggest problem; the writer tries to be funny with every sentence and it’s just very tiring to read. The biggest problem, especially for the first half of the book, is the writer complaining about moving to the sticks (Virginia) after life in New York/New Jersey. It’s not like she’s surrounded by coal miners – her social set/neighbors are rich, too. Mostly it really got to me because it reminds me of people who m Somewhat funny but unexceptional fish-out-of-water memoir. The humor is the second biggest problem; the writer tries to be funny with every sentence and it’s just very tiring to read. The biggest problem, especially for the first half of the book, is the writer complaining about moving to the sticks (Virginia) after life in New York/New Jersey. It’s not like she’s surrounded by coal miners – her social set/neighbors are rich, too. Mostly it really got to me because it reminds me of people who move here (Montana) from out of state and complain about the lack of shopping. You move to a state where cows outnumber people and you think there will be a Nordstroms on every other corner? REALLY? The other corners should, of course, be occupied by Starbucks, which was another major annoyance – the writer’s obsession with Starbucks. I’m convinced that people only go there because they think it has cachet. I’m here to say: The emperor has no clothes! Starbucks sucks! Drink local. And be happy where you are, or go somewhere else.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    I really liked this book! It had quite a few bad reviews so I was a little hesitant to read it but I'm so glad I did! The author, Susan McCorkindale, is hilarious! She writes about her experiences of quitting her high-paying job in NYC and relocating with her husband and two boys to a farm...where they actually farm. ;) Each chapter is a mini story of something that happened so you almost feel like you're reading her journal. I could relate with her on so many levels, which is always a great thi I really liked this book! It had quite a few bad reviews so I was a little hesitant to read it but I'm so glad I did! The author, Susan McCorkindale, is hilarious! She writes about her experiences of quitting her high-paying job in NYC and relocating with her husband and two boys to a farm...where they actually farm. ;) Each chapter is a mini story of something that happened so you almost feel like you're reading her journal. I could relate with her on so many levels, which is always a great thing when you're reading a memoir like this. And while the little footnote thing was a somewhat annoying and distracting, her anecdotes were hysterical! Having 4 boys of my own, her experiences with her two boys were SPOT ON to something my boys would do and I found myself laughing OUT LOUD - much to the annoyance of the dude next to me on the treadmill. HA! I even cried I laughed so hard at some of the stories! All in all, a funny, warming, light-hearted book about dealing with life's changes and looking good doing it. :)

  19. 4 out of 5

    Heather Mize

    One of the worst books I've ever read....McCorkindale's title is misleading, and this book is a trite book about a self-absorbed ego maniac with absolutely nothing worthwhile to say. It's amazing to me that this book could even be published. McCorkindale is so saracastic and egotistical about everything that it's actually hard to stomach. She's trying to be funny, and witty, but the problem is that she's not telling us a story, she's just going on and on about herself, and her wants and needs re One of the worst books I've ever read....McCorkindale's title is misleading, and this book is a trite book about a self-absorbed ego maniac with absolutely nothing worthwhile to say. It's amazing to me that this book could even be published. McCorkindale is so saracastic and egotistical about everything that it's actually hard to stomach. She's trying to be funny, and witty, but the problem is that she's not telling us a story, she's just going on and on about herself, and her wants and needs regardless of how ridiculous they are. I was hoping this book would be something like "The Dirty Life" which was amazing! Instead it's a blog turn chick lit piece of trash with absolutely no point, plot, or well......anything worthwhile.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    This is really a two star book, but I gave it 3 because she moves from New Jersey to Upperville, Va and she talks about Winchester, Paris, Va and Middleberg, which makes it marginally more interesting if you are familiar with those places. This is supposed to be a collection of funny stories written by a magazine editor who quits her job and moves with her husband out to the country (David Sedaris type of book), but it actually just isn't particularly funny. It is a good read for the pool becaus This is really a two star book, but I gave it 3 because she moves from New Jersey to Upperville, Va and she talks about Winchester, Paris, Va and Middleberg, which makes it marginally more interesting if you are familiar with those places. This is supposed to be a collection of funny stories written by a magazine editor who quits her job and moves with her husband out to the country (David Sedaris type of book), but it actually just isn't particularly funny. It is a good read for the pool because you can easily put it down and pick it up again, but just not particularly amusing.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Catherine

    McCorkindale's super forced attempt at humor fell flat for me. Not only was this book completely lacking in unfunny prose but also unendingly vapid. I'm sorry I wasted my time struggling through 2/3 of the book in search of even a tiny morsel of content. I've said it before -- humor writing is probably the most difficult to successfully accomplish. A light read is one thing. This book lacked even a modicum of merit.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Oh my goodness, I laughed until I cried reading this book. Seriously I was reading this during piano lessons and probably looked like I was having a seizure trying not to laugh out loud. VERY, VERY funny! Especially having grown up on a farm (a REAL farm girl!) I could still relate to her funny farm experiences and still share her love of shoes! So entertaining!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I always have such a hard time with the rating system... this book wasn't "amazing" in that it changed my life, but I did really like it. "Suzy" is witty, charming, and likeable throughout the book. I'm jealous that I wasn't friends with her while she was going through the two years at Nate's place, I could have used the chuckles!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

    She may be new to the country, but she's certainly not new to funny! Susan McCorkindale's first book had me laughing out loud. Her light-hearted, cheerful charm is a joy to read and I'm eagerly awaiting book #2!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Porter

    As a Farm Girl myself there were many experiences that I could directly relate to in this.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    I don't leave reviews a lot (I tend to think most of us are self-selecting with regards to what we read; in general, we're going to be ok with our picks). I stumbled on this one at Half-Price Books before a beach vacation and thought it seemed like a light read. I had such strong reactions early on, I'm surprised I finished it. I'm glad I did, because it reined in what could have been a horrifically harsh review (again, out of character for me). Here's the thing - this author needed an editor to I don't leave reviews a lot (I tend to think most of us are self-selecting with regards to what we read; in general, we're going to be ok with our picks). I stumbled on this one at Half-Price Books before a beach vacation and thought it seemed like a light read. I had such strong reactions early on, I'm surprised I finished it. I'm glad I did, because it reined in what could have been a horrifically harsh review (again, out of character for me). Here's the thing - this author needed an editor to adjust for these truths: 1. The ragging-on-your-new-territory-and-its-native-folks gets old and mean-spirited fast. I felt terrible for McCorkingdale's new community immediately. A little would have gone a long way to establishing the fish out of water theme that batters the readers on the head throughout this book. 2. Cutesy alliterative phrases and putting-a-bow-on-the-end-of-each-chapter and footnotes were unnecessary (see my positive comment below). 3. Being sincere (again, see my positive note below) would have done so much more to win readers than the way this author tries to establish herself by characterizing herself however it seemed to suit the topic at hand. I nearly threw the book into the ocean in Chapter 26, when she describes taking a job at a women's clothing boutique (not without insulting her customers, of course) and writes: "It was so much fun to spend the day among clothing and jewelry and handbags and boots. I got to dress and accessorize the mannequins[...]* *Which kind of frightened me, as there are days I can barely dress and accessorize myself." THE AUTHOR SPENT THE PRECEDING 216 PAGES DESCRIBING HERSELF AS FASHION-, BEAUTY-, AND SHOE-OBSESSED ABOVE ANY OTHER POSSIBLE CHARACTER TRAIT. SIGH. Here's the thing: I finished it. And I discovered some moments of sincere story-telling about her family and her experience. I don't think the author is entirely at fault for the off-putting elements above...I wish an editor had zeroed in on those real (and funny in their realness, not at the expense of the author herself or others) moments to craft this book more carefully. I think it would have helped the book be both a far more enjoyable read, and probably more importantly, a real picture of McCorkingdale's experiences.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Courtney

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I hoped this would be interesting and depict the author’s foray into farming life. I didn’t want to read 300 pages of city missing, real house wives of wherever crap before she finally admitted she liked it. Her humor is overplayed, she spends entirely too much time talking negatively about her sons, and the reason she seems to despise them so is probably because she doesn’t put in an effort to parent outside of her wine glass. As a fellow farm transplant I was hoping for a kindred spirit not a I hoped this would be interesting and depict the author’s foray into farming life. I didn’t want to read 300 pages of city missing, real house wives of wherever crap before she finally admitted she liked it. Her humor is overplayed, she spends entirely too much time talking negatively about her sons, and the reason she seems to despise them so is probably because she doesn’t put in an effort to parent outside of her wine glass. As a fellow farm transplant I was hoping for a kindred spirit not a reality tv wannabe.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    A DNF for me. Made it about 1/3 and called it quits. Too much sarcasm and snarkiness from the author. I should have figured it out sooner when one of the early chapters was about ways to get out of working the magazine job she hated yet loved the salary and perks. Also a lot of poking fun at Southern people and living. I didn't really find that very comical. Don't waste your time with this one. And, she wrote a sequel. Why?

  29. 4 out of 5

    Carly Erbacher

    This book is truly horrible. The only people who should read it are the people considering dating Casey and Cuyler, more as a warning than anything. I couldn’t finish this book. No wonder it was on sale at the used book store. Susan is the Veruca Salt of “the sticks”. Not only is she spoiled rotten, she’s totally unaware of her off putting nature and completely ungrateful for her extremely privileged life.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    I thought it was a cute "beach" read. Funny. The main character was from Ridgewood, NJ a town near where I grew up and she and her family ended up moving to Middleburg, VA a town I love in Virginia near where I live now. The only thing kind of annoying about the book were the dated references ("crackberry") and all of the footnotes which were really jokes and after thoughts. There were at least one on every page and it became too much. But overall, a cute book.

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